1102-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 2 Nov 14, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Brendan Emmett Quigley
THEME: BP Station … today’s themed answers sounds like well-known phrases, but with B-sounds replaced with P-sounds:

23A. Engraving on an award? : PLAQUE ART (from “black art”)
29A. Food critic’s love of fast food, maybe? : SECRET PALATE (from “secret ballot”)
48A. Collector of offerings at a revival? : CHRISTIAN PAIL (from “Christian Bale”)
55A. Waterway of Western Australia? : PERTH CANAL (from “birth canal”)
79A. Admonishment to someone eating off your plate at a Polynesian restaurant? : THAT’S MY POI (from “that’s my boy”)
85A. What’s promising about a K-K-Q-Q-J-J-7 rummy hand? : THE THREE PAIRS (from “The Three Bears”)
108A. Buzzer beaters and game-winning catches? : PLAYS OF GLORY (from “blaze of glory”)
118A. Place to reel in some freshwater game fish? : PERCH PIER (from “birch beer”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 29m 58s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Chase things, briefly? : CDS
A certificate of deposit (CD) is like a less-flexible and higher-paying savings account. Instead of depositing money into a savings account and earning interest periodically, one can open a CD. With a CD one deposits a minimum amount of money but must leave it there for a specified length of time. In return for committing the funds for a fixed period, one is given a higher interest rate than a savings account and can redeem that interest and the initial deposit when the term has expired. CDs are relatively low-risk investments as they are FDIC insured, just like savings accounts.

The original Chase National Bank was formed in 1877. Although he had no connection with the bank, it was named for the former US Treasury Secretary Salmon P. Chase.

20. Mark down anew : RELOG
The word “logbook” dates back to the days when the captain of a ship kept a daily record of the vessel’s speed, progress etc. using a “log”. A log was a wooden float on a knotted line that was dropped overboard to measure speed through the water.

21. Baby with a bow : AMOR
Cupid, the Greek god of desire, was also known as Amor. “Cupido” is Latin for “desire” and “amor” is Latin for “love”.

22. Ruthless Wall Street sort : RAIDER
The business strategy known as “corporate raiding” really is pretty ruthless and short sighted (excuse my being judgmental). The idea is to buy a large interest in a corporation, sometimes “stealthily”, by buying up a significant number of voting shares. Then, the raider uses the power of the voting rights to convince other voters to change the way the company is run, purely to increase the share price in the relatively short term. The changes often involve replacement of the management team, downsizing and even liquidation of the company, all for short term, personal gain. Corporate raider, Gordon Gekko said in the 1987 movie “Wall Street”, “greed is good”, but I wonder is he right?

25. Kahakuloa Head locale : MAUI
Kahakuloa Head is located on the north shore of Maui. It is a remote spot, only accessible by a relatively hazardous road.

27. Cookware item : OLLA
An olla is a traditional clay pot used for the making of stews. “Olla” was the Latin word used in Ancient Rome to describe a similar type of pot.

28. Middle ground, for short : DMZ
A demilitarized zone (DMZ) is usually a border between two countries where military activity is banned according to some treaty between interested parties. The most famous DMZ today has to be the buffer zone between North and South Korea. The Korean DMZ snakes right across the Korean peninsula near the 38th parallel. The centerline of the DMZ is where the front was when the ceasefire came into effect in 1953 after the Korean War. According to the armistice signed, all troops had to move back 2,000 meters from the front line on both sides, creating the DMZ that is in place today. Paradoxically perhaps, the areas on either side of the DMZ form the most heavily militarized border in the world.

33. Winter pear : BOSC
Bosc is a cultivar of the European Pear grown in the northwest of the United States. The Bosc is that pear with a skin the color of a potato, with a long neck. I always seem to use the potato as my point of reference. How Irish am I …?

35. Embarrassing spot? : ZIT
The slang term “zit”, meaning “a pimple”, came into the language in 1966, but no one seems to know its exact derivation.

