1016-17 NY Times Crossword Answers 16 Oct 2017, Monday

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Constructed by: Jennifer Nutt
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: Killer Whale

Each of today’s themed answers includes “ORCA” as a hidden word:

  • 59A. Creature found “swimming” in 16-, 22-, 28-, 42- and 47-Across : KILLER WHALE
  • 16A. It must be removed before pouring coolant into an engine : RADIATOR CAP
    • 22A. Elizabeth II’s home outside London : WINDSOR CASTLE
    • 28A. Quaint train amenity : PARLOR CAR
    • 42A. Feline that doesn’t stray : INDOOR CAT
    • 47A. Where rum and rye may be stored : LIQUOR CABINET

    Bill’s time: 5m 00s

    Bill’s errors: 0

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    Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

    Across

    1. Fancy neckwear : ASCOT

    An Ascot is a horrible-looking (I think!), wide tie that narrows at the neck, which these days is only really worn at weddings. The tie takes its name from the Royal Ascot horse race at which punters still turn up in formal wear at Ascot Racecourse in England.

    10. Something that might be said with fingers crossed behind the back : FIB

    To fib is to to tell a lie. The verb likely comes from “fibble-fable” meaning “nonsense”, with “fibble-fable” coming from “fable”.

    14. Kind of diet replicating that of early humans : PALEO

    The paleolithic or caveman diet is a fad diet that became popular in the 2000s. The idea is to eat wild plants and animals that would have been available to humans during the Paleolithic era (roughly the Stone Age). This period precedes the introduction of agriculture and domestication of animals. As a result, someone on the diet avoids consuming grains, legumes, dairy and processed foods. The diet consists mainly of lean meat (about 45-65% of the total calorie intake), non-starchy vegetables, fruits, berries and nuts.

    18. Writer Tolstoy : LEO

    The Russian author Leo Tolstoy is best known for his novels “War and Peace” and “Anna Karenina”. He also wrote the much-respected novellas “Hadji Murad” and “The Death of Ivan Ilyich”.

    22. Elizabeth II’s home outside London : WINDSOR CASTLE

    Windsor Castle is located on the River Thames in Berkshire, just 20 miles outside London. It was built in the early 11th century by William the Conqueror after the Norman invasion of England. Queen Elizabeth II likes to spend her weekends at Windsor. She has lots of room to move around there, as it’s the largest inhabited castle in the world.

    26. Hand drum : BONGO

    Bongo drums are Cuban percussion instruments consisting of a pair of drums, one larger than the other, The smaller drum is called the “hembra” (female) and the larger the “macho” (male).

    32. Churchill Downs event : DERBY

    The first Kentucky Derby took place in 1875, and is a race modeled on the Epsom Derby in England and the Grand Prix de Paris (now called the “Prix de l‘Arc de Triomphe”). As such, the Kentucky Derby was run over 1½ miles, although in 1896 this was shortened to 1¼ miles. The winning horse is presented with a very elaborate blanket made of red roses, and so the Derby is nicknamed “Run for the Roses”. The race is held on the first Saturday in May each year, and is limited to 3-year-old horses.

    Churchill Downs is a thoroughbred racetrack located in Louisville, Kentucky that is famous for hosting the Kentucky Derby each year. The track is named for John and Henry Churchill who once owned the land on which the course was built.

    36. Ye ___ Shoppe : OLDE

    The word “olde” wasn’t actually used much earlier than the 1920s. “Olde” was introduced to give a quaint antique feel to brand names, shop names etc. as in “Ye Olde Shoppe”.

    40. Documents shown at border checkpoints : VISAS

    A visa is a usually a stamp in one’s passport, an indication that one is authorized to enter (and less often, to exit) a particular country. The word “visa” comes into English, via French, from the Latin expression “charta visa” meaning “paper that has been seen”, or “verified paper”.

    44. Test for seekers of a 21-Down, for short : GRE
    (21D. Common grad sch. credential : MS DEGREE)

    Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

    53. Feverish chills : AGUE

    An ague is a fever, one usually associated with malaria.

