0617-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 17 Jun 2018, Sunday

Constructed by: Amanda Chung, Karl Ni and Erik Agard
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: Tricky Trios

Each themed answer is a TRICKY TRIO of names, with the LAST ONE STANDING, i.e. written in down-direction as part of the intersecting down-answer:

  • 105A. Survivor of an all-out brawl … or a hint to 23-, 38-, 64- and 87-Across : LAST ONE STANDING
  • 23A. Breakfast trio : SNAP, CRACKLE AND POP
  • 38A. Puppet show trio : KUKLA, FRAN AND OLLIE
  • 64A. Sailing trio : WYNKEN, BLYNKEN AND NOD
  • 87A. Folk trio : PETER, PAUL AND MARY

Bill’s time: 21m 05s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

20. Light bite : NOSH

Our word “nosh” has been around since the late fifties, when it was imported from the Yiddish word “nashn” meaning “to nibble”. We use “nosh” as a noun that means “snack”, or as a verb meaning “to eat between meals”.

23. Breakfast trio : SNAP, CRACKLE AND POP

Snap, Crackle and Pop are three elves employed as the mascots for Kellogg’s Rice Krispies. The trio first appeared in an ad campaign in 1933, although the phrase “snap, crackle and pop” had been used for the cereal for some time in radio ads. By the way, the elves are selling “Rice Bubbles” in Australia, and the elves have different names in other parts of the world (like “Cric!, Crac! and Croc! in Quebec).

29. Record label for Pink and Pitbull : RCA

“P!nk” is the stage name of American singer Alecia Beth Moore. I known so little about “modern” music, but I do like the P!nk song “Just Give Me a Reason” …

“Pitbull” is the stage name of Cuban-American rap artist Armando Perez. Pitbull is from Miami and was born to Cuban immigrants.

32. Otello, in “Otello” : TENOR

Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “Otello” was first performed in 1887 at La Scala Theater in Milan. The opera is based on Shakespeare’s play “Othello” and is considered by many to be Verdi’s greatest work.

38. Puppet show trio : KUKLA, FRAN AND OLLIE

“Kukla, Fran and Ollie” is an early television show that aired from 1947-1957. Kukla and Ollie (Oliver J. Dragon) were puppets and Fran was Fran Allison, usually the only human on the show.

41. Fall guy? : HUMPTY

Humpty Dumpty is a character in a nursery rhyme, actually an egg although that isn’t specifically called out in the original rhyme:

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
All the king’s horses and all the king’s men
Couldn’t put Humpty together again.

44. Some Canadian natives : CREE

The Cree are one of the largest groups of Native Americans on the continent. In the US most of the Cree nation live in Montana on a reservation shared with the Ojibwe people. In Canada most of the Cree live in Manitoba.

52. Ad biz awards : CLIOS

The Clio Awards are the Oscars of the advertising world and are named after Clio, the Greek Muse of History. Clio was also the recorder of great deeds, the proclaimer and celebrator of great accomplishments and a source of inspiration and genius. The Clio Awards were first presented in 1959.

54. Producer of public radio’s “Radiolab” : WNYC

There are two WNYC radio stations, both of which are based in New York City. Both stations (one AM, and one FM) are in the National Public Radio family.

“Radiolab” is a very entertaining National Public Radio program broadcast weekly from New York City. The show tackles some profound scientific and philosophical topics, but does so in a very light-hearted way. Recommended …

55. Spanish seasoning that’s a letter short of its English counterpart : SAL

In Spanish, “sal” (salt) is a “condimento” (seasoning).

56. Youngest daughter on “Black-ish” : DIANE

“Black-ish” is a sitcom starring Anthony Anderson and Tracee Ellis Ross that premiered in 2014. The show is noted for tackling tough issues such as racism, police brutality, attitudes toward the LGBT community, and the 2016 US presidential election.

59. Capital city with more than 300 islands : HELSINKI

Helsinki is the capital city of Finland, and is by far the country’s biggest urban area. In English we tend to stress the “-sink-” in “Helsinki”, whereas the Finns stress the “Hel-”.

61. Sergey of Google : BRIN

Sergey Brin co-founded Google along with Larry Page. Brin was born in Moscow and immigrated to the US with his family when he was 6 years old. Brin and Page met in Stanford as first-year students, and there created their first Internet search engine.

