0318-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 18 Mar 2018, Sunday

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Constructed by: Daniel Raymon
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: Taking Your Q

Themed answers are common phrases, but with a hard “C” sound replaced with a “Q” sound:

  • 24A. Interrogate a founding father? : QUERY WASHINGTON (from “Kerry Washington”)
  • 39A. “There are no atheists in foxholes”? : TRENCH QUOTE (from “trench coat”)
  • 46A. Tremors? : BABY QUAKES (from “baby cakes”)
  • 72A. Comment by a Brit down to his last coin? : HERE’S LOOKING AT YOU, QUID (from “Here’s looking at you, kid”)
  • 93A. One knocking out an opponent in the first round? : QUICK BOXER (from “kickboxer”)
  • 105A. Monarch who’s fine and dandy? : PEACHY QUEEN (from “peachy keen”)
  • 122A. Have a little ice cream delivered? : ORDER IN THE QUART (from “order in the court”)

Bill’s time: 20m 40s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Big name in computer networking : CISCO

Cisco is a company that I really admire (in terms of innovation and management). Headquartered in San Jose, California, Cisco develops and sells products and services in the communications sector. The name “Cisco” was taken from the name of the city San Francisco.

6. Progressive rival : ESURANCE

Esurance is a provider of auto insurance direct to customers online and over the phone. Esurance is now owned by Allstate.

14. Aries : THE RAM

Aries the Ram is the first astrological sign in the Zodiac, and is named after the constellation. Your birth sign is Aries if you were born between March 21 and April 20, but if you are an Aries you would know that! “Aries” is the Latin word for “ram”.

20. North Dakota-to-Michigan hwy. : US-TEN

US Route 10 is a highway that used to run from from Detroit, Michigan to Seattle, Washington. Dating back to 1926, interstates have replaced some of it’s length, so that now US-10 runs from Bay City, Michigan to West Fargo, North Dakota. There’s a ferry service connecting Ludington, Michigan to Manitowoc, Wisconsin across Lake Michigan. That ferry service is an officially designated section of US-10.

24. Interrogate a founding father? : QUERY WASHINGTON (from “Kerry Washington”)

By one definition, the Founding Fathers were the leaders of the American Revolution against the British Crown. By another, they were the individuals who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776. The term “Framers” is sometimes confused with “Founding Fathers”. According to the National Archives, the Framers were the 55 delegates to the 1787 Constitutional Convention, those who played a key role in drafting the Constitution of the United States. The phrase “Founding Fathers” is a relatively recent term, and one coined by future president Warren D. Harding in 1916.

26. Uganda’s Amin : IDI

Idi Amin ruled Uganda as a dictator from 1971 until 1979. Amin started his professional career as a cook in the Colonial British Army. Amin seized power from President Milton Obote in a 1971 coup d’état. The former cook eventually gave himself the title “His Excellency, President for Life, Field Marshal Al Hadji Doctor Idi Amin Dada, VC, DSO, MC, Lord of All the Beasts of the Earth and Fishes of the Seas and Conqueror of the British Empire in Africa in General and Uganda in Particular”.

31. Like the first man-made space satellite : SOVIET

The Soviet Union launched the Sputnik satellite towards the end of 1957, a development that shocked the establishment in the US. Within months, President Eisenhower created the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA, now DARPA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Space Race had begun …

38. “Sticks and Bones” playwright David : RABE

David Rabe is an American playwright, a veteran of Vietnam. He is the author of a Vietnam War Trilogy of plays:

  • “The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel”
  • “Sticks and Bones”
  • “Streamers”

39. “There are no atheists in foxholes”? : TRENCH QUOTE (from “trench coat”)

The phrase “There are no atheists in foxholes” is meant to convey the idea that in times of extreme fear, all people will believe in a higher power, no one is an atheist.

A foxhole, as one might expect, is another name for a fox’s den. Starting in WWI the term was used to describe a shallow pit dug by a soldier to provide quick-and-dirty protection from gunfire.

43. Token in the game Life : CAR

The board game we call “The Game of Life” was created quite a few years ago, in 1869 by Milton Bradley. Back then it was called “The Checkered Game of Life” and was the first parlor game to become a popular hit. The modern version of the game was first released in 1960.

