1031-17 NY Times Crossword Answers 31 Oct 2017, Tuesday

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Constructed by: Alex Eaton-Salners
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: The Ninety-Five Theses

Today’s puzzle commemorates the 500th anniversary of the start of the PROTESTANT REFORMATION:

  • 1A. With 65-Across, author of the “Ninety-Five Theses,” posted on 10/31/1517 : MARTIN …
  • 65A. See 1-Across : … LUTHER
  • 17A. With 24-Across, movement resulting from the “Ninety-Five Theses” : PROTESTANT …
  • 24A. See 17-Across : … REFORMATION
  • 36A. Building where the “Ninety-Five Theses” were posted : ALL SAINTS’ CHURCH
  • 47A. Practice condemned in the “Ninety-Five Theses” : INDULGENCES
  • 55A. Part of the 36-Across where the “Ninety-Five Theses” were posted : DOOR
  • 58A. City where the “Ninety-Five Theses” were written : WITTENBERG

Bill’s time: 6m 36s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. With 65-Across, author of the “Ninety-Five Theses,” posted on 10/31/1517 : MARTIN …
65. See 1-Across : … LUTHER

Martin Luther wrote his “95 Theses on the Power and Efficacy of the Indulgences” in 1517, a document that is often seen as the spark that set off the Protestant Reformation. Luther’s main argument was that the Catholic Church’s practice of granting “indulgences”, forgiveness from punishment for sins, was wrong. It was especially wrong when such indulgences were granted in exchange for money.

16. Home of Zion National Park : UTAH

To me, the most spectacular feature of Zion National Park, in southwestern Utah, is the magnificent Zion Canyon. The canyon cuts through red Navajo sandstone and is a truly beautiful sight.

17. With 24-Across, movement resulting from the “Ninety-Five Theses” : PROTESTANT …
24. See 17-Across : … REFORMATION

European history is often divided in three major periods: classical antiquity and the modern period, with the Middle Ages in between. Specifically, the Middle Ages are said to have begun in 476 AD, when the last Roman Emperor was deposed by a Germanic chieftain. The end date for the Middle Ages is less specific, but is about 1500 AD. The list of events signalling the end of the Middle Ages includes Christopher Columbus’s first voyage to the New World (1492) and the Protestant Reformation (1517). The term “medieval” is used to describe something belonging to the Middle Ages.

22. Intrinsically : PER SE

“Per se” is a Latin phrase that translates as “by itself”. We use “per se” pretty literally, meaning “in itself, intrinsically”.

23. Ernie of the World Golf Hall of Fame : ELS

Ernie Els is a South African golfer. Els a big guy but he has an easy fluid golf swing that has earned him the nickname “The Big Easy”. He is a former World No. 1 and has won four majors: the US Open (1994 & 1997) and the British Open (2002 & 2012).

26. Contents of a bog : PEAT

When dead plant matter accumulates in marshy areas, it may not fully decay due to a lack of oxygen or acidic conditions. We are familiar with this in Ireland, because this decaying matter can form peat, and we have lots and lots of peat bogs.

27. Pet food brand : IAMS

Iams dog food was introduced by the animal nutritionist Paul Iams. He felt that household pets were suffering somewhat by being fed a diet of table scraps, so he developed a dry dog food that he felt was more nutritious and suitable for pet dogs. He founded the Iams company, now part of Procter & Gamble, in 1946.

28. Muslim woman’s head covering : HIJAB

Some Muslim women wear a hijab in the presence of males outside of their immediate family. A hijab is a veil covering the head and chest. Some also wear a niqab as part of the hijab, which is a cloth that covers the face. Other Muslim women wear a burqa, which covers the whole body from the top of the head to the ground.

31. ___ Lingus : AER

Aer Lingus is my favorite airline! Well, the service isn’t that great, but when I get on board an Aer Lingus plane I feel like I am back in Ireland. Aer Lingus is the national airline of Ireland, with “Aer Lingus” being a phonetic spelling of the Irish “aer-loingeas” meaning “air fleet”. These days Aer Lingus can only lay claim to the title of Ireland’s oldest airline as it is no longer the biggest. That honor goes to the controversial budget airline called Ryanair.

36. Building where the “Ninety-Five Theses” were posted : ALL SAINTS’ CHURCH

All Saints’ Church in Wittenberg, Germany was consecrated in 1503, one year after the founding of the University of Wittenberg. It became common practice for the staff of the university to pin messages and notices on the main doors of the church. As a result, it is generally held that Martin Luther pinned his “Ninety-Five Theses” on the doors of All Saints’ Church, on 31 October 1517. That act is usually cited as the start of the Protestant Reformation.

