0317-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 17 Mar 2018, Saturday

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Constructed by: Roland Huget
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 22m 53s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Official on a Segway, maybe : MALL COP

The Segway PT is self-balancing two-wheel electric vehicle introduced to the world in 2001 by American inventor Dean Kamen.

16. Another name for an ear shell : ABALONE

The large edible sea snails that we call abalone are called ormer in the British Isles, and is served as “awabi” at a sushi bar. The abalone shell resembles a human ear, giving rise to the alternative names “ear shell” and “sea ear”.

19. When el Día de los Reyes is celebrated : ENERO

The holiday in the Christian tradition known as the Epiphany falls on January 6th. In some Spanish-speaking countries, the Epiphany is known as “Día de los Reyes”, and in other as “Día de Reyes” (The Day of Kings).

23. Edward Fairfax ___, “Billy Budd” captain : VERE

“Billy Budd, Sailor” is a novella by American author Herman Melville. However, Melville didn’t actually finish “Billy Budd” before he died in 1891.

30. Christmas bowlful : NOG

It’s not really clear where the term “nog” (as in “eggnog”) comes from although it might derive from the word “noggin”, which was originally a small wooden cup that was long associated with alcoholic drinks.

31. 1992 hit for k. d. lang : CONSTANT CRAVING

k.d. lang is the stage name of Kathryn Dawn Lang, a Canadian singer and songwriter. Beyond her performing career, lang is a noted activist focused on animal rights, gay rights, and human rights in Tibet.

35. Radio format for Radiohead : ALTERNATIVE ROCK

Radiohead is an alternative rock band from England that formed in 1985. When the band self-released their 2007 studio album “In Rainbows”, it was a big deal for the music industry. Radiohead offered a digital version of the album using a pay-what-you-want pricing model. Reportedly, most fans paid what would be a normal retail price for the download version of the album. That’s not bad, considering the relatively low cost to produce a download compared to the cost of producing a CD.

41. Chit in a pot : IOU

I owe you (IOU)

42. Heavy-handed administrations : REGIMES

Quite often, the terms “regime” and “regimen” seem to be used interchangeably. In contemporary usage though, “regime” is applied more generally, and “regimen” more specifically. A “regimen” is a systematic approach that one might apply to something, exercise or diet for example. The term “regime” can also be used in such contexts, but can have additional definitions, such as “government in power”. A form of government cannot be described as a “regimen”.

46. Massenet opera : LE CID

“Le Cid” is an opera by Jules Massenet that premiered at the Paris Opéra in 1885. The opera is adapted from a play of the same name by Pierre Corneille. Both works are based on the legends surrounding Spanish military leader El Cid.

48. Jazz genre : BEBOP

The jazz term “bebop” probably came from “Arriba! Arriba!”, which were words of encouragement uttered by Latin American bandleaders to their musicians.

50. Web portal with a Bing search bar : MSN

Bing is the search engine from Microsoft. Bing is the latest name for an engine that Microsoft used to call Live Search, Windows Live Search and MSN Search.

59. Depot’s terminus? : SILENT T

There is a silent letter T (tee) at the end of the word “depot”.

Down

4. Petrol measure : LITRE

Petrol is the same thing as gasoline. “Petrol” comes via French from the Latin “petroleum”, itself derived from “petra” meaning “rock” and “oleum” meaning “oil”.

5. Role for Liz in ’63 : CLEO

The 1963 movie “Cleopatra” really is an epic work. It was the highest grossing film of the year, taking in $26 million dollars at the box office, yet it still lost money. The original budget for the film was just $2 million, but so many things went wrong the final cost swelled to a staggering $44 million dollars, making it the second most expensive movie ever made (taking into account inflation). Elizabeth Taylor was supposed to earn a record amount of $1 million for the film, and ended up earned seven times that amount due to delays. But she paid dearly, as she became seriously ill during shooting and had to have an emergency tracheotomy to save her life. The scar in her throat can actually be seen in some of the shots in the film.

6. Subj. of the 2003 book “The Meaning of Everything” : OED

Oxford English Dictionary (OED)

11. Single-masted boat : SLOOP

Sloops and cutters are sailboats, and each has just one mast. One major difference between the two types of vessel is that the mast on a cutter is set much further aft than the mast on a sloop.

12. Trattoria dessert : TORTONI

Biscuit Tortoni is an ice cream dessert made with eggs and heavy cream and usually enhanced with a couple of teaspoons of rum. “Tortoni” was apparently an 18th century owner of an Italian café in Paris.

13. Keeper of logs? : ANDIRON

Andirons (also “firedogs”) are those horizontal bars on which you rest logs to burn in an open fireplace. They usually come in pairs and can be quite decorative, and are often made out of wrought iron.

28. Edwin with the 1970 #1 hit “War” : STARR

The most famous recording of “War” was by Edwin Starr in 1970. It went to number one, at the height of the anti-Vietnam War sentiment in the country, and became the song most associated with Starr. The song has also been recorded by the Temptations and Bruce Springsteen.

29. Dwellers on the North Sea : DANES

The constitutional monarchy of Denmark consists of not only the country of Denmark, but also the autonomous constituent countries of the Faroe Islands and Greenland.

32. Abbr. in an office address : STE

Suite (ste.)

33. See, in Tijuana : VER

Tijuana is the largest city in the Mexican state of Baja California, and lies just across the US-Mexico border from San Diego. Tijuana is also the most westerly of all Mexican cities. A lot of Tijuana’s growth took place in the twenties as tourists flocked south of the border during the days of prohibition in the US. One of the many casinos and hotels that flourished at that time was Hotel Caesar’s in the Avenida Revolución area. Hotel Caesar’s claims to be the birthplace of the now ubiquitous Caesar Salad.

