1119-17 NY Times Crossword Answers 19 Nov 2017, Sunday

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Constructed by: Tom McCoy
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Theme: Counterproductive

We can be PRODUCTIVE with today’s puzzle by COUNTING the number of letters in specified, themed answers. Themed answers refer to that same clue’s ANSWER LENGTH. The circled letters give us a “bonus” fact about ANSWER LENGTH, namely that FOUR is the only number that has that number of letters in the number as spelled out. ONE has three letters, TWO has three letter, THREE has five letters, but FOUR has FOUR letters:

  • 110A. Something to count to understand 22-, 28-, 49-, 64-, 81- and 102-Across : ANSWER LENGTH
  • 22A. This clue’s 110-Across, timewise : MIDNIGHT HOUR (12)
  • 28A. This clue’s 110-Across, at the Olympics : DIVER’S GOAL (10)
  • 49A. This clue’s 110-Across, as is relevant each November : VOTING AGE IN AMERICA (18)
  • 64A. This clue’s 110-Across, to the superstitious : BAD LUCK SYMBOL (13)
  • 81A. This clue’s 110-Across, in chemistry : ARGON’S ATOMIC NUMBER (18)
  • 102A. This clue’s 110-Across, in terms of attractiveness : REAL LOOKER (10)

Bill’s time: 21m 28s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

11. The Land Shark’s show, for short : SNL

“Saturday Night Live” (SNL)

19. Reno’s county : WASHOE

Reno, Nevada was named in honor of Major General Jesse Lee Reno, a Union officer killed in the Civil War. The city has a famous “Reno Arch”, a structure that stands over the main street. The arch was erected in 1926 to promote an exposition planned for the following year. After the expo, the city council decided to keep the arch and held a competition to decide what wording should be displayed, and the winner was “The Biggest Little City in the World”.

21. ___ Modern : TATE

The museum known as “the Tate” is actually made up of four separate galleries in England. The original Tate gallery was founded by Sir Henry Tate as the National Gallery of British Art. It is located on Millbank in London, on the site of the old Millbank Prison, and is now called Tate Britain. There is also the Tate Liverpool in the north of England located in an old warehouse, and the Tate St. Ives in the west country located in an old gas works. My favorite of the Tate galleries is the Tate Modern which lies on the banks of the Thames in London. It’s a beautiful building, a converted power station that you have to see to believe.

24. Not definitely going to happen : EVITABLE

Evitable is another word for avoidable, describing something that can be avoided, something that is not foreordained, not predestined.

26. Furry, red TV character : ELMO

The “Sesame Street” character named Elmo has a birthday every February 3rd, and on that birthday he always turns 3½ years old. The man behind/under Elmo on “Sesame Street” is Kevin Clash. If you want to learn more about Elmo and Clash, you can watch the 2011 documentary “Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey”.

27. Young actress who played two main characters in “The Parent Trap” : LOHAN

I think that actress Lindsay Lohan’s big break was in the Disney remake of “The Parent Trap” in 1998. I’ve really only enjoyed one of Lohan’s films though, “Freaky Friday” from 2003 in which she stars alongside the fabulous Jamie Lee Curtis.

32. Former executive with the same interior letters as his company : EISNER

Michael Eisner took over as CEO of the Walt Disney Company in 1984. Eisner has been attributed with turning Disney around, as the company was floundering really since 1966 when Walt Disney died. Eisner had a good run, but ran foul of Walt Disney’s nephew Roy Disney who led a revolt that resulted in Eisner’s resignation in 2005.

34. As such : PER SE

“Per se” is a Latin phrase that translates as “by itself”. We use “per se” pretty literally, meaning “in itself, intrinsically”.

36. Opposite of blanc : NOIR

In French, “blanc” (white) is the opposite of “noir” (black).

