1023-17 NY Times Crossword Answers 23 Oct 2017, Monday

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Constructed by: Timothy Polin
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: Ages and Ages

At first sight, each of today’s themed answers is a common word ending in -AGE. However, each has been clued so that answer is in the form “word” AGE, giving us a “punny period”:

  • 17A. Period dominated by the likes of Dan Rather and Peter Jennings? : ANCHOR AGE (looks like “anchorage”)
  • 26A. Period when every car was a junker? : WRECK AGE (looks like “wreckage”)
  • 39A. Period known for its 007 movies? : BOND AGE (looks like “bondage”)
  • 41A. Period of fuzzy sweaters? : PILL AGE (looks like “pillage”)
  • 50A. Period when tribute bands thrived? : COVER AGE (looks like “coverage”)
  • 64A. Period when psychiatrists ruled? : SHRINK AGE (looks like “shrinkage”)
  • Bill’s time: 5m 59s

    Bill’s errors: 0

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    Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

    Across

    1. Online source of film trivia : IMDB

    The website called the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) was launched in 1990, and is now owned by Amazon.com. It’s a great site for answering question one has about movies and actors.

    5. When doubled, a Hawaiian fish : MAHI

    “Mahi-mahi” is the Hawaiian name for the dolphin-fish, also called a dorado. The mahi-mahi is an ugly looking creature if ever I saw one …

    9. A lot : SCADS

    The origin of the word “scads”, meaning “lots and lots”, is unclear. That said, “scads” was used to mean “dollars” back in the mid-1800s.

    14. Sour expression : MOUE

    The term “moue” comes from French, and means “small grimace, pout”.

    21. Cool, in ’90s slang : PHAT

    In hip-hop circles, the term “phat” means “excellent, first-rate”.

    24. Joan who sang at Woodstock : BAEZ

    Joan Baez is an American folk singer and a prominent activist in the fields of non-violence, civil rights, human rights and environmental protection. Baez has dated some high-profile figures in her life including Bob Dylan, Steve Jobs (of Apple) and Mickey Hart of the Grateful Dead.

    1969’s Woodstock Music & Art Fair was held on a dairy farm located 43 miles southwest of the town of Woodstock, New York. 400,000 young people attended, and saw 32 bands and singers perform over three days.

    30. Boise’s state: Abbr. : IDA

    Boise, Idaho is the largest metropolitan area in the state by far. There are a number of stories pertaining to the etymology of the name “Boise”. One is that French trappers named the tree-lined river that ran through the area “la rivière boisée”, meaning “the wooded river”.

    32. Dawn goddess : EOS

    In Greek mythology, Eos was the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos was Aurora.

    34. English-speaking neighbor of Venezuela : GUYANA

    Guyana’s official name today is the Co-Operative Republic of Guyana. Guyana is located on the northern coast of South America. The country used to be a British colony, with the name British Guyana, but it achieve independence in 1966. It is now the only member of the British Commonwealth (now called the Commonwealth of Nations) that is on mainland South America.

    36. Maple syrup source : SAP

    The sugar maple is the state tree of New York, Vermont, West Virginia and Wisconsin. It is also the primary source of maple syrup.

    39. Period known for its 007 movies? : BOND AGE (looks like “bondage”)

    The character James Bond was the creation of writer Ian Fleming. Fleming “stole” the James Bond name from an American ornithologist. The number 007 was “stolen” from the real-life, 16th century English spy called John Dee. Dee would sign his reports to Queen Elizabeth I with a stylized “007” to indicate that the reports were for “her eyes only”. There’s an entertaining miniseries that aired on BBC America called “Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond” that details Ian Fleming’s military career, and draws some nice parallels between Fleming’s experiences and aspirations and those of his hero James Bond. Recommended …

    41. Period of fuzzy sweaters? : PILL AGE (looks like “pillage”)

    “Pill” is the name given to small, ball-like fuzz found on woollen garments. The term comes from the Latin “pilula” meaning “little ball”, which also gives us the word “pill” that is used for a tablet of medicine.

    46. Classic Diana Ross hairdo : AFRO

    Diana Ross is one of the most prolific recording artists in history. She sang with the Supremes from 1959 to 1970 and then launched an incredibly successful solo career. Ross was listed in the 1993 edition of “The Guinness Book of World Records” as the most successful music artist ever, with eighteen #1 records.

