0311-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 11 Mar 2018, Sunday

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Constructed by: Matthew Sewell
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: If Found, Call …

We have several LOST DOGS in today’s grid. The names of fictional dogs are referenced in one clue, and found as a hidden word in another:

  • 1A. Heading on a neighborhood poster : LOST DOG
  • 28A. Last seen riding in a basket. If found, call ___ [see 106-Across] : DOROTHY GALE
  • 106A. Proceed enthusiastically : GO TO TOWN (hiding TOTO from “The Wizard of Oz”)
  • 44A. Last seen in the nursery. If found, call ___ [see 84-Across] : THE DARLINGS
  • 84A. Pretend : PUT ON AN ACT (hiding NANA from “Peter Pan”)
  • 64A. Last seen with a red-haired girl. If found, call ___ [see 119-Across] : LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE
  • 119A. Algebraic variables : XS AND YS (hiding SANDY from “Annie”)
  • 86A. Last seen chasing down clues. If found, call ___ [see 24-Across] : NICK AND NORA
  • 24A. “1984” superstate : EASTASIA (hiding ASTA from “The Thin Man”)
  • 100A. Last seen being mocked by a cat. If found, call ___ [see 46-Across] : JON ARBUCKLE
  • 46A. One who can’t keep weight off for long : YO-YO DIETER (hiding ODIE from “Garfield”)

Bill’s time: 20m 45s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

8. Radio personality Glenn : BECK

Glenn Beck ss a political commentator who leans to the right, and so is a big star on the Fox News Channel. He has a had a rough life. His parents divorced, and his mother committed suicide by jumping out of a small boat in Puget Sound. Glenn Beck himself got divorced from his first wife, with her leaving him due to his struggles with substance abuse. He is now married for a second time, and living the quiet life in Connecticut.

19. Standing closet : ARMOIRE

“Armoire” is the French word for “wardrobe”, and is used for a standing closet that stores clothes.

20. Poison ivy soother : ALOE

Two of the plants that are most painful to humans are poison oak and poison ivy. Poison oak is mainly found west of the Rocky Mountains, and poison ivy to the east.

21. Huts : SHANTIES

Our word “shanty” is used for a rough cabin. It comes from the Canadian French word “chantier”, which is a “lumberjack’s headquarters”.

22. Anti-mob tool : TEAR GAS

The technical name for tear gas is a lachrymatory agent, meaning that it causes tearing (“lacrima” is the Latin for “tear”).

24. “1984” superstate : EASTASIA (hiding ASTA)

The action in George Orwell’s 1949 novel “Nineteen Eighty-Four” takes place in the intercontinental superstate of Oceania. Orwell also created two other superstates, called Eurasia and Eastasia.

25. “Get ’em!” : SIC!

“Sic ’em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with “sic” being a variation of “seek”.

27. High land : NEPAL

Nepal lies to the northeast of India. Today, the state is known as the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal. In 2008, the Communist Party of Nepal won the country’s general election. Soon after, the Assembly voted to change the form of government, moving away from a monarchy and creating a secular republic.

28. Last seen riding in a basket. If found, call ___ [see 106-Across] : DOROTHY GALE
[106A. Proceed enthusiastically : GO TO TOWN (hiding TOTO)]

In the children’s novel “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum, Dorothy Gale lives with her Aunt Em and Uncle Henry.

Toto is Dorothy’s dog in the film “The Wizard of Oz”, and in the original book “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum. Toto was played in the movie by a dog called Terry, but Terry’s name was soon changed to Toto in real life due to the success of the film.

36. Pizzeria chain, casually : UNO’S

The chain of pizza parlors known today as Uno Chicago Grill used to be called Pizzeria Uno, or just “Uno’s”. Apparently Uno’s created the world’s first deep dish pizza.

37. Like a certain Freudian complex : OEDIPAL

An oedipal relationship is one in which a child exhibits sexual desire for the parent of the opposite sex. A child exhibiting such behavior is said to have an Oedipus complex, named for the play “Oedipus Rex” by Sophocles.

