0909-18 NY Times Crossword 9 Sep 18, Sunday

Advertisement

Advertisement

Constructed by: Hal Moore
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Mixed Feelings

We have a rebus puzzle today, with the words LOVE/HATE appearing in four squares in the grid. We use the letters LOVE in the across-direction, and HATE in the down-direction:

  • 63A. They involve mixed feelings … or a hint to four squares in this completed puzzle : LOVE-HATE RELATIONSHIPS
  • 26A. Neighbor of Hungary : SLOVENIA
  • 37A. Pair of diamonds? : BATTING GLOVES
  • 83A. Option for moving an investment : ROLLOVER IRA
  • 102A. Symbol of luck : FOUR-LEAF CLOVER
  • 12D. Islamic state : CALIPHATE
  • 23D. “Why am I not surprised?” : WHAT ELSE IS NEW?
  • 45D. Basically what was said : WORDS TO THAT EFFECT
  • 98D. Fancy French home : CHATEAU

Bill’s time: 19m 34s

Bill’s errors: 0

Advertisement

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

4. “So long, dear boy” : TA-TA

An Englishman might say “ta-ta” or “cheerio” instead of “goodbye”. Well, supposedly so …

8. Soap scent : LILAC

The ornamental flowering plant known as lilac is native to the Balkans, and is a member of the olive family.

20. TD Garden, for one : ARENA

TD Garden is a sports arena that was built in the 1990s to replace the aging Boston Garden as home for the Boston Celtics basketball team and the Boston Bruins hockey team.

21. Jordan who directed “Get Out” : PEELE

“Get Out” is a 2017 horror movie, I don’t do horror, but I do hear that this one is well made …

26. Neighbor of Hungary : SLOVENIA

The Republic of Slovenia is a country in Central Europe that is bordered by Italy, Austria, Croatia and Hungary. Given its geographic location, the country has been part of various realms over the centuries, most recently being part of Yugoslavia. Slovenia declared independence from former Yugoslavia in 1991, and is now a member of the European Union.

Hungary is a country in Central Europe that has become a popular tourist destination since the collapse of the Eastern Bloc in 1989. Hungarians refer to themselves as “Magyars”.

27. Harbinger : OMEN

A harbinger is a person or a thing that indicates what is to come. The word comes from the Middle English “herbenger”, a person sent ahead to arrange lodgings.

30. Tierra ___ Fuego : DEL

Tierra del Fuego is an archipelago off the southern tip of South America and is the location of the famed Cape Horn. Tierra del Fuego was discovered by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan. He saw native fires on land as he passed by and originally called the location “Land of Smoke” This was later changed to “Land of Fire”, or “Tierra del Fuego” in Spanish.

33. Where the U.S. won its 1,000th Summer Olympic gold : RIO

Even though the 2016 Olympic Games was a summer competition, it was held in Rio de Janeiro in winter. As Rio is in the southern hemisphere, the opening ceremony on 5th August 2016 fell in the local winter season. The 2016 games was also the first to be held in South America, and the first to be hosted by a Portuguese-speaking country.

35. Id restrainer : EGO

Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the superego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

36. Sangfroid : POISE

Sang-froid is coolness, composure. The term is French for “cool blood”.

46. Horror assistant : IGOR

In the world of movies, Igor has been the assistant to Dracula, Frankenstein and Young Frankenstein among others. Igor is almost invariably portrayed as a hunchback.

47. Big name in water filters : BRITA

Brita is a German company that specializes in water filtration products. Brita products do a great job of filtering tap water, but they don’t “purify” it, they don’t remove microbes. That job is usually done by a municipality before the water gets to the faucet.

50. Black brew : ASSAM TEA

Assam is a state in the very northeast of India, and just south of the Himalayas. Assam is noted for its tea as well as its silk.

54. Man just after kneeling? : SIR

Kneel, and a monarch might “dub thee a knight” if you’re lucky. “Dub” is a specific term derived from Old English that was used to mean “make a knight”. As the knight was also given a knightly name at the same time, “dub” has come to mean “give someone a name”.

56. Classic Chevy : VETTE

The Chevrolet Corvette was introduced to the world in 1953, and was named after the small maneuverable warship called a corvette. The “vette” has legs. It is the only American sports car that has been around for over 50 years.

58. Bunker : SAND TRAP

Sand traps on a golf course are referred to as “bunkers” on the other side of the Atlantic.

