0107-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 7 Jan 2018, Sunday

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Constructed by: David Steinberg
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: Vowel Play

There’s a note with the electronic version of today’s puzzle, which explains the appearance of my grid:

In the print version of this puzzle, the squares that are circled are instead each divided into two halves with a diagonal line.

We have two letters in some squares in the grid. In one direction, these letters just act as a two-letter sequence in an answer. In the other direction, we use the first letters of the pairs to provide one answer, and the second letters of the pairs to provide a second answer. Both answers are referenced in the themed clue. A complex puzzle, and difficult to explain!

  • 22A. Richard Simmons diet regimen / London tabloid : DEAL-A-MEAL / DAILY MAIL
  • 29A. What a red pepper on a menu may signal / Made clear : SPICY FOOD / SPECIFIED
  • 43A. Preceder of free throws / Juice container? : FOUL CALL / FUEL CELL
  • 69A. Fooler / Summer Olympics standout : TRICKSTER / TRACK STAR
  • 94A. Harry Potter’s ex-girlfriend / Register sound : CHO CHANG / CHA-CHING!
  • 110A. “He’s so lame!” / Deer variety : WHAT A TOOL! / WHITE-TAIL
  • 118A. Thin neckwear / Assam or Earl Grey : STRING TIE / STRONG TEA
  • 42D. Cookies filled with green creme / Flattish sea creatures : MINT OREOS / MANTA RAYS
  • 47D. Risky / Denim attire : DANGEROUS / DUNGAREES

Bill’s time: 28m 56s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

8. Sycophant’s quality : SMARM

The term “smarm”, meaning insincere flattery, comes from a colloquial word “smalm” meaning to smear the hair with some sort of styling product.

13. Mr. Dithers’s wife in “Blondie” : CORA

“Blondie” was created as a comic strip by Chic Young. It was first published in 1930, and is still being created today (although the strip is now controlled by Chic’s son, Dean). The strip spawned a series of radio programs (1939-1950) and a series of Blondie films (1938-1950). Blondie is married to Dagwood Bumstead. Dagwood slaves away at a construction company run by Julius Dithers, whose wife is named Cora. Another famous character in the strip is Elmo Tuttle, a pesky kid who is always bugging Dagwood.

17. ___-ball pens : UNI

Uni-ball is a brand of pens and pencils made by the Mitsubishi Pencil Company. The Mitsubishi Pencil Company is unrelated to the Mitsubishi Group company that makes so many products, including the Mitsubishi line of cars and trucks that we see on our roads.

22. Richard Simmons diet regimen / London tabloid : DEAL-A-MEAL / DAILY MAIL

Richard Simmons is fitness instructor-cum-television personality and comedian. Simmons had been obese from early childhood, but managed to lose over one hundred pounds using exercise and diet. He opened his own exercise studio in Los Angeles, the success of which gradually drew media attention. After years in the spotlight, Simmons has shunned attention since 2014. Somehow, a rumor started that Simmons was being held hostage by his housekeeper. LAPD detectives actually called to his home in 2017 to check on his welfare. Subsequently, the police department issued a statement that Simmons was fine, was doing what he wanted to do, and it was his own business.

“The Daily Mail” is a tabloid newspaper published in the UK. It wouldn’t be my persona way to get the news mind you, but it is the second highest-selling paper in the country.

24. Records : ANNALS

“Annal” is a rarely used word, and is the singular of the more common “annals”. An annal would be the recorded events of one year, with annals being the chronological record of events in successive years. The term “annal” comes from the Latin “annus” meaning “year”.

27. Carpe ___ : DIEM

“Carpe diem” is a quotation from Horace, one of Ancient Rome’s leading lyric poets. “Carpe diem” translates from Latin as “seize the day” or “enjoy the day”. The satirical motto of a procrastinator is “carpe mañana”, “translating” as “seize tomorrow”.

31. Caninelike animal more closely related to a cat than a dog : HYENA

Hyenas have the reputation of being cowardly scavengers. That said, the spotted hyena that lives in Sub-Saharan Africa actually kills about 95% of its food and a pack of spotted hyenas are capable of driving off leopards or lionesses before they can consume their kill.