40. Boxing stats : TKOS

In boxing, a knockout (KO) is when one of the fighters can’t get up from the canvas within a specified time, usually 10 seconds. This can be due to fatigue, injury, or the participant may be truly “knocked out”. A referee, fighter or doctor may also decide to stop a fight without a physical knockout, especially if there is concern about a fighter’s safety. In this case the bout is said to end with a technical knockout (TKO).

41. Bambi’s mother, for one : DOE

The 1942 Disney classic “Bambi” is based on a book written by Felix Salten called “Bambi, A Life in the Woods”. There is a documented phenomenon known as the Bambi Effect, whereby people become more interested in animal rights after having watched the scene where Bambi’s mother is shot by hunters.

42. Genre for the “Pokémon” series : ANIME

“Pokémon” is the second-biggest video game franchise in the world, second only to the “Mario” franchise. “Pokémon” is a contraction of “Pocket Monsters”.

43. What sac flies produce : RBIS

That would be a sac(rifice) fly, in baseball.

47. Practice condemned in the “Ninety-Five Theses” : INDULGENCES

Pope Leo X is remembered as the last pope who was not a priest before taking office. Leo X was also known for granting indulgences to those willing to donate funds for the reconstruction of St. Peter’s Basilica, a practice that contributed to the revolt against the church by Martin Luther. As a result of the revolt, Leo X excommunicated Luther.

56. ___ Korbut, 1970s Olympic gymnastics star : OLGA

Olga Korbut is from modern-day Belarus, but was born during the days of the Soviet Union. Korbut competed for the USSR team in the 1972 and 1976 Olympic Games. She was 17 when she appeared in the 1972 Munich Games, and had been training in a sports school since she was 8-years-old. The world fell in love with her as she was a very emotional young lady, readily expressing joy and disappointment, something that we weren’t used to seeing in athletes from behind the Iron Curtain. Korbut immigrated to the US in 1991 and now lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

60. J. D. Salinger title character : ESME

J. D. Salinger wrote a short story called “For Esmé – with Love and Squalor” that was originally published in “The New Yorker” in 1950. It is a story about a young English girl called Esme and an American soldier, and is set in WWII.

61. “___ Maria” (hymn) : AVE

“Ave Maria” (“Hail Mary” in English) is the prayer at the core of the Roman Catholic Rosary, which itself is a set of prayers asking for the assistance of the Virgin Mary. Much of the text of the “Hail Mary” comes from the Gospel of Luke. The words in Latin are:

AVE MARIA, gratia plena, Dominus tecum. Benedicta tu in mulieribus, et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc, et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.

The prayer has been adapted as a hymn. The two most famous musical versions of “Ave Maria” are by Charles Gounod (based on a piece by Bach) and by Franz Schubert.

Down

3. Runs amok : RIOTS

The phrase “to run amok” (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for “attacking furiously”, “amuk”. The word “amok” was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were “frenzied”. Given Malaya’s troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy …

4. French bean? : TETE

The English word “head” translates into French as “tête”, and into German as “Kopf”.

6. Lipton rival : NESTEA

Nestea is a brand of iced tea made by Nestlé. The name is a portmanteau of “Nestlé” and “tea”.

7. “Remember the ___!” : ALAMO

The famous Alamo in San Antonio, Texas was originally known as Mission San Antonio de Valero. The mission was founded in 1718 and was the first mission established in the city. The Battle of the Alamo took place in 1836, a thirteen-day siege by the Mexican Army led by President General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Only two people defending the Alamo Mission survived the onslaught. One month later, the Texian army got its revenge by attacking and defeating the Mexican Army in the Battle of San Jacinto. During the surprise attack on Santa Anna’s camp, many of the Texian soldiers were heard to cry “Remember the Alamo!”.

8. Many Napa establishments : WINERIES

The first commercial winery in Napa Valley, California was established way back in 1858. However, premium wine production only dates back to the 1960s, with the region really hitting the big time after its success at the Paris Wine Tasting of 1976. The story of that famous blind wine tasting is told in the entertaining 2008 film “Bottle Shock”.

10. Body of water bordering Seattle : PUGET SOUND

George Vancouver was a British explorer, and an officer in the Royal Navy. As well as exploring the coast of Australia, he is best known for his travels along the northwest coast of North America. The city of Vancouver was named in his honor. Travelling with him on his American voyage was a lieutenant Peter Puget, and in his honor, Vancouver named the waters south of the Tacoma Narrows “Puget’s Sound”. Nowadays, the name “Puget Sound” describes an area much greater than Vancouver had envisioned.