36. James Joyce’s “Ulysses,” per a 1921 court decision : SMUT
Regular readers will know that I am unashamedly supportive of my native Irish culture, but I have to tell you that I can’t handle the works of James Joyce. I have spent many a fine day traipsing around Ireland learning about his life, but I have yet to appreciate one of his books. To me, his life is more absorbing than his writing. Having said that, “Ulysses” is an interesting novel in that it chronicles just one ordinary day in the life of a Dubliner named Leopold Bloom. There’s a huge celebration of “Ulysses” in Dublin every year on June 16th, called Bloomsday. The festivities vary from readings and performances of the storyline, to good old pub crawls. “Ulysses” was made into a film of the same name in 1967 starring Milo O’Shea. Back in 1921 however, the book was effectively banned in the US after a New YOrk court declared the magazine in which was serialized was declared obscene. The US Post Office burned many copies of the novel throughout the 1920s, until the US became the first English-speaking country where the book became freely available.

37. Juliet’s combative cousin in “Romeo and Juliet” : TYBALT
In William Shakespeare’s play “Romeo and Juliet”, the main antagonist of the piece is Tybalt, who is a very combative cousin of Juliet and a sworn enemy of Romeo.

43. “___ Is the Glory” (hymn) : THINE
“Thine Is the Glory” is an 1884 hymn with words by Swiss hymn writer Edmond Louis Budry, set to music from the oratorio “Judas Maccabaeus” by George Frideric Handel.

46. Former G.M. compact : ALERO
The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made under the Oldsmobile brand. The Alero was produced from 1999 to 2004.

47. Track star Al : JOYNER
Al Joyner is a former athlete, a triple jump gold medalist at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles. Joyner won the Jim Thorpe award as the top American male in the field events. Al’s sister is the athlete Jackie Joyner-Kersee, also an Olympic gold medalist.

48. Collector of offerings at a revival? : CHRISTIAN PAIL (from “Christian Bale”)
Christian Bale is an actor from Wales in the UK, although he is better known for his work on this side of the Atlantic. Bale’s big break in movies came in 1987 when whe on the starring role in Spielberg’s “Empire of the Sun” at only 13 years of age. He has also played Batman three times, in “Batman Begins” (2005), “The Dark Knight” (2008) and “The Dark Knight Rises” (2012).

52. Part of an e-tailer’s address : COM
“Etail” is the term used these days for online shopping. Etail is often compared to regular shopping in the “real world” by juxtaposing it with a “brick and mortar” store.

53. Mideast land, for short : UAE
The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a federation of seven emirates (states) in the Middle East. Included in the seven are Abu Dhabi and Dubai, with the city of Abu Dhabi being the UAE capital and cultural center.

55. Waterway of Western Australia? : PERTH CANAL (from “birth canal”)
Perth is the capital city of Western Australia. Perth earned itself the nickname of “City of Light” in 1962 as the virtually all the town’s lights were turned on at full power when astronaut John Glenn passed overhead in earth orbit in Friendship 7, so that he could see the city below. The city gave a repeat performance for Glenn in 1998 when he passed overhead in the Space Shuttle in 1998.

61. Melville’s “Billy ___” : BUDD
“Billy Budd” is a novella by American author Herman Melville. However, Melville didn’t actually finish “Billy Budd” before he died in 1891.

63. Montréal airport : MIRABEL
When Montréal–Mirabel International Airport opened in 1975, it was the largest airport in the world in terms of surface area. Mirabel has been relegated to a cargo airport as it is located almost 25 miles northwest of Montreal, and that has proven to be too far to attract passengers and passenger airlines.

66. How the Taj Mahal is decorated : ORNATELY
The most famous mausoleum in the world has to be the Taj Mahal in Agra, India. The Taj Mahal was built after the death of the third wife of Shah Jahan, Mumtaz Mahal (hence the name of the mausoleum). The poor woman died in childbirth delivering the couple’s 14th child.

69. Subject of the mnemonic “My very eager mother just served us nachos” : PLANETS
There are several mnemonics used to remember the planets and the order in which they are found in the Solar System. One example is “My Very Easy Method Just Shows Us Nine Planets” which doesn’t really work since Pluto was relegated from “planethood”. The most oft-quoted mnemonic for the eight planets is “My Very Eager Mother Just Served Us Nachos”. Given the relegation of Pluto, I kind of like “Many Very Educated Men Just Screwed Up Nature”.