50. Hershey brand : ROLO

Rolo was a hugely popular chocolate candy in Ireland when I was growing up. Rolo was introduced in the thirties in the UK, and is produced under license in the US by Hershey. I was a little disappointed when I had my first taste of the American version as the center is very hard and chewy. The recipe used on the other side of the Atlantic calls for a soft gooey center.

53. “From your lips to God’s ears” : HOPE SO

“From your lips to God’s ears” is an idiomatic phrase meaning “may what you wish for come true”. I couldn’t really uncover a definitive etymology for the expression.

55. Frequent subject of paintings by Winslow Homer : SEA

Winslow Homer was an American landscape painter and illustrator active in the second half of the 19th century. His most famous work is probably the oil painting depicting a man and three boys sailing, which bears the title “Breezing Up (A Fair Wind)”, and which can be seen in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D. C.

56. Largest lake in South America : MARACAIBO

Lake Maracaibo isn’t actually a “lake” as such, but rather a brackish bay or lagoon with a very narrow entrance into the Gulf of Venezuela in the Caribbean Sea. Paradoxically, Maracaibo was a true lake in the past, and at 20-36 million years old can be considered one of the oldest “lakes” on the planet.

60. Charles de Gaulle’s birthplace : LILLE

Lille is a large city in the very north of France sitting right on the border with Belgium. The name “Lille” is a derivation of the term “l’isle” meaning “the island”. The name “L’Isle” dates back to 1066, and is a reference to a castle that once stood on an island in the Deûle river that runs through the city. The city grew around the island and the castle.

Charles de Gaulle was a colonel in the French army at the outbreak of WWII. He was promoted to brigadier general after a successful attack on German tank forces in 1940, one of the few successes enjoyed by the French at the start of the war. Some months later, he was appointed junior minister in the French government, at which time he strenuously argued against surrender to Germany, advocating removal of the government to the French territory of Algeria. He was unsuccessful in his arguments and so flew to England where he set about building the Free French Forces from soldiers who had also fled the country. De Gaulle made several important radio addresses to the French from London that helped rally the resistance movement. Despite a shaky relationship with Winston Churchill and Dwight D. Eisenhower, De Gaulle managed to maintain a working relationship with the rest of the Allies and was accepted as leader of the new French government when Paris was liberated in 1944.

62. Animal with a trunk : TAPIR

All four species of tapir are endangered. Even though the tapir looks much like a pig, it is more closely related to the horse and the rhinoceros.

67. Kingdom in Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings” : ROHAN

Rohan is one of the realms in J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth, and is a realm that features most significantly in his book “The Lord of the Rings”.

71. Suffix in Sussex : -ISE

Sussex is a county in the very southeast of England that lies right on the English Channel. The county of Sussex has about the same boundaries as the ancient Kingdom of Sussex, a Saxon colony that existed for about five hundred years until the Battle of Hastings in 1066. Hastings, a town on the Sussex coast, was the site of the first battle of the Norman Conquest of England.

72. Comment by a Brit down to his last coin? : HERE’S LOOKING AT YOU, QUID (from “Here’s looking at you, kid”)

“Quid” is a slang term for a pound sterling (i.e. a UK pound). It’s not certain where the term comes from, but it is possibly derived somehow from the Latin phrase “quid pro quo” meaning “this for that”.

The famous line “Here’s looking at you, kid.” from 1942’s “Casablanca” was ranked no. 2 in a list of top movie quotes compiled by “The Hollywood Reporter”. The top of the list makes interesting reading, with the following comprising the top five:

  1. “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.” from “Gone With the Wind” (1939)
  2. “Here’s looking at you, kid.” from “Casablanca” (1942)
  3. “You’re gonna need a bigger boat.” from “Jaws” (1975)
  4. “May the Force be with you.” from “Star Wars” (1977)
  5. “Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.” from “The Wizard of Oz” (1939)

77. “We ___ the Champions” : ARE

“We Are the Champions” is a wonderful rock anthem written by Freddie Mercury and recorded by Queen in 1977. According to some scientific researchers in 2011, “We Are the Champions” is the catchiest song in the history of pop music.

78. Gardner of “Mogambo” : AVA

“Mogambo” is a 1953 film noted for its spectacular scenes set in the African jungle. “Mogambo” is actually a remake of a 1932 movie called “Red Dust”. Gable plays the romantic lead in both the original and the remake, even though they are filmed 21 years apart. Gable gets involved with Jean Harlow and Mary Astor in the original, and with Ava Gardner and Grace Kelly in the remake.

