0513-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 13 May 2018, Sunday

Constructed by: Neville Fogarty & Erik Agard
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: Love at First Sight

Themed answers are well-known phrases that have been reinterpreted as the name of potential dating sites:

  • 22A. Good name for a deep kissers’ dating site? : FRENCH CONNECTION
  • 51A. Good name for a dating site full of hot dudes? : STUD FINDER
  • 57A. Good name for a dating site of massage therapists? : RUBBER MATCH
  • 76A. Good name for an extreme sports dating site? : ACTION ITEMS
  • 83A. Good name for a non-monogamist dating site? : OPEN FLAMES
  • 115A. Good name for a dating site for lovers of natural foods? : ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
  • 15D. Good name for a carpentry dating site? : BOARD MEETING
  • 60D. Good name for a “High Noon”-themed dating site? : WESTERN UNION

Bill’s time: 20m 27s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Arcade hoops game : NBA JAM

NBA Jam is an arcade game that was introduced in 1993. It was successful enough to spawn a whole series of NBA Jam video games. Apparently is became the highest-earning arcade game of all time, and took in over $1 billion dollars in quarters.

7. Some TV ads, for short : PSAS

Public service announcement (PSA)

18. “The Simpsons” or “Futurama” : SATIRE

“Futurama” is an animated sci-fi show that airs on Fox. It was co-created by cartoonist Matt Groening, who also created “The Simpsons”. I simply don’t understand either show …

19. Litter’s littlest : RUNT

Back around 1500, a runt was an old or decayed tree stump, and by the early 1600s “runt” was being used to describe animals that were similarly old and decayed. Ultimately “runt” came to mean the smallest and often sickest in a litter.

20. To whom Brabantio says “Thou art a villain” : IAGO

Iago is the schemer in Shakespeare’s “Othello”. He is a soldier who fought alongside Othello and feels hard done by, missing out on promotion. Iago hatches a plot designed to discredit his rival Cassio by insinuating that Cassio is having an affair with Desdemona, Othello’s wife.

22. Good name for a deep kissers’ dating site? : FRENCH CONNECTION

New York cop Eddie Egan was responsible for breaking up an organized crime ring in the city in 1961, and the seizing of a record amount of heroin (112 pounds). His exploits were chronicled in a book by Robin Moore, which in turn was the basis of the movie “The French Connection” released in 1971. Gene Hackman played Popeye Doyle in the movie, the character based on Egan. Paradoxically, when Egan retired from the police force he started acting and played small roles in 22 movies and television shows.

25. Vittles : EATS

“Victuals” is a term for food that is fit for consumption. We tend to pronounce “victuals” as “vittles”, and we use the term “vittles” and “victuals” interchangeably.

28. Performances at Paris’s Palais Garnier : OPERAS

The Paris Opera company is currently housed in the beautifully ornate Palais Garnier. The Paris Opera was founded by Louis XIV in 1669, and the Palais Garnier is the 13th theater to house the company and has done so since 1875.

30. Manning with the second-longest QB starting streak in N.F.L. history : ELI

Eli Manning plays as quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning retired from football as the quarterback for the Denver Broncos in 2015. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, who was also a successful NFL quarterback. Eli, Peyton and Archie co-authored a book for children titles “Family Huddle” in 2009. It describes the Mannings playing football together as young boys.

34. Monster slain by Hercules : HYDRA

The Hydra of Lerna was a mythical sea snake that had multiple heads. Heracles had to slay the Lernaean Hydra as the second of his Twelve Labors. We now use the term “hydra” figuratively to describe a complex problem that presents new obstacles once once facet is resolved.

35. North Carolina university : ELON

Elon is a city in the Piedmont region of North Carolina located close to the city of Burlington. Elon University is a private liberal arts school founded in 1889.

41. Member of a southern colony : PENGUIN

The emperor penguin is the largest species of penguin, weighing in at 49-99 pounds fully grown. The emperor penguin is known for the incredible journey taken by the adults during the breeding season in the Antarctic winter. Females lay an egg and then trek 30-70 miles from the breeding colony to the sea to feed, returning to feed their chicks.

43. Actor whose first and last names look like they rhyme, but don’t : SEAN BEAN

Sean Bean is an English actor who is perhaps best known in North America for playing Boromir in the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy, and Ned Stark in the fantasy TV show “Game of Thrones”. James Bond fans will remember him as the bad guy in “GoldenEye”, the character called Alec Trevelyan.

