0218-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 18 Feb 2018, Sunday

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Constructed by: Elizabeth A. Long
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: See 68-Across

Today’s themed answers are formed by DROPPING (allowing to fall vertically in the grid) NAMES from within common phrases:

  • 68A. Supercilious sort … or the title for this puzzle : NAME-DROPPER
  • 29A. Search engine failure? : BING ERROR (dropping BILL from BILLING ERROR)
  • 29D. With 29-Across, surprise in the mail : BILL
  • 30A. Is able to translate what was heard on the wall? : SPEAKS FLY (dropping FRANK from SPEAKS FRANKLY)
  • 31D. With 30-Across, is blunt : FRANK
  • 55A. Mattress tester’s compensation? : SLUMBER PAY (dropping ART from SLUMBER PARTY)
  • 59D. With 55-Across, big sleepover : ART
  • 77A. Dress code requirement for the Puritans? : PRIM COLORS (dropping MARY from PRIMARY COLORS)
  • 78D. With 77-Across, red, blue and yellow : MARY
  • 103A. Hoped-for conclusion by someone with sore knees? : EARLY AMEN (dropping ERICA from EARLY-AMERICAN)
  • 106D. With 103-Across, simple furniture style : ERICA
  • 108A. Make a really long-distance call? : PHONE MARS (dropping ANNE from PHONE MANNERS)
  • 112D. With 108-Across, not talking loudly on a cell, e.g. : ANNE

Bill’s time: 19m 20s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. ___ aisle, part of a church : APSE

The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally, apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

5. Prayer books : MISSALS

Missals came into being in medieval times and were used primarily by priests and ministers. A missal is a book containing all the texts necessary for the celebration of Mass through the liturgical year. Nowadays missals are used by the congregation and not just by the celebrants. The term “missal” comes from the Latin for “Mass book”.

12. Bit of baloney : FIB

To fib is to to tell a lie. The verb likely comes from “fibble-fable” meaning “nonsense”, with “fibble-fable” coming from “fable”.

19. Two, in Toulouse : DEUX

Toulouse is the fourth largest city in France, and is located in the southwest of the country. These days, Toulouse is noted as home to the Airbus headquarters and is known as the center of the European aerospace industry.

20. Neighbor of New York : ONTARIO

The Canadian province of Ontario takes its name from the Great Lake. In turn, Lake Ontario’s name is thought to be derived from “Ontari:io”, a Huron word meaning “great lake”. Ontario is home to the nation’s capital of Ottawa as well as Toronto, Canada’s most populous city (and the capital of the province).

24. Cousins of jaguarundis : OCELOTS

The ocelot is a wildcat found mainly in South and Central America, although there have been sightings as far north as Arkansas. An ocelot doesn’t look too different from a domestic cat, and some have been kept as pets. Perhaps most famously, Salvador Dali had one that he carried around everywhere with him.

The jaguarundi is a small wild cat that is native to Central and South America. Also called the eyra cat, the jaguarundi used to be found in Texas as well. It is believed they are extinct in the US now.

28. European eruption site : ETNA

Mount Etna on the island of Sicily is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy, and indeed the largest of all active volcano in Europe. Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. Mt. Etna is home to a 110-km long narrow-gauge railway, and two ski resorts.

29. Search engine failure? : BING ERROR (dropping BILL from BILLING ERROR)

Bing is the search engine from Microsoft. Bing is the latest name for an engine that Microsoft used to call Live Search, Windows Live Search and MSN Search.

34. Choler : IRE

“Choler” is “anger, irritability”. Choler (also “cholera”) was one of the body’s four basic substances of medieval science, the so-called four humors. All diseases were caused by these four substances getting out of balance. The four humors were:

  • Black bile (melancholia)
  • Yellow bile (cholera)
  • Phlegm (phlegma)
  • Blood (sanguis)

36. Gin, lime and soda combo : GIMLET

A gimlet is a relatively simple cocktail, traditionally made with just gin and lime juice. The trend in more recent times is to replace the gin with vodka.

40. Arizona tribe : HOPI

Many of the Hopi nation live on a reservation that is actually located within the much larger Navajo reservation in Arizona.