41. It goes around the neck : BIB

The word “bib” comes from the Latin “bibere” meaning “to drink”, as does our word “imbibe”. So, maybe a bib is less about spilling the food, and more about soaking up the booze …

44. Last seen in the nursery. If found, call ___ [see 84-Across] : THE DARLINGS
[84A. Pretend : PUT ON AN ACT (hiding NANA)]

In J.M. Barrie’s play and novel about Peter Pan, Peter takes Wendy Darling and her two brothers on adventures on the island of Neverland. Back in the real world, the Darling children are taken care of by a nanny, a Newfoundland dog called Nana. It is Nana who takes Peter Pan’s shadow away from him as he tries to escape from the Darling house one night.

50. Tempe sch. : ASU

Arizona State University (ASU) has a long history, and was founded as the Tempe Normal School for the Arizona Territory in 1885. The athletic teams of ASU used to be known as the Normals, then the Bulldogs, and since 1946 they’ve been called the Sun Devils.

53. Reverses, as a deletion : STETS

“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

59. Toll rds. : TPKS

Back in the 15th century, a turnpike (tpk.) was a defensive barrier across a road. By the 17th century the term was used for a barrier that stopped travelers until a toll was paid. By the 18th century a turnpike was the name given to a road with a toll.

61. Yokohama “yes” : HAI

Yokohama is the second-most populous city in Japan. Yokohama lies on Tokyo Bay and is just a 40-minute drive from the nation’s capital.

62. Tijuana setting, informally : BAJA

Tijuana is the largest city in the Mexican state of Baja California, and lies just across the US-Mexico border from San Diego. Tijuana is also the most westerly of all Mexican cities. A lot of Tijuana’s growth took place in the twenties as tourists flocked south of the border during the days of prohibition in the US. One of the many casinos and hotels that flourished at that time was Hotel Caesar’s in the Avenida Revolución area. Hotel Caesar’s claims to be the birthplace of the now ubiquitous Caesar Salad.

63. Postal abbr. for a rural address : RTE

Route (rte.)

64. Last seen with a red-haired girl. If found, call ___ [see 119-Across] : LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE
[119A. Algebraic variables : XS AND YS (hiding SANDY)]

“Little Orphan Annie” is a comic strip created in 1924 by Harold Gray. The title was taken from a poem written in 1885 by James Whitcomb Riley called “Little Orphant Annie” (and yes, that spelling “orphant” is correct). Strangely enough, the original name of the poem was “Little Orphant Allie”, changed forever at its third printing, purely because of a typesetter’s error!

68. Drone, for one : BEE

Drone bees and ants are fertile males of the species, whose sole role in life seems to be to mate with a queen.

69. Cyclotron bits : IONS

A cyclotron accelerates charged particles (ions) using a magnetic field, usually directing the particles round and round a huge underground circular structure.

71. Some bygone theaters : RKOS

The RKO Pictures studio was formed when RCA (RADIO Corporation of America) bought the KEITH-Albee-ORPHEUM theaters (and Joe Kennedy’s Film Booking Offices of America). The RKO initialism then comes from the words “Radio”, “Keith” and “Orpheum”.

74. Food cart offerings : GYROS

A gyro is a traditional Greek dish of meat roasted on a tall vertical spit that is sliced from the spit as required. Gyros are usually served inside a lightly grilled piece of pita bread, along with tomato, onion and tzatziki (a yogurt and cucumber sauce).

76. One of the Marcoses of the Philippines : IMELDA

Many moons ago, I spent a couple of very happy years living in Manila in the Philippines. I had an apartment there, and residing in the apartment building next door was Imelda Marcos, along with all of her shoes I assume …

80. Alphabetically first “American Idol” judge across all 16 seasons : ABDUL

Paula Abdul is primarily a singer and dancer, and someone who endeared herself even more to the American public in recent years as a judge on “American Idol”. Abdul had a famous husband for a couple of years, as she was married to actor Emilio Estevez from 1992-94.

