1027-17 NY Times Crossword Answers 27 Oct 2017, Friday

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Constructed by: David Steinberg
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 16m 03s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

11. Disney exec Bob : IGER

Robert Iger took over from Michael Eisner as CEO in 2005. Iger worked for ABC when it was taken over by Disney in 1996, and in 1999 he was named president of Walt Disney International. Iger is doing okay for himself; he earned more than $29 million in 2009.

15. The Soviet Union, to Reagan : EVIL EMPIRE

President Ronald Reagan famously used the phrase “evil empire” to describe the Soviet Union, first doing so during the Cold War in 1983. Just over five years later, Reagan was developing a working relationship with Soviet Union General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev. As a result, he declared that he no longer felt that the use of “evil empire” applied, saying that it had been “another time, another era”.

16. Title character abducted in a hit 2003 film : NEMO

“Finding Nemo” is a 2003 animated blockbuster from Pixar. The film was the winner of the Oscar that year for Best Animated Feature. Believe it or not, “Finding Nemo” is the best-selling DVD of all time and, until 2010’s “Toy Story 3”, it was the highest-grossing, G-rated movie at the box office.

17. Sex drive enhancer introduced in 2015 : PINK VIAGRA

“Pink Viagra” is a name commonly used for the drug flibanserin, which is sold as Addyi. Pink Viagra is prescribed to some pre-menopausal women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

25. Titaness in Greek myth : RHEA

In Greek mythology Rhea was one of the Titans. She was the sister and husband of Cronus, and together they had six children, the last of which was Zeus. Cronus swallowed all of his children as soon as they were born, except for Zeus, who Rhea managed to hide from her husband.

28. Bad thing to do when you see a yellow light : GUN IT

The first traffic lights date back to 1868 when they were installed outside the Houses of Parliament in London. They resembled the signals already in use for trains, with semaphore arms and red and green gas lamps for nighttime use. That first system was operated manually, by a policeman at the base. Sadly, one police officer was killed, just one year after the light’s installation, when the gas system exploded.

32. Verizon Fios or CenturyLink, for short : ISP

Internet service provider (ISP)

34. Billy Crystal was his first guest : LENO

Jay Leno was born James Leno in New Rochelle, New York. Jay’s father was the son of Italian immigrants, and his mother was from Scotland. Leno grew up in Andover, Massachusetts and actually dropped out of school on the advice of a high school guidance counsellor. However, years later he went to Emerson college and earned a Bachelor’s degree in speech therapy. Leno also started a comedy club at Emerson in 1973. Today Jay Leno is a car nut and owns about 200 vehicles of various types. You can check them out on his website: www.jaylenosgarage.com.

Billy Crystal is an actor and comedian who first gained fame as the character Jodie Dallas on the seventies sitcom “Soap”. Crystal is also famous for hosting the Academy Awards, and has done so nine times. Only Bob Hope has hosted the event more times, and he did so on 18 occasions.

36. English car with a winged logo : BENTLEY

The Bentley is a luxury car that is built in the UK. Bentley Motors was founded in 1919 by W. O. Bentley, and taken over by Rolls Royce in 1931. The company has been owned by Volkswagen since 1998.

43. Noted evictee : ADAM

In the Christian tradition, the “fall of man” took place in the Garden of Eden when Adam and Eve succumbed to the temptation of eating from the tree of knowledge of good and evil. This went against the bidding of God, and was at the urging of the serpent. As a result, Adam and Eve were banished from Eden to prevent them becoming immortal by eating from the tree of life. The first humans had transitioned from a state of innocent obedience to a state of guilty disobedience.

45. Part of a jug : EAR

The handle of a jug might be referred to as its ear.

53. French Christian : DIOR

Christian Dior was a French fashion designer. As WWII approached, Dior was called up by the French military, drawing a temporary halt to his career in fashion. He left the army in 1942 and for the duration of the war designed clothes for wives of Nazi officers and French collaborators. After the war his designs became so popular that he helped reestablish Paris as the fashion center of the world.

69. Log unit : DIARY ENTRY

The word “logbook” dates back to the days when the captain of a ship kept a daily record of the vessel’s speed, progress etc. using a “log”. A log was a wooden float on a knotted line that was dropped overboard to measure speed through the water.

Down

1. Samuel of English history : PEPYS

Samuel Pepys was a British Member of Parliament and naval administrator, more famous these days for his diary than for his contribution to political history. Pepys started to keep a diary on New Year’s Day in 1660 and recorded his daily life for almost ten years. His writings include details of his personal life as well as firsthand accounts of the important events of the 1660s such as the Great Plague of 1665 and the Great Fire of London in 1666.

