1210-17 NY Times Crossword Answers 10 Dec 2017, Sunday

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Constructed by: Erik Agard & Laura Braunstein
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: Full-Body Cast

Themed answers are CAST members from various movies or shows, with each including a BODY part in a rebus square:

  • 112A. What eight actors took on for this puzzle? : BIT PARTS
  • 25A. “Batman” actress, 1967-68 : EARTHA KITT
  • 31A. “Traffic” actor, 2000 : DON CHEADLE
  • 36A. “Super Mario Bros.” actor, 1993 : JOHN LEGUIZAMO
  • 54A. “Bride of Frankenstein” actress, 1935 : ELSA LANCHESTER
  • 65A. “Training Day” actor, 2001 : DENZEL WASHINGTON
  • 80A. “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” actress, 2000 : MICHELLE YEOH
  • 94A. “Crash” actor, 2004 : RYAN PHILLIPPE
  • 102A. “Frost/Nixon” actor, 2008 : OLIVER PLATT

Bill’s time: 29m 30s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • JOHN LEGUIZAMO (John Leguicamo)
  • ZONK (conk)

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

6. Cartoonist Silverstein : SHEL

Author Shel Silverstein had a varied career and did a lot more than write books. Silverstein was a poet, composer, cartoonist and screenwriter among other things. One of his successful children’s books is “The Giving Tree”, which was first published in 1964. “The Giving Tree” tells of a young boy who has a special relationship with a tree in a forest. The message of the book seems to be that the tree provides the little boy with everything he needs.

18. Academy Award-winning Marisa : TOMEI

Marisa Tomei’s first screen role was in the daytime soap “As the World Turns”, but her break came with a recurring role in “The Cosby Show” spinoff “A Different World”. Tomei won an Oscar for her delightful performance in “My Cousin Vinny” in 1992.

25. “Batman” actress, 1967-68 : EARTHA KITT

Eartha Kitt really did have a unique voice and singing style. Her rendition of “Santa Baby” has to be one of the most distinctive and memorable recordings in the popular repertoire. Some of you will no doubt remember Eartha playing Catwoman on the final series of the 1960s TV show “Batman”.

28. Nine-time Pro Bowler John : ELWAY

Former quarterback John Elway played his entire professional football career with the Denver Broncos. Elway was the oldest player ever to be named MVP in a Super Bowl game, being so honored in Super Bowl XXXIII in the 1998 season after the Bronco’s victory over the Atlanta Falcons.

30. Curriculum ___ : VITAE

A curriculum vitae (CV) is a listing of someone’s work experience and qualifications, and is used mainly in making a job application. The term “curriculum vitae” can be translated from Latin as “course of life”.

31. “Traffic” actor, 2000 : DON CHEADLE

Don Cheadle is a Hollywood actor who is perhaps best known for his lead role in the 2004 drama “Hotel Rwanda” that deals with the harrowing subject of genocide. Since then, Cheadle has been very active in campaigns to end genocide in Darfur, Sudan.

The 2000 film “Traffic” explores the illegal drug trade. The movie is adapted from a 1989 British TV miniseries called “Traffik”. There was a lso 2004 American TV miniseries produced called “Traffic”, which was based on both the prior TV show and the movie.

32. Winter Olympics event : SLALOM

“Slalom” is an anglicized version of the Norwegian word “slalam” that translates as “skiing race”. There is a longer version of the traditional slalom that is called giant slalom

34. ___-de-France : ILE

Île-de-France (literally “Island of France”) isn’t an island at all. Instead, it is the most populous of France’s 26 administrative regions. Île-de-France is roughly equivalent to the Paris metropolitan area.

35. Sat ___ (GPS, to a Brit) : NAV

A global positioning system (GPS) is known as a satellite navigation (Sat Nav) system in the UK and Ireland.