79. Joe of “Home Alone” : PESCI

Joe Pesci got his big break in movies with a supporting role in “Raging Bull” starring Robert De Niro, earning Pesci an Oscar nomination early in his career. There followed a string of gangster roles played alongside De Niro, namely “Once Upon a Time in America”, “Goodfellas” and “Casino”. But I like Pesci’s comedic acting best of all. He was marvelous in the “Home Alone” films, the “Lethal Weapon” series, and my personal favorite, “My Cousin Vinny”. Pesci gets a mention in the stage musical “Jersey Boys”, which isn’t too surprising as he is one of the show’s producers.

“Home Alone” is a 1990 film starring Macaulay Culkin that has become a Christmas classic. Culkin was nominated for a Best Actor Golden Globe for his performance, becoming the youngest actor ever to be so honored.

81. Instruments played on Mount Olympus : LYRES

The lyre is a stringed instrument most closely associated with Ancient Greece, and with the gods Hermes and Apollo in particular. According to myth, Hermes slaughtered a cow from a sacred herd belonging to Apollo and offered it to the gods but kept the entrails. Hermes used the entrails to make strings that he stretched across the shell of a tortoise, creating the first lyre. Apollo liked the sound from the lyre and agreed to accept it as a trade for his herd of cattle.

Mount Olympus is the highest peak in Greece. In Greek mythology, Mount Olympus was home to the gods, and in particular home to the principal gods known as the Twelve Olympians.

86. Words of resignation : C’EST LA VIE

“C’est la vie” is French for “that’s life”.

88. Greek cross : TAU

Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet, and the letter which gave rise to our Roman “T”. Both the letters tau (T) and chi (X) have long been symbolically associated with the cross.

92. Huck Finn possessive : HIS’N

“The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain was first published in 1884, not here in the US but rather in England. The original launch planned for the US had to be delayed until the following year because some rascal had defaced the plate for one of the illustrations, making an obscene joke. Once the problem was spotted a new plate had to be made, and 30,000 copies already printed had to be reworked to cover up the obscenity.

97. Russian council : DUMA

A “duma” is a representative assembly in Russia. The word “dumat” in Russian means “to think, consider”.

99. Spanish snack : TAPA

“Tapa” is the Spanish word for “lid”, and there is no clear rationale for why this word came to be used for an appetizer. There are lots of explanations cited, all of which seem to involve the temporary covering of one’s glass of wine with a plate or item of food to either preserve the wine or give one extra space at the table.

115. Heinrich ___, “Die Lorelei” poet : HEINE

Heinrich Heine was a German romantic poet whose work often became noted through the derivative lieder composed by Robert Schumann in particular. Heine died in 1856, after spending the last eight years of his life bedridden. I like his last words … “God will forgive me. It’s his job.”

Lorelei is the name of a legendary mermaid or nymph who lured fishermen by singing a beautiful song. Lorelei’s aim was to have the fishermen steer their boats onto rocks lurking beneath the water’s surface.

117. N.W.A’s “Straight ___ Compton” : OUTTA

“Straight Outta Compton” was the first album by N.W.A. N.W.A was a hip hop group from Compton, California. The original five group members included rappers who have made a name for themselves as solo acts, including: Dr. Dre and Ice Cube. The story of NWA is told in a 2015 film, also called “Straight Outta Compton”.

119. More than a millennium : AEON

Geological time is divided into a number of units of varying lengths. These are, starting from the largest:

  • supereon
  • eon (also “aeon”)
  • era
  • period
  • epoch
  • age

121. Indochinese language : LAO

Lao, the language of Laos, does not use spaces between words (or periods!), although this is apparently changing. Spaces are used between sentences and clauses.

In the strict sense of the term, “Indochina” is a region in Southeast Asia that corresponds to the former French territory known as French Indochina. Today this region is made up of the countries of Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam. However, the term “Indochina” is more generally used to describe Mainland Southeast Asia, and in this usage it also encompasses Myanmar, Singapore and Thailand.

126. Like rope : TWINY

Our word “twine”, meaning a light string, has the same root as our word “twin”. The original Old English “twin” was a double thread.

128. Supermodel Bündchen : GISELE

Gisele Bündchen is a fashion model from Brazil. Bündchen does quite well for herself as she has been the highest-paid model in the world for several years now and has amassed a fortune of about $150 million. She was romantically involved with Leonardo DiCaprio for about five years and now is married to Tom Brady, the quarterback for the New England Patriots.

