0401-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 1 Apr 2018, Sunday

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Constructed by: Sam Ezersky
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: 1 + 1 = 5

We have a rebus puzzle today, with a twist. The rebus squares are simply read as two consecutive letters (XY) in the down-direction. In the across-direction, the rebus squares are read as two letters linked by “and” (X AND Y):

  • 23A. Excited sort : KID IN A CANDY STORE
  • 7D. Retailer with a star in its logo : MACY’S
  • 25A. Chinese restaurant chain : PANDA EXPRESS
  • 12D. Vatican jurisdiction : PAPACY
  • 44A. Heroic figure in “Star Wars” films : LANDO CALRISSIAN
  • 10D. Brothel : BORDELLO
  • 49A. “I need everyone’s help!” : ALL HANDS ON DECK!
  • 31D. Reddish-purple : FUCHSIA
  • 68A. Patriotic song lyric before “Mind the music and the step” : YANKEE DOODLE DANDY
  • 34D. Have an exclusive relationship : GO STEADY
  • 85A. Natural disaster of 2012 : HURRICANE SANDY
  • 48D. Tougher : NOT AS EASY
  • 88A. Magician known for debunking paranormal claims : THE AMAZING RANDI
  • 90D. Goal for a tailor : RIGHT FIT
  • 113A. Stretchable wrappers : ELASTIC BANDS
  • 100D. Touches, as with a tissue : DABS AT
  • 115A. 1988 crime comedy rated 93% positive on Rotten Tomatoes : A FISH CALLED WANDA
  • 104D. Figure on a poster : REWARD

Bill’s time: 26m 24s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

8. Chemicals proscribed by ’70s legislation : PCBS

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were banned with good reason. Apart from their link to cancer and other disorders in humans and animals, they are extremely persistent in the environment once contamination has occurred. Among other things, PCBs were used as coolants and insulating fluids in electrical gear such as transformers and large capacitors, as well as a transfer agent in carbonless copy paper.

22. Final song in “Fantasia” : AVE MARIA

“Ave Maria” (“Hail Mary” in English) is the prayer at the core of the Roman Catholic Rosary, which itself is a set of prayers asking for the assistance of the Virgin Mary. Much of the text of the “Hail Mary” comes from the Gospel of Luke. The words in Latin are:

AVE MARIA, gratia plena, Dominus tecum. Benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc, et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.

The prayer has been adapted as a hymn. The two most famous musical versions of “Ave Maria” are by Charles Gounod (based on a piece by Bach) and by Franz Schubert.

“Fantasia” was Disney’s third feature length movie, and was released in 1940. The film had a disappointing critical reception and pushed the Disney company into financial difficulties. RKO took over the film’s distribution in 1946. The folks at RKO cut a full hour off the running time and relaunched the movie into a successful run. If you haven’t seen “Fantasia”, I urge you to do so. It’s a real delight …

26. Actress Green of 2006’s “Casino Royale” : EVA

Despite the English-sounding name, Eva Green is a French actress. Green played Bond girl Vesper Lynd in the 2006 movie “Casino Royale”, opposite Daniel Craig.

28. 7 1/2-hour exam, for short : MCAT

Medical College Admission Test (MCAT)

30. One doing the lord’s work : SERF

A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. “Serf” comes from the Latin “servus”, meaning “slave”.

34. Bee ___ : GEES

The Brothers Gibb (hence, the name “The Bee Gees”) were born in England but grew up and started their musical careers in Australia. They moved back to Manchester in the north of England as youths, and there hit the big time.

35. Business bigwigs : SUITS

A bigwig is someone important. The use of the term harks back to the days when men of authority and rank wore … big wigs.

39. Caught morays : EELED

Morays are a large group of about 200 species of eels found across the world’s oceans. They are carnivorous and look pretty scary but they’re quite shy when confronted and present no threat to humans. One interesting thing about morays is that they will sometimes work in cooperation with the grouper fish found in reefs, the two helping each other hunt for food.

44. Heroic figure in “Star Wars” films : LANDO CALRISSIAN

The character Lando Calrissian was played by actor Billy Dee Williams in two of the “Star Wars” movies.

57. Speckled horse : ROAN

A roan horse has an even mixture of white and colored hairs on the body with the head, lower legs, mane and tail having a more solid color.