43. Scotland’s longest river : TAY

The Firth of Tay is an inlet on the east coast of Scotland into which empties Scotland’s largest river, the Tay. The city of Dundee lies on the Firth, and the city of Perth lies just inland on the Tay. The River Tay flows from Loch Tay into the Firth of Tay. Easy one to remember, that …

45. River through Russia and Kazakhstan : URAL

The Ural River rises in the Ural Mountains in Russia and flows for half its length through Russian territory until it crosses the border into Kazakhstan, finally emptying into the Caspian Sea.

53. Tactic in a war of attrition : SIEGE

Our word “siege” comes from a 13th century word for a “seat”. The military usage derives from the concept of a besieging force “sitting down” outside a fortress until it falls.

62. Suggestion of what to do, slangily : REC

Recommendation (rec)

64. Opposite of ennemies : AMIES

In French, one can have “amies” (friends) and “ennemies” (enemies).

65. Basics of education, briefly : RRR

The “three Rs” (RRR) are reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmetic.

68. Supercilious sort … or the title for this puzzle : NAME-DROPPER

“Supercilious” is a such a lovely-sounding word, with a not-so-lovely meaning. Someone described as supercilious is lofty with pride, haughtily contemptuous. The term derives from the Latin “supercilium” meaning “eyebrow” (actually “above the eyelid), the idea being that a person is prone to raise his or her eyebrows to express haughtiness.

72. A bushelful : LOTS

In the imperial system of weights and measures, a bushel is a unit of dry volume made up of 4 pecks. In the US system, a bushel is a dry volume of 8 gallons. We have used the term “bushel” to mean “large quantity” since the 14th century.

73. Make faces in front of a camera : MUG

The verb “to mug” means to make an exaggerated facial expression. The term comes from mugs used to drink beer (called Toby mugs) that are the made in the shape of heads with grotesque expressions. “Mug” can also be a noun meaning “face”.

74. European capital named after a saint : SOFIA

Sofia is the capital of Bulgaria. Natives pronounce the name “Sofia” with the emphasis on the “o”, while the rest of us tend to stress the “i”. Bulgarians do agree with us though when it comes to the girl’s name “Sofia”, then they stress the “i” like we do!

76. Monster.com posting : JOB

Monster.com is a huge (monster) employment website. At any one time, there are apparently about a million jobs posted on the website.

80. Peak in Suisse : ALPE

“Suisse” is the French word for “Swiss”, and “la Suisse” is French for “Switzerland”.

83. City on the Erie Canal : UTICA

Utica, New York is known as “Second Chance City” these days, due to the recent influx of refugees from war-torn parts of the world and from Bosnia in particular. These immigrants have helped revitalize the area and reverse a trend of population loss.

87. Goads : EGGS ON

The verb “to edge” has been used to mean to incite, to urge on, from the 16th century. Somewhere along the way “edge” was mistakenly replaced with “egg”, giving us our term “to egg on” meaning “to goad”.

90. Dark beer : PORTER

Porter is a dark beer that originated in London in the 1700s and is named for the street and river porters with whom it was very popular. Porter is a well-hopped beer made using brown malt, which gives it the dark color.

92. France’s ___ Noël : PERE

A central figure on Christmas Day is Father Christmas, known as “Père Noël” in French.

93. What may follow a school period? : EDU

The .edu domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

  • .com (commercial enterprise)
  • .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
  • .mil (US military)
  • .org (not-for-profit organization)
  • .gov (US federal government entity)
  • .edu (college-level educational institution)

96. Annual CBS awards broadcast, with “the” : TONYS

The Tony Awards are more completely referred to as the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Broadway Theatre. The awards are named for Mary Antoinette “Tony” Perry, who was a co-founder of the American Theatre Wing.

102. Actress Rowlands : GENA

Gena Rowlands is an actress best known for the films made with her husband, actor and director John Cassavetes. More recently, Rowlands played a lead role opposite James Garner in the weepy, weepy 2004 film “The Notebook”. “The Notebook” was directed by her son, Nick Cassavetes. Rowlands was nominated for Oscars for her performances in two films: “Gloria” (1980) and “A Woman Under the Influence” (1974).

113. Rani’s raiment : SARI

The item of clothing called a “sari” (also “saree”) is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that’s a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

A ranee (also “rani”) is an Indian queen or princess, and the female equivalent of a raja.

115. Matador’s foe : EL TORO

“Matador” is a Spanish word used in English for a bullfighter, although the term isn’t used in the same way in Spanish. The equivalent in Spanish is “torero”. “Matador” translates aptly enough as “killer”.