11. Company that made Pong : ATARI

Do you remember the arcade video game that was like a game of tennis, with paddles moving up and down to hit what looked like a ball, over what looked like a net? Well, that was Pong. The arcade version of Pong was introduced in 1972, with Atari selling a home version through Sears for the Christmas market in 1975.

12. “Midnight Cowboy” role : RATSO

Enrico Salvatore “Ratso” Rizzo is one of the characters in the groundbreaking 1969 movie “Midnight Cowboy”. Rizzo is a down-and-out con man played by Dustin Hoffman.

The 1969 movie “Midnight Cowboy” is a Hollywood adaptation of a novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy. It’s a pretty depressing story about a young Texan named Joe Buck (played by Jon Voight) who heads to New York City to make money as a hustler, hiring himself out to women for sex. Pretty soon the young man ends up selling his body for sex with males as well. Prior to release the MPAA gave the movie an R-rating, but the United Artists studio took advice and decided to release it with an X-rating. When “Midnight Cowboy” won the Best Picture Academy Award in 1969, it became the only X-rated film to be so honored.

13. Charlie of “Two and a Half Men” : SHEEN

Charlie Sheen’s real name is Carlos Irwin Estévez, and he is of course the youngest son of actor Martin Sheen. Charlie was the highest paid actor on television in 2010, earning $1.8 million per episode on the sitcom “Two and a Half Men”. Then of course he blew it and got fired from the show amid stories of alcohol and drug abuse and domestic violence. I bet his co-stars were pretty tweaked about the show being canceled, and pretty happy that it was given a second lease of life …

18. Only U.S. president also to serve as chief justice : TAFT

William Howard Taft may have been the 27th President of the United States, but his lifelong ambition was to be Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. President Taft was able to realize that dream in 1921, eight years after losing his bid for re-election as president. As Chief Justice, this former US President swore in two new presidents: Calvin Coolidge (in 1925) and Herbert Hoover (in 1929). William Howard Taft is also remembered as the most obese president. In the last year of his presidency, he weighed about 340 pounds (he was 5 feet 11 inches tall). Twelve months after leaving the White House, President Taft had dropped 80 pounds and substantially lowered his blood pressure.

22. Cooking spray brand : PAM

PAM cooking oil was introduced in 1961 by Leon Rubin and Arthur Meyerhoff. The name “PAM” is an acronym … standing for “Product of Arthur Meyerhoff”. Who’d a thunk it …?

24. Singer McEntire : REBA

Reba McEntire is a country music singer and television actress. McEntire starred in her own sitcom called “Reba” that aired on the WB and the CW cable channels from 2001 to 2007.

25. Painter Chagall : MARC

Marc Chagall was a Russian-French artist, one of the most successful of the 20th century. Unlike so many painters, Chagall was able to achieve wealth and notoriety for his work during his own lifetime. It did help that Chagall lived to a ripe old age though. He passed away in 1985, when he was 97 years young. One of Chagall’s most famous works is the ceiling of the Paris Opera. The new ceiling for the beautiful 19th-century building was commissioned in 1963, and took Chagall a year to complete. Chagall was 77 years old when he worked on the Paris Opera project.

28. Bowler or boater : HAT

I think a bowler hat is usually called a derby here in the US. The bowler was first produced in 1849 in London by hatmakers Thomas and William Bowler, hence the name. The alternative name of “derby” comes from the tradition of wearing bowler hats at the Derby horse race (a major race held annually in England).

A boater is a straw hat often associated with boating, hence the name.

30. Self-titled #1 pop album of 2001 : J.LO

J.Lo is the nickname of singer and actress Jennifer Lopez. “J.Lo” is also the title of her second studio album, released in 2001.

33. NPR host Shapiro : ARI

Ari Shapiro was the very able White House correspondent for National Public Radio (NPR) for several years. He became a co-host of network’s drive-time program “All Things Considered” in 2015.

34. Channel with an annual month-long Oscar celebration : TCM

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is one of my favorite television channels, delivering just what its name promises: classic movies.

39. Actor Lukas of “Witness” : HAAS

Lukas Haas is an American actor best known for the role he played as an 8-year-old child in the excellent 1985 film “Witness”. In “Witness”, Haas plays a young Amish boy, alongside Harrison Ford and Kelly McGillis. Although Haas still acts today, he is also a musician and plays drums and piano for a band called The Rogues.