54. Obsolescent high school course, informally : HOME EC

Home economics (home ec)

61. Emerald or aquamarine : BERYL

The mineral beryl is a source of a number of different semi-precious stones, depending on the nature of the impurities present. Pure beryl is colorless; blue beryl is called aquamarine, and green beryl is emerald. Traces of iron cause the blue color, and traces of chromium give the green hue.

70. IV checkers : RNS

A registered nurse (RN) might administer an intravenous drip (IV).

85. Big Apple cultural site, with “the” : MET

The Metropolitan Opera (often “the Met”) of New York City is the largest classical music organization in the country, presenting about 220 performances each and every year. Founded in 1880, the Met is renowned for using technology to expand its audiences. Performances have been broadcast live on radio since 1931, and on television since 1977. And since 2006 you can go see a live performance from New York in high definition on the big screen, at a movie theater near you …

Apparently, the first published use of the term “Big Apple” to describe New York City dates back to 1909. Edward Martin wrote the following in his book “The Wayfarer in New York”:

Kansas is apt to see in New York a greedy city. . . . It inclines to think that the big apple gets a disproportionate share of the national sap.

Over ten years later, the term “big apple” was used as a nickname for racetracks in and around New York City. However, the concerted effort to “brand” the city as the Big Apple had to wait until the seventies and was the work of the New York Convention and Visitors Bureau.

89. Southernmost of the Lesser Antilles : TRINIDAD

Trinidad and Tobago is a republic in the southern Caribbean that largely comprises the two main islands of Trinidad and Tobago.

The Antilles islands are divided into two main groups, the Greater Antilles and the Lesser Antilles. The Greater Antilles includes the islands of Cuba, Jamaica, Hispaniola and Puerto Rico. The Lesser Antilles are made up of the Leeward Islands, the Windward Islands and the Leeward Antilles, and lie just north of Venezuela.

95. Previous name for an athletic conference now with 12 members : PAC TEN

Pac-12 an abbreviation for the Pacific-12 Conference, a college athletic conference in the western US. The Pac-12 has won more NCAA National Team Championships than any other conference. The Pac-12 was founded in 1915 as the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC). Over time as it grew, the conference went by the names Big Five, Big Six, Pacific-8, Pacific-10 and became the Pacific-12 in 2011.

99. Sky-blue : AZURE

The term “azure” came into English from Persian via Old French. The French word “l’azur” was taken from the Persian name for a place in northeastern Afghanistan called “Lazhward” which was the main source of the semi-precious stone lapis lazuli. The stone has a vivid blue color, and “azure” has been describing this color since the 14th century.

106. ___ Aviv : TEL

The full name of Israel’s second largest city is Tel Aviv-Yafo. “Tel Aviv” translates into “Spring Mound”, a name chosen in 1910.

107. UTEP team : MINERS

The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) was founded in 1914, and was originally named the Texas State School of Mines and Metallurgy. To this day, there is a mine shaft on the campus. The mascot of the school’s sports teams is Paydirt Pete, a prospector from the mining industry. The teams are also known as the UTEP Miners and Lady Miners.

109. First things to go into jammies : TOOTSIES

Our word “pajamas” (sometimes “PJs” or “jammies”) comes to us from the Indian subcontinent, where “pai jamahs” were loose fitting pants tied at the waist and worn at night by locals and ultimately by the Europeans living there. And “pajamas” is another of those words that I had to learn to spell differently when I came to America. On the other side of the Atlantic, the spelling is “pyjamas”.

114. Neat as ___ : A PIN

Apparently the idiom “neat as a pin” arose in the early 1800s, with the advent of mass production. Up until that time, pins were handmade and so were irregular and relatively flawed. Mass-produced pins were uniform and of consistent quality. So, something that was uniform and of consistent quality came to be described as “neat as a pin”.

120. John of the Velvet Underground : CALE

The Velvet Underground was an influential New York City rock band active in the late sixties and early seventies. The group was formed by Lou Reed and John Cale, and was managed by pop artist Andy Warhol.

121. Tot’s wear : ONESIE

A onesie is a baby’s one-piece bodysuit, and is a common gift at a baby shower.

123. Lincoln Logs and such : TOYS

The toy known as “Lincoln Logs” was invented by John Lloyd Wright, the son of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. The toy was named after President Abraham Lincoln, who was born in a log cabin.

Down

1. [Avoid watching this in front of the boss] : NSFW

The abbreviation “NSFW” stands for “not safe/suitable for work”. It’s Internet slang used to describe online content that is best not viewed at work.