72. When Prospero makes his entrance : SCENE TWO
William Shakespeare’s play “The Tempest” tells the story of Prospero, who was removed from the throne of Milan and banished to a deserted island along with his daughter Miranda. Prospero learns sorcery while cast away, and eventually conjures up a tempest that drives those who usurped his throne onto the island’s shores (in particular his own brother, Antonio). On the island, Prospero is eventually successful in revealing Antonio’s lowly nature.

78. Billy of “Titanic” : ZANE
Billy Zane is an actor from Chicago, Illinois. One of Zane’s most prominent roles was the title character in the 1996 superhero film called “The Phantom”. He also played the somewhat creepy bad guy in the 1989 thriller movie called “Dead Calm”.

79. Admonishment to someone eating off your plate at a Polynesian restaurant? : THAT’S MY POI (from “that’s my boy”)
Nowadays the word “luau” denotes almost any kind of party on the Hawaiian Islands, but to the purist a luau is a feast that always includes a serving of “poi”, the bulbous underground stems of taro baked with coconut milk.

81. Actress Davis : GEENA
As well as being a successful Hollywood actress, Geena Davis is an accomplished archer and came close to qualifying for the US archery team for the 2000 Summer Olympics. Davis is also a member of American Mensa. She is quite the lady …

83. Jeans name : LEE
The Lee company famous for making jeans was formed in 1889, by one Henry David Lee in Salina, Kansas.

84. Eastern path : TAO
The Chinese character “tao” translates as “path”, but the concept of Tao signifies the true nature of the world.

85. What’s promising about a K-K-Q-Q-J-J-7 rummy hand? : THE THREE PAIRS (from “The Three Bears”)
The story of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” was first recorded in 1837, in England, although the narrative was around before it was actually written down. The original fairy tale was rather gruesome, but successive versions became more family-oriented. The character that eventually became Goldilocks was originally an elderly woman, and the three “nameless” bears became Papa Bear, Mama Bear and Baby Bear.

89. Quarantine : SHUT IN
The original use of our word “quarantine” back in the 1500s was as a legal term. A quarantine was the 40 days in which a widow had the legal right to reside in her dead husband’s house.

93. Blitzed, e.g. : RAN AT
The maneuver in American football known as “the blitz” was supposedly first used in 1957 by the San Francisco 49ers. Back in the early sixties, blitzes were called “Red Dogs”, a term coined by 49er announcer Bob Fouts after his Irish Setter pet dog.

94. Battery element : ZINC
A battery is a device that converts chemical energy into electric energy. A simple battery is made up of three parts: a cathode, an anode and a liquid electrolyte. Ions from the electrolyte react chemically with the material in the anode producing a compound and releasing electrons. At the same time, the electrolyte reacts with the material in the cathode, absorbing electrons and producing a different chemical compound. In this way, there is a buildup of electrons at the anode and a deficit of electrons at the cathode. When a connection (wire, say) is made between the cathode and anode, electrons flow through the resulting circuit from the anode to cathode in an attempt to rectify the electron imbalance.

95. Skater on the Hollywood Walk of Fame : HENIE
Sonja Henie was a World and Olympic Champion figure skater from Norway from the days when “amateur” sports stars were not paid. Henie made up for her lack of income from competing by developing a career in Hollywood. She was one of highest-paid film stars at the height of her movie career.

96. Brother’s home : CLOISTER
Cloisters are usually such beautifully peaceful areas. They are found as part of religious buildings in particular. Cloisters are rectangular open spaces surrounded by covered walkways that are attached to other structures.

99. Jane of “Frasier” : LEEVES
Jane Leeves is an English actress who had her big break in the US with a recurring role on the TV show “Murphy Brown”. Leeves hit the big time when she was cast as Daphne Moon on the hit sitcom “Frasier”. “Frasier’ co-star Peri Gilpin (who played “Roz”) is the godmother of Leeve’s daughter Isabella. Leeves, in turn, is godmother of Gilpin’s daughter Stella. And, Leeve and Gilpin are next door neighbors in Los Angeles.

104. Quisling : RAT
We use the word “quisling” for a person who is a collaborator with enemy forces during wartime. The term comes from Norwegian Vidkun Quisling, who led a regime during WWII that collaborated with the occupying Nazi forces.

105. Classic glam band named for an extinct creature : T REX
I remember the days of glam rock so well, as it was a hugely popular genre of music in the British Isles during the early seventies. Artistes wore the wildest of clothes, big hair, shiny outfits and really high platform boots. Names associated with glam rock are T. Rex, David Bowie, Roxy Music and Gary Glitter.

