0603-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 3 Jun 2018, Sunday

Constructed by: David J. Kahn
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: Proving Them Wrong

Themed answers are in pairs that cross each other in the grid, one in the across-direction and one in the down-direction. Those pairs spell out the names of baseball TEAMS and cross at a letter I, kind of disproving the axiom that THERE’S NO I IN TEAM. Clever!

  • 20A. Where techno music originated : DETROIT
  • 9D. Aggressive types : TIGERS
  • 25A. Where the Sun shines? : BALTIMORE
  • 15D. Relatives of bobolinks : ORIOLES
  • 112A. Where General Mills is headquartered : MINNESOTA
  • 10D1. Delivery that’s usually expected : TWINS
  • 27D. County name in 30 states : WASHINGTON
  • 49A. Final, countrywide competition : NATIONALS
  • 53D. First U.S. city to host the Olympics : ST LOUIS
  • 78A. Papal conclave members : CARDINALS

Bill’s time: 22m 12s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Overawe : COW

The verb “to cow” means to intimidate, to scare. The exact etymology of the term seems unclear.

4. Things falling out of Vogue? : INSERTS

“Vogue” magazine has been published an awfully long time, with the first issue appearing in 1892. Over the decades the magazine has picked up a lot of criticism as well as its many fans. Famously, an assistant to the editor wrote a novel based on her experiences working with the magazine’s editor, and called it “The Devil Wears Prada”.

11. Words to a Spanish sweetheart : TE AMO

“I love you” translates into “te amo” in Spanish, and into “je t’aime” in French.

19. Atlantic 10 Conf. school : URI

The University of Rhode Island (URI) was chartered as an agricultural school back in 1888. Rhody the Ram was chosen as the school’s mascot in 1923, a nod to URI’s agricultural past. As a result, the school’s sports teams are known as the Rams. URI’s main campus is located in the village of Kingston.

20. Where techno music originated : DETROIT

Techno is a type of electronic dance music that originated in Detroit in the eighties. Techno involves a heavy beat in common time, and what seems to be a lot of repetition. Not for me …

25. Where the Sun shines? : BALTIMORE

Maryland’s largest-circulation newspaper is “The Baltimore Sun”. “The Sun” has been around for a long time, having been founded in 1837.

28. “Star Wars” name : VADER

Darth Vader is (to me) the most colorful antagonist in the “Star Wars” universe. Born as Anakin Skywalker, he was corrupted by the Emperor Palpatine, and turned to “the Dark Side”. IN the original films, Darth Vader was portrayed by English bodybuilder David Prowse, and voiced by actor James Earl Jones. Jones asked that he go uncredited for the first two “Star Wars” films, feeling that his contributions were insufficient to warrant recognition. I disagree …

31. Wee bit : IOTA

Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet, one that gave rise to our letters I and J. We use the word “iota” to portray something very small, as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

33. Sunday delivery: Abbr. : SER

Our word “sermon” comes from the Latin “sermonem” meaning “discourse, talk”. The literal translation of “sermonem” is “a stringing together of words”, from the Latin “serere” meaning “to join”, as in the related word “series”.

34. Woolly ruminant : LLAMA

Many female mammals lick off their newborn. That’s not an option for llamas as their tongues only reach out of their mouths about half an inch. Instead, llama dams nuzzle their young and hum to them.

Animals that “chew the cud” are called ruminants. Ruminants eat vegetable matter but cannot extract any nutritional value from cellulose without the help of microbes in the gut. Ruminants collect roughage in the first part of the alimentary canal, allowing microbes to work on it. The partially digested material (the cud) is regurgitated into the mouth so that the ruminant can chew the food more completely exposing more surface area for microbes to do their work.

37. Fabulous fabulist : AESOP

Aesop is remembered today as a fabulist, a writer of fables. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. Aesop was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

46. Boat that landed on 94-Down : ARK
(94. See 46-Across : ARARAT)

Genesis 6:19-20 states that Noah was instructed to take two animals of every kind into the ark. Later, in Genesis 7:2-3 Noah was instructed to take on board “every clean animal by sevens … male and female, to keep offspring alive on the face of all the earth”. Apparently “extras” (7 rather than 2) were needed for ritual sacrifice.