35. O. J. Simpson trial judge : ITO

Judge Lance Ito came in for a lot of criticism for his handling of the O.J. Simpson murder trial. The lead prosecutor in that trial was Marcia Clark, you might recall. I read the book that’s Clark wrote about the trial called “Without a Doubt”, and she pointed out one trait of Judge Ito that I think is quite telling. Ito would almost always refer to the prosecutor as “Marcia”, while addressing the men on both sides of the case as “Mister”.

37. “Goosebumps” author : STINE

“Goosebumps” is a series of children’s horror novels written by author R. L. Stine. The novels have been adapted into a television series shown on Canadian TV. Author R. L. Stine is sometimes referred to as the Stephen King of children’s literature as he writes horror stories for young people.

38. So-called “cradle of civilization” : SUMER

Iraq is often called the “Cradle of Civilization” as it was home to Sumer, which was the earliest known civilization on the planet. By 5000 BC the Sumerian people were practicing year-round agriculture and had a specialized labor force. For the first time, a whole race were able to settle in one place by storing food, instead of having to migrate in a pattern dictated by crops and grazing land.

50. Inventor Howe : ELIAS

Elias Howe was an American inventor. Howe wasn’t the first to come up with the idea of a sewing machine, but he was the first to develop one that was functional.

52. Slimming surgeries, in brief : LIPOS

Liposuction (lipo) dates back to the 1920s when it was developed by a surgeon in France. However, the procedure quickly lost favor when a French model developed gangrene after surgery. As a result, it wasn’t until the mid-seventies that modern liposuction took off, after being popularized by two Italian-American surgeons in Rome.

54. ___ Ste. Marie, Mich. : SAULT

Sault Ste. Marie is the name of two cities on either side of the Canada-US border, one in Ontario and the other in Michigan. The two cities were originally one settlement in the 17th century, established by Jesuit Missionaries. The missionaries gave the settlement the name “Sault Sainte Marie”, which can be translated as “Saint Mary’s Falls”. The city was one community until 1817, when a US-UK Joint Boundary Commission set the border along the St. Mary’s River.

57. Like the data in big data : MINED

The process of data mining is used to extract information from a database and present it in a form that facilitates further use.

59. Warriors’ org. : NBA

The Golden State Warriors are our local NBA franchise out here in the San Francisco Bay Area and are based in Oakland, California. The team was founded in 1946 as the Philadelphia Warriors, becoming the San Francisco Warriors when they moved to City by the Bay in 1962. They changed named again (to Golden State) when they relocated to Oakland in 1971. The statewide name reflected the fact that the team played some of their 1971-72 season games in San Diego, and as such were “California’s” team.

65. Chow mein relative : SUBGUM

Subgum is a dish served in American-Chinese cuisine. Originating in the very early 1900s, subgum usually comprises several proteins mixed with vegetables and served over rice noodles. The term “subgum” translates as “many and varied”, and is used to indicate “with the works”, just pile it all on.

“Chow mein” has two slightly different meanings on the East and West Coasts of the US. On the East Coast, basic chow mein is a crispy dish, whereas on the West Coast it is a steamed dish that is relatively soft. On the East Coast the steamed dish is available, but under the name “lo mein”. On the West Coast, the crispy dish is also on the menu, as “Hong Kong-style chow mein”.

75. Lady friend, in Livorno : AMICA

Livorno is a port city on the west coast of Italy. The city is often called “Leghorn” in English and gave its name to the leghorn breed of chicken, and by extension to the cartoon character known as Foghorn Leghorn.

76. SoCal-based sneaker brand : LA GEAR

LA Gear is an athletic shoe manufacturer based in Los Angeles.

78. Zeno of ___ : ELEA

Zeno of Elea was a Greek philosopher who lived in Elea, a Greek colony in Southern Italy. Zeno is famous for his “paradoxes”, a set of problems that really make you think! In the problem known as “Achilles and the Tortoise”, Zeno tells us that Achilles races a tortoise, giving the tortoise a head start (of say 100 meters). By the time Achilles reaches the starting point of the tortoise, the tortoise will have moved on, albeit only a small distance. Achilles then sets his sights on the tortoise’s new position and runs to it. Again the tortoise has moved ahead a little. Achilles keeps on moving to the tortoise’s new position but can never actually catch his slower rival. Or can he …?