Fox’s “American Idol” is a spin-off show that was created after the amazing success of the British television show “Pop Idol”. Neither program(me) would be my cup of tea …

86. Last seen chasing down clues. If found, call ___ [see 24-Across] : NICK AND NORA

“The Thin Man” is a detective novel written by Dashiell Hammett that was first published in the magazine “Redbook” in 1934. Hammett never wrote a sequel to his story, but it spawned a wonderful, wonderful series of “The Thin Man” films starring William Powell and Myrna Loy (as Nick and Nora Charles). “The Thin Man” was the last novel that Hammett wrote.

[24A. “1984” superstate : EASTASIA (hiding ASTA)]
Asta is the wonderful little dog in the superb “The Thin Man” series of films starring William Powell and Myrna Loy (as Nick and Nora Charles). In the original story by Dashiell Hammett, Asta was a female Schnauzer, but on screen Asta was played by a wire-haired fox terrier called “Skippy”. Skippy was also the dog in “Bringing up Baby” with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn, the one who kept stealing the dinosaur bone. Skippy retired in 1939, so Asta was played by other dogs in the remainder of “The Thin Man” films.

90. Poet who wrote of Daedlaus : OVID

The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is known today simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets: Horace and Virgil. Although he was immensely popular during his own lifetime, Ovid spent the last ten years of his life in exile. He fell foul of Emperor Augustus, although what led to this disfavor isn’t truly understood.

92. Theme song of Milton Berle : NEAR YOU

Comedian Milton Berle was known as “Uncle Miltie” and “Mr. Television”, and was arguably the first real star of American television. Berle was hosting “Texaco Star Theater” back in 1948.

93. Forms, forms and more forms : RED TAPE

Back in the days of yore in England, official documents were bound in bundles with red ribbon. So, getting through all the paperwork required “cutting through the red tape”.

96. Sash supporter : SILL

“Sill plate”, or simply “sill”, is an architectural term for a bottom horizontal member to which vertical members are attached. Windowsills and doorsills are specific sill plates found at the bottoms of a window and door openings.

A movable (up and down) window frame is called a sash, from the French word for a frame “châssis”. The term is also applied to that part of a door or window into which windows are set.

97. Any of the Baltic states, once: Abbr. : SSR

Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR)

The Baltic is a sea in northern Europe that is much less saline than the oceans. The lower amount of salt in the Baltic partially explains why almost half of the sea freezes over during the winter. In fact, the Baltic has been known to completely freeze over several times over the past few centuries.

98. What’s left on TV? : MSNBC

MSNBC was founded in 1996 as a partnership between Microsoft (“MS”) and GE’s “NBC” broadcasting operation. Microsoft only owns a minority share in MSNBC today, but is still an equal partner in the separate company that runs msnbc.com.

100. Last seen being mocked by a cat. If found, call ___ [see 46-Across] : JON ARBUCKLE
[46A. One who can’t keep weight off for long : YO-YO DIETER (hiding ODIE)]

Jon Arbuckle is a fictional character, and the owner of Odie from Jim Davis’s comic strip “Garfield”. Garfield is Arbuckle’s orange tabby cat. Odie is his less-than-smart beagle.

103. Gambling mecca : MACAO

Macau (also “Macao”) is an autonomous territory of China located on the Pearl River estuary about 40 miles west of Hong Kong. Macau was a Portuguese colony from the mid-1500s until 1999. It was in fact the first European colony in China, and the last, having been handed back to the Chinese in 1999, two years after Hong Kong was returned by the British. Macau’s economy is driven by tourism and gambling. The territory’s gaming revenue is the highest for any gambling center in the world.

115. War loser, usually : TREY

A trey is a three in a deck of cards. The name “trey” can also be used for a domino with three pips, and even a three-point play in basketball.

117. Storied journey : ODYSSEY

“The Odyssey” is one of two epic poems from ancient Greece that is attributed to Homer. “The Odyssey” is largely a sequel to Homer’s other epic, “The Iliad”. “The Odyssey” centers on the heroic figure Odysseus, and his adventures on his journey home to Greece following the fall of Troy. We now use the term “odyssey” to describe any long series of adventures.

118. Puts the kibosh on : ENDS

A kibosh is something that constrains or checks. “Kibosh” looks like a Yiddish word but it isn’t, and is more likely English slang from the early 1800s.