113. Dramatic ending? : CEE
The word “dramatic” ends with a letter C (cee).

115. ___ Major : URSA
The constellation called Ursa Major (Latin for “Larger Bear”) is often just called the Big Dipper because of its resemblance to a ladle or dipper. Ursa Major also resembles a plow, and that’s what we usually call the same constellation back in Ireland: the “plough”.

117. Chaplin of “Game of Thrones” : OONA
Oona Chaplin is an actress from Madrid in Spain. Chaplin is getting a lot of airtime these days as she plays Talisa Maegyr on HBO’s hit fantasy series “Game of Thrones”. Oona is the granddaughter of Charlie Chaplin, and is named for her maternal grandmother Oona O’Neill. the daughter of playwright Eugene O’Neill.

118. Place to reel in some freshwater game fish? : PERCH PIER (from “birch beer”)
Birch beer is a carbonated soft drink with a flavor that is similar to root beer. The tradition of making birch beer dates back to colonial times. A key ingredient is birch sap, hence the name.

121. Electric Chevy : VOLT
Despite being late entering the eco-friendly car market, Chevrolet today produces the most fuel-efficient compact car with a gasoline engine that is sold in the US. The Chevrolet Volt went on sale at the end of 2010, a plug-in hybrid car that runs on batteries. The Volt has a gasoline engine that can be used run an electric generator if needed. The Volt also uses a regenerative braking system similar to that on my Honda Civic Hybrid, a car that I really love.

125. ___ terrier : SKYE
The Skye terrier is a breed of dog that is actually under threat of extinction. A few years ago there were only 30 Skye terriers born in the breed’s native land of the UK.

126. Meeting point : NEXUS
A nexus is a means of connection, or a center where many connections come together. “Nexus” is a Latin word meaning “that which ties or binds together”. The Latin “nexus” is the past participle of the verb “nectere” meaning “to bind”.

Down
1. Breakfast cereal pioneer : CW POST
C. W. Post decided to get into the cereal business after visiting the Battle Creek Sanitarium operated by John Harvey Kellogg. Post was interested in the chemistry of digestion and was inspired by the dietary products offered by Kellogg at his sanitarium. The first breakfast cereal Post introduced was Grape Nuts, way back in 1897.

2. Mrs. Madison : DOLLEY
Dolley Madison was the wife of President James Madison. Dolly’s maiden name was Payne, and her first marriage was to a Quaker lawyer named John Todd. The couple had two children, two boys. Sadly, husband and youngest son died in a yellow fever epidemic in 1793. 43-year-old James Madison married the 26-year-old widow the following year. The Madisons moved to Washington in 1800 when James was appointed as Secretary of State in the Jefferson administration. Dolley often served as First Lady at social functions for the president, as Thomas Jefferson was a widower. James Madison succeeded Jefferson as US President in 1809, and Dolley became the official First Lady.

3. Old Navy work site : SEALAB
SEALAB I, II and II were man-made habitats built by the US Navy designed to advance the technology needed for humans to live and work underwater for extended periods. SEALAB I was lowered to a depth of just under 200 feet off the coast of Bermuda in 1964. Four divers stayed in SEALAB for 11 days, before the experiment was halted due to the approach of a tropical storm.

4. French vineyard : CRU
“Cru” is a term used in the French wine industry that means “growth place”. So, “cru” is the name of the location where the grapes are grown, as opposed to the name of a specific vineyard. The terms “premier cru” and “grand cru” are also used, but the usage depends on the specific wine region. Generally it is a classification awarded to specific vineyards denoting their potential for producing great wines. “Grand cru” is reserved for the very best vineyards, with “premier cru” the level just below.

7. Hunting dog : BORZOI
The borzoi breed of dog looks like a hairy version of a greyhound. The borzoi is also known as the Russian wolfhound.

8. Pepper, for one : SGT
Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band was the alter-ego of the Beatles and was the title of a famous studio album released in 1967.

10. Apple offering : IMAC
The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an “all-in-one” design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such strawberry, blueberry and lime.