64. Sailing trio : WYNKEN, BLYNKEN AND NOD

“Wynken, Blynken and Nod” is a children’s poem written by Eugene Field, first published in 1889. The original title of the work was “Dutch Lullaby”.

Wynken, Blynken, and Nod one night
Sailed off in a wooden shoe —
Sailed on a river of crystal light,
Into a sea of dew.
“Where are you going, and what do you wish?”
The old moon asked the three.
“We have come to fish for the herring fish
That live in this beautiful sea;
Nets of silver and gold have we!”
Said Wynken, Blynken, and Nod.

69. “Little Latin ___ Lu” (1960s hit) : LUPE

“Little Latin Lupe Lu” is a song recorded by the Righteous Brothers in 1963. The song was written by Bill Medley (one of the Righteous Brothers duo). Medley used the name “Lupe” as he had dated a Lupe Laguna in high school.

73. Old Ford vehicles, for short : MERCS

The Mercury brand of car was made by Ford from 1938 until 2011. Mercury was introduced by Henry Ford’s son Edsel Ford. Mercury vehicles were positioned as being more luxurious that the regular Ford models, and more economical than Ford’s high-end Lincoln models.

80. Some skin art : HENNAS

Henna has been used for centuries as a dye, for leather and wool as wells as hair and skin. In modern days, henna is often used for temporary tattoos.

81. Place for R.N.s : ICU

A registered nurse (RN) might work in an intensive care unit (ICU).

82. Subj. of “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test” : LSD

“The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test” is a novel by Tom Wolfe that was first published in 1968. It tells the story of a group of guys driving across the country in a brightly painted school bus, while gaining all kinds of insights with the “benefit” of LSD and other psychedelic drugs. Trippy, man …

85. Gilda of “Saturday Night Live” : RADNER

Gilda Radner was a comedian and actress, and one of the original cast members of the hit television show “Saturday Night Live”. Radner left her first husband to marry comedic actor Gene Wilder, whom she met while they were both filming the Sidney Poitier movie “Hanky Panky”.

87. Folk trio : PETER, PAUL AND MARY

Peter, Paul and Mary were a folk-singing trio who got together in 1961. The group’s members were Peter Yarrow, Paul Stookey and Mary Travers. Peter, Paul and Mary’s big hit was 1963’s “Puff, the Magic Dragon”.

92. Rap artist Flo ___ : RIDA

Tramar Dillard is better known as rapper Flo Rida. As you might have guessed, Flo Rida was born in the state of Florida.

93. Dinero : MOOLAH

Lettuce, cabbage, kale, dough, scratch, cheddar, simoleons, clams and moola(h) are all slang terms for money.

99. “Star Wars” nickname : ANI

Anakin “Ani” Skywalker is the principal character in the first six of the “Star Wars” movies. His progress chronologically through the series of films is:

  • Episode I: Anakin is a 9-year-old slave boy who earns the promise of Jedi training by young Obi-Wan Kenobi.
  • Episode II: Anakin is 18-years-old and goes on a murdering rampage to avenge the killing of his mother.
  • Episode III: Anakin is 21-years-old and a Jedi knight, but he turns to the Dark Side and becomes Darth Vader. His wife Padme gives birth to twins, Luke and Leia Skywalker.
  • Episode IV: Darth Vader, comes into conflict with his children, Luke Skywalker and the Princess Leia.
  • Episode V: Darth Vader attempts to coax his son Luke over to the dark side, and reveals to Luke that he is his father.
  • Episode VI: Luke learns that Leia is his sister, and takes on the task of bringing Darth Vader back from the Dark Side in order to save the Galaxy. Vader saves his son from the Emperor’s evil grip, dying in the process, but his spirit ends up alongside the spirits of Yoda and Obi-Wan. They all live happily ever after …

100. Pronoun in Dixie : Y’ALL

“Dixie” is a nickname sometimes used for the American South, and often specifically for the original 11 states that seceded from the Union just prior to the Civil War. It’s apparently not certain how the name “Dixie” came about. One theory is that it comes from the term “dixie” which was used for currency issued by banks in Louisiana. The 10-dollar bills had the word “dix” on the reverse side, the French for “ten”. From the banknote, the French speaking area around New Orleans came to be known as Dixieland, and from there “Dixie” came to apply to the South in general.

