0619-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 19 Jun 2018, Tuesday

Constructed by: Peter Gordon
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Reveal Answer: Trigger Warning

Themed answers each include a weapon that features a TRIGGER:

  • 26D. With 25-Down, caution before a potentially upsetting lecture … or a hint to 19- and 59-Across and 7-Down? : TRIGGER …
  • 25D. See 26-Down : … WARNING
  • 19A. Sits in the front passenger seat : RIDES SHOTGUN
  • 59A. Do a hurried search in : RIFLE THROUGH
  • 7D. Candy with a comic, once : BAZOOKA BUBBLEGUM

Bill’s time: 7m 15s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

7. ___-relief : BAS

In bas-relief, an image projects just a little above the background, as in perhaps a head depicted on a coin.

15. Ingredient in jerk sauce : ALLSPICE

The spice known as “allspice” was given its name in the early seventeenth century as it flavor was said to resemble a combination of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. In fact, allspice is made from dried berries of the Pimenta dioica tree.

Jerk chicken is a Jamaican dish in which the meat is prepared with a hot spice mixture that is used as a marinade or a dry rub. There is a suggestion that the term “jerk” comes from the Quechuan word “ch’arki” meaning “dried, salted meat”. The same Quechuan word is the root of our term “jerky” meaning “lean, dried meat”.

17. Hall-of-Fame QB Johnny : UNITAS

Footballer Johnny Unitas was nicknamed “the Golden Arm” as well as “Johnny U”. Unitas played in the fifties through the seventies, mainly for the Baltimore Colts. He held the record for throwing touchdown passes in consecutive games (47 games) for 52 years, until it was surpassed in 2012 by Drew Brees.

18. Hit 2016 animated film with the tagline “Welcome to the urban jungle” : ZOOTOPIA

“Zootopia” is a 2016 Disney animated film about a rabbit police officer and a red fox con artist who team up to uncover a bizarre conspiracy.

21. Vice president Agnew : SPIRO

Spiro Agnew served as Vice-President under Richard Nixon, before becoming the only VP in American history to resign because of criminal charges (there was a bribery scandal). Agnew was also the first Greek-American to serve as US Vice President as he was the son of a Greek immigrant who had shortened the family name from Anagnostopoulos.

31. “___ Breckinridge” (Gore Vidal novel) : MYRA

Even today, Gore Vidal’s 1968 novel “Myra Breckinridge” is considered controversial. I haven’t read it, but I understand it addresses transsexuality and other sexual practices usually considered to be outside the norm. There was a movie version of the novel made in 1970, with Raquel Welch in the title role.

35. Church nook : APSE

The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally, apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

37. East Germany: Abbr. : DDR

The former East Germany was known officially as the German Democratic Republic (GDR), or Deutsche Demokratische Republik (DDR).

39. Pugilists’ org. : WBA

World Boxing Association (WBA)

“Pugilism”, another word for “boxing”, comes from the Latin “pugil” meaning “boxer”. In turn, “pugil” derives from “pugnus”, the word for “fist”.

42. Like moussaka and souvlaki : GREEK

Moussaka is a delicious dish from the Balkans that uses eggplant or potato as a base. The dish often includes ground meat, particularly lamb.

Souvlaki is a “fast food” from Greece consisting of meat (often lamb) grilled on a skewer, and sometimes served in a pita sandwich.

43. Cabinet dept. led by Ben Carson beginning in 2017 : HUD

The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has its roots in the “Great Society” program of President Lyndon Johnson. HUD’s mission is to address the housing needs of the citizenry at the national level. HUD can provide mortgage insurance to help people become homeowners and also provide rental subsidies to lower-income families. HUD also is responsible for enforcement of Federal Fair Housing laws.

Ben Carson is a neurosurgeon who made an unsuccessful bid to become the Republican candidate for US president in the 2016 primaries. Subsequently, Carson became Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in President Trump’s administration. He is also a lacto-ovo vegetarian, a decision that Dr. Carson made out of concern for his health.