    54. Nerve : MOXIE

    Back as far as 1876, Moxie was a brand name of a “medicine” peddled with the claim that it “built up your nerve”. In 1924, Moxie was registered as a trademark for a bitter, non-alcoholic beverage (no more claims of nerve-building). And we’ve used the term “moxie” to mean “nerve” ever since …

    55. Fink : RAT

    A fink is an informer, someone who rats out his or her cohorts.

    58. ___-de-France : ILE

    Île-de-France (literally “Island of France”) isn’t an island at all. Instead, it is the most populous of France’s 26 administrative regions. Île-de-France is roughly equivalent to the Paris metropolitan area.

    59. Creature found “swimming” in 16-, 22-, 28-, 42- and 47-Across : KILLER WHALE

    The taxonomic name for the killer whale is Orcinus orca. The use of the name “orca”, rather than “killer whale”, is becoming more and more common. The Latin word “Orcinus” means “belonging to Orcus”, with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

    62. ___ v. Wade : ROE

    Roe v. Wade was decided in a US District Court in Texas in 1970, and reached the Supreme Court on appeal. The basic decision by the Supreme Court was that a woman’s constitutional right to privacy applied to an abortion, but that this right had to be balanced with a state’s interest in protecting an unborn child and a mother’s health. The Court further defined that the state’s interest became stronger with each trimester of a pregnancy. So, in the first trimester the woman’s right to privacy outweighed any state interest. In the second trimester the state’s interest in maternal health was deemed to be strong enough to allow state regulation of abortion for the sake of the mother. In the third trimester the viability of the fetus dictated that the state’s interest in the unborn child came into play, so states could regulate or prohibit abortions, except in cases where the mother’s life was in danger. I’m no lawyer, but that’s my understanding of the initial Supreme Court decision …

    63. Maze marking next to an arrow : ENTER

    If there was a corn maze in London, I’d mark the entrance “In ear →” …

    64. Show host : EMCEE

    The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an initialism standing for Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

    66. Famed loch : NESS

    Loch Ness is one of the two most famous lakes in Scotland. Loch Ness is famous for its “monster”, and Loch Lomond is famous for the lovely song “The Bonnie Banks o’ Loch Lomond”. Oh, ye’ll tak’ the high road, and I’ll tak’ the low road …

    Down

    1. Taj Mahal city : AGRA

    Agra is a medieval city on the banks of the river Yamuna in India. Agra was also the capital of the Mughal Empire from 1556 to 1658. The city is home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites:

    • The Taj Mahal: the famous mausoleum built in memory of Mumtaz Mahal.
    • Agra Fort: the site where the famous Koh-i-Noor diamond was seized.
    • Fatehpur Sikri: a historic city that’s home to well-preserved Mughal architecture.

    2. BBQ side dish : SLAW

    The term “coleslaw” is an Anglicized version of the Dutch name “koolsla”, which in itself is a shortened form of “Koolsalade” meaning “cabbage salad”.

    4. Kimono tie : OBI

    The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied at the back in what is called a butterfly knot. The term “obi” is also used for the thick cotton belts that are an essential part of the outfits worn by practitioners of many martial arts. The color of the martial arts obi signifies the wearer’s skill level.

    The lovely Japanese kimono is a garment worn by men, women and children. The word “kimono” translates simply as “thing to wear”, with “ki” meaning “wear” and “mono” meaning “thing”.

    5. Afternoon repast : TEA

    Our word “repast”, meaning “meal”. came to us via French (in which language “repas” is “meal”). Ultimately the term comes from the Latin “repascere” meaning “to repeatedly graze”.

    6. Marx brother who never spoke : HARPO

    Harpo Marx was the second oldest of the Marx brothers. Harpo’s real name was Adolph, and he earned his nickname because he played the harp. Famously, Harpe didn’t speak on screen, a routine that he developed after reading a review that he performed really well when he just didn’t speak! He would usually whistle or toot a hand-held horn instead of speaking.