116. Infamous Chicago bootlegger : AL CAPONE

The Chicago gangster Al Capone was eventually jailed for tax evasion. He was given a record 11-year sentence in federal prison, of which he served 8 years. He left prison suffering dementia caused by late-stage syphilis. Capone suffered through 7-8 sickly years before passing away in 1947.

To bootleg is to make or smuggle alcoholic drinks illegally. The term arose in the late 1800s as slang for the practice of concealing a flask of liquor down the leg of a high boot. The term has been extended to mean the illegal production and sale of just about anything.

117. Mediterranean resort island : MINORCA

The island of Minorca in the Mediterranean takes its name from the larger neighboring island of Majorca. The names come from the Latin “Insula Minor” meaning “Minor Island” and “Insula Major” meaning “Major Island”. The island is known as “Minorca” in English, and “Menorca” in Spanish and Catalan.

119. “___ go bragh!” : ERIN

“Erin go bragh!” is an anglicization of the Irish phrase “Éirinn go Brách!”, which translates as “Ireland Forever!”

120. Swimmers with flippers : SEA LIONS

There are three families of seals. The first is the walrus family, the second the eared seals (like sea lions), and thirdly the earless seals (like elephant seals).

121. Rufous ruminant : RED DEER

“Rufous” means “reddish”.

Ruminants are animals that “chew the cud”. Ruminants eat vegetable matter but cannot extract any nutritional value from cellulose without the help of microbes in the gut. Ruminants collect roughage in the first part of the alimentary canal, allowing microbes to work on it. The partially digested material (the cud) is regurgitated into the mouth so that the ruminant can chew the food more completely exposing more surface area for microbes to do their work. We also use the verb “to ruminate” in a figurative sense, to mean “to muse, ponder, chew over”.

123. Sp. miss : SRTA

“Señorita” (Srta.) is Spanish, and “Mademoiselle” (Mlle.) is French, for “Miss”.

Down

1. “Hasta la vista” : ADIOS

The term “adiós” is Spanish for “goodbye”. In the Spanish language, “adiós” comes from the phrase “a Dios vos acomiendo” meaning “I commend you to God”.

“Hasta la vista” is Spanish for “goodbye”. The phrase translates literally as “until the seeing”, i.e. “goodbye until we see each other again”.

2. Corral : PEN UP

“Corral” is the Spanish word for an enclosure for livestock, and is a word we’ve imported into English. Ultimately, the term comes from the Vulgar Latin “currale” meaning “enclosure for carts”, itself coming from “currus”, the Latin for “cart”.

4. Like high-quality olive oil : EXTRA-VIRGIN

Virgin olive oil is oil produced from olives with no chemical treatment involved in the production process at all. To be labelled “virgin”, the oil must have an acidity level of less than 2% and must be be judged to have “a good taste”. Extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) comes from virgin oil production, and is the portion with acidity levels of less than 0.8% acidity that is judged to have “superior taste”.

6. Business magazine : INC

“Inc.” is a business magazine that specializes in articles about growing companies. “Inc.” publishes a list of the 500 fastest-growing private companies in the country each year, calling it the “Inc. 500”. The “Inc 5000” is an expanded list also published by the magazine.

9. Elvis ___ Presley : ARON

Elvis Aron Presley (aka “the King”) was the younger of two identical twins. His brother was stillborn, and delivered 35 minutes before Elvis. The brother was named Jesse Garon Presley. So, although born a twin, Elvis was raised as an only child.

11. Request for aid : SOS

The combination of three dots – three dashes – three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots – pause – three dashes – pause – three dots), although in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so SOS is in effect only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases “Save Our Souls” and “Save Our Ship” are also mnemonics, introduced after the “SOS” signal was adopted.

14. Titanic’s undoing : BERG

The RMS Titanic set off on her tragic maiden voyage in 1912, sailing from Southampton, England bound for New York City. Regulations only required that the ship have lifeboat capacity for 1,178 people, even though a full complement of passengers and crew was 3,547. When the order was given to abandon ship, the captain adhered to the traditional protocol of “women and children first”. As a result, only 20% of male passengers survived the disaster, compared to 75% of the female passengers. Perhaps more telling is that 61% of those in first class survived, and only 25% of those in third class. The crew fared even worse though, with only 24% making it.