36. “Super Mario Bros.” actor, 1993 : JOHN LEGUIZAMO

John Leguizamo is a actor whose big break came playing Luigi, one the Mario brothers in the 1993 film “Super Mario Bros.” Leguizamo was born in Bogotá, Colombia, but moved to the US with his family when he was four years old.

“Super Mario Bros.” is a 1993 big screen adaptation of the Nintendo video game. The title roles are Mario Mario (played by Bob Hoskins) and Luigi Mario (played by John Leguizamo). I haven’t seen this one …

47. ___ contendere : NOLO

“Nolo contendere” is a legal term that translates from Latin as “I do not wish to contend”. It’s the plea of no contest, and is an alternative to guilty and not guilty, meaning that one doesn’t admit guilt but nor does one dispute the charge.

48. School that lent its name to a collar : ETON

An Eton collar is a wide, stiff, buttoned collar that is still part of the formal school uniform at Eton College near Windsor in England.

50. Like many laundromats : COIN-OP

If you go looking for a laundromat in the UK or Ireland, folks will likely know what you’re talking about. However, the local name for such a facility is “launderette” or sometimes “laundrette”.

52. Seat of Penobscot County : BANGOR

Bangor is the third-most populous city in the state of Maine (after Portland and Lewiston). The city was given its name in 1791, after the hymn “Antiphonary of Bangor” that was written at Bangor Abbey in Northern Ireland.

54. “Bride of Frankenstein” actress, 1935 : ELSA LANCHESTER

Elsa Lanchester was an English actress who made her life and career in Hollywood. Lanchester’s husband was the actor Charles Laughton.

“Bride of Frankenstein” is a 1935 sequel to the iconic 1931 horror film “Frankenstein”. Boris Karloff plays the Monster, and Elsa Lanchester the monster’s mate.

65. “Training Day” actor, 2001 : DENZEL WASHINGTON

Denzel Washington is an actor from Mount Vernon, just outside New York City. Washington’s big break came with a TV role, playing Dr. Philip Chandler on “St. Elsewhere” from 1982 to 1988.

“Training Day” is a 2001 crime movie starring Denzel Washington and Ethan Hawke as two narcotics officers in Los Angeles. The film was well received and merited a TV spin off. The small-screen version was canceled after one season following the death of lead actor Bill Paxton.

71. Old C.I.A. foe : KGB

The “Komitet gosudarstvennoy bezopasnosti” (KGB) was the national security agency of the Soviet Union until 1991. The KGB was dissolved after the agency’s chairman led a failed attempt at a coup d’état designed to depose President Mikhail Gorbachev.

74. Growing art form? : BONSAI

The term “bonsai” is used more correctly to describe the Japanese art of growing carefully shaped trees in containers, although it has come to be used as the name for all miniature trees in pots.

75. “A ___ From St. Nicholas” : VISIT

The poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas” was published anonymously in 1823, and is better known today by its first line “‘Twas the night before Christmas”. Most scholars believe that the poem was written by Clement Clarke Moore, a theologian from New York City. Others say that it was written by Henry Livingston, Jr. a poet from Upstate New York.

80. “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” actress, 2000 : MICHELLE YEOH

Michelle Yeoh is an actress from Malaysia who appeared in several Hong Kong action films in which she did her own stunts and martial arts scenes. Her most famous performance was in the 2000 movie “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”, although I best know her for playing opposite Pierce Brosnan in the Bond film “Tomorrow Never Dies”.

“Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” is a martial arts movie released in 2000. Despite the film’s Mandarin dialogue, it still became a huge international hit. “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” grossed well over $100 million in the US alone, and is still the highest-grossing foreign-language film in American history.

85. Connive : SCHEME

To connive is to conspire with, to cooperate in secret. The term comes from the Latin verb “connivere” meaning “to wink”, the idea being that connivers might give each other a sly wink.

86. Shaman, e.g. : HEALER

A shaman is a supposed intermediary between the human world and the spirit world.