59. Big name in nail polish : ESSIE

Essie Cosmetics is a company that was founded by Essie Weingarten, and which is now owned by L’Oreal. Apparently, Queen Elizabeth II will only wear Essie’s Ballet Slippers color nail polish. Well, that’s what Wikipedia claims …

66. Org. that oversaw F.D.R.’s Federal Project Number One : WPA

The Work Progress Administration (WPA) was the largest of the New Deal agencies. The WPA employed millions of people during the Depression, putting them to work on various public works projects. The total spending through the WPA from 1936 to 1939 was nearly $7 billion. We have to give the federal government credit for taking an enlightened view of what types of project qualified for financial support, so artists who could not get commissions privately were hired by the government itself. The result is a collection of “New Deal Art”, including a series of murals that can be found in post offices around the country to this day.

68. Patriotic song lyric before “Mind the music and the step” : YANKEE DOODLE DANDY

“The Yankee Doodle Boy” is a song from the musical “Little Johnny Jones” by George M. Cohan. It is a patriotic number, well known for its opening line “I’m a Yankee Doodle Dandy”. The musical tells the story of American jockey Johnny Jones who rides a horse called Yankee Doodle in the English Derby. Jimmy Cagney played Cohan in the 1942 biopic called “Yankee Doodle Dandy”, and gave a famous rendition of the song.

71. Regulation followers, in brief : OTS

Overtime (OT)

73. An ace has a low one : ERA

That would be baseball.

75. Gallic gal pal : AMIE

The Gauls were a Celtic race, with Gaul covering what is now known as France and Belgium. We use the term “Gallic” today, when we refer to something pertaining to France or the French.

76. Dumbbell curls build them, for short : BIS

The biceps muscle is made up of two bundles of muscle, both of which terminate at the same point near the elbow. The heads of the bundles terminate at different points on the scapula or shoulder blade. “Biceps” is Latin for “two-headed”.

80. ___ Rios, Jamaica : OCHO

If you ever take a cruise ship to Jamaica, you will likely disembark in Ocho Rios, a major port of call for the cruise lines. “Ocho rios” is Spanish for “eight rivers”.

81. Cry to a prima donna : BRAVA

To express appreciation for a male performer at an operatic performance, traditionally one calls out “bravo!”. Appreciation for a female performer is shown by using “brava!”, and for more than one performer by using “bravi!”

83. Hero : HOAGIE

“Hoagy” is another name for a submarine sandwich. The term “hoagy” (or “hoagie”) originated in Philadelphia, apparently introduced by Italians working in the shipyards during WWI. The shipyards were located on Hog Island, and the sandwich was first called the Hog Island, which morphed into the hoagy.

85. Natural disaster of 2012 : HURRICANE SANDY

2012’s Hurricane Sandy was the second-costliest hurricane in US history up to that time, with the extent of the damage only exceeded by 2005’s Hurricane Katrina. Sandy claimed 233 lives along its path, including 71 in the US, across nine states. Because the storm’s devastation was so great, the World Meteorological Organization retired the name “Sandy” and will not be using again for a North Atlantic hurricane.

88. Magician known for debunking paranormal claims : THE AMAZING RANDI

James Randi is a retired Canadian-American magician who had a stage career using the name “The Amazing Randi”. Now he spends his time investigating the paranormal, or in fact mainly challenging claims of paranormal activity. If you’re interested, the James Randi Educational Foundation is offering one million dollars to anyone who can demonstrate paranormal activity under controlled test conditions.

92. Big ___, nickname of baseball’s David Ortiz : PAPI

The Dominican-American baseball player David Ortiz has the nickname “Big Papi”. After each home run that Ortiz scores, he looks upwards and points to the sky, a tribute to his mother who died in a car crash in 2002 when she was only 46 years old.

96. Photo-editing option : SEPIA

Sepia is that rich, brown-grey color so common in old photographs. “Sepia” is the Latinized version of the Greek word for cuttlefish, as sepia pigment is derived from the ink sac of the cuttlefish. Sepia ink was commonly used for writing and drawing as far back as Ancient Rome and Ancient Greece. The “sepia tone” of old photographs is not the result of deterioration over time. Rather, it is the result of a deliberate preservation process which converts the metallic silver in the photographic image to a more stable silver sulfide. Prints that have been sepia-toned can last in excess of 150 years.