101. Philosopher ___-tzu : LAO

Lao Tse (also “Lao-Tzu”) was a central figure in the development of the religion/philosophy of Taoism. Tradition holds that Lao-Tzu wrote the “Tao Te Ching”, a classical Chinese text that is fundamental to the philosophy of Taoism.

104. Fortune 500 company with an avian symbol : AFLAC

In 1999, Aflac (American Family Life Assurance Company) was huge in the world of insurance but it wasn’t a household name, so a New York advertising agency was given the task of making the Aflac brand more memorable. One of the agency’s art directors, while walking around Central Park one lunchtime, heard a duck quacking and in his mind linked it with “Aflac”, and that duck has been “Aflacking” ever since …

110. Battle of Leningrad, e.g. : SIEGE

Our word “siege” comes from a 13th century word for a “seat”. The military usage derives from the concept of a besieging force “sitting down” outside a fortress until it falls.

St. Petersburg in Russia is an absolutely beautiful city to visit. The city was renamed to Petrograd in 1914, Leningrad in 1924 and back to St. Petersburg in 1991.

111. Something ratable by number of Pinocchios : LIE

“The Adventures of Pinocchio” is an 1883 children’s novel by Carlo Collodi. It is all about an animated puppet named Pinocchio and Geppetto, his poor woodcarver father. Pinocchio is prone to telling lies, the stress of which causes his short nose to become longer.

“The Washington Post” takes on the tasks of fact-checking statements made by politicians. The paper grades Members of Congress based on lies told using a scale of zero to four “Pinocchios”.

114. Underworld : HADES

Hades was the god of the underworld to the ancient Greeks. Over time, Hades gave his name to the underworld itself, the place where the dead reside. The term “Hades” was also adopted into the Christian tradition, as an alternative name for hell. But, the concept of hell in Christianity is more akin to the Greek “Tartarus”, which is a dark and gloomy dungeon located in Hades, a place of suffering and torment.

115. Camera with a mirror, in brief : SLR

The initialism “SLR” stands for “single lens reflex”. Usually, cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

116. Hail on a bridge : AHOY!

“Ahoy!” is a nautical term used to signal a vessel. When the telephone was invented by Alexander Graham Bell, he suggested that “ahoy” be used as a standard greeting when answering a call. However, Thomas Edison came up with “hello”, and we’ve been using that ever since.

Down

1. Sammy on a 1998 cover of Newsweek : SOSA

Sammy Sosa was firmly in the public eye in 1998 when he and Mark McGwire were vying to be the first to surpass the home run record held by Roger Maris. McGwire fell out of public favor due to stories of steroid abuse (stories which he later admitted were true) while Sosa fell out of favor when he was found to be using a corked bat in a 2003 game.

5. John who wrote “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding” : LOCKE

John Locke was an English philosopher whose most famous work was “Essay Concerning Human Understanding”. Locke’s position was that at birth the mind is a blank slate, a “tabula rasa”, and that knowledge is determined by experiences perceived through our senses.

8. “TiK ___” (Kesha hit) : TOK

“Kesha” (formerly “Ke$ha”) is the stage name used by singer Kesha Rose Sebert.

9. Class for some immigrants, for short : ESL

English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

10. Foe of Robin Hood : SHERIFF

Robin Hood is a figure from English folklore, celebrated in story and song. Some stories suggest that Robin Hood the outlaw was actually a real nobleman, the Earl of Huntingdon. Robin Hood’s famous companion was Maid Marian. Interestingly, the legend of Maid Marian (full name Lady Marian of Leaford) had been around for centuries before she became associated with Robin Hood starting in the 1700s.

13. In view? : POPULAR OPINION

Popular opinion might be described as the view that’s “in” right now.

14. Upholsterer’s fabric : BROCADE

Brocade is a very decorative fabric usually made from silk and often incorporating gold and silver thread. The name “brocade” comes from the Italian word “broccato” meaning “embossed cloth”.