87. When tripled, a “Seinfeld” catchphrase : YADA

“The Yada Yada Yada” is the title of the 153rd episode of “Seinfeld”. Before “Seinfeld” made “yada yada yada” famous, we were more likely to hear the phrase “yadda yadda” that was often used by comedian Lenny Bruce, for example.

88. Eastern European capital : KIEV

Kiev is located on the Dnieper River, and is the capital of Ukraine. We tend to use the spelling “Kiev”, but the Ukrainian government decided in 1995 to refer to the city as “Kyiv” when using Roman/Latin script.

94. “Crash” actor, 2004 : RYAN PHILLIPPE

Actor Ryan Phillippe had a starring role in several movies in the late nineties, including “I Know What You Did Last Summer”, “Cruel Intentions” and “54”. Phillippe appeared alongside Reese Witherspoon in “Cruel Intentions”, who was his fiancee at the time. Phillippe and Witherspoon were married for eight years, and have two children together.

“Crash” is a 2004 crime drama film that was co-written, produced and directed by Paul Haggis. Haggis got the idea for the movie, which features a far-reaching carjacking, after he was the victim of a real-life carjacking in LA in the early nineties.

97. Scottish form of John : IAN

The name “John” translates into Scottish as “Ian”, into Russian as “Ivan”, into Italian as “Giovanni”, and into Irish as “Seán”.

102. “Frost/Nixon” actor, 2008 : OLIVER PLATT

Oliver Platt is a very talented actor from Windsor, Ontario. My favorite role of his was the remarkable White House Counsel Oliver Babish on the great TV drama series “The West Wing”.

The British journalist David Frost is perhaps best known in the US for hosting the television show “Through the Keyhole” and for his celebrity interviews, most notably with former President Richard Nixon. That interview was adapted as a play and then a movie called “Frost/Nixon”. The movie was directed by Ron Howard. “Frost/Nixon” is a little slow, but it is a must see for political history addicts like me.

106. Kidney-related : RENAL

Something described as “renal” is related to the kidneys. “Ren” is the Latin word for “kidney”.

109. Dame modifier : NOTRE

Notre-Dame de Paris is the spectacular Gothic cathedral that sits on the Île de la Cité, one of the islands in the middle on the River Seine in Paris. Notre Dame is home to many beautiful and significant artifacts, the most famous of which is the Crown of Thorns supposedly worn by Jesus Christ at his execution, placed in the cathedral in 1239. It’s also home to some magnificent gargoyles on the roof, and you can climb up to the roof and take a very close look at them.

112. What eight actors took on for this puzzle? : BIT PARTS

A “walk-on role” in a performance is one in which the actor makes an appearance on stage or on set, but has no dialog. One line of dialog elevates the role to a “bit part”.

117. “Mea ___” : CULPA

Many Roman Catholics are very familiar with the Latin phrase “mea culpa” meaning “my fault”, as it is used in the Latin Mass. The additional term “mea maxima culpa” translates as “my most grievous fault”.

119. Kama ___ : SUTRA

The “Kama Sutra” is renowned for its descriptions of positions that can be used for sexual intercourse, but the sutra includes many other texts that deal with various matters of a sexual nature including how to woo a woman, the conduct of a “chief wife”, the conduct of “other wives”, how to make money as a courtesan, and much more, as if that isn’t enough …

121. Lure in Vegas : NEON SIGN

The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

123. 10 cc’s and others : DOSES

Cubic centimeter (cc)

Down

4. Country singer Womack : LEE ANN

Lee Ann Womack is a country music singer and songwriter from Jacksonville, Texas.

5. What might show participants going neck and neck? : KISS CAM

The kiss cam is a diversion during some sporting events in which a video camera picks out random couples in the crowd, projecting their image onto the giant screen at the venue. The couples are encouraged to kiss, for the entertainment of the fans. Famously, President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama kissed for the kiss cam at a basketball game a few years ago, as did former President Jimmy Carter and former First Lady Rosalynn Carter.