Mount Ararat is in Turkey. Ararat is a snow-capped, dormant volcano with two peaks. The higher of the two, Greater Ararat, is the tallest peak in the country. Ararat takes its name from a legendary Armenian hero called Ara the Beautiful (or Ara the Handsome). According to the Book of Genesis, Noah’s ark landed on Mount Ararat as the Great Flood subsided.

60. Winner of 11 Grand Slam tennis titles : BORG

Björn Borg is a retired tennis player from Sweden, and a former World No. 1. Borg won 41% of the 27 Grand Slam singles tournaments that he entered, which is a record that stands to the day. He was known for reacting very calmly under pressure on the tennis court and hence earned the nicknames “Ice Man” and “Ice Borg”, which is my personal favorite.

61. Common seasoning for Italian sausage : FENNEL

Fennel is a hardy perennial plant species in the celery family that is used as a herb. It also goes by the name “sweet anise”. Personally, I can’t stand the stuff …

69. “The Handmaid’s Tale” author : ATWOOD

Canadian author Margaret Atwood is best known for her novels. However, Atwood also conceived the idea of the LongPen, a remote robotic writing technology. The LongPen allows a user to write remotely in ink via the Internet. Atwood came up with the idea so that she could remotely attend book signings.

“The Handmaid’s Tale” is a remarkably well-received television adaptation of the 1985 novel of the same name by Margaret Atwood. The story is set in a future United State after a Second American Civil War. The “Handmaids” are the few remaining fertile women in the world, who are ritually raped and forced bear children by their masters.

73. Place in a 1969 western : ETTA

Etta Place is the schoolteacher character played by the lovely Katharine Ross in the 1969 movie “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid”.

83. He said “It’s not bragging if you can back it up” : ALI

Muhammad Ali won 56 professional fights, 37 of which were knockouts. He lost 5 fights, 4 being decisions and one being a technical knockout (TKO). The TKO-loss was Ali’s second-last fight, against Larry Holmes. By the time Ali took on Holmes, he was already showing signs of Parkinson’s Syndrome, although the diagnosis would not come until four years later.

87. Sleep stage : REM

“REM” is an acronym standing for rapid eye movement sleep. REM sleep takes up 20-25% of the sleeping hours and is the period associated with one’s most vivid dreams.

90. Father of Phobos, the god of fear : ARES

The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of bloodlust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos (Fear), Deimos (Terror) and Eros (Desire). Ares was the son of Zeus and Hera, and the Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

102. ___ Minella (Muppet monkey) : SAL

Sal Minella is a Muppet character. He is the bodyguard for fellow muppet Johnny Fiama who is modeled after Frank Sinatra.

105. City ENE of Cleveland, O. : ERIE, PA

Erie is a city in the very north of Pennsylvania, right on the southern shore of Lake Erie. The city takes its name from the Erie Native American tribe that resided in the area. Erie is nicknamed the Gem City, a reference to the “sparkling” water of Lake Erie.

110. Fruit soda brand : FANTA

The soft drink named “Fanta” has quite an interesting history. As WWII approached, the Coca-Cola plant in Germany had trouble obtaining the ingredients it needed to continue production of the cola beverage, so the plant manager decided to create a new drink from what was available. The new beverage was built around whey (left over from cheese production) and pomace (left over after juice has been extracted from fruit). The inventor asked his colleagues to use their “imagination” (“Fantasie” in German) and come up with a name for the drink, so they piped up “Fanta!”

111. Temple of Isis site : ASWAN

The Egyptian city of Aswan lies in the south of the country, on the River Nile. Aswan is famous for its stone quarries, going back to ancient times. The most celebrated granite rock from the area is called syenite. Stone from Aswan was shipped northwards along the Nile and used in the construction of the pyramids. From ancient times right up to 1970, the annual flooding of the Nile was a significant event in Egypt. The flooding allowed the deposition of fertile silt far beyond the banks of the river, helping the region’s agriculture. However, the flooding was unpredictable. So the Aswan Dam was built in the sixties and from 1970 the flooding was brought under control.

117. “Be there in a jiffy!” : ONE SECOND!

“Jiff” or “jiffy”, meaning “short time, instant” is thought originally to be thieves’ slang for “lightning”.

