0610-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 10 Jun 2018, Sunday

Constructed by: Ruth Bloomfield Margolin
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: Rush Hour Headaches

Today’s themed answers sound like common phrases, but actually refer to the transportation situations:

  • 23A. Lane restricted to allow motorcades through? : CHUTE FOR THE STARS (from “shoot for the stars”)
  • 36A. Pressing and shoving me as I enter the subway? : CRAMPING MY STILE (from “cramping my style”)
  • 55A. Highway obstructed by accidents, detours and construction? : ROUTE OF ALL EVIL (from “root of all evil”)
  • 82A. Took public transportation while one’s wheels were at the shop? : BUSSED YOUR BUTT (from “bust your butt”)
  • 98A. “This tollbooth line will make me late!”? : I NEED TO LOSE WAIT (from “I need to lose weight”)
  • 116A. Split an Uber? : PAY YOUR FARE SHARE (from “pay your fair share”)
  • 15D. Get to Grand Central right at 5:00? : MAKE THE TEEM (from “make the team”)
  • 66D. “I’m scared by the speed you’re going in this traffic!”? : GIMME A BRAKE! (from “gimme a break!”)

Bill’s time: 22m 21s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

11. U.K. V.I.P. : QEII

Princess Elizabeth became queen Elizabeth II in 1952 when her father, King George VI died. The Princess was on an official visit to Kenya when her husband broke the news to her, that she had become queen. When she was crowned in 1953 in Westminster Abbey, it was the first coronation to be televised. Queen Elizabeth’s reign is longest in the history of the UK.

19. Baby’s woe : COLIC

Baby colic is a condition in which a baby cries for no apparent reason for extended periods. At least one study has shown that breastfed babies are about half as likely to suffer from colic.

20. Nap for a loafer? : SUEDE

Suede is leather made from the underside of the skin, mainly from a lamb. As such it is very soft, although not as durable as leather made from the exterior skin. The soft leather was, and is still used for making gloves. Back in 1859 these gloves were called “gants de Suede” in France, or “gloves of Sweden”. So, the name “suede” comes from the French word for Sweden.

The loafer slip-on shoe dates back to 1939. “Loafer” was originally a brand name introduced by the Fortnum and Mason’s store in London. The derivative term “penny loafer” arose in the late fifties or early sixties, although the exact etymology seems unclear.

21. “Cien ___ de Soledad” (Gabriel García Márquez novel) : ANOS

“One Hundred Years of Solitude” (“Cien años de soledad” in Spanish) is a 1967 novel by Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez.

22. Bailiwick : AREA

“Bailiwick” is a word dating back to the mid-1600s. The term originally meant “district of a bailiff”.

27. Jerry’s adversary, in cartoons : TOM

“Tom and Jerry” is a series of cartoons produced by William Hanna and Joseph Barbera starting in 1940. These short films feature Tom Cat and Jerry Mouse who are always going at it, with Jerry usually emerging victorious.

28. ___ colada : PINA

“Piña colada” is a Spanish term which translates into “strained pineapple”. The piña colada cocktail was introduced in the Caribe Hilton San Juan in 1954, and since 1978 it has been the official beverage of Puerto Rico. Yum …

30. Early online forum : USENET

Remember the good old days, when you read messages online in “newsgroups”? Well, that system of aggregating public messages is known as Usenet, and it’s still around today. Usenet started operating in 1980, some ten years before the World Wide Web was introduced (which system has displaced Usenet in terms of popularity). Usenet definitely played a significant part in the history of the Internet. For instance, the terms “FAQ” and “spam” were both born on Usenet.

32. Honolulu’s historic ___ Palace : IOLANI

The ‘Iolani Palace in downtown Honolulu is unique within this country. It is the only royal palace in the US that was used as an official residence by a reigning monarch. The Kingdom of Hawaii was overthrown in 1893 so the palace was used by successive governments even after Hawaii was awarded statehood in 1959. The palace has been a public museum since 1978.