12. Relief work : FRIEZE
A frieze is an architectural feature found in many Roman and Greek buildings. Inside a room, frieze is the name given to the upper part of the wall, between the picture rail and the crown molding. Outside of a room, the term frieze is the name given to any extended decoration that is positioned above eye level. Perhaps the most famous frieze comes from the Parthenon in Athens. Over a third of this highly decorated feature was removed from Athens and taken to London in the early 1800s by the Earl of Elgin, where they remain on display in the British Museum. These famous “Elgin Marbles” are subject of much controversy as the legality of the removal is in dispute.

14. ___ Point, Calif. : DANA
Dana Point is a city in Southern California that was named for the nearby headland of Dana Point. The headland was in turn named for Richard Henry Dana, Jr., author of the famous memoir “Two Years Before the Mast”. In his memoir, Dana described the area around the headland as “the only romantic spot on the coast”.

16. 1970s president : IDI AMIN
Idi Amin received most of his military training in the British armed forces, eventually achieving the highest rank possible for a Black African in the British Colonial Army in 1959, that of Warrant Officer. On his return to Uganda Amin joined his country’s military and quickly rose to the rank of Deputy Commander of the Army. During that time he was quite the athlete. He was a noted rugby player and swimmer, and for nine years held the Ugandan national light-heavyweight boxing title. By the early seventies, Amin was commander of all the armed forces of Uganda and in 1971 seized power in a military coup, displacing the country’s president Milton Obote. There followed seven years of brutal rule by Amin during which it is estimated that between 100,000 and 500,000 people were murdered. Amin was ousted from power in 1979 after a war with Tanzania, and fled to Libya where he stayed for a year. He then moved to Saudi Arabia, where he was financially supported by the Saudi Royal Family for the remainder of his life. Amin died in 2003.

17. Astronomical body after which element #93 is named : NEPTUNE
Neptune is the farthest planet from the Sun in our Solar System. The existence of Neptune was predicted as early as the 1820s by mathematics based on observations of the orbit of Uranus. The planet was actually first observed in 1846.

Neptunium is the chemical element with the atomic number 92 and the element symbol Np. Neptunium is radioactive and is found in nature is very small amounts in uranium ore. Neptunium lies right next to uranium (at. no. 92) in the periodic table. Given that uranium was named for the planet Uranus, element number 93 was named for the planet Neptune.

24. Like Al Jazeera : QATARI
Al Jazeera is an independent news service owned by the state of Qatar. Since 2006, Al Jazeera has been broadcasting an English language channel, hiring many top journalists from American news outlets. “Al jazeera” is Arabic for “the island”.

38. Channing of “22 Jump Street” : TATUM
One of the main roles that Channing Tatum is known for is G.I. Joe in the movies “G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra” (2009) and “G.I. Joe: Retaliation” (2013). More recently, Channing starred in the film “21 Jump Street” (2012) and “22 Jump Street” (2014).

40. Common Core org. : NEA
The Common Core State Standards Initiative lays out what K-12 students should know in English and mathematics. The standard is intended to standardize requirements across all states.

The National Education Association (NEA) is the largest labor union in the country, and mainly represents public school teachers.

42. Fish often prepared with a meunière sauce : SOLE
Meunière sauce is a relatively simple sauce that is primarily served with fish. The ingredients are brown butter, chopped parsley and lemon. The simplicity of the recipe is reflected in its name, which means “miller’s wife”.

43. Rake : TOMCAT
A “rake” (short for “rakehell”) is a man who is habituated to immoral conduct (isn’t it always the man??!!). The rake is a character who turns up frequently in novels and films, only interested in wine, women and song and not accepting the responsibilities of life. Good examples would be Wickham in Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” and Daniel Cleaver (the Hugh Grant part) in the movie “Bridget Jones’s Diary”. “Rake” comes from the Old Norse “reikall”, meaning “vagrant or a wanderer”.

45. Puccini seamstress : MIMI
“La bohème” by Giacomo Puccini is the second most frequently performed opera in the US (after Puccini’s “Madama Butterfly”). The lead female role in the piece is Mimì, a seamstress.

47. Facilities : JOHN
Hans Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn’t the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both “Hans” and “Jean” translate into English as “John”. In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. He was sent home …

48. Picasso, e.g. : CUBIST
In the art movement known as Cubism, objects which are the subject of a painting are broken up and reassembled in an abstract form. The pioneers of the Cubist movement were Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque.