120. Cold War-era inits. : SSR

When the former Soviet Union (USSR) dissolved in 1991, it was largely replaced by the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The formation of the CIS underscored the new reality, that the former Soviet Republics (SSRs) were now independent states. Most of the 15 former SSRs joined the CIS. Notably, the three Baltic SSRs (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania) opted not to join the new commonwealth, and in 2004 joined NATO and the EU.

The term “Cold War” was coined by the novelist George Orwell in a 1945 essay about the atomic bomb. Orwell described a world under threat of nuclear war as having a “peace that is no peace”, in a permanent state of “cold war”. The specific use of “cold war” to describe the tension between the Eastern bloc and the Western allies is attributed to a 1947 speech by Bernard Baruch, adviser to Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

121. Eppie’s adoptive father, in a George Eliot novel : SILAS

“Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe” is a novel written by George Eliot and first published in 1861. There’s an excellent BBC TV version of the tale (shown on PBS) starring Ben Kingsley in the title role, with Patsy Kensit playing Eppie, the young orphaned child that Marner takes under his wing.

122. Suffragist Elizabeth Cady ___ : STANTON

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was one of the earliest leaders of the women’s rights and women’s suffrage movements in the United States. Notably, she opposed the extension of voting rights to African American men (the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments), even though she was an outspoken abolitionist. She believed that increasing the number of male voters in the country would just make it harder for women to get the vote.

Down

2. Winston Churchill, notably : ORATOR

Soon after Winston Churchill took over as Prime Minister of the UK in 1940, he delivered some stirring speeches that rallied the country in the face of German victories right across Europe. The first of these was his “Blood, toil, tears, and sweat” speech as he reported the formation of a new coalition government designed to unite the country in time of war. The second was his “We shall fight on the beaches” speech, as he reported the successful evacuation of Allied troops from Dunkirk. The third speech concluded with, “This was their finest hour”, words delivered to Parliament just as France fell, and Churchill pledged that the British Commonwealth would fight on, alone if necessary. The last lines of this third speech, from this magnificent orator, were:

… But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new dark age made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves, that if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, ‘This was their finest hour’.

5. State since 1864: Abbr. : NEV

The Silver State has been celebrating Nevada Day as an official holiday since 1933. Observed on the last Friday in October, the holiday commemorates the admission of Nevada into the union on October 31, 1864.

6. McQueen or King : STEVE

Apparently Steve McQueen wasn’t the easiest actor to work with, at least as far as directors were concerned. He pretty much had a free rein though, as he was so popular with the public in the seventies (he had the nickname “The King of Cool”). McQueen was the highest paid movie star in 1974.

Stephen King is a remarkably successful author. He has sold well over 350 million copies of his books, with many of them made into hit movies. I’ve tried reading two or three of the novels, and didn’t get too far. I really don’t do horror …

7. Things that corrections correct : ERRATA

“Errata” is the past participle of the Latin word “errare” meaning “to err”. We use “errata” (singular “erratum”) to mean a list of errors that have been noted in some publication.

8. Tour hiree : ROADIE

A roadie is someone who loads, unloads and sets up equipment for musicians on tour, on the “road”.

11. Heavy winds : TUBAS

The tuba is the lowest-pitched of all the brass instruments, and one of the most recent additions to the modern symphony orchestra (usually there is just one tuba included in an orchestral line-up). “Tuba” is the Latin word for “trumpet, horn”. Oom-pah-pah …

12. Maternally related : ENATE

Something that is enate is growing outward, and “enate” is used to describe ancestors related on the mother’s side. Something that is agnate comes from a common source, and “agnate” is used to describe relatives on the father’s side of the family tree.

13. Colleague of Freud : ADLER

Alfred Adler was one of the group of medical professionals that founded the psychoanalytic movement. Today, Adler is less famous than his colleague Sigmund Freud.

15. Relatives of bobolinks : ORIOLES

The songbird called an oriole builds an interesting nest. It is a woven cup-like structure that is suspended from a branch like a hammock.

16. Only African-American to win an Oscar, Tony and Emmy for acting : VIOLA DAVIS

Actress Viola Davis is probably best known on the small screen for playing the lead in the drama “How to Get Away with Murder”. On the big screen, I’d say that her most famous role is the starring role in the 2011 film “The Help”.