98. 4-Down personnel, informally : G-MEN
(4D. “Enemies: A History of the ___” (2012 best seller) : FBI)

The nickname “G-men” is short for “government men” and refers to agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

115. 1988 crime comedy rated 93% positive on Rotten Tomatoes : A FISH CALLED WANDA

The 1988 comedy “A Fish Called Wanda” is a favorite of mine. The film was co-written by and stars John Cleese, and has an exceptional cast including Jamie Lee Curtis, Kevin Kline and Cleese’s friend from “Monty Python”, Michael Palin. Kevin Kline won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his performance. The “fish” in the film is the con artist Wanda, played by Curtis.

117. Spanish 101 question : COMO ESTA?

“Cómo estas?” is Spanish for “how are you?”

120. Massé, e.g. : SPIN SHOT

In billiards, a massé shot is one in which the cue ball makes an extreme curve due to the player imparting heavy spin on the ball with his or her cue held relatively vertically.

121. On the double : STAT

The exact etymology of “stat”, a term meaning “immediately” in the medical profession, seems to have been lost in the mists of time. It probably comes from the Latin “statim” meaning “to a standstill, immediately”. A blog reader has helpfully suggested that the term may also come from the world of laboratory analysis, where the acronym STAT stands for “short turn-around time”.

Down

3. Cockpit devices : RADARS

Scientists have been using radio waves to detect the presence of objects since the late 1800s, but it was the demands of WWII that accelerated the practical application of the technology. The British called their system RDF standing for Range and Direction Finding. The system used by the US Navy was called Radio Detection And Ranging, which was shortened to the acronym RADAR.

5. Delhi dignitary : RANI

A ranee (also “rani”) is an Indian queen or princess, and the female equivalent of a raja.

7. Retailer with a star in its logo : MACY’S

The original Macy’s store was opened by Rowland Hussey Macy in Haverhill, Massachusetts in 1851. This store, and several others that Macy opened, all failed. Macy picked himself up though, and started over again in New York City. Those early New York stores all focused on the sale of dry goods, but added departments quickly as the clientele grew. The Macy’s “star” logo has been around since the company was first established. Macy chose the star because it mimicked the star tattoo that he got as a teenager when he was working on a whaling ship out of Nantucket.

11. ___-crab soup : SHE

She-crab soup is a specialty in coastal Virginia, South Carolina and Georgia. The soup is very rich as it is made with cream and so is similar to a bisque. The list of ingredients includes Atlantic blue crab, and crab roe. It is the use of the roe that gives the name “She-crab”, as that’s where the roe comes from!

12. Vatican jurisdiction : PAPACY

Vatican City is a sovereign city-state that is walled off within the city of Rome. Vatican City is about 110 acres in area, and so is the smallest independent state in the world. With about 800 residents, it is also the smallest state in terms of population. Although the Holy See dates back to early Christianity, Vatican City only came into being in 1929. At that time, Prime Minister Benito Mussolini signed a treaty with the Holy See on behalf of the Kingdom of Italy that established the city-state.

13. Eye part : UVEA

The uvea is the middle of the three layers that make up the eyeball. The outer layer is called the fibrous tunic, and the inner layer is the retina.

15. The “Home Alone” boy, e.g. : IMP

“Home Alone” is a 1990 film starring Macaulay Culkin that has become a Christmas classic. Culkin was nominated for a Best Actor Golden Globe for his performance, becoming the youngest actor ever to be so honored.

17. Ryan of “The Beverly Hillbillies” : IRENE

Irene Ryan was the wonderful actress who played “Granny” on “The Beverly Hillbillies”. Ryan was remarkable in that she had a successful career in vaudeville, on radio and television, on film and on Broadway.

18. Embassy issuances : VISAS

A visa is a usually a stamp in one’s passport, an indication that one is authorized to enter (and less often, to exit) a particular country. The word “visa” comes into English, via French, from the Latin expression “charta visa” meaning “paper that has been seen”, or “verified paper”.

19. Big ___ Conference : EAST

The Big East collegiate athletic conference was founded in 1979. The conference went through a major realignment between 2010 and 2013 with 14 schools departing, and 15 schools joining the lineup.

