0225-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 25 Feb 2018, Sunday

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Constructed by: Will Nediger
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: Letter Recycling

Themed answers come in pairs that cross each other in the grid. Each element of the pair is related in terms of meaning, as noted in the paired clues. And, the across-element is spelled using only letters appearing in the down-element:

  • 22A. Historical period spelled using only the letters of 2-Down : GEORGIAN ERA
  • 2D. Historical period : IRON AGE
  • 28A. Revolutionary War hero spelled using only the letters of 13-Down : NATHAN HALE
  • 13D. Revolutionary War hero : ETHAN ALLEN
  • 36A. Snack items spelled using only the letters of 36-Down : PISTACHIOS
  • 36D. Snack items : POTATO CHIPS
  • 95A. Really impressive, spelled using only the letters of 39-Down : ASTOUNDING
  • 39D. Really impressive : OUTSTANDING
  • 104A. No-good, spelled using only the letters of 71-Down : DAD-BLASTED
  • 71D. No-good : DETESTABLE
  • 111A. Bagel topping spelled using only the letters of 89-Down : CREAM CHEESE
  • 89D. Bagel topping : SCHMEAR

Bill’s time: 18m 41s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Small flute : FIFE

A fife is a small flute that is often used in military and marching bands. The name “fife” comes from the German “Pfeife” meaning “pipe”.

18. 404 Not Found, e.g. : ERROR

An HTTP 404 error is one of the common errors encountered when browsing the World Wide Web. The error is returned when a user accesses a site successfully, but cannot find the the page that is requested. Usually, this 404 Not Found error is encountered when clicking on a broken or dead link. As an aside, I’d appreciate it if any reader could contact me or leave if a comment if a broken link is encountered on this web site. Thank you!

21. Kitchen brand : OXO

The OXO line of kitchen utensils is designed to be ergonomically superior to the average kitchen too. The intended user of OXO products is someone who doesn’t have the normal range of motion or strength in the hands e.g. someone suffering from arthritis.

22. Historical period spelled using only the letters of 2-Down : GEORGIAN ERA

Immediately following the Stuart period, the Georgian era of British history is named for the sequential kings George I through George IV. The era started in 1714, when George I ascended to the throne upon the death of Queen Anne. The end of the era is defined sometimes with the death of George IV in 1830, and sometimes with the death of his successor William IV in 1837. William IV was George IV’s brother and ruled for only seven years. William IV was succeeded by his niece Victoria, resulting in the start of the Victorian era.

24. Singer who once spelled her name with a “$” : KESHA

“Kesha” (formerly “Ke$ha”) is the stage name used by singer Kesha Rose Sebert.

28. Revolutionary War hero spelled using only the letters of 13-Down : NATHAN HALE
(13D. Revolutionary War hero : ETHAN ALLEN)

Nathan Hale fought for the Continental Army during the American Revolution, and was most famous for operating as a spy against the British. It was Nathan Hale who uttered the words, just before he was hanged by his British captors, “I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country”.

30. Website with a “Sell an item” option : EBAY

There have been some notable things sold on eBay over the years. For example:

  • Ad space on a guy’s forehead, in the form of a temporary tattoo – $37,375
  • William Shatner’s kidney stone – $25,000
  • A cornflake shaped like Illinois – $1,350
  • A single corn flake – $1.63
  • A box of 10 Twinkies – $59.99
  • The original Hollywood sign – $450,400
  • The meaning of life – $3.26

31. Order to go : MUSH!

“Mushing” is the use of one or more dogs to pull a sled. “Mush” is thought to come from the French “marche” meaning “go, run”.

34. Woman’s name that sounds like its second and first letters, respectively : ELLY

“Elly” sounds like “L-E”.

38. Inner tubes? : AORTAS

The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

41. Ancient theaters : ODEA

In Ancient Greece an odeon (also “odeum”) was like a small theater, with “odeon” literally meaning a “building for musical competition”. Odea were used in both Greece and Rome for entertainments such as musical shows and poetry readings.

42. Prince of Shakespeare : HAL

“Prince Hal” is a term used for Prince Henry, the son of the title character in Shakespeare’s plays “Henry IV, Part 1” and “Henry IV, Part 2”. Prince Hal then becomes king in Shakespeare’s “Henry V”.