17. Relevant, legally : AD REM

The Latin term “ad rem” translates literally as “to the matter”.

22. “Say cheese!” : SMILE

Photographers often instruct us to say “cheese”, to elicit a smile-like expression. Even Japanese photographers use the word “cheese” for the same effect. Bulgarians use the word “zele” meaning “cabbage”. The Chinese say “eggplant”, the Danish “orange”, the Iranians “apple” and the most Latin Americans say “whiskey”.

32. House speaker after Boehner : RYAN

Paul Ryan was a nominee for Vice President in the 2012 election, and was on the Republican ticket with Mitt Romney. Ryan was elected as Speaker of the House of Representatives in 2015 after John Boehner resigned. At 45, Ryan then became the youngest Speaker since 1875.

John Boehner elected Leader of the House of Representatives in 2011, and was the House Minority Leader from 2007 to 2011. Boehner is from Reading, Ohio and grew up in modest circumstances in a two-bedroom house with eleven siblings. After Boehner graduated from university in 1977, he joined a small packaging and plastics business. By the time he resigned to serve in Congress, Boehner had risen to become president of the company.

38. ___ platter : PUPU

In Hawaiian, “pu-pu” is a word originally meaning “snail”. Nowadays “pu-pu” denotes many different types of food that are usually served as an hors d’oeuvres. A “pupu platter” then is a selection of such foods served in a Hawaiian restaurant.

39. “Runaway” singer Shannon, 1961 : DEL

Del Shannon was a rock and roll singer who was born Charles Westover in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Shannon’s big hit is the 1961 classic “Runaway”. Sadly, Shannon suffered depression in his later life, and turned his own rifle on himself in 1990.

44. Novelist Patchett : ANN

Ann Patchett is an author who lives in Nashville, Tennessee. Patchett’s most famous work is probably her novel “Bel Canto”, published in 2001. In 2012, “Time” included her in the magazine’s list of 100 most influential people in the world.

57. “Baseball” documentarian Burns : KEN

Ken Burns directs and produces epic documentary films that usually make inventive use of archive footage. Recent works are the sensational “The War” (about the US in WWII) and the magnificent “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea”, as well as 2014’s “The Roosevelts: An Intimate History”. His latest offering is 2017’s “The Vietnam War”.

58. Half a step? : CHA

The cha-cha-cha (often simplified to “cha-cha”) is a Latin dance with origins in Cuba, where it was introduced by composer Enrique Jorrin in 1953.

62. Cartoon collectible : CEL

In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the “cel” its name.

64. Mortar carrier : HOD

A hod is a 3-sided box on the the end of a long handle used for carrying bricks (and sometimes mortar) at a construction site, usually up and down ladders.

67. Court plea, briefly : NOLO

“Nolo contendere” (sometimes shortened to “nolo”) is a legal term that translates from Latin as “I do not wish to contend”. It’s the plea of no contest, and is an alternative to guilty and not guilty, meaning that one doesn’t admit guilt but nor does one dispute the charge.

68. Opera set in 1800 Rome : TOSCA

Unlike so many operas, Giacomo Puccini’s “Tosca” was a big hit right from day one, when it was first performed in 1900 at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome. “Tosca” is currently the eighth-most performed opera in America.

71. German hunting dog : WEIMARANER

The Weimaraner was originally bred for hunting large game such as bears, boars and deer, and is now classed as a gun dog. The breed gets its name from Karl August, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, as he was big into hunting.

74. 1904 Jack London novel : THE SEA-WOLF

The author Jack London is a bit of a local hero in the Bay Area where I live. London was born in San Francisco, and there is a famous Jack London Square in Oakland, California that was named in his honor. London’s most famous works are “The Call of the Wild” and “White Fang”, both of which are set in the Klondike Gold Rush.

76. Caste member : ANT

Although caste systems exist in several societies around the world, we tend to associate the concept with the social stratification that is still found in many parts of India. The term “caste” comes from the Portuguese word “casta” meaning “race, breed”. The Portuguese used the term to describe the hereditary social groups that they found in India when they arrived in the subcontinent in 1498.

