1029-17 NY Times Crossword Answers 29 Oct 2017, Sunday

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Constructed by: Ross Trudeau
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: Going off Script

Each of today’s themed answers are LINES from a movie script. The movie’s name is given in the answer’s clue. Another answer in the form “xxx LINE” gives the name of the actor who utters the line:

  • 24A. Pool divider, or a further hint to 22-Across : LANE LINE
  • 22A. “The Lion King” : HAKUNA MATATA – (Nathan) LANE LINE
  • 59A. Carnival, say, or a further hint to 42-Across : CRUISE LINE
  • 42A. “Jerry Maguire” : SHOW ME THE MONEY! – (Tom) CRUISE LINE
  • 99A. F-150s or Thunderbirds, or a further hint to 76-Across : FORD LINE
  • 76A. “The Force Awakens” : CHEWIE, WE’RE HOME – (Harrison) FORD LINE
  • 61A. Musical score marking, or a further hint to 101-Across : LEDGER LINE
  • 101A. “The Dark Knight” : WHY SO SERIOUS? – (Heath) LEDGER LINE

Bill’s time: 19m 09s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Lecterns : PODIA

“Podium” (plural “podia”) is the Latin word for “raised platform”.

6. Some looping online animations : GIFS

A bitmap is an image file format used to store digital images. Basically, each pixel in a bitmap file is stored as a “bit” of information, hence the name “bitmap”. In 1987, CompuServe introduced a new type of image file called the Graphics Interchange Format (GIF). A GIF image takes the same information as a bitmap and then compresses it, resulting in a smaller file size. However, during compression the image may lose some resolution. The GIF format also handles short video clips, usually animations.

13. Canine supporters : GUMS

The canine teeth of a mammal are also called the eyeteeth or cuspids. The name “canine” is used because these particular teeth are very prominent in dogs. The name “eye” is used because in humans the eyeteeth are located in the upper jaw, directly below the eyes.

19. Actor Epps : OMAR

Omar Epps is the actor who played Eric Forman on the excellent television series “House”. Prior to playing Dr. Forman, Epps had a recurring role playing Dr. Dennis Grant on “ER”. And, in another link to the world of medicine, Epps was born in Savannah, Georgia to single mom, Dr. Bonnie Epps.

20. “Abracadabra!” : ALAKAZAM!

The incantation “abracadabra” has a long history. It was used as far back as the 2nd century AD in Ancient Rome when the word was prescribed by a physician to be worn on an amulet to help his emperor recover from disease. “Abracadabra” is Aramaic, and roughly translates as “I will create as I speak”.

22. “The Lion King” : HAKUNA MATATA – (Nathan) LANE LINE

“Hakuna Matata” is a Swahili phrase, with a literal translation of “there are no worries”, or more colloquially perhaps, “no problem”. It is a hit song from the musical “The Lion King”.

Nathan Lane is a wonderful actor, one perhaps most associated with musical theater. Famous roles include Albert in “The Birdcage” and Max in “The Producers”. Best of all though to me, is Lane’s performance in the 1996 film “The Birdcage”.

25. Wine often served with dessert : ASTI

Asti is a sparkling white wine from the Piedmont region of Italy, and is named for the town of Asti around which the wine is produced. The wine used to be called Asti Spumante, and it had a very bad reputation as a “poor man’s champagne”. The “Spumante” was dropped in a marketing attempt at rebranding associated with a reduction in the amount of residual sugar in the wine.

30. Hockey feint : DEKE

A deke, also known as a dangle, is a technique used to get past an opponent in ice hockey. “Deke” is a colloquial shortening of the word “decoy”.

31. Hallmark.com offerings : ECARDS

Hallmark produces more greeting cards in the US than any other company. The company was started by Joyce Clyde Hall in 1910, and by 1915 was known as Hall Brothers after his brother Rollie joined the enterprise. Rollie invented what we know today as “wrapping paper”, displacing the traditional use of colored tissue paper for wrapping gifts. The company took on the name “Hallmark” in 1928, taking the term for the symbol used by goldsmiths in London in the 1500s.

34. Bond, for one: Abbr. : AGT

In addition to the James Bond series of novels, Ian Fleming wrote a collection of “Bond” short stories called “For Your Eyes Only”. The name of the collection was used as for one of the Bond films. “Quantum of Solace” was one of those stories, and this title was also used for a Bond film, even though the plot bears no resemblance to the storyline.