44. Fund-raising org. : PTA

Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

47. Garment that’s often plaid : KILT

The Scottish skirt called a “kilt” takes its name from the Middle English word “kilten” meaning “to tuck up”. The idea is that the kilt can be tucked up around the body to give freedom to the legs.

Tartan is sometimes called “plaid” over here in the US, and is a word not used in the same sense outside of this country. In Scotland a “plaid” is a blanket or a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder.

51. Christmas drink : WASSAIL

“Wassail” is ale or mulled wine used for toasting at festivals, especially Christmas. The term “wassail” comes from Old Norse “ves heill” meaning “be healthy”.

55. Geraint’s wife, in Arthurian romance : ENID

Enid is a Welsh name, from “einit” an old Welsh word meaning “purity”. Enid was the wife of Geraint, one of King Arthur’s knights. Enid is described as “the personification of spotless purity”.

63. Page 1, e.g. : RECTO

The left and right pages of a book or magazine are known in publishing circles as verso and recto. Recto comes from the Latin for “right”, and verso comes from the Latin word for “turned”. The idea is that the left side of the page is “turned” and is the reverse of the recto/right side.

64. Oscar winner with four #1 Billboard hits : CHER

“Cher” is the stage name used by Cherilyn Sarkisian. Formerly one half of husband-wife duo Sonny & Cher, she is often referred to as the Goddess of Pop. In her acting career, Cher was nominated for the Best Supporting Actress Oscar of 1984 for her performance in “Silkwood”. She went further in 1988 and won the Best Actress Oscar for playing Loretta Castorini in “Moonstruck”.

66. Bass player : TUBA

The tuba is the lowest-pitched of all the brass instruments, and one of the most recent additions to the modern symphony orchestra (usually there is just one tuba included in an orchestral line-up). “Tuba” is the Latin word for “trumpet, horn”. Oom-pah-pah …

77. Future stallion : COLT

There are lots of terms to describe horses of different ages and sexes, it seems:

  • Foal: horse of either sex that is less than one year old
  • Yearling: horse of either sex that is one to two years old
  • Filly: female horse under the age of four
  • Colt: male horse under the age of four
  • Gelding: castrated male horse of any age
  • Stallion: non-castrated male horse four years or older
  • Mare: female horse four years or older

79. Tin lizzies : MODEL TS

The Ford Model T was the first really affordable car that was offered for sale, and it was produced from 1908 to 1927. It was the Model T that ushered in the era of assembly line production, which greatly cut down the cost of manufacture. The engine was designed to run on petrol, kerosene or even ethanol. Famously, the Model T was known colloquially as the “Tin Lizzie”.

82. “See you later” : ADIOS

The term “adiós” is Spanish for “goodbye”. In the Spanish language, “adiós” comes from the phrase “a Dios vos acomiendo” meaning “I commend you to God”.

86. Word that might be helpful on a class reunion name tag : NEE

“Née” is the French word for “born” when referring to a female. The male equivalent is “né”.

89. Photog’s purchase : SLR

The initialism “SLR” stands for “single lens reflex”. Usually, cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

102. Alpo alternative : IAMS

Iams dog food was introduced by the animal nutritionist Paul Iams. He felt that household pets were suffering somewhat by being fed a diet of table scraps, so he developed a dry dog food that he felt was more nutritious and suitable for pet dogs. He founded the Iams company, now part of Procter & Gamble, in 1946.

106. Include without notifying others, in a way : BCC

A blind carbon copy (bcc) is a copy of a document or message that is sent to someone without other recipients of the message knowing about that extra copy.

109. Cause of a tic, for short : OCD

Apparently, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed mental disorder, making it about as prevalent as asthma.

110. “The Master Builder” playwright : IBSEN

“The Master Builder” is an 1892 play by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen. The play deals with a complex relationship between young 24-year-old woman and a much older Master Builder who is a married man. Ibsen admitted that the play has some autobiographical elements. He conceived the plot while having a brief extra-marital affair with an 18-year-old student.

111. Bagel topping spelled using only the letters of 89-Down : CREAM CHEESE

The bagel was invented in the Polish city of Kraków in the 16th century. Bagels were brought to this country by Jewish immigrants from Poland who mainly established homes in and around New York City.