Down

1. Rowing muscle, for short : LAT

The muscles known as the “lats” are the latissimi dorsi, the broadest muscles in the back. “Latissimus” is the Latin for “broadest” and “dorsum” is Latin for “back”.

5. Sudoku entry : DIGIT

Number puzzles similar to our modern-day Sudoku first appeared in French newspapers in the late 1800s. The format that we use today was created by Howard Garns, a 74-year-old freelance puzzle constructor from Connersville, Indiana and first published in 1979. The format was introduced in Japan in 1984 and given the title of “Sūji wa dokushin ni kagiru”, which translates to “the digits are limited to one occurrence”. The rather elaborate Japanese title was eventually shortened to Sudoku. No doubt many of you are fans of Sudoku puzzles. I know I am …

7. Some kitchen appliances, for short : GES

The General Electric Company is usually referred to simply as “GE”. One of the precursor companies to GE was Edison General Electric, founded in 1890 by the inventor Thomas Edison. What we know today as GE was formed two years later when Edison merged his company with Charles Coffin’s Thomson-Houston Electric Company. In 1896, GE was selected as one of the 12 companies listed on the newly formed Dow Jones Industrial Average. GE is the only one of the original 12 that is still on that list. I spent over ten years with GE at the beginning of my working career, and in fact it was GE that asked me to transfer to the US back in the 1980s …

11. Etta of old comics : KETT

“Etta Kett” was a comic strip that first ran in 1925. The strip ceased to be published in 1974, when creator Paul Robinson passed away. The initial intent was to offer tips to teenagers on manners and social graces, hence the name of the title character Etta Kett (sounds like “etiquette”).

12. Sister of Ariadne : PHAEDRA

In Greek mythology, Phaedra is the daughter of King Minos of Crete, and the wife of Theseus who founded Athens. While married to Theseus, Phaedra fell in love with Hippolytus, Theseus’s son from a previous marriage. In one version of the myth, Phaedra tells Theseus that Hippolytus raped her, leading to Theseus killing his son, and Phaedra then committing suicide in an act of remorse. Tragic stuff …

17. Charlottetown’s prov. : PEI

Prince Edward Island (PEI) is a maritime Canadian province. The island at the center of the province was named for Prince Edward, the fourth son of King George III and the father of Queen Victoria.

18. Checkpoint org. : TSA

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is the agency that employs the good folks that check passengers and baggage at airports.

28. 43 : DUBYA

President George W. Bush was nicknamed “Dubya” based on the Texas pronunciation of his middle initial “W”.

30. One-named Swedish singer with the Grammy-nominated song “Dancing on My Own” : ROBYN

Robyn is the stage name of Swedish singer Robin Miriam Carlsson. Never heard of her outside of crosswords …

31. It goes around the neck : YOKE

A yoke is a wooden beam used between a pair of oxen so that they are forced to work together.

34. Hallux, more familiarly : BIG TOE

The big toe is referred to anatomically as the hallux (plural “halluces”). The thumb is referred to as the pollex (plural “pollices”).

40. Gold medal, to an Olympian : AIM

In the Ancient Olympic Games, the winner of an event was awarded an olive wreath. When the games were revived in 1896, the winners were originally given a silver medal and an olive branch, with runners-up receiving a bronze medal and a laurel branch. The tradition of giving gold, silver and bronze medals began at the 1904 Summer Olympic Games held in St. Louis, Missouri.

45. Boxing champ Roberto : DURAN

Roberto Durán is a retired professional boxer from Panama. He earned the nickname “Manos de Piedra” (Hands of Stone) during his very successful career. Durán retired in 2001 after being involved in a car crash which required life-saving surgery.

47. Navel type : OUTIE

The navel is basically a scar left behind when the umbilical cord is removed from a newborn baby. One interesting use of the umbilicus (navel, belly button) is to differentiate between identical twins, especially when they are very young.

57. Modest two-piece swimsuit : TANKINI

A “tankini” is a two-piece bathing suit comprising a tank top and a bikini bottom.