36. Pressing and shoving me as I enter the subway? : CRAMPING MY STILE (from “cramping my style”)

A stile is a structure allowing people to pass over or through a fence, while at the same time preventing livestock from escaping. The derivative term “turnstile” describes a revolving structure in a wall or fence that allows the controlled passage of people.

41. Sounds before sneezes : AHS

Ah…..choo!

42. Word repeated by Romeo in “As mine on ___, so ___ is set on mine” : HERS

William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” doesn’t end well for the title characters. Juliet takes a potion as a ruse to fool her parents, to trick them into thinking she is dead. The potion puts her in a death-like coma for 24 hours, after which Juliet plans to awaken and run off with Romeo. Juliet’s sends a message to Romeo apprising him of the plan, but the message fails to arrive. Romeo hears of Juliet’s “death”, and grief-stricken he takes his own life by drinking poison. Juliet awakens from the coma, only to find her lover dead beside her. She picks up a dagger and commits suicide. And nobody lives happily ever after …

43. Brown v. Board of Education city : TOPEKA

Brown v. Board of Education was the US Supreme Court Case that established the unconstitutionality of separate public schools for black and white students. Oliver L. Brown was one of thirteen parents who filed a class action suit against the Topeka, Kansas Board of Education on behalf of their twenty children. The suit called for the city to reverse its racial segregation policy. The final decision by the US Supreme Court, led by Chief Justice Earl Warren, was unanimous in rejecting segregation.

51. New Haven collegian : ELI

Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut was founded in 1701, making it the third-oldest university in the US. Originally called the Collegiate School, it was renamed to Yale University in honor of retired merchant Elihu Yale, who made generous contributions to the institution. Yale University’s nickname is “Old Eli”, in a nod to the benefactor.

52. Mousetrap brand : D-CON

d-Con is a line of rodent control products that has been around for over 50 years.

54. Take a hit : TOKE

“Toke” is a slang term for a puff on a marijuana cigarette, or on a pipe containing the drug.

61. East Berlin’s land: Abbr. : DDR

The former East Germany was known officially as the German Democratic Republic (GDR), or Deutsche Demokratische Republik (DDR).

66. Rope for strangulation : GARROTE

The handheld weapon known as a garrote (also “garotte”) was particular associated with murderers and robbers harassing travelers in India. These felons were known locally as “thuggees” (from the Hindi word for “thief”). This gave us our contemporary word “thug”, meaning “brute”.

74. Title kitten in a Key and Peele action comedy : KEANU

The Comedy Central sketch show “Key & Peele” stars comics Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele. The duo also wrote an action comedy film called “Keanu” that was released in 2016. The title character is a cat belonging to the boss of a drug cartel. Haven’t seen it …

77. Youth org. since 1910 : BSA

As every little boy (of my era) knows, the Scouting movement was founded by Lord Baden Powell, in 1907. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) soon followed, in 1910. And, the Boy Scouts motto is “Be Prepared”.

80. They sit in front of a cox : OARMEN

The coxswain of a boat is one in charge of steering and navigation. The word “coxswain” is shortened to “cox”, particularly when used for the person steering and calling out the stroke in a competition rowing boat.

86. City near Provo : OREM

Orem, Utah was originally known as “Sharon” (a Biblical name), then “Provo Bench”, and in 1914 it was given the family name of a local railroad operator called “Orem”. Orem gave itself the nickname “Family City USA” and sure enough in 2010, “Forbes” rated Orem the 5th best place in the country to raise a family.

89. Grp. with a co-pay : HMO

Health Maintenance Organization (HMO)

91. “Star-bellied” Seussian creature : SNEETCH

Dr. Seuss’s “The Sneetches and Other Stories” was first published in 1961. The collection comprises four stories in all: “The Sneetches”, “The Zax”, “Too Many Daves” and “What Was I Scared Of?”

93. Net fisher : SEINER

A seine is a type of fishing net. It is long and thin, with floats along one long edge (the top) and weights along the bottom edge so that it hangs down in the water. A seine is usually paid out into the water from a boat called a seiner, as the vessel moves slowly in a circle driving fish into the center of the net.