6. Cop : STEAL

“To cop” was northern British dialect for “to seize, catch”, and is still a slang term meaning “to get hold of, steal”. This verb evolved in the noun “copper”, describing a policeman, someone who catches criminals. “Copper” is often shortened to “cop”.

7. Le ___ (French port) : HAVRE

Le Havre is a city on the mouth of the river Seine on the northwest coast of France. The city’s name translates as “the haven”.

8. “Mr. Blue Sky” band, for short : ELO

The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) is a symphonic rock group from the north of England.

11. Word implied on Opposite Day : NOT

Opposite Day is a children’s game in which participants make statements that are the opposite of what is actually intended. I’ve never played it, I mean, I’ve played it …

13. Name of five Norwegian kings : OLAV

Of the many kings of Norway named Olaf/Olav (and there have been five), Olaf II is perhaps the most celebrated as he was canonized and made patron saint of the country. Olaf II was king from 1015 to 1028 and was known as “Olaf the Big” (or Olaf the Fat) during his reign. Today he is more commonly referred to as “Olaf the Holy”. After Olaf died he was given the title of Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae, which is Latin for “Norway’s Eternal King”.

15. Ab ___ (from the beginning) : INITIO

“Ab initio” is a Latin term meaning “from the beginning”.

16. Genre for Black Sabbath : METAL

Black Sabbath is an English heavy metal band set up in 1969 in Birmingham in the north of the country. Black Sabbath’s most famous band member was the lead singer, Ozzy Osbourne. Ozzy was kicked out of the group in 1979 as his drug usage was becoming overly disruptive.

17. Lauder of cosmetics : ESTEE

Estée Lauder was a very successful businesswoman, and someone with a great reputation as a salesperson. Lauder introduced her own line of fragrances in 1953, a bath oil called “Youth Dew”. “Youth Dew” was marketed as a perfume, but it was added to bathwater. All of a sudden women were pouring whole bottles of Ms. Lauder’s “perfume” into their baths while using only a drop or two of French perfumes behind their ears. That’s quite a difference in sales volume …

20. Hotel attendant : BELLHOP

A bell captain supervises bellhops in a hotel. The term “bellhop” comes from the fact that the front desk clerk used to ring a “bell” to summon a porter, who then “hopped” to attention and received his or her instructions.

24. Proust protagonist : SWANN

Marcel Proust was a French writer, noted for his enormous and much respected novel “In Search of Lost Time”. Graham Greene called Proust “the greatest novelist of the twentieth century”, and W. Somerset Maugham dubbed “In Search of Lost Time” as the “greatest fiction to date”. “In Search of Lost Time” is a very, very long novel. It is divided into seven volumes and was first published in 1913-1927. The first of the volumes is called “Swann’s Way”.

27. L.G.B.T. magazine since 1967 : THE ADVOCATE

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT)

33. Mosque tower : MINARET

A minaret is an architectural feature of Islamic mosques, a tall tower with an onion-shaped crown that is used for the call to prayer. The world’s oldest minaret is part of the Great Mosque of Kairouan in Tunisia, having been completed in 836 BCE. The term “minaret” comes from the Arabic for “lighthouse”.

36. Primatologist Goodall : JANE

Jane Goodall is a British anthropologist, famous for studying wild chimpanzees in Africa for 45 years. Working at Gombe Stream National Park in Tanzania, Goodall made many discoveries. She was the first to see chimps constructing and using tools, an activity thought to be limited to the human species. She also found out that chimpanzees are vegetarians.

42. Some advanced researchers, for short : POSTDOCS

A “postdoc” is someone carrying out research or study after receipt of a doctorate.

44. Particle named by Faraday : ION

Michael Faraday was a scientist from England who discovered electromagnetic induction among other things. It was Faraday who first observed that a conductor carrying an electric current has an associated magnetic field. Amazingly, the sum total of Faraday’s formal education was little more than a seven-year apprenticeship as a bookbinder and bookseller.