38. N.Y.C. attraction : MOMA

The founding of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City was very much driven by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, the wife of John D. Rockefeller, son of the oil magnate. Working with two friends, Abby managed to get the museum opened in 1929, just nine days after the Wall Street Crash. The MoMA’s sculpture garden bears the name of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and has done so since 1949.

40. “I love her ten times more than ___ I did”: Shak. : E’ER

William Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew” is about a courting couple. The male in the couple is Petruchio, a gentleman of Verona, and the female is Katharina/Kate, the so-called “shrew”. As the play progresses, the “shrew” is “tamed” and becomes an “obedient” bride … a controversial storyline in the contemporary world, to say the least. Regardless, modern adaptations have been made, including 1948’s Broadway musical “Kiss Me Kate” and the 1999 romantic comedy “10 Things I Hate About You”.

44. Steak ___ : TARTARE

What we now call steak tartare was first served in French restaurants in the early 1900s. Back then, the dish went by the name “steak à l’Americaine”, would you believe? It was basically raw, seasoned beef mixed with egg yolk. A later version of l’Americaine, without the egg yolk and with tartar sauce served on the side, was called steak tartare. Over time the two versions became one, and the steak tartare moniker won out. By the way, if you order steak tartare in Switzerland, I believe you are served horse meat. There are now similar “tartare” dishes made with raw salmon, or raw tuna.

49. This clue’s 110-Across, as is relevant each November : VOTING AGE IN AMERICA (18)

The minimum age of voters was called out in the US Constitution when it was passed in 1787. This was set at 21 years, and of course applied to only white male property owners. The minimum age of voters was lowered in the Twenty-sixth Amendment to the Constitution in 1971 as a response to student activism. Young people at that time were frustrated that they were mature enough to be drafted to fight in the Vietnam War, yet were not considered mature enough to vote in elections.

52. Assessment: Abbr. : EVAL

Evaluation (eval.)

53. Mork’s boss on “Mork & Mindy” : ORSON

“Mork & Mindy” is a sitcom that originally aired from 1978 to 1982. The title characters were played by Robin Williams and Pam Dawber. Mork is an alien from the planet Ork who reports back to his superior called Orson. Orson is played by voice actor Ralph James. Ralph James was also known for providing the voice of Mr. Turtle in famous Tootsie Pop commercials in the seventies. Nanu nanu!

59. Bro or sis: Abbr. : REL

Relative (rel.)

60. Phillies’ div. : NLE

Philadelphia’s baseball team was founded in 1883 as the Quakers, with the name changing to the Philadelphias and Phillies not long into the team’s history. The Phillies have been based in the same city using the same team name longer than any other team in US professional sports.

61. Staple of Southern cuisine : OKRA

The plant known as okra is mainly grown for it edible green pods. The pods are said to resemble “ladies’ fingers”, which is an alternative name for the plant. Okra is known as “ngombo” in Bantu, a name that might give us the word “gumbo”, the name for the name of the southern Louisiana stew that includes okra as a key ingredient.

62. One after whom a Times Square museum is named : RIPLEY

“Ripley’s Believe It or Not!” is a huge franchise on television that is affiliated to a worldwide chain of museums. The franchise started out as cartoon feature appearing in newspapers in 1918.

69. Martinique, par exemple : ILE

The island of Martinique in the eastern Caribbean is actually a part of France, and is referred to as an “overseas department”. As such, Martinique is part of the European Union and even uses the euro as its currency. The island is fully represented in the French National Assembly and Senate, just like any department within France. It’s sort of like the status of Hawaii within the US.

73. Temple athlete : OWL

Temple University was founded in 1888, and started out as a night school offering classes to people of limited means who had to hold down jobs during the day. These students earned themselves the nickname of “night owls”, leading to the use of “Owls” for Temple’s athletic teams.

74. Clear, as a table : BUS

A busboy is a person who assists a waiter, mainly by clearing tables. The verb “to bus” arose in the early 1900s and is probably a reference to the wheeled cart that was used to carry dishes.

