1021-18 NY Times Crossword 21 Oct 18, Sunday

Advertisement

Advertisement

Constructed by: Finn Vigeland
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: You’re Going Down

Themed answers are all in the down-direction and are common phrases, on the face of it. Each requires the addition of the word “DOWN” in order to make sense of the clue:

  • 3D. Headline after a toddler C.E.O. resigns, literally? : BABY STEPS (DOWN)
  • 7D. Car failure only a block from the mechanic, literally? : LUCKY BREAK(DOWN)
  • 14D. “For a massage, go that way!,” literally? : THERE’S THE RUB(DOWN)
  • 34D. Like the dress shirt that’s just adorable, literally? : CUTE AS A BUTTON(-DOWN)
  • 62D. Dissed with flowery language, literally? : ELEGANTLY PUT (DOWN)
  • 73D. Punch vs. Judy, literally? : PUPPET SHOW(DOWN)
  • 77D. One answer to the question “What’s your favorite music genre,” literally? : JAZZ, HANDS (DOWN)

Bill’s time: 19m 09s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • CARDI B (Carrib)
  • VADUZ (Varuz)

Advertisement

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Pinocchio, e.g. : FIBBER

“The Adventures of Pinocchio” is an 1883 children’s novel by Carlo Collodi. It is all about an animated puppet named Pinocchio and Geppetto, his poor woodcarver father. Pinocchio is prone to telling lies, the stress of which causes his short nose to become longer.

7. Aphrodisiacs boost it : LIBIDO

“Libido” is a term popularized by Sigmund Freud. Freud’s usage was more general than is understood today, as he used “libido” to describe all instinctive energy that arose in the subconscious. He believed that we humans are driven by two desires, the desire for life (the libido, or Eros) and the desire for death (Thanatos).

The word “aphrodisiac” is used for something that imbues sexual excitement. The word is derived from the “Aphrodite”, the Greek goddess of love and beauty.

18. Where cuneiform was discovered : AMARNA

Armana is an archaeological site on the east bank of the Nile River in Egypt, almost 200 miles south of Cairo. The ancient city is also known as el-Amarna, and Tel el-Amarna, although the use of “Tel” is apparently incorrect. “Tel” commonly appears in names in the region (Arabic for “hill”), but should not apply to Amarna as the site is perfectly flat.

Cuneiform writing is a very early form of written expression that uses characters that are variants of a wedge shape. The first form of cuneiform writing was developed in Sumer (in modern-day Iraq), and was largely a system of pictographs. Over time, the number of characters decreased and became smaller and simpler, until they eventually evolved into the characters that we use in alphabetic writing today.

19. Superhero outfits, typically : UNITARDS

A unitard is like a leotard, except that it has long legs and sometime long sleeves. It wouldn’t be a good look for me …

23. Give unsolicited advice : KIBITZ

To kibitz (or less commonly “to kibbitz”) is to look on and offer unwanted advice. The term comes into English from German via Yiddish. “Kibitz” developed in German from the name of the bird “Kiebitz”, which had the reputation as a meddler.

24. Weapon for William Tell : CROSSBOW

Supposedly, William Tell came from Uri, a canton in the German part of Switzerland. Altdorf is the capital of Uri and is the city where William Tell shot the apple off his son’s head using a crossbow, at least according to legend. There is a bronze statue of Tell that was erected in the city’s marketplace in 1895 to memorialize the event.

26. Popular singer born in County Donegal : ENYA

Enya’s real name is Eithne Ní Bhraonáin, which can translate from Irish into Enya Brennan. Her Donegal family (in the northwest of Ireland) formed a band called Clannad, which included Enya. In 1980 Enya launched her very successful solo career, eventually becoming Ireland’s best-selling solo musician. And, she sure does turn up a lot in crosswords!

31. Snide and sassy : SNARKY

“Snark” is a term that was coined by Lewis Carroll in his fabulous 1876 nonsense poem “The Hunting of the Snark”. Somehow, the term “snarky” came to mean “irritable, short-tempered” in the early 1900s, and from there “snark” became “sarcastic rhetoric” at the beginning of the 21st century.

33. Portrayer of TV’s Det. Fin Tutuola : ICE-T

Rapper Ice-T must be sick of having his name come up as an answer in crossword puzzles (I know I am!). Born Tracy Marrow, Ice-T has been interested in acting for decades and made his film debut in the 1984 movie about breakdancing called “Breakin’”. He has also played Detective Fin Tutuola in the TV show “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” since the year 2000.