79. Colonial Indian title : SAHIB

“Sahib” is most recognized as a term of address used in India, where it is used in much the same way as we use “mister” in English. The term was also used to address male Europeans in the days of the British Raj. The correct female form of address is “sahiba”, but in the colonial days the address used was “memsahib”, a melding of “ma’am” and “sahib”

84. Bridges of old film : LLOYD

The actor Lloyd Bridges is noted for his many television and movie roles over a long and distinguished career. Lloyd is also remembered as the father of two great actor sons: Beau Bridges and jeff Bridges. Lloyd served with the US Coast Guard during WWII, and was a member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary after the war. Sons Beau and Jeff also served in the Coast Guard and Coast Guard Reserve.

88. Writer Shaw : IRWIN

Irwin Shaw was an author from New York City. Shaw’s most famous works were his novels “The Young Lions” (1948) and “Rich Man, Poor Man” (1970). The former was made into a successful 1958 film of the same starring Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift and Dean Martin. The latter became a successful TV miniseries of the same name starring Peter Strauss and Nick Nolte.

94. Harry Potter’s ex-girlfriend / Register sound : CHO CHANG / CHA-CHING!

Cho Chang is a fellow student of Harry Potter, one year ahead of him at Hogwarts. Chang is the girl who gives Harry his first kiss!

96. National Spelling Bee airer : ESPN

The Scripps National Spelling Bee is sponsored and managed by the E. W. Scripps Company. ESPN has been televising the latter rounds of the National Spelling Bee since 2006.

97. Some prized Prado pieces : GOYAS

Francisco Goya was a Spanish painter, who was often called the last of the Old Masters and the first of the moderns. Two of Goya’s most famous works are “The Nude Maja” and “The Clothed Maja”.

The Museo del Prado is in Madrid, the capital of Spain, and has one of the finest art collections in the world. The gallery’s most famous work is “Las Meninas” By Velazquez.

99. One of the Kennedys : ETHEL

Ethel Kennedy is the widow of Robert F. Kennedy. Ethel was a roommate with Jean Kennedy, and through Jean met her brother Robert. Robert and Ethel had ten children together, with an eleventh child sadly arriving after Robert’s assassination in 1968.

102. Sin subject? : TRIG

The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent (abbreviated to “sin, cos and tan”). Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The “reciprocal” of these three functions are secant, cosecant and cotangent. The reciprocal functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent. These inverted ratios should not be confused with the “inverse” trigonometric functions e.g. arcsine, arccosine and arctangent. These inverse functions are the reverse of the sine, cosine and tangent.

110. “He’s so lame!” / Deer variety : WHAT A TOOL! / WHITE-TAIL

The white-tailed deer is very common in North America, especially east of the Rocky Mountains. West of the Rockies, white-tails have largely been replaced by black-tailed deer.

112. Golden apple goddess : ERIS

According to Greek mythology, the goddess Eris tossed the Golden Apple of Discord into the middle of the table during the feast of the gods at the wedding of Peleus and Thetis. The Golden Apple bore the words “to the fairest”, and the goddesses Hera, Athena and Aphrodite succumbed to their vanity and fought for the title of most fair. This dispute eventually led to the Trojan War.

116. Photographer’s light : STROBE

A strobe light is a device that produces regular flashes, like the light on top of a police car. The term derives from the Greek “strobos” meaning “twisting, whirling”.

122. Afghan, e.g. : HOUND

The Afghan Hound is a dog with a thick hairy coat. The breed originated in Afghanistan in cold areas where all that insulation was an advantage.

124. Mustang feature : MANE

A mustang is a free-roaming horse, a descendent from a once-domesticated animal. The English term comes from the Spanish “mesteño“ meaning “stray livestock animal”.

127. Major race sponsor : STP

STP is a brand name for automotive lubricants and additives. The name STP comes from “Scientifically Treated Petroleum”.

Down

5. Yappy lap dogs, informally : POMS

The Pomeranian is a small breed of dog named for the Pomerania region of Europe (part of eastern Germany and northern Poland). The breed was much loved by the royalty of Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. In the 19th century, Queen Victoria owned a particularly small Pomeranian. Due to the notoriety of the monarch’s pet, the Pomeranian was bred for small size, so that during the Queen’s admittedly long reign, the size of the average “pom” was reduced by 50% …

9. Minister’s home : MANSE

A manse is a minister’s home in various Christian traditions. “Manse” derives from “mansus”, the Latin for “dwelling”. The term can also be used for any stately residence.