44. Company that created Pong : ATARI

Do you remember the arcade video game that was like a game of tennis, with paddles moving up and down to hit what looked like a ball, over what looked like a net? Well, that was Pong. The arcade version of Pong was introduced in 1972, with Atari selling a home version through Sears for the Christmas market in 1975.

48. Anne Hathaway’s role in “Becoming Jane” : AUSTEN

Actress Anne Hathaway is a favorite of mine, I must say. She starred in “The Devil Wears Prada” in 2006 and in 2007’s “Becoming Jane”, a film I particularly enjoyed.

49. Birds that lay big green eggs : EMUS

Emu eggs are very large, with a thick shell that is dark-green in color. One emu egg weighs about the same as a dozen chicken eggs.

53. One 10-millionth of a joule : ERG

An erg is a unit of mechanical work or energy. It is a small unit, with one joule comprising 10 million ergs. it has been suggested that an erg is about the amount of energy required for a mosquito to take off. The term comes from “ergon”, the Greek word for work.

54. Speakers’ platforms : ROSTRA

A rostrum (plural “rostra”) is an elevated platform, particularly one for public speaking. The original rostrum was the platform used by public speakers in the Forum of ancient Rome.

56. Things loafers lack : LACES

The loafer slip-on shoe dates back to 1939. “Loafer” was originally a brand name introduced by the Fortnum and Mason’s store in London. The derivative term “penny loafer” arose in the late fifties or early sixties, although the exact etymology seems unclear.

68. French painter Henri known for “The Sleeping Gypsy” : ROUSSEAU

Henri Rousseau was a French Post-Impressionist painter. He was self-taught, only starting to paint seriously in his forties. He worked as a tax collector until he was 49 years old, when he retired to focus on his art. Rousseau’s most famous painting is “The Sleeping Gypsy”, a celebrated work that depicts a lion standing beside a sleeping woman in the moonlight. You can take a look at it in New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

69. A political refugee might seek it : ASYLUM

Asylum (plural “asyla”) is a Latin word meaning “sanctuary”.

70. “Three up, three down” threesome : OUTS

That would be baseball.

71. Rum ___ Tugger (“Cats” cat) : TUM

Rum Tum Tugger is one of the characters in T. S. Eliot’s “Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats”. Rum Tum Tugger also appears in the Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “Cats”, the musical based on Eliot’s book. In the musical, Rum Tum Tugger’s persona was written as a homage to Mick Jagger of Rolling Stones. So, the character tends to strut around the stage a lot.

Down

2. Writer Morrison : TONI

The writer Toni Morrison won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993. Amongst other things, Morrison is noted for coining the phrase “our first black President”, a reference to President Bill Clinton.

3. Litmus paper reddener : ACID

The “opposite” of an acid is a base. Acids turn litmus paper red, and bases turn it blue. Acids and bases react with each other to form salts. An important subset of the chemicals called bases are the alkalis, the hydroxides of the alkali metals and of ammonium. The term “alkali” is sometimes used interchangeably with “base”, especially if that base is readily soluble in water.

5. Fastener on a manila envelope : CLASP

Manila folders and envelopes were originally made from manila hemp, hence the name.

6. Mercenary for the British in the Revolutionary War : HESSIAN

The Hessians were German regiments that fought for the British during the American Revolutionary War. They took their name from the homeland of about one third of the men, i.e. Hesse-Kassel.

7. Candy with a comic, once : BAZOOKA BUBBLEGUM

The Bazooka brand of bubble gum was introduced by the Topps Company soon after the end of WWII. Bazooka have included comic strips in the wrappers for their gum since the early to mid-fifties. The hero of the strip is Bazooka Joe, a young man who wears an eyepatch.

10. George Ferris, for the Ferris wheel : EPONYM

An eponym is a name for something derived from the name of a person, as in the food item we call a “sandwich”, named for the Earl of Sandwich.

The first Ferris Wheel was built for the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. That wheel was designed and constructed by George Washington Gale Ferris, Jr. who lent his name to wheels built from then on.