113. Penguins’ org. : NHL

The Penguins are the professional hockey team based in Pittsburgh. They have been around since 1967, and were one of the first expansion teams when the NHL grew from six to twelve teams. The expansion team were to play in Pittsburgh’s Civic Arena, a domed structure known locally as the Igloo. It was the “Igloo” name that inspired a fan to suggest the “Penguins” moniker, which won a contest to choose the name of the new franchise.

115. Temporary tattoo material : HENNA

Henna has been used for centuries as a dye, not just for leather and wool, but also for the hair and skin. In modern days, henna is also used for temporary tattoos.

116. Writer Nin : ANAIS

Anaïs Nin was a French author who was famous for the journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

119. Much-abbreviated Latin phrase : ID EST

“Id est” is Latin for “that is”, and is often abbreviated to “i.e.” when used in English.

Down

2. Historical period : IRON AGE

Ancient societies can be classified by the “three-age system”, which depends on the prevalence of materials used to make tools. The three ages are:

  • The Stone Age
  • The Bronze Age
  • The Iron Age

The actual dates defined by each age depend on the society, as the timing of the transition from the use of one material to another varied around the globe.

3. Double a score : FORTY

Our verb “to score” meaning “to tally”, comes from the Old Norse “skor”, which is a “mark, notch”. It is likely that items such a livestock were counted by placing a notch in a stick for each set of twenty, hence our use of the noun “score” to mean “twenty”.

4. Therefore : ERGO

“Ergo” is the Latin word for “hence, therefore”.

5. Jamaican export : SKA

Ska originated in Jamaica in the late fifties and was the precursor to reggae music. No one has a really definitive etymology of the term “ska”, but it is likely to be imitative of some sound.

7. Muhammad’s favorite wife : AYESHA

Aisha (also”Ayesha”) was one of the wives of the prophet Muhammad. Aisha was the third of Muhammad’s eleven to thirteen wives, and was said to be his favorite.

8. Young ___ : TURK

In the context of the US, the Young Turks was a group of Republican politicians who split with the main party in the early sixties. The original “Young Turks” was an early 20th-century reform movement in the Ottoman Empire that favored replacement of the monarchy with a constitutional government. The term has further evolved, now applying to any insurgent group within a political party.

10. Nanki-Poo’s father, with “the” : MIKADO

“The Mikado” is a wonderful comic opera by Gilbert and Sullivan that is set in the exotic location of Japan. “Mikado” is a word formerly used for the “Emperor of Japan”. In the story, Nanki-Poo is the Mikado’s son, who falls in love with Yum-Yum.

11. Glacial ridges : ARETES

An arete is ridge of rock defining the border between two parallel valleys that have been formed by glaciation. If this ridge is rounded, it is called a “col”. However if it is “sharpened”, with rock falling way due to successive freezing and thawing, then it is called an “arete”. “Arête“ is the French word for “fish bone”.

12. Whole-grain cereal brand : KASHI

Kashi is a food company that primarily produces breakfast cereals. Founded in 1984, the name “Kashi” is a melding of “kashruth” (i.e. kosher), and “Kushi”. Michio Kushi helped to introduce the macrobiotic diet to the US in the fifties.

13. Revolutionary War hero : ETHAN ALLEN

Ethan Allen was one of the founders of the state of Vermont. Allen was also a hero in the American Revolutionary War, famous for leading (along with Benedict Arnold) the small band of men known as the Green Mountain Boys that captured Fort Ticonderoga. And yes, the Ethan Allen store and furniture line is named for Ethan Allen the patriot, even though he had nothing to do with the furniture business.

14. Jamaican rapper ___ Paul : SEAN

“Sean Paul” is the stage name of Sean Paul Ryan Francis Henriques, a Jamaican reggae artist.

15. Shade of blue : COBALT

Cobalt blue is a pigment, a pigment with a lighter shade than Prussian blue. Cobalt blue is made from cobalt oxide and alumina, and is used as a coloring agent in ceramics, jewelry and paint. Even “transparent” glass usually contains a little cobalt blue, giving a slight blue tint.

16. Armpit, medically : AXILLA

“Axilla” is the anatomical name for armpit, not to be confused with “maxilla”, the upper jawbone.

17. Ones not up to par? : BOGEYS

The term “bogey” originated at the Great Yarmouth Golf Club in England in 1890, and was used to indicate a total round that was one-over-par (and not one-over-par on a particular hole, as it is today). The name “bogey” came from a music hall song of the time “Here Comes the Bogeyman”. In the following years it became popular for players trying to stay at par to be “playing against Colonel Bogey”. Then, during WWI, the marching tune “Colonel Bogey” was written and named after the golfing term. If you don’t recognize the name of the tune, it’s the one that’s whistled by the soldiers marching in the great movie “The Bridge on the River Kwai”.