12. Richie’s mom on “Happy Days” : MRS C

In the great sitcom “Happy Days”, the Fonz liked to address Richie Cunningham’s mother as “Mrs. C”. In turn, Mrs. Marion Cunningham addressed the Fonz as “Arthur”.

23. Moscow landmark : LENIN’S TOMB

Lenin’s Tomb is a mausoleum in which lie the embalmed remains of Vladimir Lenin. The tomb lies just outside the walls of the Kremlin in Red Square. Lenin died in 1924, after which his body was housed in a wooden structure in Red Square for viewing by mourners. The current marble and granite structure was completed in 1930. The body has rested there on display ever since, except for the years of WWII when there was a perceived danger of Moscow falling to the Germans. The body was evacuated to Tyumen in Siberia for the war years.

28. Writer Jong : ERICA

The author Erica Jong’s most famous work is her first: “Fear of Flying”, a novel published in 1973. Over twenty years later, Jong wrote “Fear of Fifty: a midlife memoir”, published in 1994.

39. Baby in a basket : MOSES

According to the Bible, The Pharaoh issued an edict that all male Hebrew children be drowned in the river Nile soon after birth. Moses’ mother saved her child by placing him in a basket and hiding him among the bulrushes at the edge of the Nile. The baby was found and adopted by the Pharaoh’s daughter.

40. Actor Patel : DEV

Dev Patel is an actor from Harrow in England. Patel is best known for playing the lead in the hit movie “Slumdog Millionaire”. He also stars in a lovely 2012 film called “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” alongside an incredible cast that included Judi Dench, Bill Nighy, Maggie Smith and Tom Wilkinson. Patel also had a regular role in the marvelous HBO drama series called “The Newsroom”.

42. Cookies filled with green creme / Flattish sea creatures : MINT OREOS / MANTA RAYS

The manta ray is the biggest species of ray, with the largest one recorded at over 25 feet across and weighing 5,100 pounds.

48. See 49-Down : … ALBUM

49. With 48-Down, philatelist’s collection : STAMP …

Philately is the practice of collecting postage stamps. The term “philately” was coined (in French, as “philatélie) in 1864 by French collector Georges Herpin. He came up with it from the Greek “phil-” meaning “loving” and “ateleia” meaning “exemption from tax”. Apparently “exemption from tax” was the closest thing Herpin could find to “postage stamp”.

53. ___ gland (melatonin producer) : PINEAL

The pineal gland is a small gland located in the epithalamus, near the center of the brain. The gland gets its name from its shape, like a tiny pine cone. The pineal gland produces melatonin, a hormone that helps maintain our circadian rhythm, so varying levels of melatonin control our sleep-wake cycle.

56. Five things in “La Bohème” : ARIAS

“La bohème” by Giacomo Puccini is the second most frequently performed opera in the US (after “Madama Butterfly”, also by Puccini). The lead female role in the piece is Mimì, a seamstress.

63. Dog show initials : AKC

The American Kennel Club (AKC) is the organization that handles registration of purebred dogs The AKC also promotes dog shows around the country including the famous Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

64. Grp. with wands : TSA

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is the agency that employs the good folks that check passengers and baggage at airports.

70. Stressed at the end, in a way : IAMBIC

An iamb is a metrical foot containing an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. Robert Frost’s “Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening” consists of lines made up of four sequential iambs e.g. “Whose woods / these are / I think / I know”. With a sequence of four iambs, the poem’s structure is described as iambic tetrameter.

74. Crime-fighting mom of 1980s TV : LACEY

The actress Tyne Daly really came into the public eye playing Detective Lacey in “Cagney and Lacey”. From 1999 to 2005, Daly played the mother of the title character in the TV show “Judging Amy”.

77. Jets and others : GANGS

Leonard Bernstein’s musical “West Side Story” is based on William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”. The musical is set in New York City and features two rival gangs: the Sharks from Puerto Rico and the Jets with working-class, Caucasian roots. Tony from the Jets (played by Richard Beymer) falls in love with Maria (played by Natalie Wood) from the Sharks. All this parallels Romeo from the House of Montague falling for Juliet from the House of Capulet in the Italian city of Verona.

83. Massachusetts’ Cape ___ : ANN

Cape Ann is located 30 miles north of Boston and is on the northernmost edge of Massachusetts Bay. The Cape was first mapped by the explorer John Smith. Early in his adventurous life Smith had been captured and enslaved by the Ottoman Empire. His “owner” in his days of slavery was a woman called Tragabigzanda, and apparently the slave and owner fell in love. Smith originally called Cape Tragabigzanda in her memory, but King Charles I changed the name to Cape Ann in honor of his own mother, Anne of Denmark.