35. Fig. on a master’s application : GRE SCORE

Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

38. Maître’s domain : ECOLE

In French, one might learn from a “maître” (master) in an “école” (school).

42. “Jerry Maguire” : SHOW ME THE MONEY! – (Tom) CRUISE LINE

Jerry Maguire is a 1996 film starring Tom Cruise, Cuba Gooding, Jr. and Renée Zellweger. The title character is played by Cruise, and is a sports agent. There are several lines oft quoted from “Jerry Maguire” including:

  • “Show me the money!”
  • “You complete me”
  • “You had me at ‘hello’”

Tom Cruise’s real name is Tom Cruise Mapother IV. Cruise was born in Syracuse, New York. That’s one of my favorite cities in the US, because it’s where I met my wife-to-be …

46. Hunter in the night sky : ORION

The very recognizable constellation of Orion is named for the Greek God Orion, the Hunter. If you take a look at the star in Orion’s “right shoulder”, the second brightest star in the constellation, you might notice that it is quite red in color. This is the famous star called Betelgeuse, a red supergiant, a huge star that is on its way out. Betelgeuse is expected to explode into a supernova within the next thousand years or so. You don’t want to miss that …

53. Smart-alecky : WISE

Apparently the original “smart Alec” (sometimes “Aleck”) was Alec Hoag, a pimp, thief and confidence trickster who plied his trade in New York City in the 1840s.

54. American pale ___ : ALE

Pale ale is a beer made using mainly pale malt, which results in a relatively light color for a malted beer.

55. Bozo : DOLT

A bozo is a man with a low IQ, and one who is usually quite muscular. We’ve been using the term since the early 1900s and it possibly comes from the Spanish “bozal” that was used to describe someone who spoke Spanish poorly.

57. Judge’s seat : BANC

“Banc” is the French word for bench or seat.

58. Neural conductor : AXON

A nerve cell is more correctly called a neuron. The branched projections that receive electrochemical signals from other neurons are known as dendrites. The long nerve fiber that conducts signals away from the neuron is known as the axon. A neuron that has no definite axon is referred to as “apolar” or “nonpolar”. In apolar neurons the nerve impulses radiate in all directions.

59. Carnival, say, or a further hint to 42-Across : CRUISE LINE

The Carnival Cruise Line was founded in 1972, and now has over 20 vessels in operation. Three of those Carnival ships were chartered by the US government in the wake of Hurricane Katrina so that they could provided temporary housing for families displaced by the storm.

64. ___ mater : ALMA

The literal translation for the Latin term “alma mater” is “nourishing mother”. The phrase was used in Ancient Rome to refer to mother goddesses, and in Medieval Christianity the term was used to refer to the Virgin Mary. Nowadays, one’s alma mater is the school one attended, either high school or college, usually one’s last place of education.

65. Ideas spreading virally : MEMES

A meme (short for “mineme”) is a cultural practice or idea that is passed on verbally or by repetition from one person to another. The term lends itself very well to the online world where links, emails, files etc. are so easily propagated.

66. Duel tool : EPEE

The French word for sword is “épée”. In competitive fencing the épée is connected to a system that records an electrical signal when legal contact is made on an opponent’s body.

67. Blue Devils’ org. : ACC

Duke University was founded in 1838 as Brown’s Schoolhouse. The school was renamed to Trinity College in 1859, and to this day the town where the college was located back then is known as Trinity, in honor of the school. The school was moved in 1892 to Durham, North Carolina in part due to generous donations from the wealthy tobacco industrialist Washington Duke. Duke’s donation required that the school open its doors to women, placing them on an equal footing with men. Trinity’s name was changed to Duke in 1924 in recognition of the generosity of the Duke family. Duke’s athletic teams are known as the Blue Devils.

68. Hephaestus’ forge is said to be under it : ETNA

In Greek mythology, Hephaestus was the god of blacksmiths, sculptors, metallurgy, fire and volcanoes. The Roman equivalent of Hephaestus was Vulcan. Given his spheres of influence, it is perhaps not surprising that Hephaestus made all of the weapons for the gods of Olympus.