96. Song lead-in to “di” or “da” : OB-LA-

“Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” is one of many songs credited to Lennon/McCartney that was actually written by just one of the pair. Paul McCartney wrote this one, a song that John Lennon really did not like at all. Apparently, Lennon was quite obstructionist during the recording of the song and even walked out at one point.

103. Portal in “Alice in Wonderland” : RABBIT HOLE

The White Rabbit is a character who appears at the very start of Lewis Carroll’s novel “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”. Alice sees the White Rabbit checking his watch and mumbling “Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!” Alice then follows him down the rabbit hole and into Wonderland.

106. Shellac and myrrh : RESINS

Shellac is a resin that comes, not from plants, but from the female lac bug that inhabits forests of India and Thailand. The resin is dissolved in alcohol and sold as shellac. Shellac is used today mainly as a wood finish, but it can also be used as a food glaze. Vegans, beware …

Frankincense and myrrh are both tree resins that are exuded when certain species of tree are damaged. The harvested resins are used to make essentials oils for perfumes, and are also burned to give off a pleasant fragrance.

107. Rule against singing : OMERTA

“Omertà” is a code of honor in southern Italian society. The term has been adopted by the Mafia to mean a code of silence designed to prevent a Mafioso from becoming an informer. For example, the famous Joe Valachi was someone who broke the code of silence in 1963, informing on the New York Mafia. Valachi’s story was told in the movie “The Valachi Papers”, with Charles Bronson playing the lead.

115. Where Scarlett got a letter? : TARA

The last lines in Margaret Mitchell’s novel “Gone With the Wind” are spoken by Scarlett O’Hara:

“Tara! Home. I’ll go home, and I’ll think of some way to get him back! After all, tomorrow is another day!”

121. Last thing said before eating? : AMEN

A grace is a short prayer recited before or after a meal.

122. Washington, but not Jefferson : STATE

Washington has been nicknamed “the Evergreen State” since 1890, when the moniker was proposed by journalist turned real estate tycoon Charles Tallmadge Conover. The nickname has never been adopted officially, although it does appear on Washington state license plates. The name is a reference to the abundance of evergreen trees in the state’s forests.

123. Any local in “The Music Man” : IOWAN

“The Music Man” is a musical by Meredith Willson. The show was a big hit on Broadway in 1957. “The Music Man” won the first ever Grammy Award for the “Best Original Cast Album”. The show is set in the fictional River City, Iowa.

127. Alternating-current motor inventor : TESLA

Nikola Tesla was born in Serbia, but later moved to the US. Tesla’s work on mechanical and electrical engineering was crucial to the development of alternating current technology, the same technology that is used by equipment at the backbone of modern power generation and distribution systems.

Down

2. Home of many Big Apple galleries : SOHO

The Manhattan neighborhood known today as SoHo was very fashionable in the early 1900s, but as the well-heeled started to move uptown the area became very run down and poorly maintained. Noted for the number of fires that erupted in derelict buildings, SoHo earned the nickname “Hell’s Hundred Acres”. The area was then zoned for manufacturing and became home to many sweatshops. In the mid-1900s artists started to move into open loft spaces and renovating old buildings as the lofts were ideal locations in which an artist could both live and work. In 1968, artists and others organized themselves so that they could legalize their residential use of an area zoned for manufacturing. The group they formed took its name from the name given to the area by the city’s Planning Commission i.e “South of Houston”. This was shortened from So-uth of Ho-uston to SoHo as in the SoHo Artists Association, and the name stuck.

4. Alma mater of Wm. Hewlett of Hewlett-Packard : MIT

The giant multinational called HP (originally Hewlett-Packard) was founded in 1939 with an investment of $538, in a one-car garage in Palo Alto, California by Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard. The company name would have been Packard-Hewlett if Dave Packard had won a coin toss!

6. Like the “s” in “aisle” : ASONANT

In phonetics, a letter or syllable that is “sonant” is voiced, whereas an “assonant” (also “asonant”) letter is not voiced.

9. Condition for some distracted kids, for short : ADHD

The “official” name for the condition we sometimes still refer to as “attention deficit disorder” (ADD) is “attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder” (ADHD).