35. Jefferson Memorial topper : DOME

The beautiful Jefferson Memorial was completed in 1947 and sits on the banks of the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. The idea for the memorial really came from President Franklin D. Roosevelt, as he was a great admirer of President Jefferson.

37. Non-fish aquarium attraction : OTTER

Male and female otters are known as dogs and bitches, with the offspring called pups. Males and females are are sometimes referred to as boars and sows. A collection of otters is a bevy, family, lodge or perhaps a romp. When in water, a collection of otters can be called a raft.

39. Precalculator calculator : ABACUS

The abacus (plural “abaci”) was used as a counting frame long before man had invented a numbering system. It is a remarkable invention, particularly when one notes that abaci are still widely used today across Africa and Asia.

45. Clue weapon : WRENCH

Clue is board game that we knew under a different name growing up in Ireland. Outside of North America, Clue is marketed as “Cluedo”. Cluedo was the original name of the game, introduced in 1949 by the famous British board game manufacturer Waddingtons. There are cute differences between the US and UK versions. For example, the man who is murdered is called Dr. Black (Mr. Boddy in the US), one of the suspects is the Reverend Green (Mr. Green in the US), and the suspect weapons include a dagger (a knife in the US), and a spanner (a wrench in the US). I think it’s a fabulous game, a must during the holidays …

48. Street crossing Hollywood in Hollywood : VINE

Vine Street is a famous thoroughfare in Hollywood. Hollywood’s movie industry grew up around the intersection of “Hollywood and Vine”, where Hollywood Boulevard crossed Vine Street. That same intersection is now home to the Hollywood Walk of Fame, the collection of brass stars embedded in the sidewalks that are monuments to achievement in the entertainment industry.

49. Conservative : TORY

“Tory” comes from the Irish word “tóraí” meaning “outlaw, robber”. The term “tory” was originally used for an Irish outlaw and later became a term of abuse for Irish rebels. At the end of the reign of King Charles II in Britain, there was a political divide with one side being called “Whigs” and the other “Tories”. Historically, the term “Tory” evolved to basically mean a supporter of the British monarchy, and today is used for a member of the British Conservative Party.

50. Job for a plastic surgeon, for short : LIPO

Liposuction (lipo) dates back to the 1920s when it was developed by a surgeon in France. However, the procedure quickly lost favor when a French model developed gangrene after surgery. As a result, it wasn’t until the mid-seventies that modern liposuction took off, after being popularized by two Italian-American surgeons in Rome.

51. Modern name in transportation : UBER

Uber is a ridesharing service that was founded in 2009 and is based in San Francisco. The service is somewhat controversial and has been described as an illegal taxicab operation. Central to Uber’s service is the company’s mobile app, which can use the client’s GPS location to help find the nearest available ride. Uber’s main competitor is Lyft.

55. Squared building stone : ASHLAR

There’s “rubble masonry” and “ashlar masonry”. The former uses irregularly-shaped stones, to build a wall perhaps, whereas the later uses stone that has been dressed and generally sculpted into rectangular blocks. So ashlar often can look like brick, but the “brick” is just shaped stone as opposed to formed and fired building material.

57. Three short, three long, three short : SOS

The combination of three dots – three dashes – three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots – pause – three dashes – pause – three dots), although in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so SOS is in effect only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases “Save Our Souls” and “Save Our Ship” are also mnemonics, introduced after the “SOS” signal was adopted.

58. Gnocchi ___ Romana : ALLA

Gnocchi are small dumplings in Italian cuisine that can be made from various ingredients including potato, my personal favorite. The name “gnocchi” might be derived from the Italian “nocchio” meaning “knot in wood”.

62. Kindle download : E-BOOK

Amazon’s Kindle line of e-book readers was introduced in 2007. The name “kindle” was chosen to evoke images of “lighting a fire” through reading and intellectual stimulation. I bought myself a Kindle Fire HD a few years ago. I’ve started reading e-books for the first time in my life, as well as enjoying other computing options available with the tablet device …

64. First sign : ARIES

Aries the Ram is the first astrological sign in the Zodiac, and is named after the constellation. Your birth sign is Aries if you were born between March 21 and April 20, but if you are an Aries you would know that! “Aries” is the Latin word for “ram”.