63. They involve mixed feelings … or a hint to four squares in this completed puzzle : LOVE-HATE RELATIONSHIPS

Like the relationship some people have with crossword puzzles.

67. 2008 campaign slogan : YES WE CAN

The 2008 campaign that resulted in the election of President Barack Obama used the slogan “Change we can believe in”, along with the associated chant “Yes We Can”. The words “Yes We Can” were perhaps borrowed from the United Farm Workers, which organization uses the motto “Sí, se puede”. “Sí, se puede” translates as “Yes, it is possible” and is a phrase very much associated with labor leader Cesar Chavez.

68. Major fashion capital : MILAN

Milan is Italy’s second largest city, second only to Rome. Milan is a European fashion capital, the headquarters for the big Italian fashion houses of Valentino, Gucci, Versace, Armani, Prada and others. Mario Prada was even born in Milan, and helped establish the city’s reputation in the world of fashion.

69. Actress Thompson of “Thor: Ragnarok” : TESSA

Tessa Thompson is an actress from Los Angeles who is known for playing the supporting role of Jackie Cook on the TV show “Veronica Mars”, and for playing student leader Diane Nash in the 2014 film “Selma”.

“Thor: Ragnarok” is a 2017 superhero film in the “Thor” series. Not my cup of tea …

71. Efficiency stat : MPG

Miles per gallon (mpg)

72. Payment to a building board : CONDO FEE

The terms “condominium” and “apartment” tend to describe the same type of residential property, namely a private living space with facilities shared with others residing in the same building or complex. The difference is that a condominium is usually owned, and an apartment is rented. At least that’s how it is in the US. The word “condominium” comes from the Latin “com-” (together) and “dominum” (right of ownership).

75. Dance in 3/4 time : BOLERO

The word “bolero” is used to describe slow-tempo Latin music, and can be both a dance and a song.

80. “___ bien” : ESTA

“Este bien” is Spanish for “it’s okay”.

82. Leaves in : STETS

“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

83. Option for moving an investment : ROLLOVER IRA

A rollover IRA is a subtype of traditional Individual Retirement Account (IRA). The funds for a rollover IRA come from another qualified plan such as a 401(k) or a 403(b) account.

88. Parts of many law firm names : AMPERSANDS

Back in the day, when reciting the alphabet it was common to emphasize that some letters could be used as a word in itself. One would say “A per se A, B, C, D … I per se I, J, K, L … denoting that the letters A and I are also their own words. It was common to add the & symbol at the end of the recitation, as if it were a 27th letter. So the alphabet ended with “X, Y, Z, & (and) per se and”. This “and per se and” statement was slurred to “ampersand”, giving the name that we use today for the & symbol.

91. Camera setting : F-STOP

Varying the f-stop in a lens varies how big the lens opening (the aperture) is when a photograph is taken. Smaller apertures (higher f-stop values) admit less light, but result in a greater depth of field (more of the photograph is in focus).

92. “___ out!” (ump’s cry) : YER

Back in the 15th century, “an umpire” was referred to as “a noumpere”, which was misheard and hence causing the dropping of the initial letter N. The term “noumpere” came from Old French “nonper” meaning “not even, odd number”. The idea was that the original umpire was a third person called on to arbitrate between two, providing that “odd number” needed to decide the dispute.

93. Hello or goodbye : CIAO

“Ciao” is Italian for “‘bye”. “Arrivederci” is more formal, and translates as “goodbye”.

95. Dukes : FISTS

“Dukes” is a slang term meaning “fists, hands”. The route taken by “dukes” to become fists seems very tortuous, but might just be true. The term “fork” had been slang for “hand” for centuries (and gives rise to “fork out” meaning “hand over”). The slang term “fork” is expressed in Cockney rhyming slang as “Duke of York”, which is shortened to “duke”. As I said, tortuous …

97. Folkie Guthrie : ARLO

Singer Arlo Guthrie is known for his protest songs, just like his father Woody Guthrie. The younger Guthrie only ever had one song in the top 40: a cover version of “City of New Orleans”. He has lived for years in the town of Washington, just outside Pittsfield, Massachusetts. His 1976 song “Massachusetts” has been the official folk song of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts since 1981.

98. Chocolate chip cookie starters? : CEES

The starting letter in each of the words in “chocolate chip cookie” is the letter C (cee).