15. Certain expensive watch, in slang : ROLLIE

My most-prized possession is a beautiful stainless steel Rolex watch that my uncle bought while serving with the RAF in Canada during WWII. Rolex watches were made available to the Canadian servicemen at that time as they were shipping overseas. My uncle brought his Rolex home to Ireland after the war. He needed money one weekend and so sold the watch to my Dad, for five pounds. My Dad gave it to me just before he died, as he knew I loved the watch, and my brothers weren’t interested in it all. Not so long ago I had the watch appraised ($3,000), and my brothers suddenly took a liking to it! Still, it’s not something that will ever be sold, that’s for sure …

17. Michael of R.E.M. : STIPE

Michael Stipe was the lead vocalist for the band R.E.M. from 1980 through 2011. Stipe is also active in the film industry. He served as an executive producer on the films “Being John Malkovich” and “Man on the Moon”.

24. Jesus on the diamond : ALOU

Jesus Alou played Major League Baseball, as did his brothers Matty and Felipe, and as does Felipe’s son Moises.

35. Do email scamming : PHISH

Phishing is the online practice of stealing usernames, passwords and credit card details by creating a site that deceptively looks reliable and trustworthy. Phishers often send out safe-looking emails or instant messages that direct someone to an equally safe-looking website where the person might inadvertently enter sensitive information. “Phishing” is a play on the word “fishing”, as in “fishing for passwords, PIN numbers etc.”

39. Stadium section : LOGE

In most theaters and stadia today, “loge” is the name given to the front rows of a mezzanine level. Loge can also be used for box seating.

40. Police procedural beginning in 2003 : NCIS

NCIS is the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, which investigates crimes in the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. The service gives its name to the CBS TV show “NCIS”, a spin-off drama from “JAG” in which the main “NCIS” characters were first introduced. The big star in “NCIS” is the actor Mark Harmon. “NCIS” is now a franchise, with spin-off shows “NCIS: Los Angeles” and “NCIS: New Orleans”.

45. Words before a year : ANNO DOMINI

The designations Anno Domini (AD, “year of Our Lord”) and Before Christ (BC) are found in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dividing point between AD and BC is the year of the conception of Jesus, with AD 1 following 1 BC without a year “0” in between. The AD/BC scheme dates back to AD 525, and gained wide acceptance soon after AD 800. Nowadays a modified version has become popular, with CE (Common/Christian Era) used to replace AD, and BCE (Before the Common/Christian Era) used to replace BC.

46. City on the Rhône : LYON

The city of Lyon in France, is also known as “Lyons” in English. Lyon is the second-largest metropolitan area in the country, after Paris. It is located just to the north of the confluence of the Rhône and Saône Rivers.

47. Zenith : ACME

The nadir is the direction pointing immediately below a particular location (through to the other side of the Earth for example). The opposite direction, that pointing immediately above, is called the zenith. We use the terms “nadir” and “zenith” figuratively to mean the low and high points in a person’s fortunes.

53. Tall and thin : LANK

The term “lank” can describe something that is straight and flat, particularly hair. The usage was extended in the early 1800s (especially in the form “lanky”) to mean “awkwardly tall and thin”.

58. Actress/singer Hudgens : VANESSA

Vanessa Hudgens is an actress who made her name playing Gabriella Montez in the “High School Musical” series of films. More recently, Hudgens played the title role in the musical “Gigi” on Broadway.

66. Southern university whose team is the Phoenix : ELON

Elon is a city in the Piedmont region of North Carolina located close to the city of Burlington. Elon University is a private liberal arts school founded in 1889.

67. ___ Clooney, Barbara Walters’s “most fascinating person” of 2014 : AMAL

Amal Alamuddin married celebrated Hollywood actor George Clooney in 2014. Alamuddin was born in Beirut, Lebanon and moved with her family to London when she was a toddler. She is a lawyer specializing in international law, with one of her more renowned clients being the founder of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange.

76. Letter that, surprisingly, is not the end of the Greek alphabet : ZETA

Zeta is the sixth letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a precursor of our Roman letter Z. The word “zeta” is also the ancestor of the letter name “zed”, which became “zee”, the term that we use here in the US.

83. Spirals : HELICES

The plural of “helix” is “helices”.