65. Manhattan neighborhood next to the Lower East Side : NOLITA

Nolita is a neighborhood in Manhattan in New York City. The name “Nolita” is derived from “North of Little Italy”. One of Nolita’s most famous sons is the director Martin Scorsese.

71. 1960s-’70s police drama : THE FBI

“The F.B.I.” is a crime TV series that originally ran from 1965 to 1974. Star of the show is Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. who played Inspector Lewis Erskine. The Ford Motor Company sponsored the show, so the main characters were sure to always drive Ford automobiles. Former Director of the FBI J. Edgar Hoover served as a consultant for the series.

73. Medicare provision for nonhospital expenses : PART B

Medicare is divided into four parts:

  • A: Hospital Insurance
  • B: Medical Insurance
  • C: Medicare Advantage Plans
  • D: Prescription Drug Plans

74. Perch for pigeons : LEDGE

Taxonomically, doves and pigeons are the only members of the order Columbidae. The terms “dove” and “pigeon” are often used interchangeably. Scientifically speaking, dove species tend to be smaller that pigeon species. Colloquially though, many refer to doves as the white or nearly white species in the family.

77. Peter Pan rival : JIF

Jif is the leading brand of peanut butter in the US, and has been since 1981. Introduced in 1958, Jif is now produced by Smuckers.

The Peter Pan brand of peanut butter is named after the character in the J. M. Barrie play. What we know today as Peter Pan peanut butter was introduced in 1920 as E. K. Pond peanut butter, and renamed in 1928.

83. Lhasa ___ : APSO

The Lhasa apso breed of dog originated in Tibet and is named after “Lhasa” (the capital city) and “apso” (a Tibetan word meaning “bearded”). The Lhasa apso has been around since 800 BC and is one of the oldest breeds in the world, one very closely related to the ancestral wolf.

86. Son of Adam : ABEL

According to the Bible, Adam and Eve had several children, although only the first three are mentioned by name: Cain, Abel and Seth.

92. Farm measures : HECTARES

The hectare is a non-SI unit of area that is mainly used to measure land. One hectare is equal to 10,000 square meters (100 meters x 100 meters), and equivalent to 2.47 acres.

98. Fourth-down play : PUNT

That would be football.

101. Fast-food chain with a hat in its logo : ARBY’S

The Arby’s chain of fast food restaurants was founded in 1964 by two brothers, Forrest and Leroy Raffel. The name “Arby’s” is a homonym of “RB’s”, standing for “Raffel Brothers”.

104. Jennifer who wrote “Manhattan Beach” : EGAN

Jennifer Egan is an author who grew up in San Francisco. Egan’s 2010 work “A Visit from the Goon Squad” won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Usually termed a novel, “A Visit from the Goon Squad” is structured in such a way that it is sometimes described as a collection of linked short stories.

106. Printer brand : EPSON

Seiko Epson is a Japanese company, and one of the largest manufacturers of printers in the world. The company has its roots in the watch business, roots that go back to 1942. Seiko was chosen as the official timekeeper for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and was asked to supply a timer that produced a printed record. This request brought Seiko into the business of printer production. The company developed the world’s first mini-printer for the 1964 Games and called it EP-101 (EP standing for Electronic Printer). In 1975 Seiko introduced the next generation of EP printers which was called EPSON, from “SON of EP”. Cute, huh?

108. Spelunker’s helmet attachment : LAMP

Spelunking is an American term for recreational caving, although the word has Latin roots (“spelunca” is the Latin for “cave”). The term originated in the 1940s in New England when it was adopted by a group of men who explored caves in the area.

112. Five-time Emmy nominee for “Grey’s Anatomy” : SANDRA OH

The Canadian actress Sandra Oh is very much associated these days with the role of Dr. Cristina Yang on “Grey’s Anatomy”. However, my favorite of Oh’s performances are in the movies “Under the Tuscan Sun” and “Sideways”.

114. Key of Dvorák’s “New World” Symphony : E MINOR

Antonín Dvořák was a composer from Czechoslovakia who spent three years working and composing in the United States. He was the director of the National Conservatory of Music of America in New York from 1892 to 1895. Certainly here in the US, Dvořák’s best known work is his Symphony No. 9, “From the New World”, which is often referred to as “The New World Symphony”. His career was very much helped along by fellow composer Johannes Brahms, who very much appreciated Dvořák’s work.

