0213-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 13 Feb 2018, Tuesday

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Constructed by: Bruce Haight
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Reveal Answer: Boxed Roses

Today’s grid includes four sets of circled letters that spell out “ROSE”. The four letters are arranged in a BOX pattern. We also have some other answers that remind us of our Valentines:

  • 41A. With 44-Across, Valentine’s Day gift … or a hint to the shaded squares : BOXED …
  • 44A. See 41-Across : … ROSES
  • 10D. Try some Valentine’s Day candy? : HAVE A HEART
  • 37D. Try some Valentine’s Day candy, sneakily? : STEAL A KISS

Bill’s time: 6m 37s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • ARIKARA (Atikara)
  • RORY (Tory)

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Unwanted email : SPAM

The term “spam”, used for unwanted email, is taken from a “Monty Python” sketch. In the sketch (which I’ve seen) the dialog is taken over by the word Spam, a play on the glut of canned meat in the markets of Britain after WWII. So “spam” is used for the glut of emails that takes over online communication. I can just imagine nerdy Internet types (like me) adopting something from a “Monty Python” sketch to describe an online phenomenon …

10. “Buenos días!” : HOLA!

“Hola” is Spanish for the greeting “hi”.

“Buenos dias” translates from Spanish as “good day”, but can also be used to say “good morning”.

14. Actress Polo : TERI

Teri Polo’s most prominent role on the big screen was Pam Focker in “Meet the Fockers” and its sequel. Pam is the wife of the character played by Ben Stiller. Polo also played the wife of Presidential candidate Matt Santos in “The West Wing”.

16. 14-time M.L.B. All-Star, to fans : A-ROD

Professional baseball player Alex Rodriguez earned more nicknames than just A-Rod. He has been called “the Cooler” by some players as there was a perception that teams went cold when he joined them and hot when he left. He has also been called “A-Fraud” by teammates because of another perception, that he is over-demanding. Rodriguez was in a world of hurt not so long ago, for using illegal performance-enhancing drugs. He retired from the baseball in 2016.

20. Like skim milk : NON-FAT

The fatty component of milk is known as butterfat (sometimes “milkfat”). To be labeled whole milk, the butterfat content must be at least 3.25%. Low-fat milk is defined as milk containing 0.5-2% fat, with levels of 1% and 2% commonly found on grocery store shelves. Skim milk must contain less than 0.5% fat, and typically contains 0.1%.

23. Wolf (down) : SNARF

To snarf down is to gobble up, to eat voraciously. “Snarf” is a slang term that is probably related to “scarf”, which has the same meaning.

26. One-named singer with the 2016 #1 hit “Cheap Thrills” : SIA

Sia is the stage name of Australian singer Sia Furler from Adelaide. Sia is a cousin of Australian Christian Rock musician Peter Furler.

27. The “O” of NATO: Abbr. : ORG

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was founded not long after WWII in 1949 and is headquartered in Brussels, Belgium. The first NATO Secretary General was Lord Ismay, Winston Churchill’s chief military assistant during WWII. Famously, Lord Ismay said the goal of NATO was “to keep the Russians out, the Americans in, and the Germans down.”

30. Physics Nobelist Bohr : NIELS

Niels Bohr was a Danish physicist who won his 1922 Nobel Prize for his work on quantum mechanics and atomic structure. Later in his life, Bohr was part of the team working on the Manhattan Project that developed the first atomic bomb. Niels Bohr and Albert Einstein had a series of public debates and disputes in the twenties and thirties. Although the two respected each other very highly, they held very different views on quantum theory, different views on the laws of physics at the atomic level. The passage of time has shown that Bohr won out in those debates.

36. Intrinsically : PER SE

“Per se” is a Latin phrase that translates as “by itself”. We use “per se” pretty literally, meaning “in itself, intrinsically”.

40. The “E” of Q.E.D. : ERAT

The initialism “QED” is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. QED stands for the Latin “quod erat demonstrandum” meaning “that which was to be demonstrated”.

41. With 44-Across, Valentine’s Day gift … or a hint to the shaded squares : BOXED …

44. See 41-Across : … ROSES

Saint Valentine’s Day was introduced by Pope Gelasius I in 496 AD to honor various martyrs with the name Valentine. However, the saint’s’ day was dropped by the Roman Catholic church in 1969, by Pope Paul VI. Try telling that to Hallmark though …

43. The Eternal City : ROME

The Italian capital of Rome is known as “The Eternal City”, a name given by ancient Roman poets and writers.