11. Like some oil money : QATARI

Qatar is a sovereign state in the Middle East occupying the Qatar Peninsula, itself located in the Arabian Peninsula. Qatar lies on the Persian Gulf and shares one land border, with Saudi Arabia to the south. Qatar has more oil and gas reserves per capita of population than any other country in the world. In 2010, Qatar had the fastest growing economy in the world, driven by the petrochemical industry. Qatar is scheduled to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, although the nation’s eligibility to do so is under question after a far-reaching bribery scandal was uncovered at the sport’s governing body.

12. Canine coat? : ENAMEL

Tooth enamel covers the crowns of our teeth. Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body. It is composed of 96% crystalline calcium phosphate.

14. Time release : ISSUE

“Time” magazine has a readership of about 25 million, making it the largest-circulation weekly news magazine in the world.

15. Get to Grand Central right at 5:00? : MAKE THE TEEM (from “make the team”)

I guess that would be the throng of commuters at Grand Central.

Grand Central Terminal in New York City is the largest railroad station in the world in terms of the number of platforms (44). Those platforms are all underground, in two levels. The official name for the facility is “Grand Central Terminal”. The name “Grand Central Station” is very common, and is actually the name of the facility that the terminal replaced in 1913.

17. Jason’s wife in myth : MEDEA

In Greek mythology, Medea was the wife of Jason, the heroic leader of the Argonauts. Medea was a sorceress who pledged to help Jason in his search for the Golden Fleece, on condition that he take her as his wife. According to some accounts, Jason left Medea and took up with Glauce, the daughter of the king of Corinth. Medea got her own back by sending Glauce a golden coronet and a dress that were covered with poison. The poison killed Glauce, and her father the king. To further her revenge on Jason, Medea killed two of her own children that were fathered by him.

25. San Francisco : BART :: Philadelphia : ___ : SEPTA

Public transportation in and around Philadelphia is managed by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA).

Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) is a commuter rail system serving the San Francisco Bay Area (and indeed, my home town).

31. Sweater damage : SNAG

Until the early 1880s, the word “sweater” applied to clothing worn specifically for weight reduction by “sweating”.

35. Utah’s ___ Canyon (locale of petroglyphs) : SEGO

Petroglyphs are artistic images carved into rock, and are often associated with prehistoric peoples. The term comes from the Greek “petra” meaning “stone” and “glyphein” meaning “to carve”. The related form of rock art known as “pictographs” are painted onto the rock surface.

38. Pianist Rubinstein : ARTUR

The great Arthur (sometimes “Artur”) Rubinstein was a classical pianist from Poland who became a naturalized American citizen in 1946. Rubenstein was particularly respected as a performer of Chopin’s repertoire.

40. Somewhere over the rainbow they’re blue, in song : SKIES

“Over the Rainbow” is a classic song written especially for the 1939 movie “The Wizard of Oz”. It was sung by the young Judy Garland (Dorothy) in the film, and it was to become her signature song. There is an introductory verse that wasn’t used in the movie, and is very rarely heard:

When all the world is a hopeless jumble
And the raindrops tumble all around,
Heaven opens a magic lane
When all the clouds darken up the skyway,
There’s a rainbow highway to be found
Leading from your window pane
To a place behind the sun,
Just a step beyond the rain.

50. Queen dowager of Jordan : NOOR

Queen Noor is the widow of King Hussein of Jordan. Queen Noor was born Lisa Halaby in Washington, D.C., the daughter of Najeeb Halaby. Her father was appointed by President Kennedy as the head of the Federal Aviation Administration, and later became the CEO of Pan Am. Lisa Halaby met King Hussein in 1977, while working on the design of Jordan’s Queen Alia Airport. The airport was named after King Hussein’s third wife who had been killed that year in a helicopter crash. Halaby and the King were married the next year, in 1978.

Originally, a dowry was money that was set aside by a man for his wife and children, to be used in the event that he passed away. A widow who receives said money was known as a dowager. Over time, “dowry” became a term used for the money, goods or estate that a woman brought into a marriage, and “dowager” came to mean an elderly woman with an elevated social position.