100. One of the Corleones in “The Godfather” : FREDO

Fredo Corleone is a middle son in the Corleone family that features in Mario Puzo’s “The Godfather”. He was considered the weak son, and was reduced to the role of “gopher”. Fredo was with his father when Don Corleone was shot, and although he tried to retaliate as the shooting took place, he dropped his gun. On the screen, Fredo was played by Italian-American actor John Cazale.

110. “Princess ___ Theme” (John Williams composition) : LEIA’S

The great composer John Williams has won five Academy Awards for his work on film scores, for:

  • “Fiddler on the Roof”
  • “Jaws”
  • “Star Wars”
  • “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial”
  • “Schindler’s List”

111. Chocolatier since 1845 : LINDT

The delicious Swiss chocolate sold under the Lindt brand name has its origins in a small confectionery store in Zurich in the 1840s. Lindt purchased our local chocolate company here in San Francisco (Ghirardelli) back in 1998.

112. Stooge with a bowl cut : MOE

If you’ve seen a few of the films starring “The Three Stooges” you might have noticed that the line up changed over the years. The original trio was made up of Moe and Shemp Howard (two brothers) and Larry Fine (a good friend of the Howards). This line up was usually known as “Moe, Larry and Shemp”. Then Curly Howard replaced his brother when Shemp quit the act, creating the most famous trio, “Moe, Larry And Curly”. Shemp returned when Curly had a debilitating stroke in 1946, and Shemp stayed with the troupe until he died in 1955. Shemp was replaced by Joe Besser, and then “Curly-Joe” DeRita. When Larry Fine had a stroke in 1970, it effectively marked the end of the act.

114. Certain break point : AD OUT

In tennis, if the score reaches “deuce” (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the “advantage”. If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that’s two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. If the one of the players is calling out the score then if he/she has the advantage then that player announces “ad in” or more formally “advantage in”. If the score announcer’s opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is “ad out” or “advantage out”. Follow all of that …?

116. Division in geology : EON

Geological time is divided into a number of units of varying lengths. These are, starting from the largest:

  • supereon
  • eon (also “aeon”)
  • era
  • period
  • epoch
  • age

Down

1. Small balls : BBS

A BB gun is an air pistol or rifle that shoots birdshot known as BBs. Birdshot comes in a number of different sizes, from size 9 (0.070″ in diameter) to size FF (.230″). Birdshot that is size BB (0.180″ in diameter) gives the airgun its name.

3. Attire for the Bond villain Ernst Stavro Blofeld : MAO SUIT

What we call the Mao suit in the west is known as the Zhongshan suit in China. The style was introduced by Sun Yat-sen (also known as Sun Zhongshan) as the form of national dress after the founding of the Republic of China in 1912.

Ernst Stavro Blofeld is a villain in the James Bond universe. Blofeld has been played on the big screen several times by different actors. My favorite is Donald Pleasance in 1967’s “You Only Live Twice”. In the original Ian Fleming novels, Blofeld was born on 28 May 1908, which happens to be Fleming’s own birthday.

4. Author Morrison : TONI

The writer Toni Morrison won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993. Amongst other things, Morrison is noted for coining the phrase “our first black President”, a reference to President Bill Clinton.

5. Director of the “M*A*S*H” finale : ALDA

Alan Alda has had a great television career, especially of course as a lead actor in “M*A*S*H”. Alda won his first Emmy in 1972, for playing surgeon Hawkeye Pierce on “M*A*S*H”. He won his most recent Emmy in 2006 for his portrayal of Presidential candidate Senator Arnold Vinick in “The West Wing”. When it comes to the big screen, my favorite of Alda’s movies is the 1978 romantic comedy “Same Time, Next Year” in which he starred opposite Ellen Burstyn.

7. Skillful : ADROIT

The French for “to the right” is “à droit”, from which we get our word “adroit”. The original meaning of “adroit” was “rightly, properly”, but it has come to mean dexterous and skillful. Someone described as “maladroit” is unskilled and awkward.

12. Islamic state : CALIPHATE

“Caliph” is an Arabic word meaning “successor”. In the Islamic tradition, a caliph is a leader who is deemed to be a successor of Muhammad.

15. Manta ray, by another name : SEA DEVIL

The manta ray is the largest species of ray, with the largest one recorded at over 25 feet across and weighing 5,100 pounds. It is sometimes referred to as the sea devil.