79. Double-platinum album for Steely Dan : AJA

Steely Dan’s heyday was in the seventies when they toured for a couple of years, although the group mainly focused on studio work. The band was formed in 1972 and broke up in 1981. The core of the band reunited in 1993, and is still performing today despite the passing of founding member Walter Becker in 2017. Steely Dan’s best-selling album is “Aja” (pronounced “Asia”), which was released in 1977.

80. Mythological bird : ROC

The mythical roc is a huge bird of prey, one reputedly able to carry off and eat elephants. The roc was said to come from the Indian subcontinent. The supposed existence of the roc was promulgated by Marco Polo in the accounts that he published of his travels through Asia.

81. Harriet Beecher Stowe novel subtitled “A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp” : DRED

Harriet Beecher Stowe’s most famous and most successful work is “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”. It was also her first novel. Her second was published in 1856:”Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp”.

84. Ways of doing things, for short : MOS

“Modus operandi” (plural “modi operandi”) is the Latin for “mode of operating”, a term we’ve been using since the mid-1600s. It’s often used by the police when referring to the methods typically employed by a particular perpetrator of a crime, and is usually abbreviated to “M.O.”

88. Parlor pieces : SETTEES

“Settee” is another word for a couch. The term come from the Old English “setl”, which was a long bench with a high back and arms.

95. Actress Ryder : WINONA

The Hollywood actress Winona Ryder’s real name is Winona Horowitz. Ryder was born near the town of Winona in Minnesota, from which she got her name. Her success on the screen has garnered as much media attention as her life off the screen. The papers had a field day when she was arrested in 2001 on a shoplifting charge followed by a very public court appearance. Her engagement with Johnny Depp in the early nineties was another media frenzy. Depp had “Winona Forever” tattooed on his arm, which he had changed after the breakup to “Wino Forever”. A man with a sense of humor …

98. Charlotte ___ (Caribbean capital) : AMALIE

Charlotte Amalie is the capital and largest city in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The city was named after the queen consort of King Christian V of Denmark, Charlotte Amalie of Hesse-Kassel.

100. Greek island where Pythagoras and Epicurus were born : SAMOS

Samos is an island in the eastern Aegean Sea off the coast of Greece. Samos is the birthplace of the famed mathematician Pythagoras, the philosopher Epicurus, and the astronomer Aristarchus of Samos. The latter was the first person known to have proposed that the Earth revolves around the sun.

103. Insurance giant : AETNA

When the healthcare management and insurance company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mount Etna, the Italian volcano.

115. Native Oklahoman : OTO

The Otoe (also “Oto”) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestward, ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Overawe : COW
4. Things falling out of Vogue? : INSERTS
11. Words to a Spanish sweetheart : TE AMO
16. Mover, but not a shaker (one hopes) : VAN
19. Atlantic 10 Conf. school : URI
20. Where techno music originated : DETROIT
21. Belly : UNDERSIDE
23. Camelhair color : TAN
24. Surplus : OVERAGE
25. Where the Sun shines? : BALTIMORE
26. Doesn’t let it go : STEWS
28. “Star Wars” name : VADER
29. Got into a mess? : ATE
30. Pie-eyed : OILED
31. Wee bit : IOTA
32. Call it a day … or a career : RETIRE
33. Sunday delivery: Abbr. : SER
34. Woolly ruminant : LLAMA
35. Very lowbrow : TRASHY
37. Fabulous fabulist : AESOP
39. Achievement : DEED
40. Riverboat hazard : SHOAL
42. Linguists’ interests : USAGES
46. Boat that landed on 94-Down : ARK
49. Final, countrywide competition : NATIONALS
53. ___ tap : SPINAL
54. Go (for) : VIE
55. Salary negotiator : AGENT
56. Alternated : TOOK TURNS
58. Dress down : CHIDE
60. Winner of 11 Grand Slam tennis titles : BORG
61. Common seasoning for Italian sausage : FENNEL
62. Elected : CHOSEN
63. Sports axiom refuted by this puzzle : THERE’S NO I IN TEAM
69. “The Handmaid’s Tale” author : ATWOOD
72. Not with it : UNCOOL
73. Place in a 1969 western : ETTA
77. Serious devotee : FIEND
78. Papal conclave members : CARDINALS
82. Ghostly : ASHEN
83. He said “It’s not bragging if you can back it up” : ALI
84. Group with five members in this puzzle, with “the” : MAJORS
85. Court plea : NO CONTEST
87. Sleep stage : REM
88. Relief : SOLACE
89. Play the part of : ACT AS
90. Father of Phobos, the god of fear : ARES
92. Sound of the South : DRAWL
97. Liability of note? : TIN EAR
100. Swagger : STRUT
102. ___ Minella (Muppet monkey) : SAL
105. City ENE of Cleveland, O. : ERIE, PA
107. Lady’s title : DAME
108. Anticipate : AWAIT
109. Ball bearer : TEE
110. Fruit soda brand : FANTA
111. Temple of Isis site : ASWAN
112. Where General Mills is headquartered : MINNESOTA
114. Bank trouble? : EROSION
116. Dated : OLD
117. “Be there in a jiffy!” : ONE SECOND!
118. Encountered : RAN INTO
119. Not be straight : LIE
120. Cold War-era inits. : SSR
121. Eppie’s adoptive father, in a George Eliot novel : SILAS
122. Suffragist Elizabeth Cady ___ : STANTON
123. Not opposin’ : FER