17. Added numbers : ENCORES

“Encore” is French for “again, one more time”, and is a shout that an audience member will make here in North America to request another song, say. But, the term is not used this way in France. Rather, the audience will shout “Bis!”, which is the Italian for “twice!”

18. Many mowers : DEERES

John Deere invented the first commercially successful steel plow in 1837. Prior to Deere’s invention, farmers used an iron or wooden plow that constantly had to be cleaned as rich soil stuck to its surfaces. The cast-steel plow was revolutionary as its smooth sides solved the problem of “stickiness”. The Deere company that John founded uses the slogan “Nothing Runs Like a Deere”, and has a leaping deer as its logo.

22. Number of i’s in “Sicilia” : TRE

In Italian, there are “tre” (three) letters I in the word “Sicilia” (Sicily).

In the Italian Peninsula in Southern Europe, the “boot” is the mainland of Italy, and the the ball being kicked by the boot is the island of Sicily.

27. Hula accompaniment, for short : UKE

The ukulele (“uke”) originated in the 1800s and mimicked a small guitar brought to the Hawaiian Islands by Portuguese immigrants.

The hula is a native dance of Hawaii that uses arm movements to relate a story. The hula can be performed while sitting (a noho dance) or while standing (a luna dance).

33. Khayyám and others : OMARS

Omar Khayyam was a Persian with many talents. He was a poet as well as an important mathematician, astronomer and physician. A selection of his poems were translated by one Edward Fitzgerald in a collection called “Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam”. Here are some famous lines from that collection:

Here with a Loaf of Bread beneath the Bough,
A Flask of Wine, a Book of Verse — and Thou
Beside me singing in the Wilderness —
And Wilderness is Paradise enow.

37. Green of the L.P.G.A. : TAMMIE

Tammie Green won one major championship, the 1989 du Maurier classic.

39. 24 heures ago : HIER

In French, 24 “heures” (hours) ago was “hier” yesterday.

41. Sénat affirmative : OUI

In French, the “Parlement français” (French parliament) is divided into the “Sénat” (Senate) and the “Assemblée nationale” (National Assembly).

42. Polish dumpling : PIEROGI

Pierogi are stuffed dumplings made using unleavened dough, and a traditional dish from Poland.

47. Big brand of grills : WEBER

In 1952, George Stephen was working for the Weber Brothers Metal works in Chicago. One of the company’s products was a line of half-spheres that were welded together to make buoys used in Lake Michigan. Stephens took two of these metal hemispheres and converted them into the original kettle grill. The Weber company set up a barbecue division that Stephens ran, and Stephen became so successful that he bought out the Weber Brothers factory and converted all production to the manufacture of grills.

57. Authority on diamonds? : UMP

That would be baseball.

63. French vineyard : CRU

“Cru” is a term used in the French wine industry that means “growth place”. So, “cru” is the name of the location where the grapes are grown, as opposed to the name of a specific vineyard. The terms “premier cru” and “grand cru” are also used, but the usage depends on the specific wine region. Generally it is a classification awarded to specific vineyards denoting their potential for producing great wines. “Grand cru” is reserved for the very best vineyards, with “premier cru” the level just below.

70. Mine, in Milano : MIO

Milan is Italy’s second largest city, second only to Rome. Milan is a European fashion capital, the headquarters for the big Italian fashion houses of Valentino, Gucci, Versace, Armani, Prada and others. Mario Prada was even born in Milan, and helped establish the city’s reputation in the world of fashion.

71. Plains tribe : OSAGES

The Osage Nation originated in the Ohio River valley in what we now call Kentucky. The Osage were forced to migrate west of the Mississippi by the invading Iroquois tribe. Most of the tribe members now live in Osage County, Oklahoma.

72. Lackadaisical sorts : LOTUS-EATERS

The lotus-eaters were a race of people who featured in Greek mythology. The lotus flowers and fruits that were consumed were supposedly narcotic and addictive, and so the lotus-eaters enjoyed a life largely asleep in peaceful apathy.

74. Glaswegians, e.g. : SCOTS

Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and sits on the River Clyde. Back in the Victorian Era, Glasgow earned a reputation for excellence in shipbuilding and was known as “Second City of the British Empire”. Glasgow shipyards were the birthplaces of such famous vessels as the Lusitania, the Queen Mary and the Queen Elizabeth. People for Glasgow are known as Glaswegians.