16. “The Crucible,” for McCarthyism : ALLEGORY

“The Crucible” is a 1952 play by Arthur Miller that tells the story of the Salem witch trials. Miller wrote it as an allegory for the House Committee on Un-American Activities hearings that were being chaired by Senator Joe McCarthy around that time. Miller was called before the Committee himself, and was convicted of contempt of Congress for refusing to “name names”.

32. Mate for Bambi : DOE

The 1942 Disney classic “Bambi” is based on a book written by Felix Salten called “Bambi, A Life in the Woods”. There is a documented phenomenon known as the Bambi Effect, whereby people become more interested in animal rights after having watched the scene where Bambi’s mother is shot by hunters.

37. Milhouse’s toon friend : BART

Milhouse Van Houten is a character on the animated TV show “The Simpsons”. Milhouse is Bart Simpson’s best friend, and has a crush on Bart’s sister Lisa.

38. Dashboard warnings, informally : IDIOT LIGHTS

The warning and status lights that we see on the dashboard of a car are commonly referred to as “idiot lights”. In general, these lights have replaced gauges that measured things like engine temperature and oil pressure. The first idiot lights were introduced in the 1930s by the Hudson automobile company.

41. “Kung Fu” actor Philip : AHN

The actor Philip Ahn is perhaps best known for playing Master Kahn, one of Caine’s teachers on the television show “Kung Fu”. Ahn was the first Asian-American actor to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

43. Fruit juice brand : POM

POM Wonderful is a privately-held company that has been making fruit juice drinks since 2002. The main product line is pomegranate juice, hence the company name.

47. Boxer upset in the biopic “Cinderella Man” : BAER

Max Baer was an American Heavyweight Champion of the World in the thirties. Baer held the title for 364 days, and then went into the ring after hardly any training at all against the well-prepared James J. Braddock. Braddock was a huge underdog, and yet emerged victorious after 15 rounds (Braddock is the subject of the 2005 movie “Cinderella Man”). By the way, Baer’s son is Max Baer, Jr., the actor who played Jethro on “The Beverly Hillbillies”.

48. Golfer Aoki : ISAO

Isao Aoki is one of Japan’s greatest golfers. Aoki’s best finish in a major tournament was runner-up to Jack Nicklaus in the 1980 US Open.

49. Nordic native : FINN

Someone is described as Nordic if he or she is a native of Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland or Iceland.

50. Soothing succulent : ALOE

Aloe vera is a succulent plant that grows in relatively dry climates. The plants leaves are full of biologically-active compounds that have been studied extensively. Aloe vera has been used for centuries in herbal medicine, mainly for topical treatment of wounds.

51. Explorers and Expeditions : SUVS

“SUV” is an initialism standing for sports utility vehicle, and is a term that was introduced by our marketing friends. Using the phrase “sports utility vehicle” was a very clever way to get us to pay a lot of money for what was essentially a station wagon on a truck chassis, or at least it was back then.

55. Journalist Nellie : BLY

“Nellie Bly” was a pen name used by American journalist Elizabeth Cochran. In 1888, Bly took a trip around the world, emulating the fictional trip of Phileas Fogg in “Around the World in Eighty Days”. She departed from New York and arrived back in San Francisco two days behind schedule, jeopardizing her goal of beating the “eighty days”. The owner of her newspaper chartered a private train for her and she made it back to New York in just over 72 days. Quite a woman …

57. The Great ___ (Satan) : TEMPTER

Satan is the bringer of evil and temptation in the Abrahamic religions. The name “Satan” is Hebrew for “adversary”.

58. ___-Soviet : SINO

The prefix “Sino-” is used to refer to things Chinese. It comes from the Latin word “Sinae” meaning … “Chinese”!

59. Cartoon in which one cow says to another “Hey, wait a minute! This is grass! We’ve been eating grass!” : THE FAR SIDE

“The Far Side” is a cartoon series drawn by Gary Larson. It ran from 1980 to 1995, and continues today in reruns in many papers. A lot of “The Far Side” cartoons feature animals, often in outrageous, human-like situations. Larson was so popular with people working with animals that in 1989 a newly discovered insect species was named Strigiphilus garylarsoni. How cool is that?

61. View from a pew : APSE

The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally, apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

A pew is a bench in a church, one usually with a high back. The original pews were raised and sometimes enclosed seats in the church used by women and important men or families. “Pew” comes from the Old French “puie” meaning “balcony, elevation”.