Down

1. Is up to the task : CUTS IT
2. Winston Churchill, notably : ORATOR
3. One concerned with aging? : WINE TASTER
4. Wedding pair : I DOS
5. State since 1864: Abbr. : NEV
6. McQueen or King : STEVE
7. Things that corrections correct : ERRATA
8. Tour hiree : ROADIE
9. Aggressive types : TIGERS
10. Typical intro? : STEREO-
11. Heavy winds : TUBAS
12. Maternally related : ENATE
13. Colleague of Freud : ADLER
14. Encountered : MET
15. Relatives of bobolinks : ORIOLES
16. Only African-American to win an Oscar, Tony and Emmy for acting : VIOLA DAVIS
17. Relevant, legally : AD REM
18. With 47-Down, driver’s question : NEED A …
22. “Say cheese!” : SMILE
27. County name in 30 states : WASHINGTON
32. House speaker after Boehner : RYAN
36. Sidesplitter : HOOT
38. ___ platter : PUPU
39. “Runaway” singer Shannon, 1961 : DEL
41. “I’m off” : LATER
43. “My dear man” : SIR
44. Novelist Patchett : ANN
45. Fastball, in baseball slang : GAS
47. See 18-Down : … RIDE
48. Sharp : KEEN
49. Pick up : NAB
50. Back : AGO
51. Unaccompanied : LONE
52. Company name ender after “&” : SONS
53. First U.S. city to host the Olympics : ST LOUIS
57. “Baseball” documentarian Burns : KEN
58. Half a step? : CHA
59. What ballplayers look forward to after playing on the road : HOME STANDS
61. Sustained : FED
62. Cartoon collectible : CEL
64. Mortar carrier : HOD
65. Hampton ___ : INN
66. Words of confidence : I CAN
67. Court plea, briefly : NOLO
68. Opera set in 1800 Rome : TOSCA
69. Not even close? : AFAR
70. Floor piece : TILE
71. German hunting dog : WEIMARANER
74. 1904 Jack London novel : THE SEA-WOLF
75. Your, to Yves : TES
76. Caste member : ANT
78. State with five teams in the 84-Across: Abbr. : CAL
79. Double-platinum album for Steely Dan : AJA
80. Mythological bird : ROC
81. Harriet Beecher Stowe novel subtitled “A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp” : DRED
82. Lining up against : ANTI
84. Ways of doing things, for short : MOS
86. Numerical prefix : OCTA-
88. Parlor pieces : SETTEES
91. Bankrupts : RUINS
93. Points (to) : REFERS
94. See 46-Across : ARARAT
95. Actress Ryder : WINONA
96. Admits : LETS IN
98. Charlotte ___ (Caribbean capital) : AMALIE
99. Proffer : RENDER
100. Greek island where Pythagoras and Epicurus were born : SAMOS
101. Delivery that’s usually expected : TWINS
102. Prop for a lion tamer : STOOL
103. Insurance giant : AETNA
104. Some calls on a police hotline : LEADS
106. Kind of chips you shouldn’t eat : PAINT
111. Before being outed, for short : ANON
113. H.S. study : SCI
115. Native Oklahoman : OTO