129. Birdie : ONE UNDER

The following terms are routinely used in golf for scores relative to par:

  • Bogey: one over par
  • Par
  • Birdie: one under par
  • Eagle: two under par
  • Albatross (also “double eagle”): three under par
  • Condor: four under par

No one has ever recorded a condor during a professional tournament.

130. With celerity : APACE

Celerity is swiftness or speed, coming from the Latin “celeritas” that has the same meaning. And as an aside, in Einstein’s famous equation E=mc², the “c” stands for the speed of light, from the Latin “celeritas”.

Down

1. Picasso and Braque, for two : CUBISTS

In the art movement known as Cubism, objects that are the subject of a painting are broken up and reassembled in an abstract form. The pioneers of the Cubist movement were Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque.

2. Dancer Duncan : ISADORA

Isadora Duncan was an American dancer, inventor of American modern dance. Duncan emphasised the torso in her moves, a break from the balletic tradition of moving from the feet. She left the US when she was 22 years old and moved to Europe around 1900, and from there emigrated to the Soviet Union. Duncan had a tragic passing. She loved to travel in open automobiles wearing a long, flowing scarf. One day her scarf got wrapped around the spokes and axle of the car in which she was travelling, and broke her neck.

5. Like freelance work, often : ON SPEC

The term “free lance” was coined by Sir Walter Scott in his 1820 novel “Ivanhoe”, when he used it to describe a medieval mercenary warrior. Forty years later, a “freelancer” was a journalist who did work for more than one publication without a long-term commitment.

6. Attys.’ titles : ESQS

The title “esquire” is of British origin and is used differently today depending on whether one is in the US or the UK. Here in America the term is usually reserved for those practicing the law (both male and female). In the UK, “esquire” is a term of gentle respect reserved for a male who has no other title that one can use. So a mere commoner like me might receive a letter from the bank say, addressed to W. E. Butler Esq.

8. Sheik’s land, for short : UAE

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a federation of seven emirates (states) in the Middle East. Included in the seven are Abu Dhabi and Dubai, with the city of Abu Dhabi being the UAE capital and cultural center.

“Sheikh” is an Arabic title used by the head of a family or by the head of a Muslim religious order. The term arose in the 16th century and came from the Arabic word “shaykh”, meaning “chief, old man”.

9. Presidential inits. : RWR

President Ronald Reagan (RWR) used the middle name “Wilson”, as his mother was born Nelle Wilson.

13. English county : ESSEX

Essex is a county in England that is referred to as one of the “home counties”. The home counties are those that surround the city of London, outside of London itself. “Home county” is not an official designation but has been in popular use since the 1800s.

14. Response to an oversharer : TMI

Too much information! (TMI)

16. Catherine’s husband in “Wuthering Heights” : EDGAR

“Wuthering Heights” by Emily Brontë is essentially the story of a love triangle between the main characters: Catherine Earnshaw, Heathcliff and Edgar Linton.

17. Bishop’s group, once : RAT PACK

“Joey Bishop” was the stage name of entertainer Joseph Gottlieb from the Bronx, New York. Bishop was mainly a comedian, and was perhaps better known as a member of the famous Rat Pack, alongside Frank Sinatra, Peter Lawford, Sammy Davis, Jr. and Dean Martin. Bishop died in 2007, the last surviving member and the longest-lived “Rat”.

18. Ones moving with the aid of pseudopods : AMOEBAE

An ameba (or “amoeba”, as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

35. “___, sing America” (start of a Langston Hughes poem) : I, TOO

Langston Hughes was a poet active in the Harlem Renaissance, and someone who helped develop the literary form known as “jazz poetry”. His poem “I, Too, Sing America” was published in 1925.

I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
“Eat in the kitchen,”
Then.

Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed–

I, too, am America.

40. Basic French question : QUOI?

“Quoi” is French for “what”.

47. Words that can’t be heard, for short : ASL

American Sign Language (ASL)

48. Western wear : BOLO TIE

I’ve never worn a bolo tie, and was surprised to discover that it is a relatively recent invention. The first bolo tie was apparently produced in Wickenburg, Arizona in the late 1940s by a silversmith. The bolo takes its name from the boleadora, an Argentine lariat.