62. Free TV spot, for short : PSA

Public service announcement (PSA)

64. Taiwanese computer giant : ACER

Acer is a Taiwanese company that I visited a couple of times when I was in the electronics business. I was very impressed back then with the company’s dedication to quality, although I have heard that things haven’t gone so well in recent years …

65. It might be topped with guacamole : TACO

Guacamole is one of my favorite dishes. It is prepared by mashing avocados and perhaps adding the likes of tomato, onion and lime juice. The guacamole recipe dates back as early as the 16th century, to the time of the Aztecs. “Guacamole” translates as “avocado sauce”.

66. Tic ___ (mints) : TACS

Tic Tacs aren’t American candies (as I always mistakenly believed). Tic Tacs are made by the Italian company Ferrero, and were introduced in 1969.

74. Internet connection inits. : DSL

The abbreviation “DSL” originally stood for Digital Subscriber Loop, but is now accepted to mean (Asymmetric) Digital Subscriber Line. DSL is the technology that allows Internet service be delivered down the same telephone line as voice service, by separating the two into different frequency signals.

79. Great Plains tribe : OSAGE

The Osage Nation originated in the Ohio River valley in what we now call Kentucky. The Osage were forced to migrate west of the Mississippi by the invading Iroquois tribe. Most of the tribe members now live in Osage County, Oklahoma.

82. Sent up : SPOOFED

The word “spoof” came into the language in the 1880s with the meaning “hoax, deception”. The term was coined by British comedian Arthur Roberts, when it used it as the name for a card game he invented that involved trickery and nonsense. The verb “to spoof” came to mean “to satirize gently” starting in the 1920s.

83. Nutrition fig. : RDA

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII, and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

86. H.S. courses for college credit : APS

The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to kids who are still in high school. After being tested at the end of the courses, successful students receive credits that count towards a college degree.

89. 17-year-old Peace Nobelist Yousafzai : MALALA

“I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban” is a memoir co-written by Malala Yousafzai and British journalist Christina Lamb. The title tells the essence of her Malala’s story. She started a blog when she was 11 or 12, outlining her life in northwest Pakistan under occupation by the Taliban. As the Pakistani military regained control of the area, Malala’s story was told in a documentary and she was frequently giving interviews. One day a gunman came looking for her, and found her on a school bus. He shot Malala three times, with one bullet going into her forehead. She survived, and was taken to England to recuperate. She was a co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014 at the age of 17, making her the youngest ever Nobel laureate.

99. Once, once : ERST

“Erst” is an archaic way of saying “formerly, before the present time”. The term is mostly seen as part of the word “erstwhile”, an adjective meaning “of times past”.

100. The Bravest in the Big Apple, for short : FDNY

New York City Fire Department (FDNY)

101. N.L. Central squad : REDS

The Red Scare (i.e. anti-communist sentiment) following WWII had such an effect on the populace that it even caused the Cincinnati baseball team to change its name from the Reds. The team was called the Cincinnati Redlegs from 1953-1958, as the management was fearful of losing money due to public distrust of any association with “Reds”.

104. Certain tech exec : CIO

Chief Information Officer (CIO)

106. Actress Long : NIA

Nia Long is an American actress who is probably best known for playing Will Smith’s sometime girlfriend and fiancee Lisa Wilkes on the TV show “The Fresh Prince of Bel Air”.