11. ChapStick target : LIP

ChapStick is a brand of lip balm produced by Pfizer, although it is so popular that the term tends to be used generically. ChapStick was invented way back in the 1880s by a Dr. Charles Browne Fleet in Lynchburg, Virginia.

12. Verizon acquisition of 2006 : MCI

MCI was a giant telecom company that suffered a similar fate to Enron, and around about the same time. MCI’s stock price fell in 2000 and in maneuvers designed to protect the price, the company committed illegal acts. The larger-than-life CEO back then, Bernie Ebbers, is now serving a 25-year sentence in Louisiana.

16. Phaser setting : STUN

A MASER is a device that was around long before LASERs came into the public consciousness. A MASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) is similar to a LASER, but microwaves are emitted rather than light waves. When the storyline for “Star Trek” was being developed, the writers introduced a weapon called a “phaser”, with the name “phaser” derived from PHoton mASER.

26. With 25-Down, caution before a potentially upsetting lecture … or a hint to 19- and 59-Across and 7-Down? : TRIGGER …
(25. See 26-Down : … WARNING)

A trauma trigger is a stimulus that causes a person to recall some prior psychological trauma. The derivative term “trigger warning” describes an alert at the beginning of a work that warns of content that might be upsetting to some readers or viewers.

27. Italian resort on the Mediterranean : SAN REMO

The Italian city of San Remo sits on the Mediterranean, right on the border with France. In Italian the city is named Sanremo, just one word, although the spelling of “San Remo” dates back to ancient times.

36. Jacob’s twin : ESAU

Esau, was the grandson of Abraham and the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When Esau was born to Isaac and Rebekah, the event was described “Now the first came forth, red all over like a hairy garment”. Esau is portrayed later in life as being very different from his brother Jacob, as a hunter and someone who loves the outdoor life.

58. Some Japanese-made TVs : SONYS

Sony was founded by Akio Morita and Masaru Ibuka as Tokyo Tsushin Kogyo (Tokyo Telecommunications Engineering Corporation). The two partners met in the Japanese Navy during WWII.

60. Waikiki party : LUAU

Waikiki is a neighborhood of Honolulu, and home to the famous Waikiki Beach. The name “Waikiki” means “spouting fresh water” in Hawaiian.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Shirt stiffener : STARCH
7. ___-relief : BAS
10. Classic street liners : ELMS
14. Site : LOCALE
15. Ingredient in jerk sauce : ALLSPICE
17. Hall-of-Fame QB Johnny : UNITAS
18. Hit 2016 animated film with the tagline “Welcome to the urban jungle” : ZOOTOPIA
19. Sits in the front passenger seat : RIDES SHOTGUN
21. Vice president Agnew : SPIRO
22. “Be that as it may …” : ANYHOW …
26. Cough syrup amt. : TSP
29. Invite to enter : ASK IN
31. “___ Breckinridge” (Gore Vidal novel) : MYRA
32. Morsel in trail mix : RAISIN
35. Church nook : APSE
37. East Germany: Abbr. : DDR
38. Bury : INTER
39. Pugilists’ org. : WBA
40. Tornado alert : SIREN
42. Like moussaka and souvlaki : GREEK
43. Cabinet dept. led by Ben Carson beginning in 2017 : HUD
44. Company that created Pong : ATARI
45. Prefix with political and science : GEO-
46. Thick slice : SLAB
48. Anne Hathaway’s role in “Becoming Jane” : AUSTEN
49. Birds that lay big green eggs : EMUS
51. Glower in a hearth : EMBER
53. One 10-millionth of a joule : ERG
54. Speakers’ platforms : ROSTRA
56. Things loafers lack : LACES
59. Do a hurried search in : RIFLE THROUGH
64. Short, stocky person, figuratively : FIREPLUG
67. Accomplish schemingly : WANGLE
68. French painter Henri known for “The Sleeping Gypsy” : ROUSSEAU
69. A political refugee might seek it : ASYLUM
70. “Three up, three down” threesome : OUTS
71. Rum ___ Tugger (“Cats” cat) : TUM
72. Emphatic affirmative : YES YES!