    47. Strategy-free card game : WAR

    War is a simple card game, one mainly played by young children.

    54. Flees : LAMS

    To be on the lam is to be in flight, to have escaped from prison. “On the lam” is American slang that originated at the end of the 19th century. The word “lam” also means to “beat” or “thrash”, as in “lambaste”. So “on the lam” might derive from the phrase “to beat it, to scram”.

    62. “I was with my mistress at the time,” maybe : ALIBI

    “Alibi” is the Latin word for “elsewhere” as in, “I claim that I was ‘elsewhere’ when the crime was committed … I have an ‘alibi’”.

    66. Cross-dressing Disney heroine of 1998 : MULAN

    “Mulan” is a 1998 animated feature film made by Walt Disney studios. The film is based on the Chinese legend of Hua Mulan, a woman who takes the place of her father in the army and serves with distinction for twelve years without reward. Disney’s lead character was given the name Fa Mulan. Donny Osmond provided the singing voice for one of the lead characters, after which his sons remarked that he had finally made it in show business as he was in a Disney film.

    71. The first “R” of R&R : REST

    Rest and relaxation/recuperation/recreation (R&R, “R ‘n R”)

    Down

    1. Apple introduction of 1998 : IMAC

    The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an “all-in-one” design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such strawberry, blueberry and lime.

    2. “___ Lisa” : MONA

    “Mona Lisa” is a marvelous 1950 song that topped the charts for Nat King Cole for eight weeks. The song was written for the film “Captain Carey, U.S.A.” that was released that same year, starring Alan Ladd. “Mona Lisa” won the Oscar for Best Original Song.

    4. Guillotined : BEHEADED

    The guillotine is a device for executing people by decapitating them. The guillotine is most associated with France where it was used most notably and extensively during the French Revolution. The guillotine was used as the standard method of execution in France right up until 1981 when capital punishment was finally abolished.

    7. Turnpike, e.g. : HIGHWAY

    Back in the 15th century, a turnpike was a defensive barrier across a road. By the 17th century the term was used for a barrier that stopped travelers until a toll was paid. By the 18th century a turnpike was the name given to a road with a toll.

    11. A, as in Aristotle : ALPHA

    Aristotle was actually a student of Plato in Ancient Greece (and in turn, Plato was a student of Socrates). Aristotle’s most famous student was Alexander the Great.

    12. Kerchief worn as headgear : DO-RAG

    Hip-hoppers might wear do-rags today, but they have been around for centuries. If you recall the famous image known today as “Rosie the Riveter”, she is wearing a do-rag. The etymology is pretty evident, a piece of cloth (rag) to hold a hairstyle (do) in place.

    A “kerchief” is a triangular or square piece of cloth used as a covering for the head. So, a handkerchief (“hand-kerchief”) is a square piece of cloth held in the hand and used for personal hygiene.

    18. Keats poem : ODE

    The poet John Keats is famous for writing a whole series of beautiful odes. The most renowned are the so-called “1819 Odes”, a collection from the year 1819 that includes famous poems such as “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, “Ode to a Nightingale” and “Ode to Psyche”.

    22. Elvis in the 1950s or Justin Bieber in the 2010s : TEEN IDOL

    Elvis Presley was born in Tupelo, Mississippi and moved to Memphis, Tennessee with his family when he was 13-years-old. Once he had achieved fame, Elvis purchased Graceland, the famous Memphis home that he used for himself and his family. I visited Graceland some years ago, and thoroughly enjoyed the experience.

    Justin Bieber is a young pop singer from London, Ontario. Bieber was actually discovered on YouTube by talent manager Scooter Brown. Fans of Bieber call themselves “Beliebers”. Personally, I’m no believer in Bieber …

    25. Stepped tower of ancient Sumer : ZIGGURAT

    Ziggurats were massive, terraced, step pyramids built in the ancient Mesopotamian valley. The ziggurat-style of architecture has been used in modern buildings, with notable examples being the US Bullion Depository in Fort Knox, and the MI6 Building in London.