46. Old school : ALMA MATER

The literal translation for the Latin term “alma mater” is “nourishing mother”. The phrase was used in Ancient Rome to refer to mother goddesses, and in Medieval Christianity the term was used to refer to the Virgin Mary. Nowadays, one’s alma mater is the school one attended, either high school or college, usually one’s last place of education.

48. North Africa’s ___ Mountains : ATLAS

In Greek mythology Atlas was one of the Titans. Famously, he supported the heavens on his shoulders, while crouched on what are now called the Atlas Mountains in Greece.

52. When to expect someone, for short : ETA

Estimated time of arrival (ETA)

55. Stonehenge priest : DRUID

Druids were priests of Celtic Europe during the Iron Age.

The magnificent Stonehenge monument in the south of England was built from 3000 to 2000 BC. “Stonehenge” has given its name to “henges”, a whole class of earthwork monuments that are circular in form with an internal ditch surrounded by a bank. Paradoxically, Stonehenge doesn’t qualify as a henge by this contemporary definition, as its earthen bank is surrounded by an external ditch.

69. Father of Phobos : ARES

The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of bloodlust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos (Fear), Deimos (Terror) and Eros (Desire). Ares was the son of Zeus and Hera, and the Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

71. “Encore!” : MORE!

“Encore” is French for “again, one more time”, and is a shout that an audience member will make here in North America to request another song, say. But, the term is not used this way in France. Rather, the audience will shout “Bis!”, which is the Italian for “twice!”

Down

1. Baseball’s Musial : STAN

Stan Musial was a retired baseball player who went by the nickname “Stan the Man”, a moniker he was awarded by the Brooklyn Dodgers fans in 1946. Apparently, off the field Stan was quite the harmonica player.

2. 100 centavos : PESO

“Centavo” is a Spanish and Portuguese word, and is used for the coin that represents 1/100 of the basic monetary unit of quite a few countries, including Cuba. “Centavo” comes from the Latin “centum” meaning “one hundred” and “-avo” meaning “portion, fraction”.

3. Elvis’s middle name : ARON

Elvis Aron Presley (aka “the King”) was the younger of two identical twins. His brother was stillborn, and delivered 35 minutes before Elvis. The brother was named Jesse Garon Presley. So, although born a twin, Elvis was raised as an only child.

4. Irks : MIFFS

To miff is to put out, to tee off, and is verb that has been around since the early 1600s. Interestingly, in 1824 Sir Walter Scott described the word “miffed” as “a women’s phrase”. That should get him a slap, I’d say …

5. Tiki bar drink : MAI TAI

The mai tai cocktail is strongly associated with the Polynesian islands, but the drink was supposedly invented in 1944 in Trader Vic’s restaurant in Oakland, California. One recipe is 6 parts white rum, 3 parts orange curaçao, 3 parts Orgeat syrup, 1 part rock candy syrup, 2 parts fresh lime juice, all mixed with ice and then a float added of 6 parts dark rum. “Maita’i” is the Tahitian word for “good”.

The world’s first tiki bar was called “Don the Beachcomber”, and was opened in L.A. in 1933 by Ernest Gantt (also known as “Donn Beach”). The bar became famous for its exotic rum cocktails. Gantt was called to serve in WWII, and the business expanded dramatically under his ex-wife’s management so that there was a 160-restaurant chain waiting for Gantt when he returned stateside.

7. Fiver : ABE

The US five-dollar bill is often called an “Abe”, as President Lincoln’s portrait is on the front. An Abe is also referred to as a “fin”, a term that has been used for a five-pound note in Britain since 1868.

8. The “her” in the lyric “I met her in a club down in old Soho” : LOLA

“Lola” is a fabulous song that was written by Ray Davies and released by the Kinks back in 1970. Inspired by a real life incident, the lyrics tell of young man who met a young “lady” in a club, danced with her, and then discovered “she” was actually a transvestite. The storyline isn’t very traditional, but the music is superb.

10. Try some Valentine’s Day candy? : HAVE A HEART

The forerunner to Sweethearts candy was introduced in 1866, with the famous sayings written on the candy tailored for use at weddings. One of the original expressions was, “Married in pink, he will take a drink”. The original candy was a lot bigger, to fit all those words! The smaller, heart-shaped candy hit the shelves in 1901. We’ve been able to buy Sweethearts with the words “Text me” since 2010.