18. Grandfather of Alfred the Great : EGBERT

Egbert was the King of Wessex from 802 to 829. At one point Egbert’s geographic influence was sufficient for him to be named “King of Britain”.

Alfred the Great was the King of Wessex in the latter part of the ninth century, and the dominant ruler in the whole of England. Wessex was the familiar name of the Kingdom of the West Saxons in the southwest of Britain.

29. Basil, e.g. : HERB

Traditionally, basil is considered “the king of herbs”. And in fact, the herb’s name comes from the Greek “basileus” meaning “king”.

37. Jackie of “The Tuxedo” : CHAN

Jackie Chan is an actor from Hong Kong who is noted for his action and martial arts films. When Chan was 17-years-old he featured as a stunt actor in Bruce Lee movies. He also starred in the 1982 Hong Kong action film “Dragon Lord” which includes a fight scene that required an amazing 2900 takes, a record in the movie industry.

“The Tuxedo” is a 2002 spy spoof starring Jackie Chan and Jennifer Love Hewitt. Chan plays a taxi driver who acquires a gadget tuxedo that gives him special abilities. With the tuxedo he can fight using martial arts, has great speed and can even dance!

48. Amount of jam or jelly beans : JARFUL

Jelly beans are thought to have originated in Boston, and it is documented that they were sent by families and friends of soldiers fighting in the Civil War.

52. Roger in the Navy : AYE AYE

The term “roger”, meaning “yes” or “acknowledged”, comes from the world of radiotelephony. The British military used a phonetic alphabet in the fifties that included “Roger” to represent the letter “R”. As such, it became customary to say “Roger” when acknowledging a message, with R (Roger) standing for “received”.

54. Brand in the dairy aisle : LACTAID

Lactaid is a line of products made for people who are lactose intolerant, so it is 100% lactose-free.

59. Breakfast spots : IHOPS

The International House of Pancakes (IHOP) was founded back in 1958. IHOP was originally intended to be called IHOE, the International House of Eggs, but that name didn’t do too well in marketing tests!

61. Relish : GUSTO

“Gusto” is an Italian word meaning “taste”. We use it in English in the phrase “with gusto” meaning “with great enjoyment”.

65. Took back one’s story : RECANTED

Our term “to recant”, meaning “to retract, take back” comes directly from the Latin “recantare”, which has the same meaning. In turn, “recantare” derives from “re-” (back) and “cantare” (to chant).

74. Kind of medicine : FORENSIC

Something described as forensic is connected with a court of law, or with public discussion or debate. The term comes from the Latin “forensis” meaning “of a forum, of a place of assembly”. We mainly use the word today to mean “pertaining to legal trials” as in “forensic medicine” and “forensic science”.

78. In ___ of : LIEU

As one might imagine perhaps, “in lieu” came into English from the Old French word “lieu” meaning “place”, which in turn is derived from the Latin “locum” that also means “place”. So, “in lieu” translates as “in place of”.

85. Neighbor of a Montenegrin : SERB

Serbia is a landlocked country in southeast Europe. After WWII, Serbia became one of several states making up the nation called Yugoslavia. Serbia became independent again in 2006 as Yugoslavia broke up after the declaration of independence by Montenegro.

Montenegro is a country in Southeastern Europe that once was part of Yugoslavia. “Montenegro” is a historical Italianate translation of “black mountain”.

88. Pep : VIM

“Vim” and “pep” are words that both mean “energy, power”.

89. Bagel topping : SCHMEAR

The word “schmear” comes from the Yiddish word “shmir” meaning “spread”. The phrase “the whole schmear” is a relatively recent one, dating back to around 1969 and coming from the world of business.

93. Nickname of Duke basketball’s Mike Krzyzewski : COACH K

Mike Krzyzewski is a coach and former basketball player from Chicago, Illinois. As a young man, Krzyzewski captained the Army Cadets basketball team, before serving in the Army for five years. After resigning from active duty, Coach K (as he is called) eventually took the head coaching job with the Army Cadets followed by the head coach’s position with Duke, where he has been since 1980. Today, Coach K also coaches the US International team.