28. Señora, across the Pyrenees : MADAME

The Pyrénées is a mountain range that runs along the border between Spain and France. Nestled between the two countries, high in the mountains, is the lovely country of Andorra, an old haunt of my family during skiing season …

31. Reddish-purple : FUCHSIA

The colors fuchsia and magenta are identical when used on the Web. The name “magenta” comes from an aniline dye that was patented in 1859 in France and called “fuchsine”. The dye was renamed in honor of a victory against the Austrians in the Battle of Magenta of 1859, fought near the northern Italian town of Magenta.

43. Pfizer competitor : MERCK

Merck & Co., Inc. is a US company, once a subsidiary of the German company known today as Merck KGaA. The US subsidiary of the German firm was confiscated in 1917 during WWI, and set up as an independent company that grew into the giant that it is today.

Pfizer is a pharmaceutical company based in New York City that was founded in 1849 by cousins Charles Pfizer and Charles Erhart. Pfizer has an impressive list of successful products that includes Lipitor (to lower cholesterol), Viagra (to help with erectile dysfunction) and Celebrex (an anti-inflammatory).

45. Dieting units: Abbr. : LBS

The unit of mass that we know today as a pound is descended from the old Roman unit of weight known as a libra. That libra connection is why we abbreviate “pound” to “lb”. The name “pound” though comes from the Latin “pondo” meaning “weight”. Our term “ounce” (abbreviated to “oz.”) comes from the Latin “uncia”, which was 1/12 of a Roman “libra”.

46. Helen Reddy’s signature hit : I AM WOMAN

The successful singer Helen Reddy was born in Melbourne, Australia. In 1966, Reddy won a talent contest and earned herself a trip to New York City for an audition. The 25-year-old single mother decided to stay in the US, and a few years later was able to launch a successful singing career. Her hit song “I Am Woman”, released in 1972, was the first recording by an Australian artist to reach #1 in the US charts.

49. Like a fictional Casey : AT THE BAT

“Casey at the Bat” is a poem written in 1888 by Ernest Thayer, first published in the San Francisco Examiner. The poem became very popular due to repeated live performances in vaudeville by DeWolf Hopper. Casey played for the Mudville Nine, and the last line of the poem is “But there is no joy in Mudville – mighty Casey has struck out.”

52. ___ Zero : COKE

Even though Coca-Cola Zero is in the category of “diet soda”, the marketing folks at Coca-Cola don’t like its association with the word “diet”. The target market for the beverage is young, adult males, so it is described as “calorie-free” rather than “diet”, the assumption being that males associate “diet” with women. Not in this house …

62. Irish Spring, e.g. : BAR SOAP

Irish Spring soap was introduced in 1972 by Colgate-Palmolive. The scent used for the first twenty years was known internally within the manufacturer as “Ulster Fragrance”. I have no idea what an Ulster fragrance would be …

63. Pueblo ancestors : ANASAZI

The Ancient Pueblo Peoples were Native Americans who lived in what is now called the Four Corners area of the US. Archaeologists sometimes refer to these ancestral Pueblo peoples as the Anasazi, a Navajo word meaning “Ancient Ones”. The Pueblo name was given by early Spanish explorers in reference to the villages that they found. “Pueblo” is Spanish for “village”.

69. Four-letter island name with three syllables : OAHU

Oahu has been called “The Gathering Place”, although the word “O’ahu” has no translation in Hawaiian. It seems that “O’ahu” is simply the name of the island. One story is that it is named after the son of the Polynesian navigator who first found the islands. The island is made up of two volcanoes, Wai’anae and Ko’olau, joined together by a broad valley, the O’ahu Plain.

75. Associate of Athos and Porthos : ARAMIS

Alexandre Dumas’ “Three Musketeers” are Athos, Porthos and Aramis, although the hero of the novel is the trio’s young protégé D’Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, the three “musketeers” really don’t use their muskets, and are better known for prowess with their swords.

78. ___ Fridays : TGI

T.G.I. Fridays is an American restaurant chain that was founded in 1965 in New York City. Today there are over a thousand T.G.I. Friday’s restaurants in over 50 countries. I think that Fridays has always been particularly successful overseas. I used to visit one a lot with my family when we lived in the Philippines, and I believe the most successful Fridays restaurant anywhere in the world is the one in Haymarket Leicester Square in London in the UK.