57. Simple life? : AMOEBA

An ameba (or “amoeba”, as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

68. No-nonsense quartet? : ENS

There are four letters N (ens) in the term “no-nonsense”.

70. Pout : MOUE

The term “moue” comes from French, and means “small grimace, pout”.

71. Elton’s johns : LOOS

The use of “john” as a slang term for a toilet is peculiar to North America. “John” probably comes from the older slang term of “jack” or “jakes” that had been around since the 16th century. In Ireland, in less polite moments, we still refer to a toilet as “the jacks”.

73. Special soldier : GREEN BERET

The US Army Special Forces are known as the Green Berets because they wear … green berets. The Green Beret is also worn by the Royal Marines of the British Army. When US Army Rangers and OSS operatives were trained by the Royal Marines in Scotland during WWII, graduates of the gruelling training program were awarded green berets by their British instructors. The US soldiers, although proud of their new headgear, were not allowed to wear it as part of their uniform. They had to wait until 1961, when President Kennedy authorized the green beret for exclusive use by US Special Forces.

78. Certain vodka order, informally : STOLI

Stolichnaya is a brand of “Russian” vodka made from wheat and rye grain. “Stoli” originated in Russia but now it’s made in Latvia. Latvia is of course a completely different country, so you won’t see the word “Russian” on the label.

81. Neighbor of Hond. : NIC

Nicaragua is the largest country in Central America. It lies between Honduras to the north, and Costa Rica to the south. The etymology of the name “Nicaragua” is not very certain. One suggestion is that it is a melding of the name “Nicarao” and “agua”, the Spanish for “water”. Nicarao was the name of the largest city in the area when the Spanish arrived, and it is thought that “agua” refers to the two large lakes: Lake Managua and Lake Nicaragua.

Honduras is a Central American country that used to be known as Spanish Honduras, in order to differentiate it from British Honduras that is now called Belize. “Honduras” is the Spanish word for “the depths”, which is probably a reference to deep coastal waters.

88. ___ Tzu (dog) : SHIH

The Shih Tzu is one of the oldest breeds of dog, a breed that originated in China. Shih Tzus have long hairy coats but they don’t shed.

95. Sister of Snow White : ROSE RED

“Snow White” is a traditional German fairy tale that was published in 1812 in the collection of the Brothers Grimm. There is also a second, very different Grimms’ Fairy Tale called “Snow-White and Rose-Red”, not to be confused with its more famous cousin. In the latter tale, Snow-White and Rose-Red are sisters who get into trouble with a dwarf, but are rescued by a bear who turns into a prince.

100. Comic Boosler : ELAYNE

Elayne Boosler is a stand-up comedian and was one of the first female comedians to have her act aired as a special on cable television. She does have some funny lines, and here’s one that I particularly like:

When women are depressed they either eat or go shopping. Men invade another country.

101. ___ qua non : SINE

“Sine qua non” is a Latin phrase that we use to mean “the essential element or condition”. The literal translation is “without which not”. One might say, for example, “a challenging crossword is the sine qua non of a good newspaper”. Well, crossword fans might say that …

104. Refrigerator handle? : AMANA

The Amana Corporation takes its name from the location of its original headquarters, in Middle Amana, Iowa. Today, the Amana name is very much associated with household appliances. The company was founded in 1934 to manufacture commercial walk-in coolers.

105. Snacks during hora feliz : TAPAS

“Tapa” is the Spanish word for “lid”, and there is no clear rationale for why this word came to be used for an appetizer. There are lots of explanations cited, all of which seem to involve the temporary covering of one’s glass of wine with a plate or item of food to either preserve the wine or give one extra space at the table.

In Spanish, we can go buy drinks during “hora feliz” (happy hour).

110. Mlle., in Managua : SRTA

Managua is the capital city of Nicaragua.

112. House work? : LAWS

That would be the House of Representatives, perhaps.