69. Uninspired : VAPID

We use the adjective “vapid” today to describe something that is dull, that lacks liveliness. Back in the 1600s, the term was used to describe drinks that were flat. “Vapid” comes from the Latin “vapidus”, which translates literally as “that has exhaled its vapor”.

70. Satiated : FED

“Sate” is a variant of the older word “satiate”. Both terms can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

71. What I may turn into : ROYAL WE

The “royal we” is more correctly called the majestic plural, and is the use of a plural pronoun to describe a single person in a high office. I suppose the most often quoted phrase that uses the majestic plural is, “We are not amused”, often attributed to Queen Victoria. The editorial “we” is a similar concept, in which a newspaper editor or columnist refers to himself or herself when giving an opinion.

73. Coin at an arcade : TOKEN

Our word “arcade” comes from the Latin “arcus” meaning “arc”. The first arcades were passages made from a series of arches. This could be an avenue of trees, and eventually any covered avenue. I remember arcades lined with shops and stores when I was growing up on the other side of the Atlantic. Arcades came to be lined with lots of amusements, resulting in amusement arcades and video game arcades.

74. “The Merry Drinker” painter : HALS

Frans Hals was a painter from the Dutch Golden Age who was born in Antwerp but who lived and worked in Haarlem. Hals is best known for his portraits, the most famous of which is probably “The Laughing Cavalier”.

76. “The Force Awakens” : CHEWIE, WE’RE HOME – (Harrison) FORD LINE

“Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens” is the seventh episode in the “Star Wars” series of films. Several favorite characters return in “Star Wars VII”, including Han Solo (Harrison Ford), Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) and General Leia Organa (or “Princess Leia” in earlier films, played by Carrie Fisher).

Wookiees are a biped race featured in “Star Wars”. The most notable Wookiee is Chewbacca (aka “Chewie”), the loyal friend and associate of Han Solo who serves as co-pilot on the Millennium Falcon spaceship.

79. Traffic-monitoring org. : FAA

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was set up in 1958 (as the Federal Aviation Agency). The agency was established at that particular time largely in response to an increasing number of midair collisions. The worst of these disasters had taken place two years earlier over the Grand Canyon, a crash between two commercial passenger airplanes that resulted in 128 fatalities.

82. Herb pronounced differently in the U.S. and U.K. : BASIL

Traditionally, basil is considered “the king of herbs”. And in fact, the herb’s name comes from the Greek “basileus” meaning “king”.

85. Item with the words “Member Since” : AMEX CARD

“Amex” is short for American Express, the financial services company that is best known for its credit card, charge card and traveler’s check businesses. The company name is indicative of its original business. American Express was founded in 1850 in Buffalo, New York as an express mail service.

88. George Takei’s role on the U.S.S. Enterprise, in brief : LT SULU

Mr. Sulu was played by George Takei in the original “Star Trek” series. Takei has played lots of roles over the years, and is still very active in television. Did you know that he appeared in the 1963 film, “Pt-109”? He played the helmsman steering the Japanese destroyer that ran down John F. Kennedy’s motor torpedo boat. From destroyer helmsman to starship helmsman …

91. When Macduff slays Macbeth : ACT V

There is a superstition in the theatrical world that uttering the name “Macbeth” in a theater will bring disaster of some sort. To avoid this, the euphemism “the Scottish Play” is used instead.

92. They’re first in the draft : ONE-AS

The US government maintains information on all males who are potentially subject to military conscription, using what is called the Selective Service System (SSS). In the event that a draft was held, men registered would be classified into groups to determine eligibility for service. Class 1-A registrants are those available for unrestricted military service. Other classes are 1-A-O (conscientious objector available for noncombatant service), 4-A (registrant who has completed military service) and 4-D (Minister of religion).

96. Brunch offering : CREPE

“Crêpe” is the French word for “pancake”.

98. Where Samson slew the Philistines : LEHI

In the story of Samson in the Bible, Samson is tied up with ropes and taken to Lehi where he breaks free of his bonds and uses the jawbones of an ass to slay one thousand Philistines. The full name for Lehi is Ramath Lehi which translates as “jawbone hill”.

99. F-150s or Thunderbirds, or a further hint to 76-Across : FORD LINE

Ford has been selling the F-Series line of pickup trucks a long time, since 1948. The F-Series is Ford’s longest-running nameplate, and has been the best-selling vehicle in the US since 1981.