84. Charlize Theron’s role in 2015’s “Mad Max” reboot : FURIOSA

Charlize Theron is an actress from South Africa who has played leading roles in Hollywood films such as “The Devil’s Advocate”, “The Cider House Rules” and my personal favorite “The Italian Job”.

86. Dr. ___ : DRE

“Dr. Dre” is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

87. Thick soup : POTAGE

A potage is a thick soup or stew, and is named after the Old French word “pottage” meaning “potted dish”.

88. Sci-fi stunner : PHASER

A MASER is a device that was around long before LASERs came into the public consciousness. A MASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) is similar to a LASER, but microwaves are emitted rather than light waves. When the storyline for “Star Trek” was being developed, the writers introduced a weapon called a “phaser”, with the name “phaser” derived from PHoton mASER.

93. Underworld : MAFIA

Apparently, “Cosa Nostra” is the real name for the Italian Mafia. “Cosa Nostra” translates as “our thing” or “this thing of ours”. The term first became public in the US when the FBI managed to turn some members of the American Mafia. The Italian authorities established that “Cosa Nostra” was also used in Sicily when they penetrated the Sicilian Mafia in the 1980s. The term “mafia” seems to be just a literary invention that has become popular with the public.

94. Three sheets to the wind : OILED

A sheet is the rope that is used to control a sail on a sailing vessel. The expression “three sheets to the wind” meaning “drunk” dates back to the early 1800s. It likely derives from the notion that a sailboat with three sails, and with all three sheets slipped out of control, would behave like someone who was drunk, and vice versa.

97. Things near funny bones : ULNAE

The ulnar nerve runs alongside the ulna (one of the bones in the lower arm). The ulnar nerve is the largest unprotected (not surrounded by muscle or bone) nerve in the human body. The nerve can be touched under the skin at the outside of the elbow. Striking the nerve at this point causes and an electric-type shock, known as hitting one’s “funny bone” or “crazy bone”.

101. Pet peeves? : LICE

Lice (singular “louse”) are small wingless insects of which there are thousands of species, three of which are human disease agents. The three kinds of lice affecting humans are head lice, body lice and pubic lice. Most lice feed on dead skin found on the body of the host animal, although some feed on blood. Ick …

108. Freudian area of study : EGO

Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the superego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Temporarily stops running : STALLS
7. Sport-___ (some vehicles) : UTES
11. Contain, as a spewing oil well : CAP
14. Military bigwigs : BRASS
19. “Pick me!” : OOH OOH!
20. Light bite : NOSH
21. Excitement : ADO
22. GPS suggestion : ROUTE
23. Breakfast trio : SNAP, CRACKLE AND POP
26. Classic song : OLDIE
27. ___-backwards : ASS
28. Smuggler’s unit : KILO
29. Record label for Pink and Pitbull : RCA
30. Lets off the hook? : UNCLIPS
32. Otello, in “Otello” : TENOR
33. Even : TIED
34. Act as a go-between : LIAISE
35. “You can skip me” : PASS
38. Puppet show trio : KUKLA, FRAN AND OLLIE
41. Fall guy? : HUMPTY
43. “That’s rough!” : OOF!
44. Some Canadian natives : CREE
45. In the tradition of : A LA
48. ___ Aldridge, pioneering Shakespearean actor : IRA
49. Lost baggage helpers : ID TAGS
52. Ad biz awards : CLIOS
54. Producer of public radio’s “Radiolab” : WNYC
55. Spanish seasoning that’s a letter short of its English counterpart : SAL
56. Youngest daughter on “Black-ish” : DIANE
57. Hold tightly : CLASP
58. Dangerous injection : VENOM
59. Capital city with more than 300 islands : HELSINKI
61. Sergey of Google : BRIN
62. “Nobody’s here but me” : I’M ALONE
64. Sailing trio : WYNKEN, BLYNKEN AND NOD
67. Surrounded by : AMONGST
69. “Little Latin ___ Lu” (1960s hit) : LUPE
70. Effervescent citrus beverage : LIME SODA
73. Old Ford vehicles, for short : MERCS
74. Open : OVERT
76. Skyrockets : ZOOMS
77. Open ___ : MIC
78. Strip pokers? : AWLS
79. Fumes : STEWS
80. Some skin art : HENNAS
81. Place for R.N.s : ICU
82. Subj. of “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test” : LSD
83. “lol” alternative : HE-HE
84. Unnecessary extra : FAT
85. Gilda of “Saturday Night Live” : RADNER
87. Folk trio : PETER, PAUL AND MARY
92. Rap artist Flo ___ : RIDA
93. Dinero : MOOLAH
95. Throw : HURL
96. State a case : ARGUE
98. Director Taika ___ : WAITITI
99. “Star Wars” nickname : ANI
100. Pronoun in Dixie : Y’ALL
101. Philosopher ___-tzu : LAO
104. Fortune 500 company with an avian symbol : AFLAC
105. Survivor of an all-out brawl … or a hint to 23-, 38-, 64- and 87-Across : LAST ONE STANDING
110. Battle of Leningrad, e.g. : SIEGE
111. Something ratable by number of Pinocchios : LIE
112. Long transmission of folklore, say : SAGA
113. Charlotte Motor Speedway org. : NASCAR
114. Underworld : HADES
115. Camera with a mirror, in brief : SLR
116. Hail on a bridge : AHOY!
117. Trash : DELETE