114. Golden Globe winner Dunham : LENA

Lena Dunham is a co-star in the HBO series “Girls”, and is also the show’s creator. Dunham garnered a lot of attention for herself during the 2012 US Presidential election cycle as she starred in an ad focused on getting out the youth vote. In the spot, she compared voting for the first time with having sex for the first time.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. “Me too” : AS AM I
6. Expert on jingles : ADMAN
11. U.K. V.I.P. : QEII
15. Corp. leadership : MGMT
19. Baby’s woe : COLIC
20. Nap for a loafer? : SUEDE
21. “Cien ___ de Soledad” (Gabriel García Márquez novel) : ANOS
22. Bailiwick : AREA
23. Lane restricted to allow motorcades through? : CHUTE FOR THE STARS (from “shoot for the stars”)
26. Ribs : KIDS
27. Jerry’s adversary, in cartoons : TOM
28. ___ colada : PINA
29. Night vision? : DREAM
30. Early online forum : USENET
32. Honolulu’s historic ___ Palace : IOLANI
34. Current : PRESENT-DAY
36. Pressing and shoving me as I enter the subway? : CRAMPING MY STILE (from “cramping my style”)
41. Sounds before sneezes : AHS
42. Word repeated by Romeo in “As mine on ___, so ___ is set on mine” : HERS
43. Brown v. Board of Education city : TOPEKA
44. Last words of a pep talk, perhaps : GO GET ‘EM
48. Not taking a bow? : ASTERN
51. New Haven collegian : ELI
52. Mousetrap brand : D-CON
54. Take a hit : TOKE
55. Highway obstructed by accidents, detours and construction? : ROUTE OF ALL EVIL (from “root of all evil”)
59. Things sometimes stolen in Hollywood : SCENES
61. East Berlin’s land: Abbr. : DDR
62. Prosperous period : BOOM
63. Standing Rock tribe : SIOUX
65. Pays attention to : HEEDS
66. Rope for strangulation : GARROTE
69. Package sender to an enlistee, maybe : ARMY MOM
71. Kosher : LEGIT
74. Title kitten in a Key and Peele action comedy : KEANU
76. Not stay in the pail, say : SLOP
77. Youth org. since 1910 : BSA
80. They sit in front of a cox : OARMEN
82. Took public transportation while one’s wheels were at the shop? : BUSSED YOUR BUTT (from “bust your butt”)
86. City near Provo : OREM
87. “Time ___ a premium” : IS AT
89. Grp. with a co-pay : HMO
90. Bit of dangly jewelry : EARBOB
91. “Star-bellied” Seussian creature : SNEETCH
93. Net fisher : SEINER
96. Song lead-in to “di” or “da” : OB-LA-
97. Rural turndown : NAW
98. “This tollbooth line will make me late!”? : I NEED TO LOSE WAIT (from “I need to lose weight”)
103. Portal in “Alice in Wonderland” : RABBIT HOLE
106. Shellac and myrrh : RESINS
107. Rule against singing : OMERTA
108. Toodle-oos : TA-TAS
111. Peddle : VEND
112. 😀 : LOL
115. Where Scarlett got a letter? : TARA
116. Split an Uber? : PAY YOUR FARE SHARE (from “pay your fair share”)
120. Fun run length, for short : ONE-K
121. Last thing said before eating? : AMEN
122. Washington, but not Jefferson : STATE
123. Any local in “The Music Man” : IOWAN
124. Matter of interest? : RATE
125. Spot : SITE
126. Like legalized marijuana : TAXED
127. Alternating-current motor inventor : TESLA