Down

1. Speak indistinctly : SLUR
2. Writer Morrison : TONI
3. Litmus paper reddener : ACID
4. Hotel posting : RATES
5. Fastener on a manila envelope : CLASP
6. Mercenary for the British in the Revolutionary War : HESSIAN
7. Candy with a comic, once : BAZOOKA BUBBLEGUM
8. Boatloads : A LOT
9. “Just do it” and “Coke is it!” : SLOGANS
10. George Ferris, for the Ferris wheel : EPONYM
11. ChapStick target : LIP
12. Verizon acquisition of 2006 : MCI
13. Where the buoys are : SEA
16. Phaser setting : STUN
20. 12:00 and 1:00: Abbr. : HRS
23. Supply water to : HYDRATE
24. One who says “I’ll have …” : ORDERER
25. See 26-Down : … WARNING
26. With 25-Down, caution before a potentially upsetting lecture … or a hint to 19- and 59-Across and 7-Down? : TRIGGER …
27. Italian resort on the Mediterranean : SAN REMO
28. Deserving sorrow and compassion : PITEOUS
30. Apple tablet : IPAD
33. “Comprende?” : SEE?
34. Bugs : IRKS
36. Jacob’s twin : ESAU
39. Sound of an impact : WHAM!
41. “___ a living” : IT’S
47. Paper handout : LEAFLET
48. Curved entrance : ARCHWAY
50. Accent : STRESS
52. End a fast : EAT
55. Tears : RIPS
57. Clear the board : ERASE
58. Some Japanese-made TVs : SONYS
60. Waikiki party : LUAU
61. “Things might get ___” : UGLY
62. Sticky stuff : GLUE
63. Clothing lines : HEMS
64. Big do, informally : FRO
65. Debtor’s letters : IOU
66. Boring routine : RUT

12 thoughts on “0619-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 19 Jun 2018, Tuesday”

  1. 17:37. Had a harder time than you guys above. In retrospect I can’t figure out what slowed me down. I appreciated the BAZOOKA BUBBLE GUM reference, but I would have liked a Bazooka Joe reference. The grid was 16×15 because of it.

    Best –

  2. 7:20, no errors. Even though my time was slower than yesterday, it felt like I was filling boxes faster. Being able to fill in BAZOOKA BUBBLEGUM (my generation) after only 3 entries was a big boost. Always enjoy visiting this blog to see what Bill saw, and I missed. Did not catch onto the gun related theme at all.

  3. 8:01, no errors, no issues. Why can’t we have more straightforward grids like this on a regular basis?

  4. No errors. Re: Bill’s comment about how penny loafers got their name. I searched it a little and found quite a bit of explanation. But I did notice that a lot of that info was incorrect. For example, it said the term came about in the 60’s. It actually goes back at least to the 50’s. From my own recollections they are called penny loafers from the practice of inserting a penny into the tight pocket strap opening. The penny did not serve any purpose other than just being a “cool” thing to do. The fad wore off in about a year and then you were “square” if you still put a penny in your loafers.

    1. My recollection is similar to @Dale. A little bit of research on Wikipedia for “Slip-on Shoes” revealed the following trivia bits: introduced in 1936 “G.H. Bass of Wilton, Maine launched a loafer called the ‘Weejun’. It became very popular in the U.S, especially among prep school students, who kept pennies in the saddle slot for pay phone calls. Hence the name ‘penny loafers’.” The defining design feature: “Leather ‘saddle’ strap across upper, with cut out big enough to hold a penny.”

      1. @Bruce—-There was also a rock and roll song (not a very good one) entitled “Penny Loafers and Bobby Socks”. That song was released in 1957 at the height of the trend.

  5. Dale ~ Agree with you on when the loafers became a game – early 50s. Didn’t have to search further than memory. In the same high school years, DA hairstyles and the challenge among guys to sneak up on another guy and rip the red Levi tag from his jeans. Think Buick had circular hood ornaments a guy could twist off and give to his girlfriend to wear. Sock hops were fun and nondestructive (socks didn’t scrape the floor surface). Carla

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