79. “___ in the Rain” : SINGIN’

The song “Singin’ In the Rain” by Arthur Freed and Nacio Herb Brown was first published in 1929, predating the 1952 film of the same name by over two decades.

86. ___ ipsa loquitur : RES

The literal translation of “res ipsa loquitur” is “the thing speaks for itself”. The phrase is used in law and refers to situations when there is an injury, and the nature of the injury is such that one can assume that negligence had to have taken place.

94. Beethoven’s Third : EROICA

Beethoven originally dedicated his “Symphony No. 3” to Napoleon Bonaparte. Beethoven admired the principles of the French Revolution and as such respected Bonaparte who was “born” out of the uprising. When Napoleon declared himself Emperor, Beethoven (and much of Europe) saw this as a betrayal to the ideals of the revolution so he changed the name of his new symphony from “Bonaparte” to “Eroica”, meaning “heroic, valiant”.

95. Typewriter formatting aid : TAB SET

Like most features on our computer keyboards, the tab key is a hangover from the days of typewriters. When using a typewriter, making entries into a table was very tedious, involving lots of tapping on the spacebar and backspace key. So, a lever was added to typewriters that allowed the operator to “jump” across the page to positions that could be set by hand. Later this was simplified to a tab key which could be depressed, causing the carriage to jump to the next tab stop in much the same way that the modern tab key works on a computer.

98. Ballroom dance in duple time : GALOP

A galop is a type of dance that was especially popular in Parisian society in the 1800s. It is a fast-paced dance named after the fastest running gait of a horse (a gallop). The most famous exponent of the form was Johann Strauss II.

99. City near Biscayne National Park : MIAMI

Biscayne Bay is a lagoon in South Florida on the Atlantic coast.

103. Poet who wrote “For the Time Being” and “Another Time” : AUDEN

The noted poet W. H. Auden was born and raised in England, but eventually became a US citizen. As well as hundreds of poems, Auden also wrote librettos for operas, including Igor Stravinsky’s “The Rake’s Progress”.

105. Bench presses build them, for short : PECS

“Pecs” is the familiar name for the chest muscle, which is more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is a the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Hardly : FAR FROM
8. Chemicals proscribed by ’70s legislation : PCBS
12. Like some legal damages : PUNITIVE
20. 2018 N.C.A.A. football champs : ALABAMA
21. “I know the answer!” : OH OH!
22. Final song in “Fantasia” : AVE MARIA
23. Excited sort : KID IN A CANDY STORE
25. Chinese restaurant chain : PANDA EXPRESS
26. Actress Green of 2006’s “Casino Royale” : EVA
27. Tasteless : INSIPID
28. 7 1/2-hour exam, for short : MCAT
29. Component of a summer cloud : GNAT
30. One doing the lord’s work : SERF
32. Something you hope people have when they leave? : NICE DAY
34. Bee ___ : GEES
35. Business bigwigs : SUITS
39. Caught morays : EELED
40. What a spoiler spoils : PLOT
42. Crush : CREAM
44. Heroic figure in “Star Wars” films : LANDO CALRISSIAN
49. “I need everyone’s help!” : ALL HANDS ON DECK!
54. “Geez, that was tiring!” : I’M BEAT!
55. Rumpus : ADO
56. Many a cereal box toy : TIE-IN
57. Speckled horse : ROAN
59. Big name in nail polish : ESSIE
60. Bathtub accessory : MAT
61. Rating for “Game of Thrones” and “House of Cards” : TV-MA
62. Area for filming in Hollywood : BACKLOT
65. ___ favor : AS A
66. Org. that oversaw F.D.R.’s Federal Project Number One : WPA
67. Haw’s go-with : HEM
68. Patriotic song lyric before “Mind the music and the step” : YANKEE DOODLE DANDY
71. Regulation followers, in brief : OTS
72. Shorn animal : EWE
73. An ace has a low one : ERA
74. Relatives of channels : STRAITS
75. Gallic gal pal : AMIE
76. Dumbbell curls build them, for short : BIS
77. Aides: Abbr. : ASSTS
80. ___ Rios, Jamaica : OCHO
81. Cry to a prima donna : BRAVA
82. Had : ATE
83. Hero : HOAGIE
85. Natural disaster of 2012 : HURRICANE SANDY
88. Magician known for debunking paranormal claims : THE AMAZING RANDI
91. IV bag contents : SERUM
92. Big ___, nickname of baseball’s David Ortiz : PAPI
93. Fetch : GO GET
96. Photo-editing option : SEPIA
98. 4-Down personnel, informally : G-MEN
100. Item in a sink : DISHRAG
102. Lasting, unpleasant memory : SCAR
105. Match (with) : PAIR
106. Move to solid food : WEAN
108. Something used in a pinch? : TOBACCO
112. Social ___ : CUE
113. Stretchable wrappers : ELASTIC BANDS
115. 1988 crime comedy rated 93% positive on Rotten Tomatoes : A FISH CALLED WANDA
117. Spanish 101 question : COMO ESTA?
118. They may be loaded in a casino : DICE
119. Device many use in bed : E-READER
120. Massé, e.g. : SPIN SHOT
121. On the double : STAT
122. Go down : DESCEND