51. Publisher Arthur ___ Sulzberger : OCHS

Adolph Ochs was a former owner of “The New York Times”. Ochs had purchased a controlling interest in “The Chattanooga Times” when he was only 19 years of age, and took control of “The New York Times” in 1896 when he was 38 years old. Soon after taking charge, Ochs coined the paper’s slogan “All the News That’s Fit to Print”. It was also Ochs who moved the paper’s headquarters to a new building on Longacre Square in Manhattan, which the city later renamed to the famous “Times Square” after the newspaper. Och’s son-in-law Arthur Hays Sulzberger took over control of “The New York Times” after Adolph died. The Ochs Sulzberger family has owned the paper ever since.

52. Song woman who’s asked “Darlin’, won’t you ease my worried mind?” : LAYLA

“Layla” is one of the great rock anthems of the seventies, released by Derek and the Dominos as a single in 1971. It is a masterpiece of composition, with the first half of the song a great vehicle for the guitar-playing talents of Eric Clapton. The second half is a beautifully melodic piano coda (a coda … taking up half the length of the track!). To top things off we have the “unplugged” version recorded by Clapton in 1992, a fabulous and inventive variation on the original.

Layla, you’ve got me on my knees.
Layla, I’m begging, darling please.
Layla, darling won’t you ease my worried mind.

54. Subject of the mnemonic “Men Very Easily Make Jugs Serve Useful Needs” : PLANETS

There are several mnemonics used to remember the planets and the order in which they are found in the Solar System. One example is “My Very Easy Method Just Shows Us Nine Planets”, but that doesn’t really work since Pluto was relegated from “planethood”. The most oft-quoted mnemonic for the eight planets is “My Very Eager Mother Just Served Us Nachos”. Given the relegation of Pluto, I kind of like “Many Very Educated Men Just Screwed Up Nature”.

56. Taj ___ : MAHAL

The most famous mausoleum in the world has to be the Taj Mahal in Agra, India. The Taj Mahal was built after the death of the fourth wife of Shah Jahan, Mumtaz Mahal (hence the name of the mausoleum). The poor woman died in childbirth delivering the couple’s 14th child. When Shah Jahan himself passed away 35 years later, he was buried beside his wife Mumtaz, in the Taj Mahal.

64. Judas’s question to the Lord : IS IT I?

At the Last Supper, Jesus told his apostles that one of them would betray him that day. According to the Gospel of Matthew:

And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began every one of them to say unto him, Lord, is it I?

73. Some gametes : OVA

A gamete is a reproductive cell that has half the full complement of genes needed to make a normal cell. In sexual reproduction, it takes two gametes, one from each parent, to fuse into one cell which then develops into a new organism. The female gamete is the ovum, and the male the sperm.

75. Things with colons inside them : URLS

Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

83. Nordstrom rival : SAKS

Saks Fifth Avenue is a high-end specialty store that competes with the likes of Bloomingdale’s and Neiman Marcus. The original Saks & Company business was founded by Andrew Saks in 1867. The first Saks Fifth Avenue store was opened on Fifth Avenue in New York City in 1924. There are now Saks Fifth Avenue stores in many major cities in the US, as well in several locations worldwide.

85. Term for a hole in Swiss cheese : EYE

“Swiss cheese” is a relatively generic term for a type of cheese produced in various countries and not necessarily in Switzerland. What they all have in common though, is a resemblance to the original Swiss Emmental cheese.

87. 1979 exile : SHAH

The last Shah of Iran was Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, as he was overthrown in the revolution led by the Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979. The post-revolution government sought the extradition of the Shah back to Iran while he was in the United States seeking medical care (he had cancer). His prolonged stay in the United States, recovering from surgery, caused some unrest back in Iran and resentment towards the United States. Some say that this resentment precipitated the storming of the US Embassy in Tehran and the resulting hostage crisis.

91. Prefix with -graphic : IDEO-

An ideograph or ideogram is pictorial symbol used to represent a concept. A good example would be an emoticon, like a smiley face 🙂

93. Hard-shell clams : QUAHOGS

“Quahog” is another word for “hard clam”, the clam that is commonly harvested on the eastern shores of North America. The quahog may also be called the “chowder clam”. Hard clams are the largest of the clams commonly sold, with the cherrystone clams being a little smaller.

96. Bagel variety : ONION

The bagel was invented in the Polish city of Kraków in the 16th century. Bagels were brought to this country by Jewish immigrants from Poland who mainly established homes in and around New York City.