77. Home of Oral Roberts University : TULSA

Oral Roberts University (ORU) is a private school in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ORU was founded relatively recently, in 1963 by the late televangelist Oral Roberts. The campus includes a Prayer Tower at its center, a spectacular glass and steel structure designed by architect Frank Wallace. The tower includes an observation deck, and is a popular tourist attraction. The school’s sports teams are known as the Oral Roberts Golden Eagles.

80. Shakespearean plotter : IAGO

Iago is the schemer in Shakespeare’s “Othello”. He is a soldier who fought alongside Othello and feels hard done by, missing out on promotion. Iago hatches a plot designed to discredit his rival Cassio by insinuating that Cassio is having an affair with Desdemona, Othello’s wife.

81. This clue’s 110-Across, in chemistry : ARGON’S ATOMIC NUMBER (18)

The chemical element argon has the symbol Ar. Argon is a noble gas, and so by definition is relatively nonreactive. The name “argon” comes from the Greek word for “lazy, inactive”. There’s a lot of argon around, as it is the third-most abundant gas in our atmosphere.

87. Moving companies? : TROUPES

“Troupe” is the French word for “company”.

89. Article in a German paper : DER

The definite article in German is der, die or das, for masculine, feminine and neuter nouns. The indefinite article is ein, eine or ein, again depending on the gender of the noun. A further complication, relative to English, is that the masculine form (and only the masculine form) of the article changes when used in the accusative case, when used with the object of a sentence. The accusative forms are “den” and “einen”.

90. Quash : VETO

The verb “veto” comes directly from Latin and means “I forbid”. The term was used by tribunes of Ancient Rome to indicate that they opposed measures passed by the Senate.

92. State sch. on the Pacific Coast : UCSD

The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) is located in La Jolla. The school was founded in 1960 as the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Appropriately enough, UCSD’s athletic teams are known as the Tritons, and the school mascot is King Triton.

93. Co. leader : CEO

Chief executive officer (CEO)

94. Beethoven dedicatee : ELISE

“Fur Elise” is a beautiful piece of music by Beethoven that is also known as “Bagatelle in A Minor”. “Fur Elise” means simply “For Elise”, but sadly no one knows for sure the identity of the mysterious dedicatee.

97. Pat of “The Karate Kid” : MORITA

Pat Morita was a Japanese-American actor who was born in Isleton, California. Morita’s most noted roles were playing “Arnold” on TV’s “Happy Days”, and Mr. Miyagi in “The Karate Kid” movies. Morita was just a child during WWII and spent most of it in the Gila River internment camp in Arizona with his family.

104. 2017 U.S. Open winner : NADAL

Rafael “Rafa” Nadal is a Spanish tennis player. He is noted for his expertise on clay courts, which earned him the nickname “The King of Clay”.

107. 13th or 15th : IDES

There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days originally depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually “fixed” by law. “Kalendae” were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. “Nonae” were originally the days of the half moon. And “idus” (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure …

113. “___ It Romantic?” : ISN’T

“Isn’t It Romantic?” is a charming song by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart that was introduced in the 1932 movie “Love Me Tonight”. In the film it is sung twice, by Jeanette MacDonald and by Maurice Chevalier.

114. Designer Maya : LIN

Maya Lin is a Chinese American born in Athens Ohio, and is an artist and architect. Her most famous work is the moving Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. Lin was only 21-years-old when she won a public design competition in 1981 to create the memorial. Although her design is very fitting, sadly Lin was not a popular choice for the work given her Asian heritage. As she said herself, she probably would not have been picked had the competition been judged with the knowledge of who was behind each submission.

119. Primetime ___ : EMMYS

The Emmy Awards are the television equivalent of the Oscars from the world of film, the Grammy Awards in music and the Tony Awards for the stage. Emmy Awards are presented throughout the year, depending on the sector of television being honored. The most famous of these ceremonies are the Primetime Emmy Awards and the Daytime Emmy Awards. The distinctive name of “Emmy” is a softened version of the word “immy”, the nickname given to the video camera tubes found in old television cameras.