11. Shipments to smelteries : ORES

Metals are found in ore in the form of oxides. In order to get pure metal from the ore, the ore is heated and the metal oxides within are reduced (i.e. the oxygen is removed) in the chemical process known as smelting. The oxygen is extracted by adding a source of carbon or carbon monoxide which uses up the excess oxygen atoms to make carbon dioxide, a waste product of smelting (and, a greenhouse gas).

19. Philosopher Fromm : ERICH

Erich Fromm was a German psychologist. Fromm studied extensively the work of Sigmund Freud, and became very critical of his theories. He was also noted for his political views, and had a socialist leaning. He spent some time in the US and was active in the Socialist Party of America in the fifties, when McCarthyism was running rampant.

21. Fashion’s Klein : ANNE

Anne Klein was a fashion designer from Brooklyn, New York. Anna was born Hannah Golofski, and founded her first clothing company in the 1940s along with her first husband Ben Klein.

24. PC start-overs : REBOOTS

The verb “to boot” as used in the world of computers comes from the phrase “pull oneself up by one’s bootstraps”. The idea is that the software that has to be loaded before a computer can do anything useful is called a “bootstrap load”.

25. Big source of omega-3 fatty acids : FLAX SEED

Fish oils are noted for containing omega-3 fatty acids, which have many health benefits including the reduction of inflammation. Like so many essential nutrients that we get from animals, the only reason the animal has them is that it feeds on plants. In this case, fish cannot manufacture omega-3 fatty acids, and instead absorb them from algae. Omega-3 fatty acids are also readily found in other plant oils such as flaxseed oil.

27. Schedule at the Met : OPERAS

The Metropolitan Opera (often “the Met”) of New York City is the largest classical music organization in the country, presenting about 220 performances each and every year. Founded in 1880, the Met is renowned for using technology to expand its audiences. Performances have been broadcast live on radio since 1931, and on television since 1977. And since 2006 you can go see a live performance from New York in high definition on the big screen, at a movie theater near you …

28. Keep going in Yahtzee : RE-ROLL

The dice game of Yahtzee was introduced in 1956 and is a variant of earlier dice games, especially the game “Yacht” (which even has a similar name). Yahtzee is required playing in our house at holidays. The game involves the rolling of five dice, with the intent of getting certain combinations. A lot of those combinations resemble poker hands, such as “three of a kind”, “four of a kind” and “full house”.

29. One of 22 for U2 : GRAMMY

The first Grammy Awards Ceremony was held in 1959 and focused on recognizing outstanding achievement in the recording industry. The idea of a Grammy Award came up when recording executives were working on the Hollywood Walk of Fame project in the fifties. These executives concluded that there were many people in the recording industry deserving of accolades but who would probably never make it to the Walk of Fame. As a result, they founded the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. The Academy considered naming the award the “Eddies” after Thomas Edison, but then opted for “Grammy” after Edison’s invention: the gramophone.

Irish singer Bono is a Dubliner who was born Paul David Hewson. As a youth, Hewson was given the nickname “Bono Vox” by a friend, a Latin expression meaning “good voice”, and so the singer has been known as Bono since the late seventies. His band’s first name was “Feedback”, later changed to “The Hype”. The band members searched for yet another name and chose U2 from a list of six names suggested by a friend. They picked U2 because it was the name they disliked least …

34. Poker advice for Sajak? : SIT PAT

Pat Sajak took over the hosting of “Wheel of Fortune” from Chuck Woolery back in 1983 and has been doing the job ever since. Sajak had a short run as a talk show host in 1989/1990 and used to sub quite often for Larry King and Regis Philbin.

35. Greek peak, briefly : MT OSSA

Mount Ossa in Greece is located between Mount Pelion in the south, and the famed Mount Olympus in the north. Mount Ossa is also known as Kissavos.

37. Try some Valentine’s Day candy, sneakily? : STEAL A KISS

The Hershey Company produces over 80 million chocolate Kisses each day, and has been making them since 1907.

39. Investments with fixed rates, for short : CDS

A certificate of deposit (CD) is like a less-flexible and higher-paying savings account. Instead of depositing money into a savings account and earning interest periodically, one can open a CD. With a CD one deposits a minimum amount of money but must leave it there for a specified length of time. In return for committing the funds for a fixed period, one is given a higher interest rate than a savings account and can redeem that interest and the initial deposit when the term has expired. CDs are relatively low-risk investments as they are FDIC insured, just like savings accounts.