52. Pot holder : BONG

A bong is a smaller and more portable version of a hookah, with both being filtration devices for smoking especially tobacco and cannabis. The term “bong” comes from the Thai word “baung” that is used for a wooden pope cut from bamboo.

53. 1947, for Jackie Robinson : ROOKIE YEAR

The great Jackie Robinson was the first African-American to play in baseball’s Major League. When Robinson made his first MLB appearance, for the Brooklyn Dodgers, he did so in front of over 26,000 spectators. Well over half the crowd that day were African-Americans, there to witness the event. Major League Baseball universally retired Robinson’s number 42 in 1997. However, on the annual Jackie Robinson Day, all MLB players on all teams wear #42 in his honor.

55. Stripling : LAD

We’ve been calling youths “striplings” since the 14th century. The name probably originates from the description of a youth as a thin strip of a thing. I was a stripling once, a long, long time ago …

57. Ruckus : BIG TO-DO

The word “ruckus” is used to mean a commotion, and has been around since the late 1800s. “Ruckus” is possibly a melding of the words “ruction” and “rumpus”.

62. “Je ___” (French words of affection) : T’AIME

“I love you” translates into “te amo” in Spanish, and into “je t’aime” in French.

78. Branch of Islam : SHIA

The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family, and favoured the Prophet’s son-in-law Ali.

79. Any of the Ninja Turtles : TEEN

The “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” started out as a parody of comic book superheroes, first appearing in a self-published comic book in 1984. A couple of years later the characters were picked up by someone who built a whole line toys around the characters, and then television and movies followed. Do you remember the names of all four of the Turtles? Their names were all taken from Renaissance artists:

  • Leonardo
  • Raphael
  • Michelangelo
  • Donatello

82. The Browns, on a scoreboard : CLE

The Cleveland Browns football team was a charter member of the All-American Football Conference, formed in 1946. Cleveland is the only NFL city that has never hosted nor sent a team to the Super Bowl.

83. Bad spell : HEX

“Hexen” is a German word meaning “to practice witchcraft”. The use of the word “hex” in English started with the Pennsylvania Dutch in the early 1800s.

89. Program saver : TIVO

TiVo was introduced in 1999 and was the world’s first commercially successful Digital Video Recorder (DVR).

90. Like SEALs : ELITE

“SEAL” is an acronym used by the US Navy’s SEa, Air and Land teams. The SEALs were born out of the Navy’s special warfare groups from WWII, like the Underwater Demolition Teams and the Motor Torpedo Boat Squadrons. The Navy SEAL unit was established soon after President Kennedy’s famous speech in which he announced the plan to put a man on the moon, as in the same speech the president allocated $100m of funding to strengthen special operations forces. The Navy used some of this money to set up guerrilla and counterguerrilla units, which soon became the SEALs.

98. Best-selling Japanese manga series : NARUTO

“Naruto” is a manga comic series from Japan that has been adapted into a television anime show. A censored version of the TV show (to remove gore, bad language, smoking etc.) shows on the Cartoon Network here in the US.

100. Where Javert drowned in “Les Misérables” : SEINE

Victor Hugo’s famous 1862 novel “Les Misérables”, has been translated into English several times. However, the title is usually left in the original French as a successful translation of “les misérables” seems to be elusive. Some suggestions for an English title are “The Wretched”, “The Victims” and “The Dispossessed”. The novel follows the lives of several characters including an ex-convict Jean Valjean, a fanatic police inspector Javert, a beautiful prostitute Fantine, and Fantine’s illegitimate daughter Cosette.

102. With 84-Down, bit of black attire : OPERA
84. See 102-Down : HAT

An opera hat is a spring-loaded, collapsible top hat. Doesn’t that sound cool …?