108. Currency with denominations of 1,000, 5,000 and 10,000 : YEN

The Korean Won, the Chinese Yuan, and the Japanese Yen (all of which are Asian currencies) take their names from the Chinese written character that represents “round shape”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. No-goodnik : BUM
4. “So long, dear boy” : TA-TA
8. Soap scent : LILAC
13. Test for purity : ASSAY
18. Bullet ___ (1950s fashion fad) : BRA
19. Hiding, with “up” : HOLED
20. TD Garden, for one : ARENA
21. Jordan who directed “Get Out” : PEELE
22. Overwhelm : SNOW UNDER
24. Result of a photographic memory : TOTAL RECALL
26. Neighbor of Hungary : SLOVENIA
27. Harbinger : OMEN
29. Whopper inventor : LIAR
30. Tierra ___ Fuego : DEL
31. Minor’s opposite : ADULT
33. Where the U.S. won its 1,000th Summer Olympic gold : RIO
34. Chooses : OPTS
35. Id restrainer : EGO
36. Sangfroid : POISE
37. Pair of diamonds? : BATTING GLOVES
41. Swear : AVOW
42. Robin Williams role in a 1991 blockbuster : PETER PAN
44. Reasons to hold one’s nose : ODORS
45. Fan sounds : WHIRS
46. Horror assistant : IGOR
47. Big name in water filters : BRITA
48. “I wish!” : IF ONLY!
50. Black brew : ASSAM TEA
53. Item at the end of a wizard’s staff : ORB
54. Man just after kneeling? : SIR
55. Uncompromisingly direct : BLUNT
56. Classic Chevy : VETTE
58. Bunker : SAND TRAP
63. They involve mixed feelings … or a hint to four squares in this completed puzzle : LOVE-HATE RELATIONSHIPS
67. 2008 campaign slogan : YES WE CAN
68. Major fashion capital : MILAN
69. Actress Thompson of “Thor: Ragnarok” : TESSA
70. ___ league (amateur sports group) : REC
71. Efficiency stat : MPG
72. Payment to a building board : CONDO FEE
75. Dance in 3/4 time : BOLERO
78. Set of values : ETHOS
80. “___ bien” : ESTA
81. One smoothing the way? : PAVER
82. Leaves in : STETS
83. Option for moving an investment : ROLLOVER IRA
87. Neighborhood : AREA
88. Parts of many law firm names : AMPERSANDS
91. Camera setting : F-STOP
92. “___ out!” (ump’s cry) : YER
93. Hello or goodbye : CIAO
94. ___ long way : GO A
95. Dukes : FISTS
96. O’er and o’er : OFT
97. Folkie Guthrie : ARLO
98. Chocolate chip cookie starters? : CEES
100. One of the Corleones in “The Godfather” : FREDO
102. Symbol of luck : FOUR-LEAF CLOVER
105. Public nudity or foul language : INDECENCY
109. Place to chat : FORUM
110. “Princess ___ Theme” (John Williams composition) : LEIA’S
111. Chocolatier since 1845 : LINDT
112. Stooge with a bowl cut : MOE
113. Checks : STEMS
114. Certain break point : AD OUT
115. Cries of approval : YAYS
116. Division in geology : EON

Down

1. Small balls : BBS
2. Graveside container : URN
3. Attire for the Bond villain Ernst Stavro Blofeld : MAO SUIT
4. Author Morrison : TONI
5. Director of the “M*A*S*H” finale : ALDA
6. Simple top : TEE
7. Skillful : ADROIT
8. Delayed : LATE
9. Weights, informally : IRON
10. Court do-over : LET
11. Parallels : ANALOGS
12. Islamic state : CALIPHATE
13. Copycats : APERS
14. Short time, for short : SEC
15. Manta ray, by another name : SEA DEVIL
16. “The Crucible,” for McCarthyism : ALLEGORY
17. Mustard and saffron : YELLOWS
19. One living off the land : HUNTER-GATHERER
23. “Why am I not surprised?” : WHAT ELSE IS NEW?
25. “Darn!” : RATS!
28. Drive : MOTOR
31. ___ Store : APP
32. Mate for Bambi : DOE
33. Supervised : RAN
37. Milhouse’s toon friend : BART
38. Dashboard warnings, informally : IDIOT LIGHTS
39. Imaginary : NOT REAL
40. Partner of smash : GRAB
41. “Kung Fu” actor Philip : AHN
43. Fruit juice brand : POM
45. Basically what was said : WORDS TO THAT EFFECT
47. Boxer upset in the biopic “Cinderella Man” : BAER
48. Golfer Aoki : ISAO
49. Nordic native : FINN
50. Soothing succulent : ALOE
51. Explorers and Expeditions : SUVS
52. Fair : EVEN
55. Journalist Nellie : BLY
57. The Great ___ (Satan) : TEMPTER
58. ___-Soviet : SINO
59. Cartoon in which one cow says to another “Hey, wait a minute! This is grass! We’ve been eating grass!” : THE FAR SIDE
60. Climb : RISE
61. View from a pew : APSE
62. Free TV spot, for short : PSA
64. Taiwanese computer giant : ACER
65. It might be topped with guacamole : TACO
66. Tic ___ (mints) : TACS
71. Give (out) : METE
73. Modernists, for short : NEOS
74. Internet connection inits. : DSL
75. Sandal-less, say : BAREFOOT
76. Score starter : OVERTURE
77. Shepherd’s scene : LEA
79. Great Plains tribe : OSAGE
81. Bribes : PAYOFFS
82. Sent up : SPOOFED
83. Nutrition fig. : RDA
84. “I’ll cover this” : IT’S ON ME
85. Nonsense : ROT
86. H.S. courses for college credit : APS
88. Suffix with large numbers : -AIRE
89. 17-year-old Peace Nobelist Yousafzai : MALALA
90. In too curious a manner : NOSILY
93. Composes : CALMS
98. Fancy French home : CHATEAU
99. Once, once : ERST
100. The Bravest in the Big Apple, for short : FDNY
101. N.L. Central squad : REDS
103. Ingredient in a Bali Hai cocktail : RUM
104. Certain tech exec : CIO
106. Actress Long : NIA
107. Tender sound : COO
108. Currency with denominations of 1,000, 5,000 and 10,000 : YEN