4. Chinese leader Xi : JINPING

Xi Jinping is the current paramount leader of China. In China, the term “paramount leader” has been used since the days of Mao Zedong to describe the person who holds several leadership offices concurrently. The paramount leaders have been:

  1. Mao Zedong (1949 – 1976)
  2. Hua Guofeng (1976 – 1978)
  3. Deng Xiaoping (1978 – 1992)
  4. Jiang Zemin (1992 – 2004)
  5. Hu Jintao (2004 – 2012)
  6. Xi Jinping (2012 – )

5. Rainbows, e.g. : ARCS

Sunlight shining through airborne water droplets can produce rainbows. The water droplets act as little prisms, dispersing the white light into its constituent colors. Sometimes we see double rainbows. If we look carefully, we can see that the order of the colors in the first and second arcs is reversed.

7. Immediately : PRONTO

The Spanish and Italian (and now English) word “pronto” is derived from the Latin “promptus” meaning “ready, quick”.

9. One of the Brontës : ANNE

Anne was the youngest of the three sisters in the literary Brontë family. Her older sisters wrote novels that are more recognized, but Anne’s two novels do have a following. “Agnes Grey” is based on her own experiences working as a governess. Her other novel, “The Tenant of Wildfell Hall” is written as a long letter from a young man describing the events leading up to his first meeting with his wife-to-be. Anne Brontë’s writing career was cut short in 1849, when she died of pulmonary tuberculosis, at only 29 years of age.

11. Instrument plucked with a mezrab : SITAR

The sitar has been around since the Middle Ages. It is a stringed instrument that is played by plucking, and is used most often in Hindustani classical music. In the West we have been exposed to the instrument largely through the performances of Ravi Shankar and some music by George Harrison of the Beatles, a onetime student of Shankar.

14. Like early Elvis recordings : MONO

Monophonic sound (“mono”) is sound reproduced using just one audio channel, which is usually played out of just one speaker. Stereophonic sound is reproduced using two audio channels, with the sound from each channel played out of two different speakers. The pair of stereo speakers are usually positioned apart from each other so that sound appears to come from between the two. Quadraphonic sound (4.0 surround sound) uses four audio channels with the sound played back through four speakers often positioned at the corners of the room in which one is listening.

17. Thompson of “Selma” : TESSA

Tessa Thompson is an actress from Los Angeles who is known for playing the supporting role of Jackie Cook on the TV show “Veronica Mars”, and for playing student leader Diane Nash in the 2014 film “Selma”.

23. Noggin : COCONUT

Slang terms for “head” are “bean”, “coconut” and “noggin”.

24. Chairman and ___ (common title) : CEO

Chief executive officer (CEO)

31. Back-of-newspaper section : OBITS

Our word “obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”. The Latin term was used for “record of the death of a person”, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

35. Org. with a flower logo : EPA

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

44. Chaperones, usually : ADULTS

Traditionally, a chaperone (often “chaperon” in the British Isles) was a woman accompanying a younger unmarried lady in public, with the term “chaperone” originating in France. The French word was used to mean “hood, cowl” going back to the 12th century, a diminutive of “chape” meaning “cape”. So, out word “chaperone” has the same roots as our word “cape” and indeed “cap”. The idea is that a chaperone is “covering” someone who is vulnerable socially.

45. Lincoln’s home: Abbr. : NEB

The city of Lincoln is the second-largest in Nebraska, and is the state capital. In the days of the Nebraska Territory, the capital was the larger city of Omaha. When the territory was being considered for statehood, most of the population (which lived south of the River Platte) was in favor of annexation to Kansas. The pro-statehood legislature voted to move the capital nearer to that population in a move intended to appease those favoring annexation. As this conflict was taking place just after the Civil War, a special interest group in Omaha arranged for the new capital to be named Lincoln, in honor of the recently-assassinated president. The thought was that the populace south of the River Platte had been sympathetic to the Confederate cause and so would not pass the measure to move the capital if the Lincoln name was used. But the measure passed, the capital was moved, and Nebraska became the thirty-seventh State of the Union in 1867.

46. “I’ll return shortly,” in a text : BRB

Be right back (BRB)

49. German interjections : ACHS

The German exclamation “ach!” is usually translated into English as “oh!”

52. “That’s mine!” : DIBS!

The phrase “to have dibs on” expresses a claim on something. Apparently, the term “dibs” is a contraction of “dibstone”, which was a knucklebone or jack used in a children’s game.