    Iraq is often called the “Cradle of Civilization” as it was home to Sumer, which was the earliest known civilization on the planet. By 5000 BC the Sumerian people were practicing year-round agriculture and had a specialized labor force. For the first time, a whole race were able to settle in one place by storing food, instead of having to migrate in a pattern dictated by crops and grazing land.

    28. Classic clown with a repetitive name : BOBO

    “Bobo the Clown” was the stage name of Chester Barnett who worked the circus circuit from the 1920s to the 1970s. Barnett gave himself the nickname “Bobo” when he was a child, using it for a persona that he adopted when he ran around the house wearing a paper bag on this head, with two holes cut to allow him to see.

    29. Missing, as a G.I. : AWOL

    The Military Police (MPs) often track down personnel who go AWOL (absent without leave).

    31. Climax of “Hamilton” : DUEL

    “Hamilton” is a 2015 musical based on the life or US Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, as described in the 2004 biography by Ron Chernow. The show opened off-Broadway in February 2015, and transferred to Broadway in August of the same year. Advance ticket sales for the Broadway production were unprecedented, and reportedly amounted to $30 million. The representations of the main characters is decidedly ground-breaking. The show is rooted in hip-hop and the main roles such as Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington are all played by African-American and Hispanic actors.

    Alexander Hamilton was one of America’s Founding Fathers, chief of staff to General George Washington and the first Secretary of the Treasury. It was Hamilton who founded the nation’s first political party, the Federalist Party. He is also famous for fighting a duel with Vice President Aaron Burr, which resulted in Hamilton’s death a few days later.

    37. Taj Mahal locale : AGRA

    The most famous mausoleum in the world has to be the Taj Mahal in Agra, India. The Taj Mahal was built after the death of the fourth wife of Shah Jahan, Mumtaz Mahal (hence the name of the mausoleum). The poor woman died in childbirth delivering the couple’s 14th child. When Shah Jahan himself passed away 35 years later, he was buried beside his wife Mumtaz, in the Taj Mahal.

    38. Lowly worker : PEON

    A peon is a lowly worker with no real control over his/her working conditions. The word comes into English from Spanish, in which language it has the same meaning.

    40. Food-thickening agent : AGAR

    Agar (also “agar-agar”) is a jelly extracted from seaweed that has many uses. Agar is found in Japanese desserts, and can also be used as a food thickener or even as a laxative. In the world of science it is the most common medium used for growing bacteria in Petri dishes.

    47. Home mixology station : WET BAR

    A mixologist is someone who is well versed in the mixing of cocktails, said he reaching for the shaker …

    52. “And there it is!” : VOILA!

    “Voilà” means “there it is”, and “voici” means “here it is”. The terms come from “voi là” meaning “see there” and “voi ici” meaning “see here”.

    53. Painting surface : GESSO

    “Gesso” is the Italian word for “chalk” and gives its name to the powdered calcium carbonate that is used as a primer coat under artistic panel paintings. The gesso is mixed with a glue and applied to wood so that it acts as an absorbent surface for paint.

    55. ___ Arbor, Mich. : ANN

    Ann Arbor, Michigan was founded in 1824 by John Allen and Elisha Rumsey. Supposedly, Allen and Rumsey originally used the name “Annsarbour” in recognition of stands of bur oak that were on the land they had purchased and in recognition of their wives, both of whom were called “Ann” (i.e. Anns’ Arbor)

    63. What quills are dipped in : INK

    Quills have been used as writing implements since the 6th century. Historically, goose, swan and turkey feathers have been the quills of choice. A bird’s feather is well suited for writing, as the hollow shaft acts as a reservoir for ink which then flows to the tip due to capillary action. Choice of feather is important. Right-handed writers are best served by feathers from the left wing, as the feather curves away from the palm of the hand when writing. The tip of the quill is sharpened using a “quill knife”. This quill knife is the ancestor of what we know today as a “penknife”.

    65. “___ Always Sunny in Philadelphia” : IT’S

    “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” is a long-running sitcom that premiered in 2005 and that is set in an Irish bar in South Philly. The show has a talented lineup of actors, but the big name in the cast is Danny DeVito.