45. Person whose name might start with Mc- : SCOT

“Mac” is a Gaelic word meaning “son” and “son of”, and is a common prefix in Irish and Scottish names.

46. Post production? : CEREAL

C. W. Post decided to get into the cereal business after visiting the Battle Creek Sanitarium operated by John Harvey Kellogg. Post was interested in the chemistry of digestion and was inspired by the dietary products offered by Kellogg at his sanitarium. The first breakfast cereal Post introduced was Grape-Nuts, way back in 1897.

47. “Hedda Gabler” playwright : IBSEN

“Hedda Gabler” is a play by the great Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen that was first published in 1890. Considered one of the greatest theater roles, the title character of Hedda Gabler is sometimes referred to as the female Hamlet.

49. Something taken on faith : DOGMA

A dogma is a set of beliefs, with the plural being “dogmata” (or “dogmas”, if you’re not a pedant like me!)

56. Newspaper piece that always starts at the end? : OBIT

“Obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”, originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

59. Madame ___ of 1960s Vietnam : NHU

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. With 65-Across, author of the “Ninety-Five Theses,” posted on 10/31/1517 : MARTIN …
7. Leatherworker’s tool : AWL
10. Numbers on a golf course : PARS
14. Each : APIECE
15. Tell a tall tale : LIE
16. Home of Zion National Park : UTAH
17. With 24-Across, movement resulting from the “Ninety-Five Theses” : PROTESTANT …
19. Flight board info : GATE
20. Lo-fat : LITE
21. Not wild : TAME
22. Intrinsically : PER SE
23. Ernie of the World Golf Hall of Fame : ELS
24. See 17-Across : … REFORMATION
26. Contents of a bog : PEAT
27. Pet food brand : IAMS
28. Muslim woman’s head covering : HIJAB
31. ___ Lingus : AER
32. Breakfast bar bits : OATS
36. Building where the “Ninety-Five Theses” were posted : ALL SAINTS’ CHURCH
40. Boxing stats : TKOS
41. Bambi’s mother, for one : DOE
42. Genre for the “Pokémon” series : ANIME
43. What sac flies produce : RBIS
45. Whole bunch : SCAD
47. Practice condemned in the “Ninety-Five Theses” : INDULGENCES
51. Distant : FAR
54. Give a leg up : BOOST
55. Part of the 36-Across where the “Ninety-Five Theses” were posted : DOOR
56. ___ Korbut, 1970s Olympic gymnastics star : OLGA
57. [Ugh, here we go again] : SIGH
58. City where the “Ninety-Five Theses” were written : WITTENBERG
60. J. D. Salinger title character : ESME
61. “___ Maria” (hymn) : AVE
62. “It’s all clear to me now!” : AH, I SEE!
63. Not distant : NEAR
64. “With pleasure!” : YES!
65. See 1-Across : … LUTHER

Down

1. Kind of syrup : MAPLE
2. Easter’s month, usually : APRIL
3. Runs amok : RIOTS
4. French bean? : TETE
5. Freezer buildup : ICE
6. Lipton rival : NESTEA
7. “Remember the ___!” : ALAMO
8. Many Napa establishments : WINERIES
9. Give permission to : LET
10. Body of water bordering Seattle : PUGET SOUND
11. Company that made Pong : ATARI
12. “Midnight Cowboy” role : RATSO
13. Charlie of “Two and a Half Men” : SHEEN
18. Only U.S. president also to serve as chief justice : TAFT
22. Cooking spray brand : PAM
24. Singer McEntire : REBA
25. Painter Chagall : MARC
26. Sack seeker : PASS RUSHER
28. Bowler or boater : HAT
29. Type : ILK
30. Self-titled #1 pop album of 2001 : J.LO
31. Cleaned the dishes? : ATE
33. NPR host Shapiro : ARI
34. Channel with an annual month-long Oscar celebration : TCM
35. “That’s all ___ wrote” : SHE
37. “That’s cool with me!” : I DIG!
38. Plummet : NOSEDIVE
39. Actor Lukas of “Witness” : HAAS
44. Three-layer sandwich, for short : BLT
45. Person whose name might start with Mc- : SCOT
46. Post production? : CEREAL
47. “Hedda Gabler” playwright : IBSEN
48. Static, e.g. : NOISE
49. Something taken on faith : DOGMA
50. Memos : NOTES
51. Edible part of a fruit : FLESH
52. Concur : AGREE
53. Wild party, in slang : RAGER
56. Newspaper piece that always starts at the end? : OBIT
58. Course of action : WAY
59. Madame ___ of 1960s Vietnam : NHU