116. World-weariness : ENNUI

“Ennui” is the French word for “boredom”, and a word that we now use in English. It’s one of the few French words we’ve imported that we haven’t anglicized, and actually pronounce “correctly”.

120. TV colleague of Hayes and O’Donnell : MADDOW

We used to be able to listen to “The Rachel Maddow Show” on Air America Radio before the radio station went bust. Now we can see Maddow on a TV show with the same name, every night on MSNBC. She is the first openly gay anchor to host a primetime news program in the US.

Down

4. Coiner of the term “generative music” : BRIAN ENO

Brian Eno is a musician, composer and record producer from England who first achieved fame as the synthesizer player with Roxy Music. As a producer, Eno has worked with David Bowie, Devo, Talking Heads and U2.

5. Certain med. specialist : ENT

Ear, nose and throat specialist (ENT)

8. About, on memos : IN RE

The term “in re” is Latin, and is derived from “in” (in) and “res” (thing, matter). “In re” literally means “in the matter”, and is used to mean “in regard to” or “in the matter of”.

14. “For a massage, go that way!,” literally? : THERE’S THE RUB(DOWN)

To sleep — perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub!

A rub is a difficulty or obstruction. The usage of the term “rub” predates Shakespeare, and comes from the game of lawn bowls in which a rub is a fault in the bowling surface.

17. Drudge : PEON

A peon is a lowly worker with no real control over his/her working conditions. The word “peon” comes into English from Spanish, in which language it has the same meaning.

20. Its HQ is the Pentagon : DOD

Department of Defense (DOD)

The incredible building known as the Pentagon was built during WWII, and dedicated on January 15, 1943. It is the largest office building in the world (by floor space) covering an area of about 6.5 million square feet. As it was built during the war years, a major requirement was that it use a minimum amount of steel. That steel shortage dictated that the building be no more than four stories in height, and hence cover an awful lot of real estate.

21. First country to legalize changing one’s gender identity (1972) : SWEDEN

The country of Sweden emerged during the Middle Ages, and became one of the great powers of Europe in the days of the Swedish Empire in 17th and early 18th century. Since then Sweden’s influence has waned. What was the eastern part of Sweden was lost to Russia in the early 1800s, and is now modern-day Finland. In the 20th century Sweden has adopted a very non-aggressive stance and was neutral in both World Wars. Sweden is not a member of NATO, but is a member of the European Union, although the country does not use the euro as its currency.

28. First African-American sorority : AKA

Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA)

36. Draftable : ONE-A

The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System (SSS). In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

38. Chamber music group, often : TRIO

In the world of chamber music, a trio often includes a piano. Common forms are:

  • Clarinet-cello-piano
  • Clarinet-viola-piano
  • Clarinet-violin-piano

40. ___ Lingus : AER

“Aer” is the Irish word for “air” as in “Aer Lingus”, which is the name of the Irish national airline.

46. Signature Jacques Tati role : HULOT

Monsieur Hulot is a celebrated comedic character played by French actor Jacques Tati in several films in the fifties and sixties, including “Les Vacances de Monsieur Hulot” (1953) and “Mon Oncle” (1959). Rowan Atkinson draws on the antics of Monsieur Hulot when he plays his “Mr. Bean”.

48. Capital of Liechtenstein : VADUZ

Liechtenstein is a tiny European country with an area of just over 61 square miles, located in the Alps between Switzerland and Austria. It is one of only two doubly-landlocked nations in the world, the other being Uzbekistan. Liechtenstein has the highest gross domestic product per person in the world. The country is a winter sports haven attracting lots of visitors, and is also a tax haven with a strong financial center. There are actually more registered companies in Liechtenstein than there are citizens!

54. For nothing : GRATIS

Something provided “gratis” is supplied free of charge. “Gratis” is a Latin term, a contraction of “gratiis” meaning “for thanks”.

59. Midnight, maybe : CURFEW

Our word “curfew” comes from an Old French word meaning “cover fire”. In medieval days a bell would be ring in the evenings as a signal to bank the hearths in preparation for sleeping. The intent was to prevent uncontrolled fires starting from fireplaces that were not tended during the night.