82. Witch’s home : ENDOR

According to the First Book of Samuel, the Witch of Endor called up the ghost of the deceased Samuel at the behest of Saul, the first King of the Israelites. Endor was a city in the land of Canaan.

88. Like fried food vis-à-vis grilled food, typically : GREASIER

We can use the French phrase “vis-à-vis” as a preposition meaning “compared with”. When used as an adverb or adjective, it means “face-to-face”, which is a more literal translation from French.

90. Fey’s co-star in “Baby Mama” and “Sisters” : POEHLER

Amy Poehler was a cast member on “Saturday Night Live” from 2001 to 2008, notable for appearing in many great sketches, including those where she played Hillary Clinton opposite Tina Fey’s Sarah Palin. Poehler also starred with Fey in the 2008 movie “Baby Mama”. And, Poehler led the cast of the sitcom “Parks and Recreation” for its seven-season run.

“Baby Mama” is a 2008 film starring Tina Fey as successful single businesswoman who hires a surrogate mother (played by Amy Poehler). “Baby mama” is a term used these days as an alternative to “single mother”.

“Sisters” is a 2015 comedy movie starring Tina Fey and Amy Poehler in the title roles. “The film wasn’t really well received, even though the performances by Fey and Poehler received good reviews.

91. Simple variant of baseball : ONE-O’-CAT

One-o’-cat, or more properly “one old cat”, is an abbreviated form of baseball with a home plate and just one base. The name “one old cat” may have been a contraction of “one hole catapult”. In early variants of the game, the precursor to ball and bat was an oblong wooden object that was “catapulted” into the air. Sometimes it was a short stick placed over a stone that was flipped into the air by striking it with a hand or foot.

92. Part of Potus: Abbr. : PRES

President of the United States (POTUS)

100. Three-dimensional fig. : CYL

Cylinder (cyl.)

104. Buenos ___ : AIRES

Buenos Aires is the capital of Argentina, and is located on the estuary of the Ria de la Plata. As it is a port city, the people of Buenos Aires are known as porteños (“people of the port”).

107. Schubert’s “Eine Kleine Trauermusik,” e.g. : NONET

A nonet is a piece requiring nine musicians for a performance. Franz Schubert’s “Eine kleine Trauermusik” was written for two clarinets, two bassoons, a contrabassoon, two horns and two trombones. The name of the piece translates into “A little music for mourning”.

109. Lion queen in “The Lion King” : NALA

In “The Lion King”, Nala is a lioness and the childhood friend of Simba. By the end of the story, Nala and Simba become wedded. “The Lion King” is inspired by William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”, with Simba representing the title character, and Nala representing Hamlet’s love interest Ophelia.

110. Prefix with dermis : EPI-

The epidermis is the outermost layer of the skin. The thickest piece of epidermal tissue in humans is on the soles of the feet and the palms, measuring about 1.5 mm. The thinnest measures 0.1 mm, and that would be the human eyelid.

114. “The King ___” : AND I

“The King and I” is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical based on a book by Margaret Landon called “Anna and the King of Siam” first published in 1944. Landon’s book is based on a true story, told in the memoirs of Anna Leonowens. Leonowens was the governess of the children of King Mongkut of Siam in the 1860s, and she also taught the king’s wives.

117. “D.C. Cab” co-star : MR T

“D.C. Cab” is a comedy movie released in 1983 starring Mr. T. I don’t hear many good things about the film, although there is a special appearance by Irene Cara of “Fame” fame …