98. British sports automobile : MCLAREN

Bruce McLaren was a racecar driver and designer from New Zealand. He was very successful during the sixties. The race team that he founded is still active and successful today. McLaren himself died while testing a car at the Goodwood Circuit in England in 1970.

100. Kind of harp : AEOLIAN

Aeolus was the ruler of the winds in Greek mythology, and he gave his name to the adjective “aeolian” (also “aeolic, eolic”) meaning “windblown”, something produced or carried by the wind.

106. Navy petty officer: Abbr. : YEO

In the US Navy, a yeoman is tasked with administrative and clerical work. In fact, the position of yeoman is the oldest rating in the navy. You’ll also see a lot of yeomen in the background on “Star Trek”.

107. The so-called “Flying Kangaroo” : QANTAS

QANTAS is the national airline of Australia. The company name was originally an acronym for Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services. QANTAS has featured a koala in advertising campaigns for many years, although the company’s logo is a kangaroo and the company’s nickname is “Flying Kangaroo”.

111. Informal sleep option : FUTON

Anyone lucky enough to have visited Japan might be familiar with the traditional Japanese futon. Unlike what we tend to call futon in this country, the Japanese original is a padded mattress and quilt. Japanese futons are usually rolled up in the morning so that the space used for sleeping can be repurposed during the day.

123. Iraq War danger, for short : IED

Having lived much of my life in the border areas between southern and Northern Ireland, I am sadly all too familiar with the devastating effects of improvised explosive devices (IEDs). One has to admire the bravery of soldiers who spend their careers defusing (or attempting to defuse) such devices in order to save the lives and property of others.

124. A.C.C. powerhouse : UNC

The University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill started enrolling students way back in 1795, making it the oldest public university in the country, i.e. the first to enrol students.

127. F.D.R. job-creating prog. : WPA

The Work Progress Administration (WPA) was the largest of the New Deal agencies. The WPA employed millions of people during the Depression, putting them to work on various public works projects. The total spending through the WPA from 1936 to 1939 was nearly $7 billion. We have to give the federal government credit for taking an enlightened view of what types of project qualified for financial support, so artists who could not get commissions privately were hired by the government itself. The result is a collection of “New Deal Art”, including a series of murals that can be found in post offices around the country to this day.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Big name in computer networking : CISCO
6. Progressive rival : ESURANCE
14. Aries : THE RAM
20. North Dakota-to-Michigan hwy. : US-TEN
21. Members of an Oklahoma tribe : SHAWNEES
22. Addressee of a waiter in a French restaurant : MADAME
23. Exposes : BARES
24. Interrogate a founding father? : QUERY WASHINGTON (from “Kerry Washington”)
26. Uganda’s Amin : IDI
27. One getting shooed : PEST
29. Bone: Prefix : OSSEO-
30. Was wide open : GAPED
31. Like the first man-made space satellite : SOVIET
33. What the earth and many political analysts do : SPIN
36. They’re added on bus. lines : EXTS
38. “Sticks and Bones” playwright David : RABE
39. “There are no atheists in foxholes”? : TRENCH QUOTE (from “trench coat”)
41. Word aptly found in “controlled” and “marshaled” : LED
43. Token in the game Life : CAR
44. Was a rat : SANG
45. Engaged in : UP TO
46. Tremors? : BABY QUAKES (from “baby cakes”)
50. Hershey brand : ROLO
53. “From your lips to God’s ears” : HOPE SO
55. Frequent subject of paintings by Winslow Homer : SEA
56. Largest lake in South America : MARACAIBO
60. Charles de Gaulle’s birthplace : LILLE
62. Animal with a trunk : TAPIR
66. Interest’s opposite : APATHY
67. Kingdom in Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings” : ROHAN
69. Email address ending : ORG
71. Suffix in Sussex : -ISE
72. Comment by a Brit down to his last coin? : HERE’S LOOKING AT YOU, QUID (from “Here’s looking at you, kid”)
77. “We ___ the Champions” : ARE
78. Gardner of “Mogambo” : AVA
79. Joe of “Home Alone” : PESCI
80. True : TRUSTY
81. Instruments played on Mount Olympus : LYRES
84. Expert : ADEPT
86. Words of resignation : C’EST LA VIE
88. Greek cross : TAU
90. “As you wish, Captain!” : AYE, SIR!
92. Huck Finn possessive : HIS’N
93. One knocking out an opponent in the first round? : QUICK BOXER (from “kickboxer”)
97. Russian council : DUMA
99. Spanish snack : TAPA
103. ___ Indianapolis : USS
104. One of 100: Abbr. : SEN
105. Monarch who’s fine and dandy? : PEACHY QUEEN (from “peachy keen”)
108. Cries of surprise : AHAS
110. Teeming : RIFE
113. Veg out : LOLL
114. Irish form of “Edmund” : EAMONN
115. Heinrich ___, “Die Lorelei” poet : HEINE
117. N.W.A’s “Straight ___ Compton” : OUTTA
119. More than a millennium : AEON
121. Indochinese language : LAO
122. Have a little ice cream delivered? : ORDER IN THE QUART (from “order in the court”)
126. Like rope : TWINY
128. Supermodel Bündchen : GISELE
129. Birdie : ONE UNDER
130. With celerity : APACE
131. Kept others awake, maybe : SNORED
132. Tip of a missile : NOSE CONE
133. More sound : SANER