40. Mideast diet : KNESSET

The Knesset is the legislative branch of the Israeli government, and does its business in the Givat Ram neighborhood of central Jerusalem.

45. Philosopher Kierkegaard : SOREN

Soren Kierkegaard was a Danish philosopher and theologian, and I’ve never really understood anything that he wrote!

47. Dodgers Hall-of-Famer whose #1 has been retired : REESE

Pee Wee Reese was a shortstop who played his professional career with the Brooklyn and LA Dodgers. Reese is remembered not only for his skill on the field, but for his very visible support for teammate Jackie Robinson, who famously struggled to be accepted as the first African American player in the majors. As he was an outstanding marbles player as a child, Reese was given the nickname “pee wee” after the name for a small marble.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Official on a Segway, maybe : MALL COP
8. Rotating part of a tape recorder : CAPSTAN
15. Merchant with tiny shopping carts : E-TAILER
16. Another name for an ear shell : ABALONE
17. Epitome of completeness : DOTTED I
18. Edits, as text : REWORDS
19. When el Día de los Reyes is celebrated : ENERO
20. It’s an honor : ODE
22. Playground declaration : NOT IT!
23. Edward Fairfax ___, “Billy Budd” captain : VERE
24. Exclaimed : CRIED
26. Little sweater? : PORE
27. Back : AGO
28. Changed course quickly, at sea : SHEERED
30. Christmas bowlful : NOG
31. 1992 hit for k. d. lang : CONSTANT CRAVING
34. Reddish orange : TANGERINE
35. Radio format for Radiohead : ALTERNATIVE ROCK
41. Chit in a pot : IOU
42. Heavy-handed administrations : REGIMES
43. De : French :: ___ : German : VON
44. Big Caribbean exports : RUMS
46. Massenet opera : LE CID
47. ___ Belbenoît, noted escapee from Devil’s Island : RENE
48. Jazz genre : BEBOP
50. Web portal with a Bing search bar : MSN
51. Sickos : PERVS
52. Court order : ALL RISE
54. Conforms (to) : ADHERES
56. Ignore the alarm, say : SLEEP IN
57. Downtime : LEISURE
58. Heartfelt : EARNEST
59. Depot’s terminus? : SILENT T

Down

1. One role for a helicopter : MEDEVAC
2. Simultaneously : AT ONE GO
3. In a bit : LATER ON
4. Petrol measure : LITRE
5. Role for Liz in ’63 : CLEO
6. Subj. of the 2003 book “The Meaning of Everything” : OED
7. Reason to refuse an invitation : PRIOR ENGAGEMENT
8. Those prone to recidivism : CAREER CRIMINALS
9. White House nickname : ABE
10. Puppet : PAWN
11. Single-masted boat : SLOOP
12. Trattoria dessert : TORTONI
13. Keeper of logs? : ANDIRON
14. Savings : NEST EGG
21. Nutrition science : DIETETICS
24. Band selection : CHANNEL
25. Obtained (from) : DERIVED
28. Edwin with the 1970 #1 hit “War” : STARR
29. Dwellers on the North Sea : DANES
32. Abbr. in an office address : STE
33. See, in Tijuana : VER
35. Where drones return : AIR BASE
36. Parsons of old Hollywood gossip : LOUELLA
37. Lock component : TUMBLER
38. Inundate : OVERRUN
39. Persuaded one : CONVERT
40. Mideast diet : KNESSET
45. Philosopher Kierkegaard : SOREN
47. Dodgers Hall-of-Famer whose #1 has been retired : REESE
49. Word with organ or cleaner : PIPE
51. Man’s nickname in a metropolitan orchestra? : PHIL
53. Member of the family, for short : SIS
55. “Ad majorem ___ gloriam” (motto of the Jesuits) : DEI

8 thoughts on “0317-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 17 Mar 2018, Saturday”

    1. Just noticed that my time is slightly better than Bill’s. (Hey, it happens once in a while … a very looong while ?.) So I suppose I should follow the lead of another poster here and say that I’m “chuffed”. Or, “right chuffed”. Or, to Americanize it, “downright chuffed”. Or, considering the boost it has given me, “left downright chuffed”! … ?

  1. 30:46 Agree with Dave, pretty normal for a Saturday. Got MALLCOP right away but took a bit to get the rest of that corner. Ended up getting the middle section first. Got MSN right away so I took a bit of a leap and put in CRIMINALS hoping that was right. Last part was the upper right. Never heard of CAPSTAN and couldn’t get ANDIRONS for awhile.

  2. Right, then. With that proper intro, I’ll say that I’m similarly chuffed: 16:21, and no errors. Very easy by Saturday standards. Or, maybe this is one of those times when I’m just in tune with the setter: God knows the opposite is true so much more often. I’ll take it, though: a rare bettering of Bill’s time (and by a LOT), the end of a week in which I had only 4 errors in all grids (and all those on MONDAY?????)

  3. 20:29, no errors. Deliberately vague clueing gave so many options, that it seemed like a DNF. Just enough letters in the right places kept me going, eventually able to gain speed toward the end, as the entries became more obvious. May I join the chuff train?

  4. What? Today I’m thrown in with a bunch of high achievers, or should I say “chuffers”, and left to write about my errors? No way. Won’t do it.

  5. 27 minutes, 2 errors. Call me almost chuffed myself.

    Edit to add: And once again the Sunday grid takes the prize for hardest grid of the week (by far). I’m starting to not believe this “Sunday is just Thursday difficulty but with a bigger grid” stuff the more I do of these.

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