Ford manufactured the Thunderbird (T-Bird) from 1955 to 2005. Originally a two-seater sporty convertible, the T-Bird was introduced as a competitor to Chevrolet’s new sports car, the Corvette.

101. “The Dark Knight” : WHY SO SERIOUS? – (Heath) LEDGER LINE

Christian Bale is an actor from Wales in the UK, although he is better known for his work on this side of the Atlantic. Bale’s big break in movies came in 1987 with the starring role in Spielberg’s “Empire of the Sun” at only 13 years of age. He has also played Batman three times, in “Batman Begins” (2005), “The Dark Knight” (2008) and “The Dark Knight Rises” (2012).

106. “Friday I’m in Love” band, 1992 : THE CURE

The Cure is an English rock band founded in 1976 and still going strong today, although not with the original line up. The only top ten hit the Cure had in the US is “Love Song”, released in 1989.

107. Caviars : ROES

Caviar is the roe of a large fish that has been salted and seasoned, and especially the roe of a sturgeon. Beluga caviar comes from the beluga sturgeon, found primarily in the Caspian Sea. It is the most expensive type of caviar in the world. 8 ounces of US-farmed beluga caviar can be purchased through Amazon.com for just over $850, in case you’re feeling peckish …

108. Defib locales : ERS

You might find a defibrillator (defib.) in an emergency room (ER) of a hospital.

Down

1. Sci-fi weapons : PHASERS

A MASER is a device that was around long before LASERs came into the public consciousness. A MASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) is similar to a LASER, but microwaves are emitted rather than light waves. When the storyline for “Star Trek” was being developed, the writers introduced a weapon called a “phaser”, with the name “phaser” derived from PHoton mASER.

3. Stonehenge priests : DRUIDS

Druids were priests of Celtic Europe during the Iron Age.

The magnificent Stonehenge monument in the south of England was built from 3000 to 2000 BC. “Stonehenge” has given its name to “henges”, a whole class of earthwork monuments that are circular in form with an internal ditch surrounded by a bank. Paradoxically, Stonehenge doesn’t qualify as a henge by this contemporary definition, as its earthen bank is surrounded by an external ditch.

4. McKellen who played Gandalf : IAN

Sir Ian McKellen is a marvelous English actor, someone who is comfortable playing anything from Macbeth on stage to Magneto in an “X-Men” movie. On the big screen, McKellen is very famous for playing Gandalf in “The Lord of Rings”. In the UK, Sir Ian is noted for being at the forefront of the campaign for equal rights for gay people, a role he has enthusiastically embraced since the eighties.

5. City south of Seminole, Okla. : ADA

Back in 1889, Jeff Reed was hired to carry the mail between the two communities of Stonewall and Center in what was then called the Indian Territory. Reed had moved to the area from Texas and he bought some land in between the two limits of his mail route and built himself a log cabin. Pretty soon other settlers built homes nearby and in 1891 the settlement got its own post office. As postman, Reed got to name the new post office and he called it Ada, after his oldest daughter. Ada is now a county seat in Oklahoma and has over 17,000 residents. One of the sons of the city of Ada was the televangelist Oral Roberts.

6. Singer with the 2012 #1 hit “Somebody That I Used to Know” : GOTYE

Gotye is the stage name of Belgian-Australian singer Wally De Backer. The stage name comes from the French name “Gauthier” meaning “Walter” (Wally).

8. New Year’s Eve figure : FATHER TIME

“Chronos” is the Greek word for time, with the name applying in Ancient Greece to a personification of time. He was not a Greek god, although Chronos has often been confused with the Titan Cronus of Greek mythology. The Titan Cronus was often depicted with a scythe, as this was the tool he used to castrate his father Uranus. The confusion of Chronos and Cronus led to the traditional depiction of “Old Father Time” with a scythe.

9. Mrs., abroad : SRA

The equivalent of “Mrs.” in French is “Mme.” (Madame), in Spanish is “Sra.” (Señora) and in Portuguese is also “Sra.” (Senhora).

14. Eponymous Israeli gun designer : UZI GAL

The first Uzi submachine gun was designed in the late 1940s by Major Uziel “Uzi” Gal of the Israel Defense Forces, who gave his name to the gun.