62. Ecosystem endangered by global warming : BAYOU

A bayou is a marshy inlet or outlet of a lake or river, usually with stagnant or slow-moving water. The exact origins of the term “bayou” is uncertain, but it is thought perhaps to come from the Choctaw (a Native American people from the southeast) word “bayuk”, meaning “small stream”.

65. 2000s corporate scandal subject : ENRON

After all the trials following the exposure of fraud at Enron, several of the key players ended up in jail. Andrew Fastow was the Chief Financial Officer. He plea-bargained and received ten years without parole, and became the key witness in the trials of others. Even Fastow’s wife was involved and she was sentenced to one year for helping her husband hide money. Jeffrey Skilling (ex-CEO) was sentenced to 24 years and 4 months. Kenneth Lay (CEO) died in 2006 after he had been found guilty but before he could be sentenced. The accounting firm Arthur Andersen was found guilty of obstruction of justice for shredding thousands of pertinent documents and deleting emails and files (a decision that the Supreme Court later overturned on a technicality). But still, Arthur Andersen collapsed under the weight of the scandal and 85,000 people lost their jobs (despite only a handful being directly involved with Enron).

67. Vagabond : NOMAD

A vagabond is a person without a home who moves from place to place. The term derives from the Latin “vagabundus” meaning “wandering, strolling about”.

72. Marriage announcement : BANNS

In the Christian tradition, the banns of marriage are the public announcement posted in a parish church of an intended marriage. The banns are intended to give anyone a chance to raise any valid objections to the union.

73. Some centerfolds : PLAYMATES

In the magazine world, a centerfold is large illustration that is folded to form the central spread of a publication. Famously, Hugh Hefner used the centerfold of “Playboy” magazine for a large color photograph of a nude model, and since then the term “centerfold” has been used for a model who has featured in such a layout. Playboy’s first centerfold model was Marilyn Monroe.

74. Golden Globe-winning actor for “Chicago” : GERE

Richard Gere has played such great roles on the screen, and I find him to be a very interesting character off the screen. Gere has been studying Buddhism since 1978 and is a very visible supporter of the Dalai Lama and the people of Tibet.

The wonderful 1975 musical “Chicago” is based on a 1926 play of the same name written by a news reporter called Maurine Dallas Watkins. Watkins had been assigned to cover the murder trials of Beulah Annan and Belva Gaertner for the “Chicago Tribune”, and used the story that unfolded as the basis for her play. Annan became the character Roxie Hart, and Gaertner became Velma Kelly. I’ve only ever seen the movie version of “Chicago” and never a live performance …

77. Vision-correcting procedure : LASIK

LASIK surgery uses a laser to reshape the cornea of the eye to improve vision. The LASIK acronym stands for “laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis”.

81. Former part of the U.S.S.R.: Abbr. : UKR

Ukraine is a large country in Eastern Europe that was a Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR) before the dissolution of the USSR. In English, we often call the country “the Ukraine”, but I am told that we should say just “Ukraine”.

83. Alternative to boeuf or jambon : PORC

In French, meat served for dinner might be “boeuf” (beef), “jambon” (ham) or “porc” (pork).

87. Love all around? : NO SCORE

In tennis the score of zero is designated as “love”. Some people believe that this usage originates from the French “l’oeuf” (meaning “the egg”). The idea is that the written character “0” looks like an egg.

88. Actress Faye : DUNAWAY

Faye Dunaway won an Oscar for her performance in the 1976 movie “Network”. She also starred in the original version of “The Thomas Crown Affair” in 1968, opposite Steve McQueen. She had a role in the remake of “The Thomas Crown Affair” with Pierce Brosnan, over thirty years later in 1999.

102. Utah’s ___ Mountains : UINTA

The Uinta Mountains are a subrange of the Rocky Mountains located mainly in northeastern Utah, approximately 100 miles east of Salt Lake City. The highest point in the Uintas is Kings Peak, the highest point in Utah.

107. Webster’s Third competitor, for short : OED

Oxford English Dictionary (OED)

108. Scotland’s longest river : TAY

The Firth of Tay is an inlet on the east coast of Scotland, into which empties Scotland’s largest river, the Tay. The city of Dundee lies on the Firth, and the city of Perth a little further inland on the Tay.