120. Sen. Thurmond : STROM

Strom Thurmond was a US Senator for the state of South Carolina for 48 years, until he stepped down in 2003. Thurmond was the oldest-serving senator in US history. He retired from his office at the age of 100-years-old, and passed away just a few months after leaving Washington.

Down

3. Snapchat request : ADD ME

Snapchat is a messaging system that allows users to send photos and video clips to a limited list of recipients. The photos and clips, called “snaps”, can be viewed for only a few seconds before they are deleted from the recipient’s device, and from the Snapchat servers.

5. ___ Lanka : SRI

The island nation of Sri Lanka lies off the southeast coast of India. The name “Sri Lanka” translates from Sanskrit into English as “venerable island”. Before 1970, Sri Lanka was known as Ceylon, a name given to the country during British rule.

7. Labor agcy. : OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

8. Perform perfunctorily : PHONE IT IN

A person who does a job while expending minimal effort is said to “phone it in”.

10. Certain high school clique : NERDS

A “clique” is a small, exclusive group of people. The term comes to us from France, where it has the same meaning. In French it somehow evolved in meaning from the original “clique” meaning a sharp noise, or as we would say today, a “click”.

11. One of the stuntmen on “Jackass” : STEVE-O

Steve-O is someone who made a name for himself doing silly things on the TV show “Jackass”.

“Jackass” is a reality show that originally aired on MTV from 2000 to 2001. The show features a group of men doing stunts in which they usually get injured to some extent. The leader of the group is called Johnny Knoxville, who appears in the stunts and who also created the show. Not my cup of tea …

13. The Lonely Mountain, for Smaug : LAIR

The dragon named Smaug is the principal antagonist in J. R. R. Tolkien’s “The Hobbit”.

16. Place holders? : ATLASES

The famous Flemish geographer Gerardus Mercator published his first collection of maps in 1578. Mercator’s collection contained a frontispiece with an image of Atlas the Titan from Greek mythology holding up the world on his shoulders. That image gave us our term “atlas”.

25. Recipe amt. : TSP

Teaspoon (tsp.)

31. Hero role in “The Force Awakens” : FINN

“Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens” is the seventh episode in the “Star Wars” series of films. Several favorite characters return in “Star Wars VII”, including Han Solo (Harrison Ford), Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) and General Leia Organa (or “Princess Leia” in earlier films, played by Carrie Fisher).

33. Country whose name is also a two-word sentence : IRAN

The letter in the country name “Iran” might be rewritten as the sentence “I ran”.

36. Badgers : NAGS

“To badger” is “to harass”. The term comes from the cruel practice of badger-baiting, which dates back to medieval times. Badger-baiting is a blood sport in which a dog is used as bait for a badger in its den, to draw it out into the open. The den is an artificial structure built to resemble a natural badgers’ den, complete with a tunnel entrance. The dog is sent down the tunnel causing the badger and dog to lock their jaws on each other. The badger and dog are then removed from the den by pulling on the dog’s tale.

37. Crumbled froyo topping : OREO

Frozen yogurt (froyo)

39. Nickname for a young Darth Vader : ANI

Anakin “Ani” Skywalker is the principal character in the first six of the “Star Wars” movies. His progress chronologically through the series of films is:

  • Episode I: Anakin is a 9-year-old slave boy who earns the promise of Jedi training by young Obi-Wan Kenobi.
  • Episode II: Anakin is 18-years-old and goes on a murdering rampage to avenge the killing of his mother.
  • Episode III: Anakin is 21-years-old and a Jedi knight, but he turns to the Dark Side and becomes Darth Vader. His wife Padme gives birth to twins, Luke and Leia Skywalker.
  • Episode IV: Darth Vader, comes into conflict with his children, Luke Skywalker and the Princess Leia.
  • Episode V: Darth Vader attempts to coax his son Luke over to the dark side, and reveals to Luke that he is his father.
  • Episode VI: Luke learns that Leia is his sister, and takes on the task of bringing Darth Vader back from the Dark Side in order to save the Galaxy. Vader saves his son from the Emperor’s evil grip, dying in the process, but his spirit ends up alongside the spirits of Yoda and Obi-Wan. They all live happily ever after …

43. List-ending phrase : ET ALIAE

Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact “et al.” can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

44. Weighed, in a way, as a container : TARED

Tare is the weight of a container that is deducted from the gross weight to determine the net weight, the weight of the container’s contents.

47. University in Montreal : MCGILL

McGill University is a school in Montreal that was founded in 1821. The university was formed from the preexisting McGill College that had been established using a grant from Montreal merchant James McGill.

48. Seniors’ org. : AARP

“AARP” is now the official name for the interest group that used to be called the American Association of Retired Persons. The name change reflects the current focus of the group on all Americans aged 50 or over, as opposed to just people who have retired.

50. ___ Heights : GOLAN

Geographically speaking, the Golan Heights is a plateau in the Middle East with the western two-thirds of its area falling within Israel, and the eastern third falling within Syria. The name Golan Heights also applies to the geopolitical region that was captured from Syria during the Six-Day War of 1967 and occupied by Israel.

51. Mild cheese : EDAM

Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

56. Famous password stealer : ALI BABA

In the folk tale “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves”, the title character is a poor woodcutter who discovers the magic words “open sesame”, which open the thieves’ den.

66. Shipping center : UPS STORE

The franchised UPS Stores make up the world’s largest network of retail shipping, printing and business service centers. The first such outlets were branded and owned by Mail Boxes Etc., starting in 1980. UPS acquired Mail Boxes Etc. in 2001, and introduced the UPS Store brand in 2003. I’m a big fan …

67. French film award : CESAR

The César Award is the national film award of France. The first César was awarded in 1975, named after the French sculptor César Baldaccini. The awards themselves are reproductions of an actual Baldaccini sculpture.

68. Some pears : BOSCS

Bosc is a cultivar of the European pear grown in the northwest of the United States. The Bosc is that pear with a skin the color of a potato, with a long neck. I always seem to use the potato as my point of reference. How Irish am I …?

77. One with a large bill at breakfast? : TOUCAN SAM

Toucan Sam is the mascot of Kellogg’s Froot Loops breakfast cereal, and he can be seen on the front of every box. Froot Loops have been manufactured by Kellogg’s since 1963. The little loops come in different colors, originally red, orange and yellow, but now there are green, purple and blue loops as well. Notice I said “different colors” not “different flavors”. Each loop tastes the same, so I wonder where the color comes from …?

78. Ones stationed at home : UMPS

That would be baseball.

80. McDonald’s slogan introduced in 2003 : I’M LOVIN’ IT

The original McDonald’s restaurant was opened in 1940 by Richard and Maurice McDonald as a barbecue restaurant. The brothers then moved into fast food hamburgers, eventually selling out to one of their franchise agents, Ray Kroc. It was Ray Kroc who really led the company to its worldwide success. He was played by Michael Keaton in the movie about Ray Kroc’s business life called “The Founder”.

82. URL ending : GOV

Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

The .gov domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

  • .com (commercial enterprise)
  • .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
  • .mil (US military)
  • .org (not-for-profit organization)
  • .gov (US federal government entity)
  • .edu (college-level educational institution)

86. Businesswoman Huffington : ARIANNA

“The Huffington Post” is a news website founded in 2005 by Arianna Huffington. It is a very active site, with 3,000 people contributing blog posts (including many celebrities and politicians), and readers leaving over one million comments every month. “The Huffington Post” was sold to AOL in 2011 for $315 million, with Arianna Huffington staying on as editor-in-chief.