65. Hip-hop dance move : NAE NAE

The Nae Nae is a hip hop dance that is named for the 2013 song “Drop that NaeNae” recorded by We Are Toon. The main move in the dance involves swaying with one hand in the air and one hand down, with both feet firmly planted on the dancefloor. Go on, do it. You know you want to …

66. Classic London theater : OLD VIC

The Old Vic is a very famous theater (or I should I say “theatre”?) in London, previously known as the Royal Coburg Theatre and then the Royal Victorian Theatre (giving it the current name “The Old Vic”). The theater owes a lot of its fame and standing to the fact that it housed the National Theater of Great Britain after it was founded in 1963 by Sir Laurence Olivier. Today the National Theater has new, modern premises, but the Old Vic Theatre Company stills garners a lot of attention.

67. Angled edge : BEVEL

A beveled edged is like a chamfered edge. The edge of a mirror is often beveled, meaning that it is cut at an angle that isn’t perpendicular to the mirror’s surface.

69. Snacks often paired with milk : OREOS

There’s a smartphone app featuring the Oreo cookie. It’s a game in which one twists Oreo cookies apart, “licks” the cream from the center and then dunks the remainder of the cookie in a glass of milk.

70. “Mutiny on the Bounty” captain : BLIGH

William Bligh was a senior officer in the Royal Navy who was famously captain of the HMS Bounty when her crew mutinied. As I found out in my last trip back to Ireland, late in his life Bligh charted and mapped Dublin Bay and designed the important North Bull Wall that sits at the mouth of the River Liffey and entrance to Dublin Port.

Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall wrote “Mutiny on the ‘Bounty’”, based on a true story. They followed up their successful novel with two more works, creating what is now called the “Bounty Trilogy”. The three books are:

  1. “Mutiny on the ‘Bounty’”, the tale of the mutiny against Captain Bligh.
  2. “Men Against the Sea”, the story of Captain Bligh and the eighteen men set adrift in an open boat by the mutineers.
  3. “Pitcairn’s Island”, a narrative about the lives of the mutineers on South Sea islands after the mutiny.

72. Underwear brand : HANES

The Hanes brand of apparel was founded in 1901. A related brand was introduced in 1986 called Hanes Her Way.

73. Punch vs. Judy, literally? : PUPPET SHOW(DOWN)

Punch and Judy puppets date back to the 17th century, with roots in Italy, The manifestation familiar to the English-speaking world feature Punch wearing a jester’s outfit and carrying a stick. Punch is very violent, and tends to use his stick to wallop his wife Judy.

78. Agenda entry : ITEM

“Agenda” is a Latin word that translates as “things to be done”, coming from the verb “agere” meaning “to do”.

79. Music outro effect : FADE

In the world of pop music, an outro is the opposite to an intro. An outro might perhaps be the concluding track of an album, for example.

84. Haberdashery buys : TIE CLIPS

Back in the 14th century, a haberdasher was a dealer in small wares. By the late 1800s, the term had evolved to mean a purveyor of menswear, and in particular was associated with the sale of hats.

89. CVS rival : RITE AID

What we know today as Rite Aid started out as one store in Scranton, Pennsylvania in 1962. Rite Aid is now the biggest chain of drugstores on the East Coast of the United States and has operations all over the country.

91. “Alea iacta ___”: Caesar : EST

Supposedly, when Julius Caesar marched back to Rome from Gaul, he defiantly “crossed the Rubicon” with his army while uttering the words “Alea iacta est” (“The die is cast”).

94. About 10% of Russia : TUNDRA

Tundra is an ecosystem that is treeless, or very nearly so. There are three types of tundra. Arctic and Antarctic tundra can’t support the growth of trees as the ground is pretty much frozen. Alpine tundra cannot support tree-growth due to high altitude.

98. Land in “The Hunger Games” : PANEM

“Panem” is the name of the fictional nation in “The Hunger Games” series of novels. Panem is in North America, with a capital city located in the Rocky Mountains, and thirteen surrounding, outlying districts. The name “Panem” comes from the Latin for “bread”.

103. Actor Eric : BANA

Eric Bana is an Australian actor who enjoyed a successful career in his home country before breaking into Hollywood playing an American Delta Force sergeant in “Black Hawk Down”. A couple of years later he played the lead in Ang Lee’s 2003 movie “Hulk”, the role of Dr Bruce Banner. More recently he played the Romulan villain Nero, in the 2009 “Star Trek” movie.