Down

1. Deceptive moves : FAKES
2. Partner of well : ALIVE
3. Cockpit devices : RADARS
4. “Enemies: A History of the ___” (2012 best seller) : FBI
5. Delhi dignitary : RANI
6. Country whose total land area is less than .01% forested : OMAN
7. Retailer with a star in its logo : MACY’S
8. Flaky entree : POT PIE
9. A, B, C or D : CHOICE
10. Brothel : BORDELLO
11. ___-crab soup : SHE
12. Vatican jurisdiction : PAPACY
13. Eye part : UVEA
14. Call from behind a counter : NEXT
15. The “Home Alone” boy, e.g. : IMP
16. Things to shoot for … or shoot at : TARGETS
17. Ryan of “The Beverly Hillbillies” : IRENE
18. Embassy issuances : VISAS
19. Big ___ Conference : EAST
24. Sermon topic : SIN
28. Señora, across the Pyrenees : MADAME
31. Reddish-purple : FUCHSIA
33. Prefix with liter : DECI-
34. Have an exclusive relationship : GO STEADY
36. Nutrient in lentils and liver : IRON
37. X : TEN
38. Pathetic : SAD
40. Make easier to plow, in a way : PRE-SALT
41. Makes a connection : LIAISES
43. Pfizer competitor : MERCK
45. Dieting units: Abbr. : LBS
46. Helen Reddy’s signature hit : I AM WOMAN
47. Malleable : ADAPTIVE
48. Tougher : NOT AS EASY
49. Like a fictional Casey : AT THE BAT
50. Have as a housemate : LIVE WITH
51. “I wanna look!” : LEMME SEE!
52. ___ Zero : COKE
53. Leafy vegetables : KALES
58. Acknowledge without words : NOD TO
62. Irish Spring, e.g. : BAR SOAP
63. Pueblo ancestors : ANASAZI
64. It’s lit : TORCH
68. “Totally, bro” : YEAH, MAN
69. Four-letter island name with three syllables : OAHU
70. Some expensive gowns : DIORS
75. Associate of Athos and Porthos : ARAMIS
78. ___ Fridays : TGI
79. “___ in the Rain” : SINGIN’
81. Certain bra spec : B-CUP
84. Big heads : EGOS
86. ___ ipsa loquitur : RES
87. Hot state : IRE
89. Each : A PERSON
90. Goal for a tailor : RIGHT FIT
94. Beethoven’s Third : EROICA
95. Typewriter formatting aid : TAB SET
97. Consent (to) : ACCEDE
98. Ballroom dance in duple time : GALOP
99. City near Biscayne National Park : MIAMI
100. Touches, as with a tissue : DABS AT
101. “This is SO frustrating!” : GAH!
103. Poet who wrote “For the Time Being” and “Another Time” : AUDEN
104. Figure on a poster : REWARD
105. Bench presses build them, for short : PECS
106. Well thought? : WISH
107. Prefix with -derm : ECTO-
109. Kept in the loop, in a way : CC’ED
110. Prudence : CARE
111. Whoops? : OLES
114. French possessive : TES
115. Billboards, e.g. : ADS
116. France’s ___ du Bourget : LAC