56. Model Page known as “The Queen of Pinups” : BETTIE

As a model, Bettie Page was famous for her fetish modelling pictures from the fifties, depicting images of bondage. After her successful career as a pinup she changed her lifestyle completely by converting to Christianity and taking a job with evangelist Billy Graham.

58. Naval officer: Abbr. : ENS

Ensign is (usually) the most junior rank of commissioned officer in the armed forces. The name comes from the tradition that the junior officer would be given the task of carrying the ensign flag.

59. Geronimo, for one : APACHE

Cochise and Geronimo were perhaps the two most famous Apache leaders to resist intrusions by the European Americans in 1800s. Both lived lives full of conflict, but both also lived relatively long lives. Cochise eventually entered into a treaty putting an end to the fighting, and retired onto a new reservation. Cochise died of natural causes in 1874, at the age of 69. Geronimo surrendered, and spent years as a prisoner of war. He spent his last years as a celebrity, and even rode in the inaugural parade for President Theodore Roosevelt. Geronimo died of pneumonia in 1909 at the age of 79.

60. Good name for a “High Noon”-themed dating site? : WESTERN UNION

I am not a huge fan of western movies, but “High Noon” works for me. The film has a great cast, with Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly in the lead roles. I suppose I like the film because it doesn’t fit the mold as a typical western with lots of predictable action sequences. That said, when “High Noon” first hit theaters it was not popular with audiences, largely because moviegoers were expecting the formulaic western film. One interesting feature of the storyline is that the sequence of events takes place in approximate real time.

65. ___ Bread (cafe chain) : PANERA

Panera Bread is a chain of bakery/coffeehouses. A Panera restaurant is a good place to get online while having a cup of coffee. Back in 2006 and 2007, Panera was the largest provider of free Wi-Fi access in the whole of the US.

66. NPR host Shapiro : ARI

Ari Shapiro was the very able White House correspondent for National Public Radio (NPR) for several years. He became a co-host of network’s drive-time program “All Things Considered” in 2015.

68. “2 funny!!!” : ROFL

Rolling on Floor Laughing (ROFL)

69. “To Live and Die ___” : IN LA

“To Live and Die in L.A.” is novel written by Gerald Petievich, a former Secret Service agent. The book was made into a pretty successful 1985 film starring William L. Petersen, the former lead from TV’s “CSI”. Petersen plays the good guy, and Willem Dafoe the bad guy. The plot is all about a pair of Secret Service agents tracking down a counterfeiter. I haven’t seen the film, but it’s on my list …

71. Visage : FACE

“Visage” is the French word for “face”, and is a term we’ve imported into English to mean “face” or “facial expression”.

72. Player of Robin Hood in 1991 : COSTNER

Kevin Costner attributes some of his motivation to pursue an acting career to the great Welsh actor, Richard Burton. Back when Costner was taking acting classes, and was undecided about whether to continue chasing his dream, he ran into Burton on a flight from Puerto Vallarta. Burton agreed to chat with him for a little while, and so Costner was able to ask him if acting meant tolerating the kind of personal drama that had plagued Burton’s own life. Burton told him, “You have green eyes. I have green eyes. I think you’ll be fine”.

75. Nautical title, informally : BO’S’N

A boatswain works on the deck of a boat. A boatswain is unlicensed, and so is not involved in the navigation or handling of the vessel. He or she has charge of the other unlicensed workers on the deck. Boatswain is pronounced “bosun” and this phonetic spelling is often used interchangeably with “boatswain”. The contraction “bo’s’n” is also very popular.

78. Prefix with center : EPI-

The epicenter is that point on the surface of the earth that is directly above the focus of an earthquake.

80. Ginormous : IMMENSE

“Ginormous” is a melding of the words “gigantic” and “enormous”, and surprisingly to me, one dates back to about 1948. I thought that the term was far more contemporary …

81. Lowly workers : PEONS

A peon is a lowly worker with no real control over his/her working conditions. The word comes into English from Spanish, in which language it has the same meaning.

84. O.T.C. O.K.’er : FDA

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has its roots in the Division of Chemistry (later “Bureau of Chemistry”) that was part of the US Department of Agriculture. President Theodore Roosevelt gave responsibility for examination of food and drugs to the Bureau of Chemistry with the signing of the Pure Food and Drug Act. The Bureau’s name was changed to the Food, Drug and Insecticide Organization in 1927, and to the Food and Drug Administration in 1930.

Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs don’t need a prescription (Rx).