41. Item under a blouse : BRA

The word “brassière” is French in origin, but it isn’t the word that the French use for a “bra”. In France, what we call a bra is known as a “soutien-gorge”, translating to “held under the neck”. The word “brassière” is indeed used in France but there it describes a baby’s undershirt, a lifebelt or a harness. “Brassière” comes from the Old French word for an “arm protector” in a military uniform (“bras” is the French for “arm”). Later “brassière” came to mean “breastplate” and from there the word was used for a type of woman’s corset. The word jumped into English around 1900.

51. Bags for guys : MURSES

A “murse” is a “man purse”. What’s wrong with pockets …?

54. Home of King Minos : CRETE

Minos was the King of Crete in Greek mythology, and the son of Zeus and Europa. Minos had an elaborate labyrinth built under the island, designed by the architect Daedalus and his son Icarus (who famously died trying to escape from the island by “flying” away). In the labyrinth, King Minos kept the Minotaur, a dreadful creature with the head of a bull on the body of a man.

56. Bongos, e.g. : DRUMS

Bongo drums are Cuban percussion instruments consisting of a pair of drums, one larger than the other, The smaller drum is called the “hembra” (female) and the larger the “macho” (male).

57. Lab medium : AGAR

Agar (also “agar-agar”) is a jelly extracted from seaweed that has many uses. Agar is found in Japanese desserts, and can also be used as a food thickener or even as a laxative. In the world of science, it is the most common medium used for growing bacteria in Petri dishes.

58. Actor Calhoun : RORY

Rory Calhoun was a film and TV actor from Los Angeles. Calhoun really carved out a nice career for himself after a very ignominious start in life. Calhoun served three years in federal prison for robbing jewelry stores and cars while in this teens.

63. Famed “fiddler” : NERO

The Great Fire of Rome raged for five and a half days in 64 AD. Of the fourteen districts of Rome, three were completely destroyed and seven more suffered serious damage. The emperor at the time was Nero, although reports that he fiddled, played his lyre or sang while the city burned; those accounts are probably not true. In fact, Nero was staying outside of Rome when the fire started and rushed home on hearing the news. He organized a massive relief effort, throwing open his own home to give shelter to many of the citizens who were left living on the street.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Unwanted email : SPAM
5. Series of courses? : MEALS
10. “Buenos días!” : HOLA!
14. Actress Polo : TERI
15. Top Trappist, maybe : ABBOT
16. 14-time M.L.B. All-Star, to fans : A-ROD
17. Beginning, datewise : AS OF
18. “Yes, that’s my opinion” : I BELIEVE SO
20. Like skim milk : NON-FAT
22. Takes to the station house : ARRESTS
23. Wolf (down) : SNARF
26. One-named singer with the 2016 #1 hit “Cheap Thrills” : SIA
27. The “O” of NATO: Abbr. : ORG
30. Physics Nobelist Bohr : NIELS
32. Big rift : CHASM
36. Intrinsically : PER SE
38. Lived like a single guy : BATCHED IT
40. The “E” of Q.E.D. : ERAT
41. With 44-Across, Valentine’s Day gift … or a hint to the shaded squares : BOXED …
42. Regarding : AS TO
43. The Eternal City : ROME
44. See 41-Across : … ROSES
45. Knocks : RAPS
46. Old school : ALMA MATER
48. North Africa’s ___ Mountains : ATLAS
49. On the down-low : SLYLY
50. Looks to be : SEEMS
52. When to expect someone, for short : ETA
53. Airer of “The Bachelor” and “The Catch” : ABC
55. Stonehenge priest : DRUID
57. Dakota tribe that attacked “The Revenant” trappers : ARIKARA
61. Enthusiastic : RARING
65. Get fouled up, idiomatically : GO SIDEWAYS
68. Manual reader : USER
69. Father of Phobos : ARES
70. Snicker sound : TE-HEE
71. “Encore!” : MORE!
72. Some hard drinks : RYES
73. Does some post-shooting film work : EDITS
74. Reason for a school closing : SNOW