95. Challenge for a college-bound student, maybe : AP TEST

The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to kids who are still in high school. After being tested at the end of the courses, successful students receive credits that count towards a college degree.

96. Medical inserts : STENTS

In the world of medicine and surgery, a stent is an artificial tube inserted inside a vessel in the body, say an artery, so that it reduces the effects of a local restriction in the body’s conduit.

97. ___ Creed (Christian statement of faith) : NICENE

What is known today in the Christian tradition as the Nicene Creed, was originally adopted by the first ecumenical council when it met in 325 AD. The meeting took place in the city of Nicaea, which gave its name to this particular profession of faith. Nicaea is the Greek name of the city that is now called Iznik, and it lies in the northwest of Turkey.

101. Actor Davis : OSSIE

Ossie Davis was a very successful African-American actor, but also a director, poet, playwright and social activist. One of Davis’s better known performances was in the 1993 movie “Grumpy Old Men”, in which he played the owner of the bait shop by the lake.

105. Neeson of “Schindler’s List” : LIAM

Irish actor Liam Neeson got his big break when he played Oskar Schindler in the Spielberg epic, “Schindler’s List”. Neeson was in the news a few years ago when he lost his wife, actress Natasha Richardson, in a tragic skiing accident in 2009.

Oskar Schindler is the protagonist in the Steven Spielberg movie “Schindler’s List”. Schindler was a real person who survived WWII. During the Holocaust, Schindler managed to save almost 1,200 Jews from perishing by employing them in his factories. After the war, Schindler and his wife were left penniless having used his assets to protect and feed his workers. For years the couple survived on the charity of Jewish groups. Schindler tried to make a go of it in business again but never had any real success. He died a pauper in 1974 in Hildesheim, not far from Hanover. His last wish was to be buried in Jerusalem. Schindler was the only former member of the Nazi Party to be buried on Mount Zion.

108. Ballot hanger : CHAD

We are all familiar with “hanging chads” after the famous Florida election recounts of 2000. A chad is any piece of paper punched out from a larger sheet. So, those round bits of paper we’ve all dropped over the floor when emptying a hole punch, they’re chads.

Today a ballot is a piece of paper used to cast a vote. Back in the 1500s, a “ballot” was a small “ball” used in the process of voting.

111. X : CHI

The Greek letter “chi” is the one that looks like our “X”.

112. Dojo surface : MAT

The Japanese word “dojo” literally means “place of the way”. Originally the term applied to training halls that were found in or beside temples. The teaching in a dojo was not limited to the martial arts, but in the Western world we use the dojo as the name for a training facility for judo, karate and the like.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Small flute : FIFE
5. Tries to beat the buzzer? : SWATS
10. Throws together : MAKES
15. Airport waiter? : CAB
18. 404 Not Found, e.g. : ERROR
19. Energize : KEY UP
20. Not happy, to say the least : IRATE
21. Kitchen brand : OXO
22. Historical period spelled using only the letters of 2-Down : GEORGIAN ERA
24. Singer who once spelled her name with a “$” : KESHA
25. Word before data or deal : BIG …
26. Unlikely to be talked out of : BENT ON
27. “That wasn’t nice!” : TSK!
28. Revolutionary War hero spelled using only the letters of 13-Down : NATHAN HALE
30. Website with a “Sell an item” option : EBAY
31. Order to go : MUSH!
33. Enter the fray : WADE IN
34. Woman’s name that sounds like its second and first letters, respectively : ELLY
35. Fix : RIG
36. Snack items spelled using only the letters of 36-Down : PISTACHIOS
38. Inner tubes? : AORTAS
40. Casual top : TEE
41. Ancient theaters : ODEA
42. Prince of Shakespeare : HAL
43. Screw up : FLUB
44. Fund-raising org. : PTA
45. Be annoying : GRATE
47. Garment that’s often plaid : KILT
48. Sukkot celebrant : JEW
51. Christmas drink : WASSAIL
55. Geraint’s wife, in Arthurian romance : ENID
56. What assayers assay : ORES
57. Butt’s end? : ASH
58. Many an office worker’s problem : EYESTRAIN
60. It’s imagined : FIGMENT
62. TV demonstrator at the 1939 World’s Fair : RCA
63. Page 1, e.g. : RECTO
64. Oscar winner with four #1 Billboard hits : CHER
66. Bass player : TUBA
67. When it comes to : AS FOR
69. You can lend one without letting go of it : EAR
70. Jewel case holder : CD TOWER
73. Combo meal entree : SURF ‘N’ TURF
75. Spanish “Listen!” : OYE!
76. Mound : HEAP
77. Future stallion : COLT
79. Tin lizzies : MODEL TS
80. Basket part : NET
81. “That so?” reply : IT IS
82. “See you later” : ADIOS
84. Basket part : RIM
85. Put the pedal to the metal : SPED
86. Word that might be helpful on a class reunion name tag : NEE
87. Rack site : OVEN
89. Photog’s purchase : SLR
92. What a press pass provides : ACCESS
95. Really impressive, spelled using only the letters of 39-Down : ASTOUNDING
98. Chalked stick : CUE
99. Stern-looking : DOUR
100. Many a year-end list : TOP TEN
102. Alpo alternative : IAMS
103. Drive-___ : THRU
104. No-good, spelled using only the letters of 71-Down : DAD-BLASTED
106. Include without notifying others, in a way : BCC
107. Bygone deliverers : ICEMEN
109. Cause of a tic, for short : OCD
110. “The Master Builder” playwright : IBSEN
111. Bagel topping spelled using only the letters of 89-Down : CREAM CHEESE
113. Penguins’ org. : NHL
114. Group of stars : A-LIST
115. Temporary tattoo material : HENNA
116. Writer Nin : ANAIS
117. Sun spot? : SKY
118. Track schedule : MEETS
119. Much-abbreviated Latin phrase : ID EST
120. “Aw rats!” : DARN!