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    Complete List of Clues/Answers

    Across

    1. Online source of film trivia : IMDB
    5. When doubled, a Hawaiian fish : MAHI
    9. A lot : SCADS
    14. Sour expression : MOUE
    15. “Yeah, right!” : AS IF!
    16. Give permission : ALLOW
    17. Period dominated by the likes of Dan Rather and Peter Jennings? : ANCHOR AGE (looks like “anchorage”)
    19. Stop competing as an amateur : GO PRO
    20. Like dry, clumpy mud : CAKED
    21. Cool, in ’90s slang : PHAT
    23. Blacken, as by fire : CHAR
    24. Joan who sang at Woodstock : BAEZ
    26. Period when every car was a junker? : WRECK AGE (looks like “wreckage”)
    28. Hairless : BALD
    30. Boise’s state: Abbr. : IDA
    32. Dawn goddess : EOS
    33. Painful boo-boo : OWIE
    34. English-speaking neighbor of Venezuela : GUYANA
    36. Maple syrup source : SAP
    39. Period known for its 007 movies? : BOND AGE (looks like “bondage”)
    41. Period of fuzzy sweaters? : PILL AGE (looks like “pillage”)
    43. So last year : OLD
    44. Swallowed quickly : GULPED
    46. Classic Diana Ross hairdo : AFRO
    47. Strategy-free card game : WAR
    48. Wedding vow : I DO
    49. Gradually remove, as from a mother’s milk : WEAN
    50. Period when tribute bands thrived? : COVER AGE (looks like “coverage”)
    54. Flees : LAMS
    56. Go wild in the streets : RIOT
    57. Reason to pull an all-nighter : TEST
    59. Backs of necks : NAPES
    62. “I was with my mistress at the time,” maybe : ALIBI
    64. Period when psychiatrists ruled? : SHRINK AGE (looks like “shrinkage”)
    66. Cross-dressing Disney heroine of 1998 : MULAN
    67. Chimney buildup : SOOT
    68. Supply-and-demand subj. : ECON
    69. Fire starter : SPARK
    70. Chooses : OPTS
    71. The first “R” of R&R : REST

    Down

    1. Apple introduction of 1998 : IMAC
    2. “___ Lisa” : MONA
    3. Hunter’s hiding spot in a marsh : DUCK BLIND
    4. Guillotined : BEHEADED
    5. Tarnish or deface : MAR
    6. “Right away!” : ASAP!
    7. Turnpike, e.g. : HIGHWAY
    8. Lead-in to bad news : I FEAR …
    9. Droop : SAG
    10. Things seen in most public buildings, but almost never in casinos : CLOCKS
    11. A, as in Aristotle : ALPHA
    12. Kerchief worn as headgear : DO-RAG
    13. Used foul language : SWORE
    18. Keats poem : ODE
    22. Elvis in the 1950s or Justin Bieber in the 2010s : TEEN IDOL
    25. Stepped tower of ancient Sumer : ZIGGURAT
    27. Anthracite, e.g. : COAL
    28. Classic clown with a repetitive name : BOBO
    29. Missing, as a G.I. : AWOL
    31. Climax of “Hamilton” : DUEL
    35. Mimicked : APED
    36. Campus sanctuary, in modern parlance : SAFE SPACE
    37. Taj Mahal locale : AGRA
    38. Lowly worker : PEON
    40. Food-thickening agent : AGAR
    42. Legislator : LAWMAKER
    45. Specialty bakery : PIE SHOP
    47. Home mixology station : WET BAR
    50. Pulls an all-nighter, say : CRAMS
    51. Prepare for a bodybuilding contest : OIL UP
    52. “And there it is!” : VOILA!
    53. Painting surface : GESSO
    55. ___ Arbor, Mich. : ANN
    58. Gait between a walk and a canter : TROT
    60. Causes of bigheadedness : EGOS
    61. Mailed : SENT
    63. What quills are dipped in : INK
    65. “___ Always Sunny in Philadelphia” : IT’S

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    3 thoughts on “1023-17 NY Times Crossword Answers 23 Oct 2017, Monday”

    1. Agreed – fun theme. Pretty easy Monday although they did manage to get MOUE and ZIGGURAT into a Monday grid. Both new to me. Not bad.

      Best –

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