    7. Stomach trouble : ULCER

    Until fairly recently, a peptic ulcer was believed to be caused by undue amounts of stress in one’s life. It is now known that 70-90% of all peptic ulcers are in fact associated with a particular bacterium.

    8. Google.com function : SEARCH

    The search engine “Google” was originally called “BackRub” would you believe? The name was eventually changed to Google, an intentional misspelling of the word “googol”. A googol is a pretty big number, 10 to the power of 100. That would be the digit 1 followed by 100 zeros.

    9. Partner of skip and jump : HOP

    The track and field sport sometimes called the “hop, skip and jump” is more correctly termed the “triple jump”. The triple jump dates back as an event to the ancient Olympic Games. When the modern Olympics were introduced in 1896, the triple jump consisted of two hops on the same foot followed by a jump. Today’s triple jump consists of a hop, a bound and then a jump.

    10. Serving of sole : FILET

    A fillet is a boneless cut of meat or fish. The term comes from the Old French “filet” meaning “small thread, filament”. Apparently we applied the term to food as the piece of fish or meat was tied up with string after it was boned. Here in the US, we tend to use the French spelling “filet”.

    11. Like a five-star Yelp review : IDEAL

    yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”.

    12. Frontiersman Daniel : BOONE

    Daniel Boone was a pioneer and folk hero. For frontiersman Boone, the frontier was what we now call the state of Kentucky. He led the building of the Wilderness Road through the famous Cumberland Gap in the Appalachians, a route subsequently taken by hundreds of thousands of migrants into Kentucky. Boone fought in the Revolutionary War with distinction, and after the war returned to Kentucky and got himself into land speculation. He became mired in debt, forcing him to emigrate to Missouri to settle down on land that was at that time owned by the French. It was there that he spent the last decades of his life.

    17. Elizabeth I was the last of them : TUDORS

    The Wars of the Roses was a series of civil wars fought for the throne of England between the rival Houses of Lancaster (with a symbol of a red rose) and York (with a symbol of a white rose). Ultimately the Lancastrians emerged victorious after Henry Tudor defeated King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field. Henry was crowned King Henry VII, and so began the Tudor dynasty. Henry Tudor united the rival houses by marrying his cousin Elizabeth of York. Henry VII had a relatively long reign of 23 years that lasted until his death, after which his son succeeded to the throne as Henry VIII, continuing the relatively short-lived Tudor dynasty. Henry VIII ruled from 1509 until his death in 1547. Henry VIII was the last male to lead the the House of Tudor, as his daughter Queen Elizabeth I died without issue. When Elizabeth died, the Scottish King James VI succeeded to the throne as James I of England and Ireland. James I was the first English monarch of the House of Stuart.

    24. Doctors Without Borders, e.g., in brief : NGO

    Non-governmental organization (NGO)

    25. What Doctors Without Borders provides : AID

    Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders) is an international aid organization that was founded in France in 1971. The organization is usually referred to as Doctors Without Borders here in North America, but goes by the initialism MSF in much of the world.

    26. “___ Ha’i” (“South Pacific” song) : BALI

    The song “Bali Ha’i” is from the musical “South Pacific” by Rodgers and Hammerstein. Bali Ha’i is the name of a volcanic island that neighbors the island on which the story takes place. The matriarch of Bali Ha’i is a character named Bloody Mary, and it is Bloody Mary who sings the song in the musical.

    The 1949 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “South Pacific” is based on stories from the 1947 book “Tales of the South Pacific” by James A. Michener. “South Pacific” really is a classic show featuring some classic songs, like “Bali Ha’i”, “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outta My Hair”, “Some Enchanted Evening” and “Happy Talk”.

    28. Long-running PBS film series : POV

    “POV” is a PBS television series that showcases independent documentary films. “POV” has been on the air since 1988.

    29. Home of the Cubs, for short : CHI

    The Chicago Cubs is one of only two charter members of the baseball’s National League who are still playing, the other being the Atlanta Braves. The Cubs won the World Series in 2016 for the first time since 1908, which is a long time ago. In fact, the Cubs had the longest championship drought of any professional sports team in North America.

