0106-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 6 Jan 2018, Saturday

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Constructed by: Peter Wentz
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 20m 13s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5. What you can do to “Moon River” : WALTZ

What we tend to think of as a waltz today is danced at about 90 beats per minute. The original waltz was much faster, and is danced at about 180 beats per minute. To differentiate, we now call the faster dance a “Viennese Waltz”, and sometimes refer to the other as the “English Waltz” or “slow waltz”.

The lovely song “Moon River” was written by Johnny Mercer and Henry Mancini. It was sung by Audrey Hepburn in the wonderful 1961 movie “Breakfast at Tiffany’s”. The song went on to become the theme song for Andy Williams, who performed it at the Academy Awards ceremony in 1962.

10. Follower of John : ACTS

The Acts of the Apostles is the fifth book of the Christian New Testament. It is believed that the author of the Gospel of Luke was the same person who wrote “Acts”.

16. One of the initial anchors of CNN’s “American Morning” : ZAHN

Paula Zahn has worked as a journalist and news anchor with ABC, NBC, Fox News and CNN. She is currently the host of a true crime show on the Discovery Channel called “On the Case with Paula Zahn”. Outside of her work on television, Zahn is an accomplished cellist and has even played at Carnegie Hall with the New York Pops Orchestra.

“American Morning” is CNN’s flagship morning show. It tries to differentiate itself from the competition by avoiding much of the banal “chat” between the news presenters, focusing more on the stories themselves.

18. Event in every Summer Olympics since 1900 : EPEE

There are three fencing events in the modern Olympics, with each distinguished by the weapon used:

  • Foil
  • Épée
  • Sabre

22. Chaser of un trago de tequila : AGUA

In Spanish, one might drink some “agua” (water) as a chaser after taking “un trago de tequila” (a shot of tequila).

30. Garden sight : GNOME

In English folklore, the fairy’s anti-hero is the diminutive gnome, an evil ugly character. Over the centuries, the gnome has become more lovable so we now have garden gnomes, and even the Travelocity Gnome.

39. Something good for Charlie Brown? : GRIEF

Charlie Brown is the main character in the long-running comic strip called “Peanuts”, created by Charles Schulz. Charlie’s catchphrase is “good grief”. He has several persistent frustrations in his life, including an inability to fly a kite. The focus of his kite-flying frustration is the dreaded Kite-Eating Tree.

44. Writing form even more constrained than a tweet : HAIKU

A haiku is a very elegant form of Japanese verse. When writing a haiku in English we tend to impose the rule that the verse must contain 17 syllables. This restriction comes from the rule in Japanese that the verse must contain 17 sound units called “moras”, but moras and syllables aren’t the same thing. What the difference is though, is not so clear to me. Here’s an example of a Haiku:

Haikus are easy
But sometimes they don’t make sense
Refrigerator

46. Results of some scans : PDFS

Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format introduced by Adobe Systems in 1993. PDF documents can be shared between users and read using many different applications, making them more universally accessible than documents saved by one particular program.

48. City at the foot of the Sierra Nevada : RENO

Reno, Nevada was named in honor of Major General Jesse Lee Reno, a Union officer killed in the Civil War. The city has a famous “Reno Arch”, a structure that stands over the main street. The arch was erected in 1926 to promote an exposition planned for the following year. After the expo, the city council decided to keep the arch and held a competition to decide what wording should be displayed, and the winner was “The Biggest Little City in the World”.

The American Sierra Nevada range lies in California and Nevada. The Spanish Sierra Nevada range is in Andalusia, with the name meaning “snowy range” in Spanish.

54. Sticking point? : VOODOO DOLL

Voodoo is a religion that originated the French slave colony of Saint-Domingue on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola.

58. Noted Brit in the news : HUME

The TV journalist Brit Hume’s full name is Alexander Britton Hume. He makes a lot of appearances on the Fox News Channel.

Down

6. Home of the world’s busiest airport: Abbr. : ATL

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is the world’s busiest airport, as measured by passenger traffic. Atlanta has had that distinction since 1998, and was the world’s busiest in terms of take-offs and landings from 2005 until 2013. Over 50% of Atlanta’s traffic comes from Delta Air Lines.

7. Actress Lucy : LIU

Lucy Liu is an actress from Queens, New York. Liu’s big break came when she was chosen to play the Ling Woo character in “Ally McBeal”. I liked her in the 2000 film “Charlie’s Angels” but as I am no fan of Quentin Tarantino, I did not enjoy the movie “Kill Bill”. I am having fun watching one of Liu’s more recent projects, in which she plays Jane Watson, one of the two lead characters in the TV crime drama “Elementary”.

8. “Did not need to know that” : TMI

Too much information! (TMI)

9. Terminals at London Heathrow? : ZEDS

The letter named “zed” has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation of “zee”, used in America today, first popped up in the 1670s.