Down

1. Picasso and Braque, for two : CUBISTS
2. Dancer Duncan : ISADORA
3. Gone to great lengths : STRIVEN
4. Middling mark : CEE
5. Like freelance work, often : ON SPEC
6. Attys.’ titles : ESQS
7. Stops yapping : SHUTS UP
8. Sheik’s land, for short : UAE
9. Presidential inits. : RWR
10. “Who’s interested?” : ANYONE?
11. Update, say : NEWS
12. Terminate : CEASE
13. English county : ESSEX
14. Response to an oversharer : TMI
15. Suspend : HANG
16. Catherine’s husband in “Wuthering Heights” : EDGAR
17. Bishop’s group, once : RAT PACK
18. Ones moving with the aid of pseudopods : AMOEBAE
19. Seamstresses, at times : MENDERS
25. With vehemence : HOTLY
28. Ending of the Bible : -ETH
32. Unappreciative sort : INGRATE
34. Metallic S-shaped piece : POTHOOK
35. “___, sing America” (start of a Langston Hughes poem) : I, TOO
37. “Look Who’s Talking Too” and “2 Fast 2 Furious”: Abbr. : SEQS
40. Basic French question : QUOI?
42. Number for two : DUET
46. Sentient ones : BEINGS
47. Words that can’t be heard, for short : ASL
48. Western wear : BOLO TIE
49. Strong bond? : AAA
51. Publisher Arthur ___ Sulzberger : OCHS
52. Song woman who’s asked “Darlin’, won’t you ease my worried mind?” : LAYLA
54. Subject of the mnemonic “Men Very Easily Make Jugs Serve Useful Needs” : PLANETS
56. Taj ___ : MAHAL
57. Mimic’s activity : APERY
58. Not so common : RARER
59. Medieval weapon : BROADAX
61. Suffix with trick : -ERY
63. Pope who excommunicated Elizabeth I : PIUS V
64. Judas’s question to the Lord : IS IT I?
65. Change the color of again : REDYE
68. More trendy : HIPPER
70. TV’s “Growing Up ___” : GOTTI
73. Some gametes : OVA
74. Accumulation : ACCRUAL
75. Things with colons inside them : URLS
76. Kind of leap : QUANTUM
82. Abbr. that’s sometimes doubled or tripled : ETC
83. Nordstrom rival : SAKS
85. Term for a hole in Swiss cheese : EYE
87. 1979 exile : SHAH
89. It’ll take you for a ride : UBER
91. Prefix with -graphic : IDEO-
93. Hard-shell clams : QUAHOGS
94. Mark the beginning of : USHER IN
95. Unsatisfying answer to “Why?” : I SAID SO
96. Bagel variety : ONION
98. British sports automobile : MCLAREN
100. Kind of harp : AEOLIAN
101. Atonement : PENANCE
102. Nuisance : ANNOYER
105. Trophy alternative : PLAQUE
106. Navy petty officer: Abbr. : YEO
107. The so-called “Flying Kangaroo” : QANTAS
109. Curl one’s lip : SNEER
111. Informal sleep option : FUTON
112. People: Prefix : ETHNO-
116. Man’s name that comes from an English noble : ERLE
118. Some summer wear : TEES
120. Ser : Spanish :: ___ : French : ETRE
123. Iraq War danger, for short : IED
124. A.C.C. powerhouse : UNC
125. Rumpus : ADO
127. F.D.R. job-creating prog. : WPA