107. ___ stick : POGO

What we know today as a pogo stick was invented in Germany by Max Pohlig and Ernst Gottschall. The name “pogo” comes from the first two letters in each of the inventors’ family names: Po-hlig and Go-ttschall.

109. Pouty face : MOUE

The term “moue” comes from French, and means “small grimace, pout”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Pinocchio, e.g. : FIBBER
7. Aphrodisiacs boost it : LIBIDO
13. Backpack feature : STRAP
18. Where cuneiform was discovered : AMARNA
19. Superhero outfits, typically : UNITARDS
22. Irritate : CHAFE
23. Give unsolicited advice : KIBITZ
24. Weapon for William Tell : CROSSBOW
25. Coming back in : RETRO
26. Popular singer born in County Donegal : ENYA
27. Like many wine casks : OAKEN
29. Lie low : HIDE
30. What starts with a spark of an idea? : ARSON
31. Snide and sassy : SNARKY
33. Portrayer of TV’s Det. Fin Tutuola : ICE-T
35. Jefferson Memorial topper : DOME
37. Non-fish aquarium attraction : OTTER
39. Precalculator calculator : ABACUS
41. Where one might be well-suited : MEN’S SHOP
45. Clue weapon : WRENCH
47. “Give it a ___” : REST
48. Street crossing Hollywood in Hollywood : VINE
49. Conservative : TORY
50. Job for a plastic surgeon, for short : LIPO
51. Modern name in transportation : UBER
53. “Heavens!” : EGAD!
55. Squared building stone : ASHLAR
57. Three short, three long, three short : SOS
58. Gnocchi ___ Romana : ALLA
59. Rapper with the 2017 #1 hit “Bodak Yellow” : CARDI B
61. Brought about : LED TO
62. Kindle download : E-BOOK
63. Chant at a political rally : USA! USA!
64. First sign : ARIES
65. Manhattan neighborhood next to the Lower East Side : NOLITA
67. Popular line of dolls with “Kidz” and “Babyz” spinoffs : BRATZ
68. Hole foods? : DONUTS
70. Bundled, as hay : BALED
71. 1960s-’70s police drama : THE FBI
73. Medicare provision for nonhospital expenses : PART B
74. Perch for pigeons : LEDGE
75. Plea to a superhero, maybe : SAVE US
76. Employs : USES
77. Peter Pan rival : JIF
80. Trespass upon : INVADE
82. Seventh-year exam in Harry Potter : NEWT
83. Lhasa ___ : APSO
84. “Toodles!” : TA-TA!
85. Positive market move : GAIN
86. Son of Adam : ABEL
88. Trigger, as an alarm : TRIP
90. Repossessed : SEIZED
92. Farm measures : HECTARES
94. Kind of humor : TOILET
96. “Cuz I told you to!” : SEZ ME!
97. Like rain forests : LUSH
98. Fourth-down play : PUNT
99. Spasm : TWITCH
101. Fast-food chain with a hat in its logo : ARBY’S
104. Jennifer who wrote “Manhattan Beach” : EGAN
106. Printer brand : EPSON
108. Spelunker’s helmet attachment : LAMP
111. Springs : LEAPS
112. Five-time Emmy nominee for “Grey’s Anatomy” : SANDRA OH
114. Key of Dvorák’s “New World” Symphony : E MINOR
116. World-weariness : ENNUI
117. “Silly me, rambling again!” : THERE I GO!
118. The Chainsmokers or Eurythmics : POP DUO
119. Declare : STATE
120. TV colleague of Hayes and O’Donnell : MADDOW
121. Didn’t sleep well : TOSSED