50. Mellow, faintly sweet hot beverage : RED TEA
Red tea is made from the leaves of the South African Rooibos plant.

58. Many a Sherpa : NEPALI
In the Tibetan language, Sherpa means “eastern people” (sher = east, pa = people). Sherpas are an ethnic group from Nepal, but the name is also used for the local guides who assist mountaineers in the Himalayas, and particularly on Mount Everest.

59. Big name in campers : ALINER
Aliner is a line of trailed popup campers that have a clever A-frame construction when erected.

60. Schools after collèges : LYCEES
The “lycée” is the last stage of secondary education in France.

64. Show tune with the repeated line “Come to me, come to me!” : BALI HA’I
The song “Bali Ha’i” is from the musical “South Pacific” by Rodgers and Hammerstein. In the musical, Bali Ha’i is the name of a volcanic island that neighbors the island on which the story takes place.

68. Certain terrier, informally : WESTIE
The West Highland White Terrier is a cute-looking little white dog from Scotland. The “Westie” looks very much like a related breed, the little black Scottish Terrier. The two breeds can be seen sitting side-by-side on the famous label of Black & White Scotch whisky.

73. Laundering investigator, for short : T-MAN
A T-man is a law-enforcement agent of the US Treasury (the “T” stands for Treasury).

74. Its motto is “Equal rights”: Abbr. : WYO
Wyoming is nicknamed the “Equality State”, and the state’s motto is “equal rights”. Wyoming was the first state to give women the vote, and to allow women on juries. It was also the first state to have a female governor, Nellie Tayloe Ross, who took office in 1925.

82. It’s breath-taking : APNEA
Sleep apnea (“apnoea” in British English) can be caused by an obstruction in the airways, possibly due to obesity or enlarged tonsils.

86. One-striper: Abbr. : ENS
Ensign is (usually) the most junior rank of commissioned officer in the armed forces. The name comes from the tradition that the junior officer would be given the task of carrying the ensign flag.

88. Hand with two bullets and two deuces, e.g. : ACES UP
A poker hand with two pairs is usually referred to as “two pair”. However, is one of the pairs is aces, the hand is referred to as “aces up”.

90. End of a shift? : HEMLINE
A shift is a dress that is cut above-the-knee and has no clearly-defined waist. This style of dress originated in the 1920s when it was worn by the “flappers”, young women who defied social norms at the time. The shift was comfortable to wear and allowed easy movement, particularly on the dance floor.

100. Manly : VIRILE
“Vir” is the Latin word for “man” and is the root of our word “virile”, for example, meaning “manly”.

104. Roping event : RODEO
“Rodeo” is a Spanish word, which is usually translated as “round up”.

106. Duplicate : XEROX
A xerox is a copy made on a xerograph machine. Xerography is a dry photocopying technique that was invented in 1938 by Chester Carlson, although he originally referred to the process as electrophotography.

114. Neutral color : ECRU
The shade called ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word “ecru” comes from French and means “raw, unbleached”. “Ecru” has the same roots as our word “crude”.

118. Greek god of the wild : PAN
In Greek mythology, Pan was a lecherous god, one who fell in love with Echo the mountain nymph. Echo refused Pan’s advances so that he became very angry. Pan’s anger created a “panic” (a word derived from the name “Pan”) and a group of shepherds were driven to kill Echo.