    30. Firebrand Rand : AYN

    Ayn Rand was a Russian-American novelist born Alisa Rosenbaum. Her two best known works are her novels “The Fountainhead” published in 1943 and “Atlas Shrugged” from 1957. Back in 1951, Rand moved from Los Angeles to New York City. Soon after, she gathered a group of admirers around her with whom she discussed philosophy and shared drafts of her magnum opus, “Atlas Shrugged”. This group called itself “The Collective”, and one of the founding members was none other than future Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan. Rand described herself as “right-wing” politically, and both she and her novel “Atlas Shrugged” have become inspirations for the American conservatives, and the Tea Party in particular.

    33. Churchill Downs, e.g. : RACETRACK

    Churchill Downs is a thoroughbred racetrack located in Louisville, Kentucky that is famous for hosting the Kentucky Derby each year. The track is named for John and Henry Churchill who once owned the land on which the course was built.

    34. Trombone honk, e.g. : BLAT

    To blat is to cry, especially like a sheep. In other words, to “blat” is to “bleat”. The noun “blat” is often used for an overblown sound on a brass instrument.

    41. Sold-out box-office sign : SRO

    Standing room only (SRO)

    43. The “O” of B.Y.O.B. : OWN

    Bring Your Own Beer/Bottle/Booze (BYOB)

    45. Valuable white fur : ERMINE

    The stoat has dark brown fur in the summer, and white fur in the winter. Sometimes the term “ermine” is used for the animal during the winter when the fur is white. Ermine skins have long been prized by royalty and are often used for white trim on ceremonial robes.

    48. Probably not a summer home : IGLOO

    The Inuit word for “house” is “iglu”, which we usually write as “igloo”. The Greenlandic (yes, that’s a language) word for “house” is very similar, namely “igdlo”. The walls of igloos are tremendous insulators, due to the air pockets in the blocks of snow.

    49. “Bohemian Rhapsody” band : QUEEN

    Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” is a marvelously unique song in the pop repertoire. It has a very appealing structure, with no chorus but three distinct parts and with three distinct “sounds”. The opening is truly a slow ballad, which morphs into an operatic middle section, ending with a really heavy, rock-guitar conclusion. The song monopolized the number one slot in the UK charts for weeks in 1975/76, and made a comeback in 1996 when it appeared in the movie “Wayne’s World”. Great stuff …

    50. Indianapolis team : COLTS

    The Indianapolis Colts professional football team has been in Indiana since 1984. The team traces its roots back to the Dayton Triangles, one of the founding members of the NFL created in 1913. The Dayton Triangles relocated and became the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1930, and then the Brooklyn Tigers in 1944. The team merged with the Boston Yanks in 1945, so then played in Boston. The Yanks were moved to New York in 1949, and then to Dallas in 1952 as the Dallas Texans. The Texan franchise moved to Baltimore in 1953, forming the Colts. The Colts made their last move in 1984, to Indianapolis. Whew!

    52. Casket stand : BIER

    Biers are the stands on which one rests a coffin for a service, or perhaps if the corpse is to lie in state. A bier may have wheels on it so that it can be used to transport the coffin to the graveside. The original biers were just flat pieces of wood on which the body was placed, covered with a shroud. Nowadays, we place the body in a casket, and then onto the bier.

    56. Away from the wind : ALEE

    Alee is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing aweather.

    59. Documentarian Burns : KEN

    Ken Burns directs and produces epic documentary films that usually make inventive use of archive footage. Recent works are the sensational “The War” (about the US in WWII) and the magnificent “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea”, as well as 2014’s “The Roosevelts: An Intimate History”. His latest offering is 2017’s “The Vietnam War”.