105. Where one might raise a flap about a reservation? : TEPEE

A tepee (also written as “tipi” and “teepee”) is a cone-shaped tent traditionally made from animal hides that is used by the Great Plains Native Americans. A wigwam is a completely different structure and is often a misnomer for a tepee. A wigwam is a domed structure built by Native Americans in the West and Southwest, intended to be a more permanent dwelling. The wigwam can also be covered with hides but more often was covered with grass, reeds, brush or cloth.

111. Early 2000s outbreak, for short : SARS

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a viral disease in humans that went pandemic in 2002/2003. There were over 8,000 confirmed cases, and 12 deaths from the disease during that outbreak. There have been no known cases since 2003, although the disease has not yet been declared as “eradicated”.

113. Old résident at Versailles : ROI

Versailles is a city located just 10 miles from the center of Paris. It is famous as home to the magnificent Palace of Versailles. The palace started out as a hunting lodge built in the village of Versailles in 1624, built for Louis XIII. Louis XIII extended the lodge into a full-blown château, but it was Louis XIV who expanded it into one of the largest palaces on the planet. Louis XIV moved the royal court from Paris to Versailles starting in 1678.

114. “Star Trek” spinoff, to fans : TNG

When Gene Roddenberry first proposed the science fiction series that became “Star Trek”, he marketed it as “Wagon Train to the Stars”, a pioneer-style Western in outer space. In fact his idea was to produce something more like “Gulliver’s Travels”, as he intended to write episodes that were adventure stories on one level, but morality tales on another. Personally I think that he best achieved this model with the spin-off series “Star Trek: The Next Generation” (TNG). If you watch individual episodes you will see thinly disguised treatments of moral issues such as racism, homosexuality, genocide etc. For my money, “The Next Generation” is the best of the whole franchise …

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Take ___ on the wild side : A WALK
6. Cartoonist Silverstein : SHEL
10. Before you can say Jack Robinson : IN NO TIME
18. Academy Award-winning Marisa : TOMEI
19. Hip-hop’s ___ Kweli : TALIB
21. Crisis connections : HOTLINES
22. Boo-boos : OWIES
23. Brings up : EVOKES
25. “Batman” actress, 1967-68 : EARTHA KITT
26. A-list topper : MEGASTAR
28. Nine-time Pro Bowler John : ELWAY
30. Curriculum ___ : VITAE
31. “Traffic” actor, 2000 : DON CHEADLE
32. Winter Olympics event : SLALOM
34. ___-de-France : ILE
35. Sat ___ (GPS, to a Brit) : NAV
36. “Super Mario Bros.” actor, 1993 : JOHN LEGUIZAMO
40. Comic book onomatopoeia : ZAP!
43. Irish form of Mary : MOIRA
46. Figure on a foam finger : ONE
47. ___ contendere : NOLO
48. School that lent its name to a collar : ETON
50. Like many laundromats : COIN-OP
52. Seat of Penobscot County : BANGOR
54. “Bride of Frankenstein” actress, 1935 : ELSA LANCHESTER
56. Traditional Filipino dish marinated in vinegar and soy sauce : PORK ADOBO
59. Turn up : AT-BAT
60. Bring into harmony : ATTUNE
63. Yves’s evening : SOIR
64. Like many write-in candidates: Abbr. : IND
65. “Training Day” actor, 2001 : DENZEL WASHINGTON
71. Old C.I.A. foe : KGB
72. Where people get off : STOP
74. Growing art form? : BONSAI
75. “A ___ From St. Nicholas” : VISIT
77. Roadside establishment much seen in the Southwest : TACO STAND
80. “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” actress, 2000 : MICHELLE YEOH
85. Connive : SCHEME
86. Shaman, e.g. : HEALER
87. When tripled, a “Seinfeld” catchphrase : YADA
88. Eastern European capital : KIEV
89. Simple top : TEE
91. Cell exchanges : TEXTS
93. Deteriorate : ROT
94. “Crash” actor, 2004 : RYAN PHILLIPPE
97. Scottish form of John : IAN
99. Operate : USE
101. Deliverance person : SAVIOR
102. “Frost/Nixon” actor, 2008 : OLIVER PLATT
106. Kidney-related : RENAL
109. Dame modifier : NOTRE
110. Bear claws and such : PASTRIES
112. What eight actors took on for this puzzle? : BIT PARTS
115. Written deeply : ETCHED
117. “Mea ___” : CULPA
118. Daughter of Oedipus : ANTIGONE
119. Kama ___ : SUTRA
120. Hermione’s Patronus, in the Harry Potter books : OTTER
121. Lure in Vegas : NEON SIGN
122. Leader wearing the Great Imperial Crown : TSAR
123. 10 cc’s and others : DOSES