London’s Heathrow handles handles more international passengers than any other airport in the world, and is the third busiest airport around the globe in terms of passenger traffic (after Atlanta and Beijing).

10. High-end Hyundai : AZERA

The Hyundai Azera was the name used worldwide for the model known as the Hyundai Grandeur in its homeland of South Korea. The Azera was produced from 1986 to 1992.

11. Main feature of the Gmail logo : CAPITAL M

Gmail is a free webmail service provided by Google, and my favorite of the free email services. Gmail made a big splash when it was introduced in 2007 because it offered a whopping 1GB of storage whereas other services offered a measly 2-4MB on average.

12. National force, informally : THE FEDS

A “fed” is an officer of a US federal agency, although the term usually applies to an agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

15. Blue-striped ball : TEN

That would be pool.

21. English channel : THE BEEB

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is also known as “the Beeb”, a name given to the network by the great Peter Sellers on the classic British radio comedy called “The Goon Show”. The BBC was founded in 1922, and was the world’s first national broadcasting organization.

31. Who said “Revolutions are the locomotives of history” : MARX

Karl Marx was a German philosopher and revolutionary who helped develop the principles of modern communism and socialism. Marx argued that feudal society created internal strife due to class inequalities which led to its destruction and replacement by capitalism. He further argued that the inequalities created in a capitalist society create tensions that will also lead to its self-destruction. His thesis was that the inevitable replacement of capitalism was a classless (and stateless) society, which he called pure communism.

35. 1960s movie with the tagline “A man went looking for America. And couldn’t find it anywhere” : EASY RIDER

“Easy Rider” is a 1969 movie about two bikers traversing the American Southwest and the South. The bikers are famously played by Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper, who also co-wrote the screenplay. Fonda produced the film and Hopper directed.

36. Devices that hurt sales at Kodak : DIGICAMS

George Eastman founded the Eastman Kodak Company, named after the Kodak camera that he had invented four years earlier. He came up with the name of Kodak after careful consideration. Firstly he was a big fan of the letter “K”, calling it “strong, incisive”. He also wanted a word that was short, easy to pronounce and difficult to mispronounce, and a word that was clearly unique with no prior associations. “Kodak” fit the bill.

38. Precious : CHICHI

Someone who is “chichi” is showily trendy and pretentious. “Chichi” is a French noun meaning “airs, fuss”.

41. Dell competitor : LENOVO

Lenovo is a Chinese manufacturer of computers. The company is very successful, and sold more personal computers in 2013 than any other vendor worldwide. IBM sold off its personal computer division to Lenovo in 2005.

45. Sagal of “Futurama” : KATEY

Katey Sagal played Peggy Bundy on “Married … with Children”. Later she took over as star of the show “8 Simple Rules” in the middle of its run, when John Ritter passed away unexpectedly in 2003. More recently, Sagal appeared on the FX drama “Sons of Anarchy”. In 2004, she married Kurt Sutter who created the “Sons of Anarchy” series.

52. Response to a joke, maybe : LOL

Laugh out loud (LOL)

57. Deal breakers, for short? : DEA

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) was set up in 1973, while President Nixon was in office.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Champion’s accessory : BELT
5. What you can do to “Moon River” : WALTZ
10. Follower of John : ACTS
14. “Don’t rush in!” : ONE AT A TIME!
16. One of the initial anchors of CNN’s “American Morning” : ZAHN
17. Something that might be replaced during car servicing : BRAKE FLUID
18. Event in every Summer Olympics since 1900 : EPEE
19. Rhythmic : CADENT
20. Conflict : STRIFE
22. Chaser of un trago de tequila : AGUA
23. Determines (if) : SEES
27. Misanthrope : HATER
28. Lacking in passion : TEPID
30. Garden sight : GNOME
32. Block between shows : ADS
33. Universal, Sony and Warner : MAJOR LABELS
36. Have high hopes : DARE TO DREAM
37. Kitty-corner things? : LITTER BOXES
38. Lowly worker : COG
39. Something good for Charlie Brown? : GRIEF
40. Internal rule : BYLAW
44. Writing form even more constrained than a tweet : HAIKU
46. Results of some scans : PDFS
48. City at the foot of the Sierra Nevada : RENO
49. Recite : INCANT
51. Popular pricing game on “The Price Is Right” : PLINKO
53. Chesterfield, for one : COAT
54. Sticking point? : VOODOO DOLL
58. Noted Brit in the news : HUME
59. Strength rating in video games : POWER LEVEL
60. Teeny : ITSY
61. Black piano key : G-FLAT
62. Promising : ROSY