Down

1. ___ no. : ACCT
2. Home of many Big Apple galleries : SOHO
3. One with ’18 after one’s name, say : ALUM
4. Alma mater of Wm. Hewlett of Hewlett-Packard : MIT
5. Colorful summer treat : ICE POP
6. Like the “s” in “aisle” : ASONANT
7. Dodge S.U.V. : DURANGO
8. Brave adversary : MET
9. Condition for some distracted kids, for short : ADHD
10. Not e’en once : NE’ER
11. Like some oil money : QATARI
12. Canine coat? : ENAMEL
13. “Hmm, the oven was on. Did ___ didn’t …” : I OR
14. Time release : ISSUE
15. Get to Grand Central right at 5:00? : MAKE THE TEEM (from “make the team”)
16. Tool for a blacksmith : GRINDSTONE
17. Jason’s wife in myth : MEDEA
18. Finger-licking good : TASTY
24. Thread: Prefix : FILI-
25. San Francisco : BART :: Philadelphia : ___ : SEPTA
31. Sweater damage : SNAG
32. “No more for me, thanks” : I’M SET
33. Force onward : IMPEL
35. Utah’s ___ Canyon (locale of petroglyphs) : SEGO
36. Kale alternative : CHARD
37. Fix, as a golf green : RESOD
38. Pianist Rubinstein : ARTUR
39. Rise above the din, say : YELL
40. Somewhere over the rainbow they’re blue, in song : SKIES
45. Carry-___ : ONS
46. Scraped (out) : EKED
47. Cleanup target : MESS
49. Tax ___ : REBATE
50. Queen dowager of Jordan : NOOR
52. ___ Homme (fashion line) : DIOR
53. Awkward : CLUMSY
56. Decision point : FORK
57. Simple life? : AMOEBA
58. Through : VIA
60. “Quantico” actress Priyanka ___ : CHOPRA
64. Prefix with -phone : XYLO-
66. “I’m scared by the speed you’re going in this traffic!”? : GIMME A BRAKE! (from “gimme a break!”)
67. Not sagging at all : TAUT
68. No-nonsense quartet? : ENS
70. Pout : MOUE
71. Elton’s johns : LOOS
72. Bring in : EARN
73. Special soldier : GREEN BERET
75. Did some theater work, casually : USHED
77. Good ol’ boy : BUBBA
78. Certain vodka order, informally : STOLI
79. Up : AT BAT
81. Neighbor of Hond. : NIC
83. Radiate : EMIT
84. Campaign supporter : DONOR
85. Expressive facial features : BROWS
88. ___ Tzu (dog) : SHIH
92. Doofus : TWIT
93. Take care of : SEE TO
94. Put on a pedestal : ELEVATE
95. Sister of Snow White : ROSE RED
99. Delaying response to “Is it time?” : NOT YET
100. Comic Boosler : ELAYNE
101. ___ qua non : SINE
102. Sends a breakup text, say (tsk!) : ENDS IT
103. Helicopter feature : ROTOR
104. Refrigerator handle? : AMANA
105. Snacks during hora feliz : TAPAS
109. N.Z. neighbor : AUST
110. Mlle., in Managua : SRTA
112. House work? : LAWS
113. ___ cavity : ORAL
114. Golden Globe winner Dunham : LENA
117. Friend of Francine : AMI
118. Kind of paper : FAX
119. Help make the bed? : HOE

13 thoughts on “0610-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 10 Jun 2018, Sunday”

  1. 28:16, no errors. There are a couple of pretty serious groaners in the theme answers (but, hey, that’s what puns are all about 😜).

  2. 33:18 Agree with Dave. Lots of groaners. Only slight problem was the area around MOUE. I had MOpE in there for awhile.

    1. That was one of the real groaners. At rush hour, Grand Central Station is TEEMing with people and one might imagine referring to the crowd of commuters there as a TEEM. Mind you, a quick check of several dictionaries didn’t reveal any such “official” definition, so I suppose one could argue that the clue is unfair … but one could also argue that puns don’t have to follow no stinkin’ rules! … 😜

  3. 46:47 and 8 unfilled; just couldn’t figure out all of the stupid puns. Not at all happy with this kind of foolishness. 82A was the worst of the lot: nothing in the clue suggested “your butt”.

  4. 32:49, no errors. Agree that the clueing in today’s puzzle was groan worthy. Surprised that 82A BUSSED YOUR BUTT made it through the editors. Definite stretch in that it makes sense when compared to ‘haul your butt to work’ or ‘get your butt out of here’, where ‘your butt’ is a synonymous with one’s self. Additionally, BUSSED is also the past tense of buss (to kiss), so BUSSED YOUR BUTT could be equally construed to mean ‘kissed your a**’

  5. DNF after 69 minutes and 6 errors. Utterly stupid theme coupled with some nonsensical cluing made this impossible to finish. I wouldn’t doubt this to again be the hardest puzzle of the week.

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