Down

1. Embarrassment for an art curator : FAKE
2. “Sign me up!” : I’M IN!
3. Headline after a toddler C.E.O. resigns, literally? : BABY STEPS (DOWN)
4. Coiner of the term “generative music” : BRIAN ENO
5. Certain med. specialist : ENT
6. It may be cutting things close : RAZOR
7. Car failure only a block from the mechanic, literally? : LUCKY BREAK(DOWN)
8. About, on memos : IN RE
9. Mixture of nature and technology : BIONICS
10. “___ official” : IT’S
11. Takes off in a hurry : DASHES
12. Eye socket : ORBIT
13. Takes off in a hurry : SCRAMS
14. “For a massage, go that way!,” literally? : THERE’S THE RUB(DOWN)
15. “Darn it all!” : RATS!
16. Do for Jon Batiste : AFRO
17. Drudge : PEON
20. Its HQ is the Pentagon : DOD
21. First country to legalize changing one’s gender identity (1972) : SWEDEN
28. First African-American sorority : AKA
32. Part of a circle : ARC
34. Like the dress shirt that’s just adorable, literally? : CUTE AS A BUTTON(-DOWN)
36. Draftable : ONE-A
37. “Wise” ones : OWLS
38. Chamber music group, often : TRIO
40. ___ Lingus : AER
41. Calf-length dresses : MIDIS
42. “Not so fast!” : HOLD IT!
43. Addresses a crowd : ORATES
44. Firebugs : PYROS
46. Signature Jacques Tati role : HULOT
48. Capital of Liechtenstein : VADUZ
52. Puffs up : BLOATS
54. For nothing : GRATIS
56. Perspectives : SLANTS
58. Bore : ABIDED
59. Midnight, maybe : CURFEW
60. Total baller : BADASS
62. Dissed with flowery language, literally? : ELEGANTLY PUT (DOWN)
65. Hip-hop dance move : NAE NAE
66. Classic London theater : OLD VIC
67. Angled edge : BEVEL
69. Snacks often paired with milk : OREOS
70. “Mutiny on the Bounty” captain : BLIGH
72. Underwear brand : HANES
73. Punch vs. Judy, literally? : PUPPET SHOW(DOWN)
77. One answer to the question “What’s your favorite music genre,” literally? : JAZZ, HANDS (DOWN)
78. Agenda entry : ITEM
79. Music outro effect : FADE
81. Prominent parts of goblins : EARS
83. Not do so well : AIL
84. Haberdashery buys : TIE CLIPS
87. Directive : BEHEST
89. CVS rival : RITE AID
91. “Alea iacta ___”: Caesar : EST
93. Barbie attendee : AUSSIE
94. About 10% of Russia : TUNDRA
95. Afternoon hour : TWO
98. Land in “The Hunger Games” : PANEM
100. Bumbling : INEPT
101. Orders at the Rose & Crown : ALES
102. Quote from a letter : RENT
103. Actor Eric : BANA
105. Frustrated cry : GAH!
107. ___ stick : POGO
109. Pouty face : MOUE
110. Urge on : PROD
113. Bloody, say : RED
115. Barn greeting : MOO

10 thoughts on “1021-18 NY Times Crossword 21 Oct 18, Sunday”

    1. Dave do you use powder soap, liquid or pods? Hows the new washer working.

      65 down naenae stumped us. Other than that enjoyed the puzzle.

      1. @Donna & Bill (since you asked … 😜). My first new washer was a Whirlpool and I have concluded that there really was something badly wrong with it (which may explain why the store was so willing to replace it); also, the manuals that came with it were of little use in trying to figure out just what was wrong. The replacement is a GE: the manuals are great and the machine is working very well indeed. Both machines are of the new-fangled variety that use very little water and I use “HE” (“High Efficiency”) powdered Tide.

  1. About 2 hrs. and 4 errors(8 by Bills standards).
    Why do constructors take a good puzzle and add words like hectares, nolita, aka, and naenae to ruin all the fun?

    1. @Jack … I think there are two reasons: 1) For some of us dementos, such words are the fun; puzzles without new words to learn are boring. 2) Constructing a crossword puzzle, particularly a large one, is not that easy; having a larger pool of usable entries to draw on is important to facilitate the process.

  2. Easy-peasy puzzle; really enjoyed both the cluing and the theme. Some of my favorites:
    6D) It may be cutting things close (“Razor”).
    37A) Nonfish aquarium attraction (“Otter”).
    68A) Hole foods (“Donuts”).
    89D) CVS rival (“Rite Aid”).
    93D) Barbie attendee (“Aussie”).
    Any of the theme clues.

    Fine work, Finn. There need to be more puzzle-makers like you.

  3. I had the same error as @BruceB and was in good company with Bill. I also had Amarma/EMT. Otherwise, I was perfect. Still, I didn’t totally grasp the theme till coming here and seeing Bill nail it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.