Down

1. Ohio University player : BOBCAT
2. Tee off : ENRAGE
3. Prelim : LEAD-UP
4. Put in one’s sights : TAKE AIM AT
5. Moves lightly through the air : WAFTS
6. Home of the world’s busiest airport: Abbr. : ATL
7. Actress Lucy : LIU
8. “Did not need to know that” : TMI
9. Terminals at London Heathrow? : ZEDS
10. High-end Hyundai : AZERA
11. Main feature of the Gmail logo : CAPITAL M
12. National force, informally : THE FEDS
13. Mocking responses : SNEERS
15. Blue-striped ball : TEN
21. English channel : THE BEEB
24. Something only I can go on? : EGO TRIP
25. In vestments : ENROBED
26. Liquidated : SOLD OFF
29. Park ranger’s weapon : DART GUN
31. Who said “Revolutions are the locomotives of history” : MARX
34. Foul call : JEER
35. 1960s movie with the tagline “A man went looking for America. And couldn’t find it anywhere” : EASY RIDER
36. Devices that hurt sales at Kodak : DIGICAMS
37. Give for a bit : LOAN OUT
38. Precious : CHICHI
41. Dell competitor : LENOVO
42. Places for braces : ANKLES
43. Like some caterpillars : WOOLLY
45. Sagal of “Futurama” : KATEY
47. Friendly term of address : SPORT
50. What suggestive dialogue may result in : TV-PG
52. Response to a joke, maybe : LOL
55. “You got me good!” : OOF!
56. “Wide-staring” one in a Wordsworth poem : OWL
57. Deal breakers, for short? : DEA

9 thoughts on “0106-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 6 Jan 2018, Saturday”

  1. 34:12 This wasn’t too hard and I was cruising along until I got to the top left. I don’t know my bible books, I thought it was Luke, Mark or Paul. It took me forever to get 10D even though just yesterday I spent 3 hours at the Hyundai dealer while they fixed my car. I must have walked past an AZERA about 50 times while I was waiting. For the gmail clue all I could think of was envelope. I also had a slight problem with the very bottom. I had VOODOODOLL but nothing underneath the first part of that. I thought 50D was TVma for awhile. Eventually figured everything out but could have been about 10 minutes faster.

  2. 36:45. Started this one thinking I wouldn’t fill in a single square. Finally filled in RENO and ended up finishing. Any Saturday I finish unaided is a good one for me. I initially had “envelope” for the Gmail clue as well.

    A better alternative to AGUA after tequila is a sangrita – a tomato juice, lime juice, orange juice, worcestershire and tobasco mix that seems to work very well with tequila. There are a million variations of it as you might imagine, but that is my personal favorite.

    Best –

  3. 33:04, but, because of several things I didn’t know, I cheated to finish this one. I’m in the middle of a long trip to attend the funeral of my ex-father-in-law (a real Mensch, in every sense of the word) and to visit an older brother who is in pretty poor health, so I’ve fallen woefully behind on my crossword “duties” … ?.

  4. 29:55 and six errors, mostly in the bottom right. Couldn’t discern POWER LEVEL for the life of me, so it all went pear-shaped from there.

    1. “All went pear-shaped” was totally new to me, so I had to look it up. And I like it! Went south. Went all wrong. I was guessing that its origins might have something to do with a tee shirt “message” I saw once: it said “I (heart) N Y”, but with the “heart” upside down, suggesting something quite different. But it’s a Britishism and its origins are in doubt.

      So, Allen, please forgive my idle curiosity, but you have been known to use “gob-smacked”, “right chuffed”, and now “went pear-shaped”. Am I to infer that you have a British connection?

  5. 18:53, no errors. In the same boat, initially as @Jeff, was about halfway through the clues with very little to show. Then, for some reason the long entries just clicked, and smooth sailing after that.

    22A initially entered LIMA before AGUA; my pet peeve strikes again.

    Thank you to those who responded yesterday to my question about CRAWDADDY.

  6. When it comes to proper nouns, names, either you know them or you don’t, and I didn’t in the bottom area of this puzzle. And so some needed crosses didn’t bail me out of it.

    HUME? Didn’t know he was a Brit and don’t watch Fox News. DIGICAMS? Didn’t come up with the contraction/contracted name. PLINKO??? Give me a break.

    Is a VOODOODOLL a “sticking point”? I guess it’s a kind of point, as a locus, of “sticking”, but I didn’t buy that either.

    Must admit, though, that it’s a very worthy Saturday challenge.

    1. @Tom M.: FYI: Prior to his current stint with Fox News “Alexander Britton “Brit” Hume is an American television journalist and political commentator. Hume had a 23-year career with ABC News, where he contributed to World News Tonight with Peter Jennings, Nightline and This Week. He served as ABC’s chief White House correspondent from 1989 through 1996.”

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