85. Command of Captain Jean-Luc Picard : MAKE IT SO

When Gene Roddenberry was creating the “Star Trek” spin-off series “Star Trek: The Next Generation”, I think he chose a quite magnificent name for the new starship captain. “Jean-Luc Picard” is imitative of one or both of the twin-brother Swiss scientists Auguste and Jean Felix Piccard. The role of Picard was played by the wonderful Shakespearean actor Patrick Stewart.

96. Gum ingredient : CHICLE

Chicle is a natural gum or latex that can be extracted from the Manilkara chicle tree that is native to Mexico and Central America. Companies like Wrigley were major users of chicle prior to the sixties as the product was used as the base ingredient in chewing gum. Today chewing gum manufacturers generally use a synthetic rubber that is cheap to manufacture as a replacement for natural chicle. I am so happy I don’t chew gum!

100. Nada : ZIPPO

The use of the words “zip” and “zippo” to mean “nothing” dates back to the early 1900s, when it was student slang for being graded zero on a test.

102. Certain computer whiz : IT GUY

Information technology (IT)

103. Deep defenses : MOATS

A moat is a protective trench that surrounds a castle, say, or a an exhibit in a zoo. A moat may or may not be filled with water.

112. ___ colada : PINA

“Piña colada” is a Spanish term which translates into “strained pineapple”. The piña colada cocktail was introduced in the Caribe Hilton San Juan in 1954, and since 1978 it has been the official beverage of Puerto Rico. Yum …

116. Down Under hopper : ROO

The word “kangaroo” comes from the Australian Aborigine term for the animal. There’s an oft-quoted story that the explorer James Cook (later Captain Cook) asked a local native what was the name of this remarkable-looking animal, and the native responded with “Kangaroo”. The story is that the native was actually saying “I don’t understand you”, but as cute as that tale is, it’s just an urban myth.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Arcade hoops game : NBA JAM
7. Some TV ads, for short : PSAS
11. Went through channels? : SWAM
15. Hitter’s hitter : BAT
18. “The Simpsons” or “Futurama” : SATIRE
19. Litter’s littlest : RUNT
20. To whom Brabantio says “Thou art a villain” : IAGO
21. Singular : SOLE
22. Good name for a deep kissers’ dating site? : FRENCH CONNECTION
25. Vittles : EATS
26. A shroud of secrecy, idiomatically : WRAPS
27. Endlessly starting over : ON REPEAT
28. Performances at Paris’s Palais Garnier : OPERAS
30. Manning with the second-longest QB starting streak in N.F.L. history : ELI
31. Numerical prefix : OCTA-
32. “Ish” : OR SO
34. Monster slain by Hercules : HYDRA
35. North Carolina university : ELON
36. Victor’s shout : BOOYAH!
39. It’s all in the head : DREAM
41. Member of a southern colony : PENGUIN
43. Actor whose first and last names look like they rhyme, but don’t : SEAN BEAN
47. Slice of a timeline : ERA
50. Fruit drink : ADE
51. Good name for a dating site full of hot dudes? : STUD FINDER
54. Obsolescent high school course, informally : HOME EC
56. Number one pal : BESTIE
57. Good name for a dating site of massage therapists? : RUBBER MATCH
59. In amazement : AWED
61. Emerald or aquamarine : BERYL
63. Revolting sorts : NASTIES
64. Kitty-cat, e.g. : PET
65. Carbo-loading dish : PASTA
67. Patty alternative? : TRISH
70. IV checkers : RNS
71. 1988 top 10 hit for Tracy Chapman : FAST CAR
73. George ___ University : MASON
75. Swamps : BOGS
76. Good name for an extreme sports dating site? : ACTION ITEMS
79. Be traitorous to : FLIP ON
82. Burger topper : CHEESE
83. Good name for a non-monogamist dating site? : OPEN FLAMES
85. Big Apple cultural site, with “the” : MET
88. Alway : E’ER
89. Southernmost of the Lesser Antilles : TRINIDAD
91. Napa Valley vintner Robert : MONDAVI
93. Grannies : NANAS
95. Previous name for an athletic conference now with 12 members : PAC TEN
98. Comparable (to) : AKIN
99. Sky-blue : AZURE
101. Performer in makeup, typically : MIME
105. Certain layers : HENS
106. ___ Aviv : TEL
107. UTEP team : MINERS
109. First things to go into jammies : TOOTSIES
112. “Trading Spaces” host Davis : PAIGE
114. Neat as ___ : A PIN
115. Good name for a dating site for lovers of natural foods? : ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
118. Ad : SPOT
119. Big loss : ROUT
120. John of the Velvet Underground : CALE
121. Tot’s wear : ONESIE
122. Junior : SON
123. Lincoln Logs and such : TOYS
124. Something taken on a field? : KNEE
125. Ones passed on a track : BATONS