18 thoughts on “0909-18 NY Times Crossword 9 Sep 18, Sunday”

  1. 36:15, no errors. Clever theme. Wasn’t sure how to handle the rebus squares, ended up putting “LOVE” in all four, and the app was okay with that.

  2. 28:21 I was bouncing around at first trying to get going which ended up helping because I got the revealer pretty early on. Overall I thought this was a good Sunday.

  3. 35:24…most of which was figuring out the theme. I went right to the reveal which helped. FOUR LEAF C L/H R was my aha moment. Good story about Gary Larson’s insect. I put “LOVE/HATE” in the rebus squares and the app took it.

    @bellecurve –
    I tend to agree with you..BATTING GLOVES are gloves worn on a baseball diamond and there are usually a pair of them worn, but the wording seems off to me as well. “A pair on a diamond” would have made more sense to me. Regardless, it’s a baseball reference.

    Just checked – Diamond is indeed a brand name of batting gloves so a pair of Diamond batting gloves, I suppose, is the reference. However, if that’s the case, wouldn’t “diamond” be capitalized?

    Best –

  4. This puzzle was relatively easy to solve but it must have been a bear to create. Where did the author get the idea from? After he thought of the first example, how did he develop the rest? What convinced him that it was possible? (He must have tried a number of similar ideas TIC/TAC, … LIVE/LEARN and failed.) What made him think that Shortz would take a puzzle with only four interesting squares? Did Shortz think of circling the four squares? How do solvers come up with the gimmick? Most of us did but it’s hard to figure out how we did it.
    How does Shortz control the difficulty of puzzles like this?
    And one more: Are there crosword puzzles in Mandarin?

    1. I also couldn’t imagine how this puzzle was created! Wow. All great questions that you asked. Wonder if you’ll get any answers…

    2. Constructors start with themes on grids, which are basically written by the constructor. For this one, it was the LOVE/HATE rebus cross which the constructor develops a set that will fit across the grid and answer to the rules, along with the revealer. That information is set into the grid first. And then the rest of the fill is built in around it. This is pretty much how all crossword grids are made.

  5. One hour and 22 min. With no errors.
    I knew love hate was the rebus I just didn’t know where to put 2 of them.
    It still blows my mind how someone can put this together and make it work. Hats off to you.

  6. 34:15, no errors. Bill’s explanation for ARLO Guthrie sent me to Wikipedia, certain that ‘Alice’s Restaurant’ would have been a Top 40 hit. Learned that, due the almost 20 minute length of the song, it could not be released as a single on a 45 RPM record. It therefore did not qualify for Top 40 record sales.

  7. Would like to say I loved this puzzle because the LOVE part came early and easy with FOUR LEAF CLOVER. Finding the other loves was not as easy and took some time. Most notably, wanted “battery mates” (pitcher and catcher), which didn’t work but made more sense to me, instead of BATTING GLOVES. Missed the HATE part altogether, and did not finish.

  8. Really liked this puzzle and felt a sense of accomplishment when I finally finished. Will not reveal my time for reasons of pride!

  9. I became so frustrated with this thing, I nearly hurled it out the window — a move which the other airline passengers certainly would not have appreciated.

    I blame lack of sleep and other factors related to jet lag. Now I understand the theme, at least, but the inconsistently phrased clue/answer about baseball diamonds compelled me to give up on this puzzle for today. Maybe I’ll try again tomorrow … or maybe I’ll just repeatedly smash my thumb with a hammer instead.

  10. The rest of you are more advanced solvers than I, and, personally I hate these rebus puzzles. If I had known this was one, I wouldn’t have invested a couple of hours in it. I had about 90%.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.