Down

1. Baseball’s Musial : STAN
2. 100 centavos : PESO
3. Elvis’s middle name : ARON
4. Irks : MIFFS
5. Tiki bar drink : MAI TAI
6. Flow out : EBB
7. Fiver : ABE
8. The “her” in the lyric “I met her in a club down in old Soho” : LOLA
9. Excites : STIRS
10. Try some Valentine’s Day candy? : HAVE A HEART
11. Shipments to smelteries : ORES
12. Heading on a poster with a picture of a dog : LOST
13. Hubbubs : ADOS
19. Philosopher Fromm : ERICH
21. Fashion’s Klein : ANNE
24. PC start-overs : REBOOTS
25. Big source of omega-3 fatty acids : FLAX SEED
27. Schedule at the Met : OPERAS
28. Keep going in Yahtzee : RE-ROLL
29. One of 22 for U2 : GRAMMY
31. Pilot : STEERER
33. Commercial success? : AD SALE
34. Poker advice for Sajak? : SIT PAT
35. Greek peak, briefly : MT OSSA
37. Try some Valentine’s Day candy, sneakily? : STEAL A KISS
39. Investments with fixed rates, for short : CDS
41. Item under a blouse : BRA
47. “Oops, sorry!” : MY BAD!
48. Locale of both the 2018 and 2020 Olympics : ASIA
51. Bags for guys : MURSES
54. Home of King Minos : CRETE
56. Bongos, e.g. : DRUMS
57. Lab medium : AGAR
58. Actor Calhoun : RORY
59. “Hmm …” : I SEE …
60. Bedazzled : AWED
62. Has the stage : IS ON
63. Famed “fiddler” : NERO
64. Sprouted : GREW
66. Sushi fish : AHI
67. “Nevertheless …” : YET …

26 thoughts on “0213-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 13 Feb 2018, Tuesday”

  1. 13:52 A bit longer than average for Tuesday. People on twitter last night said this one was tough but I flew through the top half. Then I hit a few rough spots. BATCHEDIT and MURSES were both unknown to me. I thought the revealer was BOXof for awhile so that slowed me down. Then the bottom left really got me. I didn’t know ARIKARA and it just didn’t look right. Plus the R was a total guess as I didn’t know the actor. I also didn’t think 59D would be ISEE since SEEMS was already in the puzzle.

    1. I think that the actual answer for 23 across should be scarfs, not snarfs (which isn’t even a real slang word), as in “she scarfed down her food” not “she snarfed down her food.”

  2. 8:08, no errors. Not too difficult. But … just now, I read Marc’s post and said to myself, “BATCH EDIT? I don’t remember seeing BATCH EDIT in the puzzle.” Gotta work a little more on the old short-term-memory problem, I guess. And … I have a little backpack that goes everywhere with me, but it isn’t a MURSE … really, it isn’t … 😜

  3. 18:25. Definitely had some tricky points. I too had ScARF, but then that meant there had to be someone named ACNE Klein. Something looked amiss. Then I switched to ANNE/SNARF….

    I got ARIKARA via crosses. Somewhere I had heard the name RORY Calhoun so I went with it.

    Is a computer bag a MURSE? I see fewer and fewer of them in airports. Hmmm

    Best –

    1. I understand. Actually, after I posted the comment above, it occurred to me that “batch edit” is a term that not all will know. It’s familiar to me from my days as a computer programmer (though it’s also used in photo processing, I guess). I was just amused that, a day after doing the puzzle, I saw the entry as “BATCH EDIT” instead of “BATCHED IT” (and therefore commented about my short-term memory problems).

  4. Nice, educational puzzle.

    If men had to carry all the stuff women do, they wouldn’t have enough pockets. Or, as my husband says, “Here, hold this for me.” And I schlepp along.

    I don’t accept either scarf or snarf as words. Aren’t even rooted in Yiddish or any other immigrant language. Maybe onomatopoeia.

  5. 15:27, no errors. Similar to other posters, I breezed through the upper third, and bogged down in the middle. Lost a lot of time guessing that 38A BATCHED IT would end in ALONE. Caught the repeating four letter theme in the shaded boxes, but thought the word was EROS rather than ROSE, which sort of worked out. It enabled me to enter ARES as the father of Phobos, rather than MARS (note that the moons of the planet Mars are Deimos and Phobos). I think MURSE was one of those flash in the pan fads which died quickly; and anyone in my old neighborhood who would have ‘snarfed down their food’ instead of ‘scarfed down their food’ would have been teased mercilessly.