110. Start of Yale’s motto : LUX

“Lux et veritas” translates from Latin as “Light and Truth”. “Lux et veritas” is used as a motto of several universities including Indiana University, the University of Montana and Yale University. However, Yale’s motto is often given in Hebrew, as “Urim and Thummim”.

111. Chicago terminal code : ORD

O’Hare International is the fourth busiest airport in the world. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport’s current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O’Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Butch O’Hare who grew up in Chicago. O’Hare was the US Navy’s first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Heading on a neighborhood poster : LOST DOG
8. Radio personality Glenn : BECK
12. Bump, as from a schedule : PREEMPT
19. Standing closet : ARMOIRE
20. Poison ivy soother : ALOE
21. Huts : SHANTIES
22. Anti-mob tool : TEAR GAS
23. Dryer buildup : LINT
24. “1984” superstate : EASTASIA (hiding ASTA)
25. “Get ’em!” : SIC!
26. Power up? : ELECT
27. High land : NEPAL
28. Last seen riding in a basket. If found, call ___ [see 106-Across] : DOROTHY GALE
32. Mix with : ADD IN
33. Fall off : EBB
36. Pizzeria chain, casually : UNO’S
37. Like a certain Freudian complex : OEDIPAL
39. Graduation attire : REGALIA
41. It goes around the neck : BIB
42. Doesn’t just assume : ASKS
44. Last seen in the nursery. If found, call ___ [see 84-Across] : THE DARLINGS
46. One who can’t keep weight off for long : YO-YO DIETER (hiding ODIE)
50. Tempe sch. : ASU
51. Scream or bawl, e.g. : EMOTE
52. Like most holidays : ANNUAL
53. Reverses, as a deletion : STETS
55. “Darn it all!” : RATS!
58. It may hold the line : ROD
59. Toll rds. : TPKS
61. Yokohama “yes” : HAI
62. Tijuana setting, informally : BAJA
63. Postal abbr. for a rural address : RTE
64. Last seen with a red-haired girl. If found, call ___ [see 119-Across] : LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE
68. Drone, for one : BEE
69. Cyclotron bits : IONS
70. “Here’s an idea …” : SAY …
71. Some bygone theaters : RKOS
72. Bleat : BAA
73. Confrere : PEER
74. Food cart offerings : GYROS
76. One of the Marcoses of the Philippines : IMELDA
80. Alphabetically first “American Idol” judge across all 16 seasons : ABDUL
82. Go from bud to blossom, to a poet : OPE
84. Pretend : PUT ON AN ACT (hiding NANA)
86. Last seen chasing down clues. If found, call ___ [see 24-Across] : NICK AND NORA
90. Poet who wrote of Daedalus : OVID
91. ___-green : SEA
92. Theme song of Milton Berle : NEAR YOU
93. Forms, forms and more forms : RED TAPE
96. Sash supporter : SILL
97. Any of the Baltic states, once: Abbr. : SSR
98. What’s left on TV? : MSNBC
100. Last seen being mocked by a cat. If found, call ___ [see 46-Across] : JON ARBUCKLE
103. Gambling mecca : MACAO
104. Increase : MOUNT
105. Lilt : AIR
106. Proceed enthusiastically : GO TO TOWN (hiding TOTO)
109. Symbol gotten by typing Option+Shift+2 : EURO
110. Hit straight to the shortstop, perhaps : LINE OUT
114. Promo : TEASER AD
115. War loser, usually : TREY
116. Declared : UTTERED
117. Storied journey : ODYSSEY
118. Puts the kibosh on : ENDS
119. Algebraic variables : XS AND YS (hiding SANDY)