16. Refine : SMELT

Metals are found in ore in the form of oxides. In order to get pure metal from the ore, the ore is heated and the metal oxides within are reduced (i.e. the oxygen is removed) in the chemical process known as smelting. The oxygen is extracted by adding a source of carbon or carbon monoxide which uses up the excess oxygen atoms to make carbon dioxide, a waste product of smelting (and, a greenhouse gas).

18. Kind of penguin : EMPEROR

The Emperor Penguin is the largest species of penguin, weighing in at 49-99 pounds fully grown. The Emperor Penguin is known for the incredible journey taken by the adults during the breeding season in the Antarctic winter. Females lay an egg and then trek 30-70 miles from the breeding colony to the sea to feed, returning to feed their chicks.

27. Connoisseur : MAVEN

I’ve always loved the word “maven”, which is another word for an expert. Maven comes into English from the Yiddish “meyvn” meaning someone who appreciates and is a connoisseur.

30. Capital of Qatar : DOHA

Doha is the capital city of the state of Qatar located on the Persian Gulf. The name “Doha” translates from Arabic as “the big tree”.

32. Some salmon : COHOS

The Coho salmon is dark blue with silver along the side of its body, but only during the phase of its life while it is in the ocean. When spawning and heading up into a freshwater river, the Coho has bright red sides.

33. Get old : SENESCE

To senesce is to grow old. The Latin for “to grow old” is “senescere”, from “senex” meaning “old”.

49. Stag : ALONE

Back where I come from, bachelor parties are called stag parties, and bachelorette parties are known as hen parties.

50. Actress Russo : RENE

The very talented actress Rene Russo is a native of Burbank, California. Russo went to highschool (with actor/director Ron Howard), but dropped out in tenth grade. At seventeen, she was given the opportunity to train as a model and within a very short time appeared on the cover of “Vogue”. As her modelling jobs slowed down in her early thirties, Russo made a career change and studied theater and acting. I am so glad she did, as Rene Russo is one of my favorite actresses …

51. Like trampolines : BOUNCY

The first modern trampoline was developed in 1936. The apparatus was given its name from the Spanish “trampolín” meaning “diving board”. Trampolines were used during WWII in the training of pilots, to give them exposure to some spatial orientations that would be encountered during flight. Trampolines were also used by astronauts training in the space flight program. The sport of trampolining became in Olympic event starting in the 2000 Games.

52. ___ ballerina : PRIMA

The title of “prima ballerina” is the second-highest awarded to a female dancer in a company. The more prestigious “prima ballerina assoluta” is only awarded to the most notable dancers.

55. Harry’s wizarding foe : DRACO

Draco Malfoy is one of the regular “bad guys” in the “Harry Potter” stories. Malfoy is one of Potter’s fellow students, the one who sneers a lot. Draco’s father is Lucius Malfoy, a character who becomes more and more relevant as the storyline in the series of books progresses.

57. Candy heart message : BE MINE

The forerunner to Sweethearts candy was introduced in 1866, with the famous sayings written on the candy tailored for use at weddings. One of the original expressions was, “Married in pink, he will take a drink”. The original candy was a lot bigger, to fit all those words! The smaller, heart-shaped candy hit the shelves in 1901. We’ve been able to buy Sweethearts with the words “Text me” since 2010.

58. Suisse peaks : ALPES

There are eight Alpine countries:

  • Austria
  • Slovenia
  • France
  • Switzerland
  • Liechtenstein
  • Germany
  • Monaco
  • Italy

61. Pariahs : LEPERS

The horrible disease known as leprosy is also called Hansen’s disease, named after the Norwegian physician famous for isolating the bacterium that causes the disease. We can use the term “leper” to mean someone in general who is shunned by society.

“Pariah” is an anglicized version of the Tamil word “Paraiyar”. The Paraiyar are a social group of about 9 million people found in some Indian states and in Sri Lanka. The term “pariah” came to be a general term for members of the lowest caste in society, outcasts.

68. K-12 : ELHI

“Elhi” is an informal word used to describe anything related to schooling from grades 1 through 12, i.e. elementary through high school.

72. Window fixtures, for short : ACS

Room coolers are air conditioning units (ACs).

78. ___ Productions, company behind TV’s “Dr. Phil” : HARPO

Oprah Winfrey’s multimedia production company is known as Harpo Studios. “Harpo” is “Oprah” spelled backwards, and is also the name of the husband of the character Winfrey played in the movie “The Color Purple”.