  6. I’ve been toying with the notion of doing a “little” experiment: The idea is that every day for a couple of weeks I would do the NYT crosswords for that date in 1955, 1973, 1985, 1994, and 2018. Each of these dates is associated with the tenure of a particular editor (Margaret Farrar, 1942-1969; Will Weng, 1969-1977; Eugene Maleska, 1977-1993; and Will Shortz, 1993-present); 1955, 1973, and 1985 are centered in their respective tenures, while 1993 and 2018 are near the beginning and end of the current tenure. My hope would be to get a better sense of how the puzzles have changed over time.

    Mind you, I reserve the right to abandon or modify this experiment when I find out just how much time I’m going to have to invest in it 😜.
    (In particular, the pre-Shortz puzzles, especially on Sunday, can be problematical – in part, because they can be quite difficult to extract from the NYT archives).

    @Allen … You have been known (on occasion 😜) to criticize the editing skills of Will Shortz. Which of the above years do you think is most likely to produce puzzles that would meet your criteria for excellence in editing? What features of the puzzles should I take note of? What statistics would you be interested in?

    1. I couldn’t venture a guess there, as I wasn’t doing the NYT puzzle during earlier “regimes”. I’d be interested to see whatever you uncovered with your experiment, though, just to have additional information (or ammo against Shortz) 🙂

    2. Of interest to me might be if you can pinpoint under which editor certain NYT-centric wrinkles first started? Such as, who spearheaded or “popularized” (if you can call it that) rebuses? Who first allowed “out of grid” tricks (the most recent outrage of this sort was last year’s Aluminum siding puzzle)? Who first allowed the “imperative command” clue? The first “pun…?” clue format.

  7. I finally got my husband to carry a man-purse (never heard it called a “murse” — we call it a “bag”) after watching him looking for things in his pockets, slapping the pants pockets (front and back), shirt pocket, jacket packets (top and bottom), overcoat pockets — now he knows where everything is, even if he can’t find it right away! Guys, try it, you’ll like it.

    1. “It’s a European shoulder bag!!” Have you seen that commercial, with the well-meaning wife trying to “sell” the idea to a skeptical friend, with her put-upon husband standing by sheepishly? 😀

  8. Two errors at the ANNE/SNARF cross. Like most others I went with SCARF even though ACNE surely did not look right. I was familiar with Calvin Klein and that threw me off as I thought there could not be another “Klein” in fashion. Actually, I have now learned that there are two famous fashion designers with the last name of Klein. It turns out that this is just a coincidence and indeed Anne Klein and Calvin Klein are not related. Live and learn.

  9. Good theme and execution. Valentine’s Day is long past out here in syndiland, but this was still a treat. Enjoyed it.

  10. @Dave: I couldn’t venture a guess there, as I wasn’t doing the NYT puzzle during earlier “regimes”. I’d be interested to see whatever you uncovered with your experiment, though, just to have additional information (or ammo against Shortz) 🙂

    14:44 and no errors; pleased to see I was just slightly more accurate than Bill, even at double the time.

    I, too got all entangled in SNARF, instead of the expected SCARF. Took awhile to get that, especially when thinking the center entries should be *DOZEN* ROSES instead of BOXED.

    **OUTRAGED** at BATCHED IT…. (said no one, EVER). Now with the confusion and conundrum about BATCH EDIT, I wish the setter would have come up with a nice clue for THAT, since it’s an actual honest-to-God term. MURSES, I have at least come across that bit of new English, a time or too.

  11. I have used, and heard my friends use, batched it on many occasions. “What did you do last weekend?” “Oh my wife was at her moms so I batched it.”

  12. It’s a new one on me….. what part of the country are you in, and what’s your “general” age range? I’d be curious to know the etymology of this “term”….

      1. Well ‘baching it’ sure doesn’t look right, does it? But I will admit the ‘t’ threw me for a bit.

      1. I also have heard the term “batched it” several times over the years. I personally never took a liking to the term so I never used it myself. I also took notice of the curious insertion of the “t” into the spelling. Nice to have the discussion , clears up a lot of points.

  13. Thanks for your site Bill! I like to learn the little Butler tidbits you feed us daily.

    I’m a ‘Mr. Wednesday,’ if I’m very lucky I can solve a Wednesday. Only once have I completed a Thursday puzzle… And when I came to this site all the comments said ‘too easy for a Thursday.’ Sigh.

    At any rate, I solved this bad boy! Quite the feeling of accomplishment to ‘one up’ the master, Bill for the first time in 2 years or so.

    BTW, I’ll be ‘batching it’ this weekend, working on my garden while the wife spends time with her daughter.

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