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. ___ aisle, part of a church : APSE
5. Prayer books : MISSALS
12. Bit of baloney : FIB
15. Rep : CRED
19. Two, in Toulouse : DEUX
20. Neighbor of New York : ONTARIO
21. Pesticide ingredient : URETHANE
23. Still a contender : IN IT
24. Cousins of jaguarundis : OCELOTS
25. City in Los Angeles County : TORRANCE
26. Leave in the dust : OUTRUN
28. European eruption site : ETNA
29. Search engine failure? : BING ERROR (dropping BILL from BILLING ERROR)
30. Is able to translate what was heard on the wall? : SPEAKS FLY (dropping FRANK from SPEAKS FRANKLY)
32. Thwart : FOIL
34. Choler : IRE
35. Not stay the course? : VEER
36. Gin, lime and soda combo : GIMLET
38. Things that are bought and soled : SHOES
40. Arizona tribe : HOPI
43. Scotland’s longest river : TAY
45. River through Russia and Kazakhstan : URAL
46. Is expecting : AWAITS
48. Oddity : QUIRK
50. More in order : NEATER
52. Dole (out) : METE
53. Tactic in a war of attrition : SIEGE
54. It goes after go : -KART
55. Mattress tester’s compensation? : SLUMBER PAY (dropping ART from SLUMBER PARTY)
61. Word after big or oil : RIG
62. Suggestion of what to do, slangily : REC
64. Opposite of ennemies : AMIES
65. Basics of education, briefly : RRR
66. Super superstar : ICON
68. Supercilious sort … or the title for this puzzle : NAME-DROPPER
72. A bushelful : LOTS
73. Make faces in front of a camera : MUG
74. European capital named after a saint : SOFIA
75. “___ your head!” : USE
76. Monster.com posting : JOB
77. Dress code requirement for the Puritans? : PRIM COLORS (dropping MARY from PRIMARY COLORS)
80. Peak in Suisse : ALPE
83. City on the Erie Canal : UTICA
86. Tops : A-ONE
87. Goads : EGGS ON
89. Test prep aid : TUTOR
90. Dark beer : PORTER
92. France’s ___ Noël : PERE
93. What may follow a school period? : EDU
95. Connect, as picture with sound : SYNC
96. Annual CBS awards broadcast, with “the” : TONYS
97. Playoff matchup : SERIES
99. Years ago : ONCE
101. “Mudbound” director Rees : DEE
102. Actress Rowlands : GENA
103. Hoped-for conclusion by someone with sore knees? : EARLY AMEN (dropping ERICA from EARLY-AMERICAN)
108. Make a really long-distance call? : PHONE MARS (dropping ANNE from PHONE MANNERS)
113. Rani’s raiment : SARI
115. Matador’s foe : EL TORO
116. Infamous Chicago bootlegger : AL CAPONE
117. Mediterranean resort island : MINORCA
119. “___ go bragh!” : ERIN
120. Swimmers with flippers : SEA LIONS
121. Rufous ruminant : RED DEER
122. Census datum : RACE
123. Sp. miss : SRTA
124. Follower of hi or lo : -RES
125. Slips into at a store, say : TRIES ON
126. Louver : SLAT

Down

1. “Hasta la vista” : ADIOS
2. Corral : PEN UP
3. Software package : SUITE
4. Like high-quality olive oil : EXTRA-VIRGIN
5. Nighttime event in the western sky : MOONSET
6. Business magazine : INC
7. Resolve : STEEL
8. Coarse, as language : SALTY
9. Elvis ___ Presley : ARON
10. Engaged in arson : LIT A FIRE
11. Request for aid : SOS
12. Pointless : FUTILE
13. Go over one’s wardrobe? : IRON
14. Titanic’s undoing : BERG
15. Burn a little : CHAR
16. Went wild : RAN RIOT
17. Added numbers : ENCORES
18. Many mowers : DEERES
22. Number of i’s in “Sicilia” : TRE
27. Hula accompaniment, for short : UKE
29. With 29-Across, surprise in the mail : BILL
31. With 30-Across, is blunt : FRANK
33. Khayyám and others : OMARS
36. Left only the exterior of : GUTTED
37. Green of the L.P.G.A. : TAMMIE
38. Fills : SATES
39. 24 heures ago : HIER
40. Central command spots, for short : HQS
41. Sénat affirmative : OUI
42. Polish dumpling : PIEROGI
44. Senate affirmative : YEA
47. Big brand of grills : WEBER
49. Gunpowder holder : KEG
51. Overdue amount : ARREAR
56. Things that might be grabbed by someone in an argument : LAPELS
57. Authority on diamonds? : UMP
58. Uprightness : PROBITY
59. With 55-Across, big sleepover : ART
60. What mos. and mos. add up to : YRS
63. French vineyard : CRU
66. Devilkin : IMP
67. Apt rhyme for “grr” : CUR
68. Everybody’s opposite : NO ONE
69. New York Titans and Dallas Texans, in ’60s sports : AFLERS
70. Mine, in Milano : MIO
71. Plains tribe : OSAGES
72. Lackadaisical sorts : LOTUS-EATERS
74. Glaswegians, e.g. : SCOTS
76. Protrude : JUT
78. With 77-Across, red, blue and yellow : MARY
79. Welcome at the front door : SEE IN
81. “The Oblong Box” writer : POE
82. Witch’s home : ENDOR
84. Against : CON
85. Electrical connection? : ARC
88. Like fried food vis-à-vis grilled food, typically : GREASIER
90. Fey’s co-star in “Baby Mama” and “Sisters” : POEHLER
91. Simple variant of baseball : ONE O’ CAT
92. Part of Potus: Abbr. : PRES
94. Break, as a habit : UNLEARN
96. QB’s feat : TD PASS
98. Way out : EGRESS
100. Three-dimensional fig. : CYL
103. Wear down : ERODE
104. Buenos ___ : AIRES
105. End of story? : MORAL
106. With 103-Across, simple furniture style : ERICA
107. Schubert’s “Eine Kleine Trauermusik,” e.g. : NONET
109. Lion queen in “The Lion King” : NALA
110. Prefix with dermis : EPI-
111. Anchor : MOOR
112. With 108-Across, not talking loudly on a cell, e.g. : ANNE
114. “The King ___” : AND I
117. “D.C. Cab” co-star : MR T
118. Board hiree, for short : CEO