3. It might list your accomplishments : LINKEDIN PROFILE

LinkedIn is a website used by professionals wishing to network with other professionals. From what I’ve heard, LinkedIn is mainly used by folks looking for a job, and other folks looking for suitable candidates to hire.

4. ___ Day (fed. holiday) : MLK

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is a US Federal holiday taking place on the third Monday of each year. It celebrates the birthday of Dr. King, and was signed into law by President Reagan in 1983, and first observed in 1986. However, some states resisted naming the holiday MLK Day, and gave it alternative names (like “Civil Rights Day”). It was officially celebrated as MLK Day in all 50 states from the year 2000 onwards.

5. Races before a race? : REVS

Rev that engine!

6. Expat : EMIGRE

An “émigré” is an emigrant. The term is French in origin, and particularly applies to someone who is a political refugee from his or her native land.

12. Have one’s hard work recognized : GET AN A FOR EFFORT

Apparently the phrase “E for effort” originated as a WWII campaign in the US to help boost productivity in factories. Over time, the phrase has been misconstrued as “A for Effort”, apparently assuming that we’re talking about grades.

13. Something that’s had its head turned? : EMOTICON

An emoticon is a glyph created using text characters to represent facial features, and usually oriented sideways. The emoticon is designed to indicate emotion or attitude. The classic example is the smiley face 🙂

14. 1960s pop trio in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, with “the” : RONETTES

The Ronettes were a sixties girl group from New York City who worked with famed record producer Phil Spector. Their most famous hit was probably “Be My Baby” from 1963. The lead singer of the group was Veronica Bennett, who ended up marrying Spector in 1968, leaving him in 1974 to become “Ronnie” Spector, “the original bad girl of rock and roll”.

24. Evidence of disuse : MUST

Something described as “musty” has as stale or moldy odor. The term derives from an obsolete word “moisty”, as in “moist”.

26. Anago or unagi : EEL

“Unagi” is the Japanese name for freshwater eel, and “anago” is the name for saltwater eel.

36. 2003 film set in a mall : BAD SANTA

“Bad Santa” is a black comedy, not one I really enjoyed, starring Billy Bob Thornton as the not-so-nice Santa Claus. If you want to see an unrated version of the film, you can just buy the DVD and watch the special feature called “Badder Santa”.

41. People encountered by the conquistadors : MAYA

The Maya civilization held sway in Central America and Mexico from about 350 AD, until the arrival of the Spanish in the 1500s.

“Conquistador” is the Spanish for “conqueror”.

47. Forum annoyances : TROLLS

In Internet terms, a troll is someone who attempts to disrupt online group activities. The fishing term “troll” is used to describe such a person, as he or she throws out off-topic remarks in an attempt to “lure” others into some emotional response. Sad, sad people …

48. Big maker of small appliances, or, as two words, a 1997 action film : CONAIR (or CON AIR)

“Con Air” is an entertaining action movie that was released in 1997. The film tells the story of a bunch of convicts being transported by air who escape and take control of the plane. If you take a look at the movie’s closing credits you’ll see the words “In Memory of Phil Swartz”. Swartz, a welder with the special effects team, was killed in a tragic accident when a static model of the plane used in the movie fell on him.

49. TV clown name : KRUSTY

Krusty the Clown is a character on the TV show “The Simpsons”, one voiced by Dan Castellaneta. Krusty has a sidekick named sideshow Mel, a character also voiced by Castellaneta.

51. Quidditch position : SEEKER

Quidditch is a game that is famously played in the “Harry Potter” series of books and films. The game is contended by two teams of seven wizards or witches flying on broomsticks. The are four animated balls and six ring-shaped goals floating in mid-air. One of the balls is the Golden Snitch, and one of the players is the Seeker. It is the Seeker’s sole purpose to capture the Golden Snitch and thereby end the game.

59. Allen ___, onetime U.S. poet laureate : TATE

A poet laureate is a poet who is officially pointed by some institution to compose works for special occasions. The US Poet Laureate is more correctly known as the Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress.

63. Letters for the detail-averse : TMI

TMI (too much information!)