Dr. Phil (McGraw) met Oprah Winfrey when he was hired to work with her as a legal consultant during the Amarillo Texas beef trial (when the industry sued Oprah for libel over “Mad Cow Disease” statements). Oprah was impressed with Dr. Phil and invited him onto her show, and we haven’t stopped seeing him since!

80. First family after the Garfields : ARTHURS

Chester Alan Arthur (CAA) was the 21st President of the US, and came to power after the assassination of James Garfield in 1881. President Arthur was known to be socially adept, and was very conscious of his role in society. He was always immaculately attired, apparently even changing his pants several times in a day. He was called “Chet” by family and friends, and sometimes answered to his middle name, Alan. However, he insisted that Alan be pronounced with the stress on the second syllable, Al-an.

James Abram Garfield, the 20th President, was assassinated in office. He was shot twice, and one bullet could not be found (it was lodged in his spine). The inventor Alexander Graham Bell developed a metal detector in an attempt to locate the bullet, but apparently he was unsuccessful because of interference from the metal bed frame on which the president lay. Garfield died two months after being shot.

82. Endangered ape : BONOBO

The bonobo used to be called the pygmy chimpanzee, and is a cousin of the common chimpanzee. The Bonobo is an endangered species, found in the wild only in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Africa. Along with the common chimpanzee, the bonobo is the closest species to humans genetically.

86. Multicolored : CALICO

Domestic cats with a white coat and patches of brown and black are called calico cats in this country. Back in Ireland, and the rest of the world I think, such cats are called tortoiseshell-and-white. “Calico” is not a breed of cat, simply a coloring.

89. Jazz pianist McCoy ___ : TYNER

McCoy Tyner is a jazz pianist from Philadelphia. For many years, Tyner was a member of the John Coltrane Quartet. McCoy’s younger brother is Jarvis Tyner, a member of the Communist Party USA who ran for Vice President in 1972 and 1976.

90. Artist’s base : GESSO

“Gesso” is the Italian word for “chalk” and gives its name to the powdered calcium carbonate that is used as a primer coat under artistic panel paintings. The gesso is mixed with a glue and applied to wood so that it acts as an absorbent surface for paint.

94. Camera option, for short : SLR

SLR stands for “single lens reflex”. Usually, cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

101. The U.S. joined it in 1917: Abbr. : WWI

Prior to the outbreak of World War II, what we now know as World War I was referred to as “the World War” or “the Great War”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Lecterns : PODIA
6. Some looping online animations : GIFS
10. No. 2’s : VPS
13. Canine supporters : GUMS
17. It’s all an act : CHARADE
19. Actor Epps : OMAR
20. “Abracadabra!” : ALAKAZAM!
22. “The Lion King” : HAKUNA MATATA – (Nathan) LANE LINE
24. Pool divider, or a further hint to 22-Across : LANE LINE
25. Wine often served with dessert : ASTI
26. College department that might offer paid studies, informally : PSYCH
27. “Who, me?” : MOI?
28. Majestic : REGAL
29. Get excited about crosswords, say, with “out” : NERD
30. Hockey feint : DEKE
31. Hallmark.com offerings : ECARDS
34. Bond, for one: Abbr. : AGT
35. Fig. on a master’s application : GRE SCORE
37. Geometry test directive : PROVE
38. Maître’s domain : ECOLE
41. Suffix with legal : -ESE
42. “Jerry Maguire” : SHOW ME THE MONEY! – (Tom) CRUISE LINE
45. Box a bit : SPAR
46. Hunter in the night sky : ORION
47. Feature of Chairman Mao’s cap : RED STAR
51. Reaction to a bad joke : BOO
52. They’re often cross-bred with apricots : PLUMS
53. Smart-alecky : WISE
54. American pale ___ : ALE
55. Bozo : DOLT
56. Get up : ARISE
57. Judge’s seat : BANC
58. Neural conductor : AXON
59. Carnival, say, or a further hint to 42-Across : CRUISE LINE
61. Musical score marking, or a further hint to 101-Across : LEDGER LINE
63. Full house, for one : HAND
64. ___ mater : ALMA
65. Ideas spreading virally : MEMES
66. Duel tool : EPEE
67. Blue Devils’ org. : ACC
68. Hephaestus’ forge is said to be under it : ETNA
69. Uninspired : VAPID
70. Satiated : FED
71. What I may turn into : ROYAL WE
73. Coin at an arcade : TOKEN
74. “The Merry Drinker” painter : HALS
76. “The Force Awakens” : CHEWIE, WE’RE HOME – (Harrison) FORD LINE
79. Traffic-monitoring org. : FAA
82. Herb pronounced differently in the U.S. and U.K. : BASIL
84. Appears : SEEMS
85. Item with the words “Member Since” : AMEX CARD
87. White House extension? : GOV
88. George Takei’s role on the U.S.S. Enterprise, in brief : LT SULU
90. Small beam : GRIN
91. When Macduff slays Macbeth : ACT V
92. They’re first in the draft : ONE-AS
95. “Sure” : YUP
96. Brunch offering : CREPE
98. Where Samson slew the Philistines : LEHI
99. F-150s or Thunderbirds, or a further hint to 76-Across : FORD LINE
101. “The Dark Knight” : WHY SO SERIOUS? – (Heath) LEDGER LINE
104. Onlooker : OBSERVER
105. Ills : WOES
106. “Friday I’m in Love” band, 1992 : THE CURE
107. Caviars : ROES
108. Defib locales : ERS
109. “In that case …” : IF SO …
110. Language in which the first four cardinal numbers are ane, twa, three and fower : SCOTS