    61. Wellness grp. : HMO

    Health Maintenance Organization (HMO)

    Complete List of Clues/Answers

    Across

    1. Fancy neckwear : ASCOT
    6. “Zip your lip!” : HUSH!
    10. Something that might be said with fingers crossed behind the back : FIB
    13. Classroom item that spins : GLOBE
    14. Kind of diet replicating that of early humans : PALEO
    15. Wedding vow : I DO
    16. It must be removed before pouring coolant into an engine : RADIATOR CAP
    18. Writer Tolstoy : LEO
    19. Bedazzle : AWE
    20. Lower’s opposite : UPPER
    21. Unkind : MEAN
    22. Elizabeth II’s home outside London : WINDSOR CASTLE
    26. Hand drum : BONGO
    27. Secreted : HID
    28. Quaint train amenity : PARLOR CAR
    32. Churchill Downs event : DERBY
    36. Ye ___ Shoppe : OLDE
    37. Less outgoing : SHYER
    39. Big wind : GALE
    40. Documents shown at border checkpoints : VISAS
    42. Feline that doesn’t stray : INDOOR CAT
    44. Test for seekers of a 21-Down, for short : GRE
    46. Sugary : SWEET
    47. Where rum and rye may be stored : LIQUOR CABINET
    53. Feverish chills : AGUE
    54. Nerve : MOXIE
    55. Fink : RAT
    58. ___-de-France : ILE
    59. Creature found “swimming” in 16-, 22-, 28-, 42- and 47-Across : KILLER WHALE
    62. ___ v. Wade : ROE
    63. Maze marking next to an arrow : ENTER
    64. Show host : EMCEE
    65. ___ of a gun : SON
    66. Famed loch : NESS
    67. Penguin or T. rex in the modern version of Monopoly : TOKEN

    Down

    1. Taj Mahal city : AGRA
    2. BBQ side dish : SLAW
    3. Substitute terms for sensitive subjects : CODE WORDS
    4. Kimono tie : OBI
    5. Afternoon repast : TEA
    6. Marx brother who never spoke : HARPO
    7. Stomach trouble : ULCER
    8. Google.com function : SEARCH
    9. Partner of skip and jump : HOP
    10. Serving of sole : FILET
    11. Like a five-star Yelp review : IDEAL
    12. Frontiersman Daniel : BOONE
    14. Bursts, as a balloon : POPS
    17. Elizabeth I was the last of them : TUDORS
    21. Common grad sch. credential : MS DEGREE
    23. Joined (with) : IN LEAGUE
    24. Doctors Without Borders, e.g., in brief : NGO
    25. What Doctors Without Borders provides : AID
    26. “___ Ha’i” (“South Pacific” song) : BALI
    28. Long-running PBS film series : POV
    29. Home of the Cubs, for short : CHI
    30. Firebrand Rand : AYN
    31. Color in sunsets : RED
    33. Churchill Downs, e.g. : RACETRACK
    34. Trombone honk, e.g. : BLAT
    35. “Are we there ___?” : YET
    38. More optimistic : ROSIER
    41. Sold-out box-office sign : SRO
    43. The “O” of B.Y.O.B. : OWN
    45. Valuable white fur : ERMINE
    47. Bears’ retreats : LAIRS
    48. Probably not a summer home : IGLOO
    49. “Bohemian Rhapsody” band : QUEEN
    50. Indianapolis team : COLTS
    51. Highway tolls may be based on the number of them : AXLES
    52. Casket stand : BIER
    56. Away from the wind : ALEE
    57. One under 20 : TEEN
    59. Documentarian Burns : KEN
    60. Sopping ___ : WET
    61. Wellness grp. : HMO

    3 thoughts on “1016-17 NY Times Crossword Answers 16 Oct 2017, Monday”

    1. 7:20, no errors.

      @Bill … Re 63A: Hilarious idea for a sign in London 😄, but I have to ask: Is the spelling of “a corn maize in London” intentional? (Either way, it’s all good … 😄.)

    2. Nice Monday effort. I made it a little tougher on myself reading 21D as “Common gradE school credential..”. As Bill would say, less haste….

      I thought the rule was that if you crossed your fingers behind your back, it doesn’t count as a FIB. I’ll consult the official international grade school kids handbook published in The Hague to be certain…

      Best –

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