Down

1. Sammy on a 1998 cover of Newsweek : SOSA
2. Heaps : TONS
3. Good crosswords provide lots of them : AHAS
4. Chop (off) : LOP
5. John who wrote “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding” : LOCKE
6. Arts-and-crafts kit trendy in the 1970s-’80s : SHRINKY DINKS
7. Open, as a bottle of wine : UNCORK
8. “TiK ___” (Kesha hit) : TOK
9. Class for some immigrants, for short : ESL
10. Foe of Robin Hood : SHERIFF
11. Geographically largest member of NATO : CANADA
12. Interject : ADD
13. In view? : POPULAR OPINION
14. Upholsterer’s fabric : BROCADE
15. Certain expensive watch, in slang : ROLLIE
16. Autobahn autos : AUDIS
17. Michael of R.E.M. : STIPE
18. Goes with : SEES
24. Jesus on the diamond : ALOU
25. Big name in laptops : ACER
31. Digits ending many prices : NINES
32. Baking meas. : TSP
33. Eponymous New Mexico tribe : TAOS
35. Do email scamming : PHISH
36. Radiant emanations : AURAE
37. “Huh, you know him, too?!” : SMALL WORLD
39. Stadium section : LOGE
40. Police procedural beginning in 2003 : NCIS
42. News : TIDINGS
45. Words before a year : ANNO DOMINI
46. City on the Rhône : LYON
47. Zenith : ACME
50. Flee : TAKE TO THE HILLS
51. Have ___ with : AN IN
52. Ernest who wrote “Ready Player One” : CLINE
53. Tall and thin : LANK
54. Joins : WELDS
57. Classic horror film locale : CRYPT
58. Actress/singer Hudgens : VANESSA
60. Matches up : SYNCS
61. Makes fuzzy : BLURS
63. Nursing facility? : MAMMARY GLAND
65. Huffed and puffed : BLEW
66. Southern university whose team is the Phoenix : ELON
67. ___ Clooney, Barbara Walters’s “most fascinating person” of 2014 : AMAL
68. Litter sounds : MEWS
71. Chopped up : DICED
72. BMW competitor : ACURA
75. Swerve : VEER
76. Letter that, surprisingly, is not the end of the Greek alphabet : ZETA
79. Assail : SET AT
80. Campus building : HALL
83. Spirals : HELICES
84. Charlize Theron’s role in 2015’s “Mad Max” reboot : FURIOSA
86. Dr. ___ : DRE
87. Thick soup : POTAGE
88. Sci-fi stunner : PHASER
89. One who cries “Uncle!”? : AUNT
90. Contradict : NAYSAY
91. “Nuts!” : DRAT!
93. Underworld : MAFIA
94. Three sheets to the wind : OILED
97. Things near funny bones : ULNAE
98. Load of laundry : WASH
101. Pet peeves? : LICE
102. Med. school course : ANAT
103. Fearsome figure : OGRE
106. Suffer : AIL
107. “Forget about it!” : NAH!
108. Freudian area of study : EGO
109. Cable alternative : DSL