99. 2006 film with massive profits in related toy sales : CARS

“Cars” is a 2006 animated feature from Pixar. The great cast of voice actors includes Paul Newman in his last movie role before he passed away in 2008.

100. One of Mr. Poe’s children in a Lemony Snicket book : EDGAR

Lemony Snicket is a pen name used by Daniel Handler, a novelist from San Francisco, California. Snicket also appears as the narrator of his books, including the best known of the works: “A Series of Unfortunate Events”. Count Olaf is the antagonist in “A Series of Unfortunate Events”.

106. Blue side, for short : DEMS

On political maps, red states are usually Republican and blue states usually Democrat. The designation of red and blue states is a very recent concept, only introduced in the 2000 presidential election by TV journalist, the late Tim Russert. In retrospect, the choice of colors is surprising, as in other democracies around the world red is usually used to describe left-leaning socialist parties (the reds under the bed!), and blue is used for conservative right-wing parties. In election cycles, swing/battleground states are often depicted in purple.

108. Fraud : SHAM

A sham is something that is imitation, fake. In the world of bed linens, a sham is also an imitation or fake, in the sense that it is a decorative cover designed to cover up a regular pillow used for sleeping.

111. ___ de guerre : NOM

“Nom de guerre” is a French term meaning “name of war”. It describes the practice of adopting a pseudonym when in a conflict, perhaps to protect family or to symbolize a separation between one’s life in the military and as a civilian. The term originates with the French Foreign Legion, where recruits routinely adopted noms de guerre as they broke with their past lives and started afresh.

112. French connections : ETS

“Et” is French for “and”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Sports figures : STATS
6. Words said through a car window : HOP IN
11. The Land Shark’s show, for short : SNL
14. Throw (together) : SLAP
18. Fervor : ARDOR
19. Reno’s county : WASHOE
20. It may come hot or iced : TEA
21. ___ Modern : TATE
22. This clue’s 110-Across, timewise : MIDNIGHT HOUR (12)
24. Not definitely going to happen : EVITABLE
26. Furry, red TV character : ELMO
27. Young actress who played two main characters in “The Parent Trap” : LOHAN
28. This clue’s 110-Across, at the Olympics : DIVER’S GOAL (10)
30. Flipped (through) : LEAFED
32. Former executive with the same interior letters as his company : EISNER
34. As such : PER SE
35. Compete (for) : VIE
36. Opposite of blanc : NOIR
38. N.Y.C. attraction : MOMA
40. “I love her ten times more than ___ I did”: Shak. : E’ER
41. Large amount : OCEAN
44. Steak ___ : TARTARE
46. End of the sci-fi film titles “First Man …” and “Last Days …” : ON MARS
49. This clue’s 110-Across, as is relevant each November : VOTING AGE IN AMERICA (18)
52. Assessment: Abbr. : EVAL
53. Mork’s boss on “Mork & Mindy” : ORSON
54. Branching point : NODE
55. Leave one’s mark? : GRADE
59. Bro or sis: Abbr. : REL
60. Phillies’ div. : NLE
61. Staple of Southern cuisine : OKRA
62. One after whom a Times Square museum is named : RIPLEY
63. Prefix with -mester : TRI-
64. This clue’s 110-Across, to the superstitious : BAD LUCK SYMBOL (13)
69. Martinique, par exemple : ILE
70. Words of adulation : I’M A FAN
72. Mimics : APES
73. Temple athlete : OWL
74. Clear, as a table : BUS
75. Jordan who directed “Get Out” : PEELE
76. Feline’s warning : HISS
77. Home of Oral Roberts University : TULSA
80. Shakespearean plotter : IAGO
81. This clue’s 110-Across, in chemistry : ARGON’S ATOMIC NUMBER (18)
85. Return fee? : RANSOM
87. Moving companies? : TROUPES
88. Unit of grass : BLADE
89. Article in a German paper : DER
90. Quash : VETO
92. State sch. on the Pacific Coast : UCSD
93. Co. leader : CEO
94. Beethoven dedicatee : ELISE
97. Pat of “The Karate Kid” : MORITA
99. Thanksgiving role : CARVER
102. This clue’s 110-Across, in terms of attractiveness : REAL LOOKER (10)
104. 2017 U.S. Open winner : NADAL
107. 13th or 15th : IDES
109. “My word!” : MAN ALIVE!
110. Something to count to understand 22-, 28-, 49-, 64-, 81- and 102-Across : ANSWER LENGTH
113. “___ It Romantic?” : ISN’T
114. Designer Maya : LIN
115. Dramatic battle cry : TO ARMS!
116. Ornamental crown : TIARA
117. Rising concerns in modern times? : SEAS
118. “You rang?” : YES?
119. Primetime ___ : EMMYS
120. Sen. Thurmond : STROM