Down

1. Sci-fi weapons : PHASERS
2. Symbol of strength : OAK TREE
3. Stonehenge priests : DRUIDS
4. McKellen who played Gandalf : IAN
5. City south of Seminole, Okla. : ADA
6. Singer with the 2012 #1 hit “Somebody That I Used to Know” : GOTYE
7. Apple desktop : IMAC
8. New Year’s Eve figure : FATHER TIME
9. Mrs., abroad : SRA
10. Ad ___ tax : VALOREM
11. Daring thing to wear with polka dots : PLAID
12. ___ Gabriel Mountains : SAN
13. Big gust : GALE
14. Eponymous Israeli gun designer : UZI GAL
15. Get by : MANAGE
16. Refine : SMELT
17. What metathesiophobia is the fear of : CHANGE
18. Kind of penguin : EMPEROR
21. Splat preceder : KER-
23. Out of whack : ASKEW
27. Connoisseur : MAVEN
30. Capital of Qatar : DOHA
32. Some salmon : COHOS
33. Get old : SENESCE
36. $100 bills, in slang : C-SPOTS
37. Study : PERUSE
39. Turn over : CEDE
40. Yiddish cries : OYS
43. José, Bengie and Yadier ___, catcher brothers with five World Series rings among them : MOLINA
44. Redundant-sounding engine parts : O-RINGS
45. Like the 1-to-7 balls : SOLID
48. Prepared for takeoff : TAXIED
49. Stag : ALONE
50. Actress Russo : RENE
51. Like trampolines : BOUNCY
52. ___ ballerina : PRIMA
53. Got one’s feet wet? : WADED
55. Harry’s wizarding foe : DRACO
56. Never-before-seen : ALL-NEW
57. Candy heart message : BE MINE
58. Suisse peaks : ALPES
59. A fish … or to cook it, in a way : CHAR
60. Have nutritious foods : EAT WELL
61. Pariahs : LEPERS
62. Flinching, typically : REFLEX
65. Play up : MAKE MUCH OF
68. K-12 : ELHI
69. What “w” is in Welsh, at times : VOWEL
72. Window fixtures, for short : ACS
73. Get ready to drive : TEE UP
74. Most cozy : HOMIEST
75. “Preach!” : AMEN!
77. Publishers : ISSUERS
78. ___ Productions, company behind TV’s “Dr. Phil” : HARPO
79. Look onto the street, say : FACE OUT
80. First family after the Garfields : ARTHURS
81. Counsel : ADVISE
82. Endangered ape : BONOBO
83. Opposed (to) : AVERSE
86. Multicolored : CALICO
87. Choose : GO FOR
89. Jazz pianist McCoy ___ : TYNER
90. Artist’s base : GESSO
93. Coolers in coolers : ADES
94. Camera option, for short : SLR
97. Loafs around a deli? : RYES
100. “___ had it!” : I’VE
101. The U.S. joined it in 1917: Abbr. : WWI
102. Quizzical utterances : EHS
103. Fun, for short : REC