Down

1. [Avoid watching this in front of the boss] : NSFW
2. Sped (along) : BARRELED
3. Had a table for one : ATE ALONE
4. Chinese leader Xi : JINPING
5. Rainbows, e.g. : ARCS
6. “That doesn’t impress me much” : MEH
7. Immediately : PRONTO
8. Natural light beam : SUNRAY
9. One of the Brontës : ANNE
10. Group dance with stomps and claps : STEP
11. Instrument plucked with a mezrab : SITAR
12. Cools one’s heels : WAITS
13. Back in time : AGO
14. Like early Elvis recordings : MONO
15. Good name for a carpentry dating site? : BOARD MEETING
16. The rite place? : ALTAR
17. Thompson of “Selma” : TESSA
21. “Toodles!” : SEE YA!
23. Noggin : COCONUT
24. Chairman and ___ (common title) : CEO
29. Ones to watch : PHENOMS
31. Back-of-newspaper section : OBITS
33. Poetic tribute : ODE
35. Org. with a flower logo : EPA
37. “Just ___ suspected” : AS I
38. 1940s vice president Wallace : HENRY
40. Enthusiastic : RAH-RAH
42. Not new : USED
44. Chaperones, usually : ADULTS
45. Lincoln’s home: Abbr. : NEB
46. “I’ll return shortly,” in a text : BRB
48. Swing time? : RECESS
49. German interjections : ACHS
52. “That’s mine!” : DIBS!
53. ‘ : FEET
55. Dignified lady : MATRON
56. Model Page known as “The Queen of Pinups” : BETTIE
58. Naval officer: Abbr. : ENS
59. Geronimo, for one : APACHE
60. Good name for a “High Noon”-themed dating site? : WESTERN UNION
62. Hit hard : RAMMED
65. ___ Bread (cafe chain) : PANERA
66. NPR host Shapiro : ARI
68. “2 funny!!!” : ROFL
69. “To Live and Die ___” : IN LA
71. Visage : FACE
72. Player of Robin Hood in 1991 : COSTNER
74. Like child’s play : A SNAP
75. Nautical title, informally : BO’S’N
77. Whole lot : TON
78. Prefix with center : EPI-
80. Ginormous : IMMENSE
81. Lowly workers : PEONS
84. O.T.C. O.K.’er : FDA
85. Command of Captain Jean-Luc Picard : MAKE IT SO
86. Satanic look : EVIL GRIN
87. Cookie holder : TIN
90. Movement : ISM
92. Statistician’s grouping : DATA SET
94. “___ you the clever one!” : AREN’T
96. Gum ingredient : CHICLE
97. Titter : TEE-HEE
99. Stockpile : AMASS
100. Nada : ZIPPO
102. Certain computer whiz : IT GUY
103. Deep defenses : MOATS
104. Long span : EON
108. Put in order : SORT
110. Camping menace : TICK
111. Digitize, in a way : SCAN
112. ___ colada : PINA
113. Real lookers? : EYES
116. Down Under hopper : ROO
117. Gather around, as an idol : MOB

8 thoughts on “0513-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 13 May 2018, Sunday”

  1. 34:02. Fun theme. I particularly liked ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. I actually put “Ill” for “Lincoln home” at first (is this my first crossword??). Otherwise, everything seemed pretty straightforward.

    NBA JAM grossed a $1 billion in quarters? I did the math on that. That’s about 25,000 tons of quarters. Who got to roll all those at the bank??

    Best –

  2. 24:18, no errors. I got NBA JAM almost immediately because it appeared in another puzzle not too long ago. So … maybe I do still have a working memory! ?

  3. 29:36, no errors. Many of the answers were very simple, but a few tripped me up. Spent an inordinate amount of time on 85D, looking to fit STAR SHIP or even ENTERPRISE in the spaces. MAKE IT SO was a nasty curveball.

  4. Took my sweet time on this. Savored the theme, clues, and answers. Made the Sunday sloggishness worthwhile, for a change. No errors, pen on paper.

  5. 26 minutes 5 sec. No errors. Had one big guess, at the juncture of 96 down and 105A. I was thinking “layers” for 105A as in layers of clothing, or layers of the earth’s crust or something… finally, I remembered the chewing gum brand CHICLETS for 96 down (I was otherwise stumped), and went with that. It paid off. Error-free Sundays are rare!!!

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