88. Olympian blood : ICHOR

Ichor is a golden fluid that is the blood of the gods in Greek mythology.

89. Like some German wines : RHENISH

Something that is “Rhenish” pertains to the Rhine River or the area surrounding it.

93. Garments worn in old Rome : TOGAE

In Ancient Rome the classical attire known as a toga (plural “togae”) was usually worn over a tunic. The tunic was made from linen, and the toga itself was a piece of cloth about twenty feet long made from wool. The toga could only be worn by men, and only if those men were Roman citizens. The female equivalent of the toga was called a “stola”.

98. Actress Ronan of “Lady Bird” : SAOIRSE

Saoirse Ronan is an Irish-American actress, having been born in the Bronx, New York and raised in Carlow and Dublin in Ireland. Ronan’s big break came when she was cast in the 2007 film “Atonement” at 12 years of age, a role for which she was nominated for that season’s Best Supporting Actress Oscar. “Saoirse” is the Irish word for “freedom”.

102. Second letter in the Greek for “Athens” : THETA

The Greek letter theta is the one that looks like the number zero with a horizontal line across the middle.

109. Daddy Warbucks’s bodyguard : THE ASP

The Asp is a secondary character in the comic strip “Little Orphan Annie”. The Asp is a henchman working for Oliver “Daddy” Warbucks, the antagonist in the storyline.

113. Word with “f” or full : STOP

Varying the f-stop in a lens varies how big the lens opening (the aperture) is when a photograph is taken. Smaller apertures (higher f-stop values) admit less light, but result in a greater depth of field (more of the photograph is in focus).

The punctuation mark used to terminate a sentence is called a “period” in American English, and a “full stop” in British English. The same punctuation mark has no symbol in Morse code, so the word STOP is used instead in telegraphy.

114. First N.F.L. team to go 0-16 for a season, in 2008 : LIONS

The Detroit Lions are the NFL team that plays home games at Ford Field in Detroit, Michigan. The team was founded way back in 1929 as the Portsmouth Spartans from Portsmouth, Ohio. The Spartans joined the NFL during the Great Depression as other franchises collapsed. However, the Spartans couldn’t command a large enough gate in Portsmouth so the team was sold and relocated to Detroit in 1934.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Start of the third qtr. : JUL
4. Treatment centers? : SPAS
8. Sycophant’s quality : SMARM
13. Mr. Dithers’s wife in “Blondie” : CORA
17. ___-ball pens : UNI
18. Ristorante dessert : TORTA
20. Construction site vehicle : LOADER
21. Top : APEX
22. Richard Simmons diet regimen / London tabloid : DEAL-A-MEAL / DAILY MAIL
24. Records : ANNALS
25. One may have a height restriction : RIDE
26. Gauge : ASSESS
27. Carpe ___ : DIEM
29. What a red pepper on a menu may signal / Made clear : SPICY FOOD / SPECIFIED
31. Caninelike animal more closely related to a cat than a dog : HYENA
32. Three-engine planes : TRIJETS
34. Babies grow into them : KIDS
35. O. J. Simpson trial judge : ITO
37. “Goosebumps” author : STINE
38. So-called “cradle of civilization” : SUMER
40. Curse : DAMN
43. Preceder of free throws / Juice container? : FOUL CALL / FUEL CELL
46. Pretended to be : POSED AS
50. Inventor Howe : ELIAS
51. Discombobulated : AT SEA
52. Slimming surgeries, in brief : LIPOS
54. ___ Ste. Marie, Mich. : SAULT
55. Strategic position : VANTAGE
57. Like the data in big data : MINED
59. Warriors’ org. : NBA
60. Really bothered : TORE AT
62. Used, as a chair : SAT IN
65. Chow mein relative : SUBGUM
67. Self-reflective question : WHO AM I?
69. Fooler / Summer Olympics standout : TRICKSTER / TRACK STAR
72. Sound signal booster : PREAMP
73. Kind of medicine : HERBAL
75. Lady friend, in Livorno : AMICA
76. SoCal-based sneaker brand : LA GEAR
78. Zeno of ___ : ELEA
79. Colonial Indian title : SAHIB
81. When big bands thrived : RADIO ERA
84. Bridges of old film : LLOYD
86. “Shush!” : CAN IT!
88. Writer Shaw : IRWIN
91. Scheduled to arrive : DUE IN
92. Hypothesized : POSITED
94. Harry Potter’s ex-girlfriend / Register sound : CHO CHANG / CHA-CHING!
96. National Spelling Bee airer : ESPN
97. Some prized Prado pieces : GOYAS
99. One of the Kennedys : ETHEL
100. Disappointing : SAD
102. Sin subject? : TRIG
104. Lessens the distance between, in a race : GAINS ON
106. Straight or curly hair, e.g. : TRAIT
110. “He’s so lame!” / Deer variety : WHAT A TOOL! / WHITE-TAIL
112. Golden apple goddess : ERIS
114. App developer’s milestone : LAUNCH
115. Prefix with port : HELI-
116. Photographer’s light : STROBE
118. Thin neckwear / Assam or Earl Grey : STRING TIE / STRONG TEA
120. Complete : A TO Z
121. Lightly touched : KISSED
122. Afghan, e.g. : HOUND
123. Cursive capital that looks like a flipped “&” : ESS
124. Mustang feature : MANE
125. Mount : STEED
126. Little sibling, often : PEST
127. Major race sponsor : STP