Down

1. It’s comped : FREEBIE
2. Historical period : IRON AGE
3. Double a score : FORTY
4. Therefore : ERGO
5. Jamaican export : SKA
6. Was dateless : WENT STAG
7. Muhammad’s favorite wife : AYESHA
8. Young ___ : TURK
9. Place to get pampered : SPA
10. Nanki-Poo’s father, with “the” : MIKADO
11. Glacial ridges : ARETES
12. Whole-grain cereal brand : KASHI
13. Revolutionary War hero : ETHAN ALLEN
14. Jamaican rapper ___ Paul : SEAN
15. Shade of blue : COBALT
16. Armpit, medically : AXILLA
17. Ones not up to par? : BOGEYS
18. Grandfather of Alfred the Great : EGBERT
23. Aloft : IN MIDAIR
28. Sarcastic response to a fail : NAILED IT!
29. Basil, e.g. : HERB
32. Word before “before” : USE …
33. Hypothetical : WHAT-IF
36. Snack items : POTATO CHIPS
37. Jackie of “The Tuxedo” : CHAN
39. Really impressive : OUTSTANDING
43. Holder of shells : FIREARM
44. “Hey!” : PSST!
46. Approve another season of : RENEW
47. Seaweed in Japanese cuisine : KOMBU
48. Amount of jam or jelly beans : JARFUL
49. Part of a motorcade : ESCORT
50. Berth places : WHARFS
51. “You and I have a deal!” : WE’RE ON!
52. Roger in the Navy : AYE AYE
53. Clandestine : SECRET
54. Brand in the dairy aisle : LACTAID
59. Breakfast spots : IHOPS
61. Relish : GUSTO
65. Took back one’s story : RECANTED
68. Cherry throwaway : STEM
71. No-good : DETESTABLE
72. Was mounted atop : RODE ON
74. Kind of medicine : FORENSIC
78. In ___ of : LIEU
83. Six things in some six-packs : SODA CANS
85. Neighbor of a Montenegrin : SERB
88. Pep : VIM
89. Bagel topping : SCHMEAR
90. Slyly attracts : LURES IN
91. Gets back together : REUNES
92. Extras : ADD-ONS
93. Nickname of Duke basketball’s Mike Krzyzewski : COACH K
94. Huggable : CUDDLY
95. Challenge for a college-bound student, maybe : AP TEST
96. Medical inserts : STENTS
97. ___ Creed (Christian statement of faith) : NICENE
101. Actor Davis : OSSIE
103. Lead role in “Boys Don’t Cry,” 1999 : TEENA
105. Neeson of “Schindler’s List” : LIAM
106. Fostered : BRED
108. Ballot hanger : CHAD
111. X : CHI
112. Dojo surface : MAT