Down

1. Thing whose size is measured in picometers : ATOM
2. Floored : WOWED
3. Pal : AMIGO
4. Country singer Womack : LEE ANN
5. What might show participants going neck and neck? : KISS CAM
6. Cop : STEAL
7. Le ___ (French port) : HAVRE
8. “Mr. Blue Sky” band, for short : ELO
9. This way : LIKE SO
10. “Gotcha” : I HEAR YOU
11. Word implied on Opposite Day : NOT
12. Ultimate degree : NTH
13. Name of five Norwegian kings : OLAV
14. Word with torch or bar : TIKI
15. Ab ___ (from the beginning) : INITIO
16. Genre for Black Sabbath : METAL
17. Lauder of cosmetics : ESTEE
20. Hotel attendant : BELLHOP
24. Proust protagonist : SWANN
27. L.G.B.T. magazine since 1967 : THE ADVOCATE
29. State as fact : ALLEGE
33. Mosque tower : MINARET
36. Primatologist Goodall : JANE
37. Crash, with “out” : ZONK
38. Pond growth : ALGA
39. Emotional states : MOODS
40. N, seen from the side : ZEE
41. Where I-20, I-65 and I-85 all meet : ATLANTA
42. Some advanced researchers, for short : POSTDOCS
44. Particle named by Faraday : ION
45. Most caloric : RICHEST
49. Catch : NAB
51. Face-to-face challenges : ORALS
52. Pot holder : BONG
53. 1947, for Jackie Robinson : ROOKIE YEAR
55. Stripling : LAD
56. Depress : PUSH IN
57. Ruckus : BIG TO-DO
58. Sphere : ORB
61. J.F.K.’s former ___ Terminal : TWA
62. “Je ___” (French words of affection) : T’AIME
64. Suffix with novel or Nobel : -IST
66. Standout hoopsters : NBA MVPS
67. City planners’ designation : ZONE
68. Undoing : END
69. Leaves a lot on the table? : OVERTIPS
70. Nothing : NIL
73. Chocolate-coated snack stick : POCKY
76. Like some winks : SLY
78. Branch of Islam : SHIA
79. Any of the Ninja Turtles : TEEN
81. “Must’ve been something ___” : I ATE
82. The Browns, on a scoreboard : CLE
83. Bad spell : HEX
84. See 102-Down : HAT
86. Vertical landing spots : HELIPORTS
89. Program saver : TIVO
90. Like SEALs : ELITE
92. Cured and dried fish : SALT COD
94. Have as a tenant : RENT TO
95. “Dear Evan ___,” Best Musical of 2017 : HANSEN
96. Like florists’ flowers that are already in vases : PRECUT
98. Best-selling Japanese manga series : NARUTO
99. ___ Outfitters (retailer) : URBAN
100. Where Javert drowned in “Les Misérables” : SEINE
102. With 84-Down, bit of black attire : OPERA
103. Real-time tool for meteorologists : LIVE RADAR
104. Isn’t level : TILTS
105. Where one might raise a flap about a reservation? : TEPEE
107. So quiet you can hear ___ drop : A PIN
108. Isn’t up to date : LAGS
111. Early 2000s outbreak, for short : SARS
113. Old résident at Versailles : ROI
114. “Star Trek” spinoff, to fans : TNG
116. Elevs. : HTS