64. Ring org. : WBA

World Boxing Association (WBA)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Line judge? : PALM READER
11. Disney exec Bob : IGER
15. The Soviet Union, to Reagan : EVIL EMPIRE
16. Title character abducted in a hit 2003 film : NEMO
17. Sex drive enhancer introduced in 2015 : PINK VIAGRA
18. Heaps : A TON
19. Gab : YAK
20. Three-striper: Abbr. : SGT
21. Steal : PIRATE
23. Fruit throwaway : STEM
25. Titaness in Greek myth : RHEA
28. Bad thing to do when you see a yellow light : GUN IT
29. Alternative to .net : EDU
30. Aid for establishing rapport : EYE CONTACT
32. Verizon Fios or CenturyLink, for short : ISP
34. Billy Crystal was his first guest : LENO
35. Other side : FOE
36. English car with a winged logo : BENTLEY
40. Serious talking-tos : SERMONS
42. Facebook Messenger, e.g. : APP
43. Noted evictee : ADAM
45. Part of a jug : EAR
46. Bit of foul play : DIRTY TRICK
50. Triumphant cry : YES!
52. Best Original ___ : SCORE
53. French Christian : DIOR
54. Not many : A FEW
56. Have the means for : AFFORD
58. Loony tune : NUT
60. It might come with baggage : FEE
61. Polish place : NAIL
62. “Come on, lighten up!” : IT WAS A JOKE!
66. Bill collector : TILL
67. Resentful : EMBITTERED
68. Flanders red and others : ALES
69. Log unit : DIARY ENTRY

Down

1. Samuel of English history : PEPYS
2. Do aerobatics, e.g. : AVIATE
3. It might list your accomplishments : LINKEDIN PROFILE
4. ___ Day (fed. holiday) : MLK
5. Races before a race? : REVS
6. Expat : EMIGRE
7. Opposite of drive : APATHY
8. Like, man : DIG
9. Transgress : ERR
10. Collect : REAP
11. Stuck : IN A RUT
12. Have one’s hard work recognized : GET AN A FOR EFFORT
13. Something that’s had its head turned? : EMOTICON
14. 1960s pop trio in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, with “the” : RONETTES
22. Pass over : IGNORE
24. Evidence of disuse : MUST
26. Anago or unagi : EEL
27. Wonderful, in old slang : ACES
31. With 33-Down, like solitaire : ONE-
33. See 31-Down : PLAYER
36. 2003 film set in a mall : BAD SANTA
37. Facepalm inducer : EPIC FAIL
38. Summer hrs. in Somerville : EDT
39. Ending with school or steel : -YARD
41. People encountered by the conquistadors : MAYA
44. Early second-millennium year : MII
47. Forum annoyances : TROLLS
48. Big maker of small appliances, or, as two words, a 1997 action film : CONAIR (or CON AIR)
49. TV clown name : KRUSTY
51. Quidditch position : SEEKER
55. Like a neglected garden : WEEDY
57. Broke down : DIED
59. Allen ___, onetime U.S. poet laureate : TATE
63. Letters for the detail-averse : TMI
64. Ring org. : WBA
65. ___ Psaki, White House communications director under Obama : JEN

10 thoughts on “1027-17 NY Times Crossword Answers 27 Oct 2017, Friday”

  1. 27:53, no errors. Another lovely David Steinberg puzzle, so of course it was a slow solve for me … 😜 … but I enjoyed every minute of it … 😁

    Had to enter my name and email address again …

  2. @Greg … It’s a slang term. “He has a screw loose; he’s a loony tune, a nut, a flake.”

    And, BTW (since I’m here):

    Yesterday, while searching for a particular NYT puzzle, I came across a very amusing and informative article that appeared in the New York Times on October 8, 1979. It is titled “Confessions of a Crossword Editor” and was written by Eugene Maleska, who was the 3rd editor of the NYT crossword puzzles (in between Will Weng and Will Shortz). Due to the way in which it was created, the version I found had a lot of errors in it, so I located the original in the NYT archives and created a corrected version, which I have posted on my brand-new Word Press web site:

    https://kennisonskorner.wordpress.com

    It’s good read! Don’t miss it!

  3. Now my name has disappeared. Sigh…This is Jeff:

    35:58. Fun one from David Steinberg. I think Reagan first used the term EVIL EMPIRE immediately following the downing of the Korean passenger plane that had strayed into Soviet air space in Sept of 83.

    Dave – Interesting article about the perils involved with being a crossword editor. Is this something you will do on a regular basis – ie the site?

    Best –

  4. 30:54, no errors. Overall didn’t seem too difficult when looking back at the solve. However I did lose significant time stepping into pitfalls, such as entering PILFER in 21A before PIRATE, or DAILY ENTRY into 69A before DIARY ENTRY (the switching of the ‘I’ and the ‘A’ were particularly troublesome).

  5. 27:09, no errors. *whew* Tough, as you always expect with a Steinberg puzzle. Had exactly the same experience as Bruce B, which left me 67A at the end of this.

  6. Steinberg is a very fine puzzle-maker, and I like his work a lot. Needed a couple of cheats to “finish” this one, and hope not to do that too often in the future.

  7. @Dave: Thanks so much for that link to the (corrected!!!) Maleska article. It was a VERY enjoyable read… although it did not give me any more sympathy whatsoever for that *bindlestiff* Will Shortz!!!!! Rather, it placed me as a dyed-in-the-wool middle-of-the-roader. 🙂

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