Down

1. “Me too!!!” : SAME!!!
2. Warble : TRILL
3. Snapchat request : ADD ME
4. Uselessly : TO NO AVAIL
5. ___ Lanka : SRI
6. Has in an old form? : HATH
7. Labor agcy. : OSHA
8. Perform perfunctorily : PHONE IT IN
9. Debt note : IOU
10. Certain high school clique : NERDS
11. One of the stuntmen on “Jackass” : STEVE-O
12. Old-fashioned “That’s absolutely the last time” : NEVERMORE
13. The Lonely Mountain, for Smaug : LAIR
14. Play place : STAGE
15. Worker : LABORER
16. Place holders? : ATLASES
17. Kitchen tool : PEELER
19. “___ have thought …” : WHO’D
23. Giddy happiness : GLEE
25. Recipe amt. : TSP
29. As far as one can recall : IN MEMORY
31. Hero role in “The Force Awakens” : FINN
33. Country whose name is also a two-word sentence : IRAN
36. Badgers : NAGS
37. Crumbled froyo topping : OREO
39. Nickname for a young Darth Vader : ANI
41. Be really generous to a waiter : OVERTIP
42. Words before “I’m going in” : COVER ME
43. List-ending phrase : ET ALIAE
44. Weighed, in a way, as a container : TARED
45. Orders : RANKS
47. University in Montreal : MCGILL
48. Seniors’ org. : AARP
50. ___ Heights : GOLAN
51. Mild cheese : EDAM
56. Famous password stealer : ALI BABA
57. Inundated : DELUGED
58. Trash-filled lot, e.g. : EYESORE
60. Shooting stars? : NBAERS
61. Green lights : OKS
62. Mountain ash : ROWAN
65. Been in bed : LAIN
66. Shipping center : UPS STORE
67. French film award : CESAR
68. Some pears : BOSCS
71. Custardy dessert : FLAN
76. Family Night entertainment : HOME MOVIE
77. One with a large bill at breakfast? : TOUCAN SAM
78. Ones stationed at home : UMPS
79. Told stories : LIED
80. McDonald’s slogan introduced in 2003 : I’M LOVIN’ IT
82. URL ending : GOV
83. Push : TOUT
84. Ride option : UBER
85. Hollywood news : RELEASE
86. Businesswoman Huffington : ARIANNA
89. Layer of skin : DERMIS
91. Wooden nickels, e.g. : TOKENS
93. Give a ring : CALL
95. Blind parts : SLATS
96. Right-angle shape : ELL
98. Fit to be tied : IRATE
99. 2006 film with massive profits in related toy sales : CARS
100. One of Mr. Poe’s children in a Lemony Snicket book : EDGAR
101. Back in : RETRO
103. Oleaginous : OILY
105. Wrong : AWRY
106. Blue side, for short : DEMS
108. Fraud : SHAM
111. ___ de guerre : NOM
112. French connections : ETS