Down

1. Rowing muscle, for short : LAT
2. Iron Range product : ORE
3. Wee, to a Scot : SMA
4. Chests’ places : TORSOS
5. Sudoku entry : DIGIT
6. Herb resembling spinach : ORACH
7. Some kitchen appliances, for short : GES
8. Adele’s “Someone Like You,” e.g. : BALLAD
9. Hebrew for “My God! My God!” : ELI! ELI!
10. Idea : CONCEPT
11. Etta of old comics : KETT
12. Sister of Ariadne : PHAEDRA
13. More hoarse : RASPIER
14. Snares : ENTANGLES
15. List-reducing abbr. : ET AL
16. Prefix with play and place : MIS-
17. Charlottetown’s prov. : PEI
18. Checkpoint org. : TSA
21. Post : SEND
26. Discharges : EGESTS
28. 43 : DUBYA
29. Kind of dip : ONION
30. One-named Swedish singer with the Grammy-nominated song “Dancing on My Own” : ROBYN
31. It goes around the neck : YOKE
32. Inn stock : ALES
33. The U.S., to Mexicans : EL NORTE
34. Hallux, more familiarly : BIG TOE
35. Stationed (at) : BASED
38. Clicking sounds? : AHAS
40. Gold medal, to an Olympian : AIM
42. Repurpose : ADAPT
43. Dressy accessory : SILK TIE
45. Boxing champ Roberto : DURAN
47. Navel type : OUTIE
48. Cultural values : ETHOS
49. Where the engine is in a Porsche 911 : REAR
54. A bit stiff : TIPSY
56. A bit cracked : AJAR
57. Modest two-piece swimsuit : TANKINI
60. Sharply sour fruit : SLOE
62. Ecosystem endangered by global warming : BAYOU
63. Up : RISEN
64. Pacer : LEAD CAR
65. 2000s corporate scandal subject : ENRON
66. Heavenly sound? : HARP
67. Vagabond : NOMAD
68. Coddles : BABIES
72. Marriage announcement : BANNS
73. Some centerfolds : PLAYMATES
74. Golden Globe-winning actor for “Chicago” : GERE
75. Visit during a trip : STOP AT
77. Vision-correcting procedure : LASIK
78. Big battery : D-CELL
79. Subtitle of Hawthorne’s “Fanshawe” : A TALE
81. Former part of the U.S.S.R.: Abbr. : UKR
83. Alternative to boeuf or jambon : PORC
85. [continued] : OVER
87. Love all around? : NO SCORE
88. Actress Faye : DUNAWAY
89. Stop for now : ADJOURN
94. Saw the sights : TOURED
95. Ruffles : ANNOYS
96. Moviedom : SCREEN
99. My word, maybe : BOND
101. Lures : BAITS
102. Utah’s ___ Mountains : UINTA
103. Some greenery that’s not grass : MOSS
104. Parcel (out) : METE
106. ’60s Pontiac : GTO
107. Webster’s Third competitor, for short : OED
108. Scotland’s longest river : TAY
110. Start of Yale’s motto : LUX
111. Chicago terminal code : ORD
112. Double-back move : UEY
113. QB’s tally : TDS

6 thoughts on “0311-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 11 Mar 2018, Sunday”

  1. 46:33 Had a little trouble figuring out the theme but it was helpful once I did. Biggest problem was BANNS. Never heard of that word and I thought it was BANDS which made the cross DEARYOU which made sense. Had a few other minor rough spots but overall not too bad.

  2. Donna & Bill

    Suggest that Matthew Seweell never make another puzzle again. Kidding.

    OEDIPAL really?

    We had to go on line a lot for this one. Oh well see you next week.

  3. 44:11, and 9 errors. This puzzle was tricky, and I fell into several traps. 41A was one, as I assumed that must be “tie”; never tidied up that area before I declared “pen down” so I had to eat 5 of my errors right there.

    The other problem was the last across clue, XS AND YS, which is a pet peeve of mine: expressions that just don’t “read” well in a grid (what with no spaces, diacritical marks or punctuation). That and the annoyingly frequent use of UEY (or is that UIE, sometimes?).

    Have to admit it: Matt Sewell GOT ME on this one…

  4. 45:14, 2 errors: BAN(D)S/(D)EAR YOU. So many pitfalls, frustrating in the sense that there were many answers that I felt that I should know, but just could not remember. A big fan of Garfield, but could not remember the last name of JON ARBUCKLE; also couldn’t recall the name of LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE’s dog SANDY. Many answers were slap-your-head simple, after the fact. Raised in the Christian Church, had not heard of the word BANN until today.

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