11 thoughts on “0218-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 18 Feb 2018, Sunday”

  1. 27:26, no errors. Pretty tricky. I understood how the gimmick worked, but I didn’t tie it to the 68A entry (NAME-DROPPER) until I came here and read Bill’s explanation. A good tussle, in any case.

  2. 58:40 including a few minutes for “seek and destroy” missions to correct a couple of errors. A tricky but clever theme. Seemed like a lot of foreign words in this one. Interesting derivation of the word supercilious. It seems obvious when I look at the word now, but I had never really thought about the “cilia” that is “super” to the eyes…eyebrows…haughty.

    As much as I love baseball, ONE O’CAT was new to me too.

    Best –

  3. @Jeff Lot of foreign words.
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Little hard when you don’t know when its French or Italian.
    Confused on the clue went wild. Answer was ran riot. Really

    Elvis Presley (Aron) ? Always thought it was Aaron .

    All and all we had fun. Thanks Bill. See you next week. If you will.

  4. Just when I think they can’t expand on tortured, forced, stretched, **STOOPID** gags to put in these puzzles… here’s another one.

    I’m still squinting and looking at how you “drop down a name” and then continue on in the line above. It just…. doesn’t work.

    30A: SPEAKS FLY????? What the hell is **that**? Flies simply do not speak! A clue about perhaps “raps like a emcee DJ” might have been better.

    43:23 and 4 errors, all based around 30A. 54A’s clue wasn’t much of a help, either.

  5. 39:49, 5 errors: SPEAK STRONGLY (counted as 2 errors); TOY; GURT; YEU. As a father of 3 and grandfather of 5, Go-Gurt came to mind before Go-Kart and it worked with SPEAK STRONGLY. Tough one for me today. With all the foreign words in the ENGLISH language puzzle, I figure YEU must mean yes in some language.

  6. Surprisingly I was able to finish most of this one. Thanks in part to 2 years of high school French and a very good pencil eraser. You don’t want to know how long it took.

  7. Well, once again … I liked this one and, just for kicks, I decided to try to create another possible theme entry. It took me most of the afternoon (interleaved with other activities), but I succeeded … and it’s my own name that gets dropped: the “across” part of it reads “GOOD RAGE”, for which the clue is “Righteous anger”, and the clue for the “DAVE” that “drops down” from it is “With ##-Across, evidence of bowling proficiency” (suggesting “GOOD AVERAGE” as the original generating phrase). When you consider that Ms. Long created six of these, distributed them throughout the puzzle (together with the theme revealer at 68A) in such a way as to preserve grid symmetry, and then filled the rest of the grid with other entries, I can only marvel at her proficiency. Others may (and apparently do) find the theme “stoo-pid”, but the setter certainly cannot be so described; trying to replicate a small portion of the task ought to convince anyone of that.

    And the clue for 38A (“Is able to translate what was heard on the wall”) is meant to suggest the old line “I’d love to be a fly on the wall listening to the conversation between those two!” In order to find out what the fly heard, you’d have to be able to “speak fly”. Whimsical, yes; incomprehensible, no.

    My two cents’ worth …

  8. Clue 42 Down is wrong. It should have been: “Polish dumplings”.
    The answer “pierogi” is plural. The singular (as the clue indicates) is “pierog”.

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