Down

1. Jerusalem’s onetime kingdom : JUDAH
2. Nervous : UNEASY
3. Act the middleman : LIAISE
4. Visits for a time : STAYS AT
5. Yappy lap dogs, informally : POMS
6. Plane calculation : AREA
7. Unadventurous : STAID
8. Word after “&” in many a company name : SON
9. Minister’s home : MANSE
10. Makes into a movie, say : ADAPTS
11. Trusts : RELIES UPON
12. Richie’s mom on “Happy Days” : MRS C
13. Flare-ups in the hood? : CAR FIRES
14. OxyContin or Demerol : OPIOID
15. Fixes the décor of completely : REDOES
16. Canceled : AXED
19. Sort of : A LITTLE
20. Thin layers : LAMINAE
23. Moscow landmark : LENIN’S TOMB
28. Writer Jong : ERICA
30. “Hoo boy!” : YIKES!
33. Solidify : JELL
36. 18, say : OF AGE
37. Is litigious : SUES
39. Baby in a basket : MOSES
40. Actor Patel : DEV
41. Resembling : A LA
42. Cookies filled with green creme / Flattish sea creatures : MINT OREOS / MANTA RAYS
44. Best at a hot dog contest : OUTEAT
45. Cap : LIMIT
47. Risky / Denim attire : DANGEROUS / DUNGAREES
48. See 49-Down : … ALBUM
49. With 48-Down, philatelist’s collection : STAMP …
53. ___ gland (melatonin producer) : PINEAL
56. Five things in “La Bohème” : ARIAS
58. Pulled a fast one on : DUPED
61. Part of a wedding that drags : TRAIN
62. Comp ___ (college major, informally) : SCI
63. Dog show initials : AKC
64. Grp. with wands : TSA
66. Often-oval floor décor : BRAIDED RUG
67. Puppy : WHELP
68. “Are you listening?!” : HELLO?!
70. Stressed at the end, in a way : IAMBIC
71. ___ to go : RARIN’
74. Crime-fighting mom of 1980s TV : LACEY
77. Jets and others : GANGS
80. Tried something : HAD A GO AT IT
82. Lambaste : RIP
83. Massachusetts’ Cape ___ : ANN
85. Scan, in a way : DIGITIZE
87. Storyteller’s transition : THEN
88. Olympian blood : ICHOR
89. Like some German wines : RHENISH
90. Howl : WAIL
93. Garments worn in old Rome : TOGAE
95. Future cereal grain : OAT SEED
98. Actress Ronan of “Lady Bird” : SAOIRSE
101. Sprint competitor : AT AND T
102. Second letter in the Greek for “Athens” : THETA
103. Vehemently criticize : RAIL ON
105. Words of resignation : I LOSE
107. Potful : ANTES
108. Least warm : ICIEST
109. Daddy Warbucks’s bodyguard : THE ASP
110. Hard smack : WHAM
111. Judgmental sounds : TSKS
113. Word with “f” or full : STOP
114. First N.F.L. team to go 0-16 for a season, in 2008 : LIONS
117. Spring locale : BED
119. ___ the day : RUE