119. Billie Holiday’s “___ Funny That Way” : HE’S
Billie Holiday was a jazz singer from Philadelphia. Holiday had a tough life, which she described in her 1956 autobiography “Lady Sings the Blues”. She recorded an album, also called “Lady sings the Blues”, that was released at the same time as the autobiography. The book was the bases of the 1972 film of the same name starring Diana Ross in the title role.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Chase things, briefly? : CDS
4. Complainers : CRABS
9. Spat : TIFF
13. Landscaping task : EDGING
19. Ill : WOE
20. Mark down anew : RELOG
21. Baby with a bow : AMOR
22. Ruthless Wall Street sort : RAIDER
23. Engraving on an award? : PLAQUE ART (from “black art”)
25. Kahakuloa Head locale : MAUI
26. Green, say : UNRIPE
27. Cookware item : OLLA
28. Middle ground, for short : DMZ
29. Food critic’s love of fast food, maybe? : SECRET PALATE (from “secret ballot”)
31. Stadium capacity : SEATS
33. Winter pear : BOSC
35. Embarrassing spot? : ZIT
36. James Joyce’s “Ulysses,” per a 1921 court decision : SMUT
37. Juliet’s combative cousin in “Romeo and Juliet” : TYBALT
39. “Down in front!” : I CAN’T SEE!
43. “___ Is the Glory” (hymn) : THINE
44. Go exploring, say : ROAM
46. Former G.M. compact : ALERO
47. Track star Al : JOYNER
48. Collector of offerings at a revival? : CHRISTIAN PAIL (from “Christian Bale”)
52. Part of an e-tailer’s address : COM
53. Mideast land, for short : UAE
54. Sticky : HUMID
55. Waterway of Western Australia? : PERTH CANAL (from “birth canal”)
61. Melville’s “Billy ___” : BUDD
63. Montréal airport : MIRABEL
66. How the Taj Mahal is decorated : ORNATELY
67. Following behind : IN TOW
69. Subject of the mnemonic “My very eager mother just served us nachos” : PLANETS
71. Message board thread : TOPIC
72. When Prospero makes his entrance : SCENE TWO
75. “All right already!” : LET IT GO!
78. Billy of “Titanic” : ZANE
79. Admonishment to someone eating off your plate at a Polynesian restaurant? : THAT’S MY POI (from “that’s my boy”)
81. Actress Davis : GEENA
83. Jeans name : LEE
84. Eastern path : TAO
85. What’s promising about a K-K-Q-Q-J-J-7 rummy hand? : THE THREE PAIRS (from “The Three Bears”)
89. Quarantine : SHUT IN
93. Blitzed, e.g. : RAN AT
94. Battery element : ZINC
95. Skater on the Hollywood Walk of Fame : HENIE
96. Brother’s home : CLOISTER
99. Jane of “Frasier” : LEEVES
103. Foreshadowing : OMEN
104. Quisling : RAT
105. Classic glam band named for an extinct creature : T REX
107. Part of some fusion cuisine : ASIAN
108. Buzzer beaters and game-winning catches? : PLAYS OF GLORY (from “blaze of glory”)
113. Dramatic ending? : CEE
115. ___ Major : URSA
116. Like some sheets : FITTED
117. Chaplin of “Game of Thrones” : OONA
118. Place to reel in some freshwater game fish? : PERCH PIER (from “birch beer”)
120. Low draw : ONE-ONE
121. Electric Chevy : VOLT
122. Love, love, love : ADORE
123. “Well, I’d love to keep talking …,” probably : LIE
124. Have as a tenant : RENT TO
125. ___ terrier : SKYE
126. Meeting point : NEXUS
127. Discontinue : END

Down
1. Breakfast cereal pioneer : CW POST
2. Mrs. Madison : DOLLEY
3. Old Navy work site : SEALAB
4. French vineyard : CRU
5. Sax, e.g. : REED
6. Like ___ to the slaughter : A LAMB
7. Hunting dog : BORZOI
8. Pepper, for one : SGT
9. PG-rated : TAME
10. Apple offering : IMAC
11. Teatime, maybe : FOUR
12. Relief work : FRIEZE
13. Go off : ERUPT
14. ___ Point, Calif. : DANA
15. Afraid to ask for a dance, maybe : GIRL SHY
16. 1970s president : IDI AMIN
17. Astronomical body after which element #93 is named : NEPTUNE
18. Doorman, e.g. : GREETER
24. Like Al Jazeera : QATARI
29. Place for a massage : SCALP
30. Come out even : TIE
32. Not get carried evenly, say : SLOSH
34. Politician’s downfall : SCANDAL
38. Channing of “22 Jump Street” : TATUM
40. Common Core org. : NEA
41. Rare birth : TRIPLET
42. Fish often prepared with a meunière sauce : SOLE
43. Rake : TOMCAT
45. Puccini seamstress : MIMI
47. Facilities : JOHN
48. Picasso, e.g. : CUBIST
49. Horse’s hindquarter : HAUNCH
50. Mellow, faintly sweet hot beverage : RED TEA
51. Cook without oil, as some corn : AIR POP
52. One snapping a ball to the QB: Abbr. : CTR
56. Club roll : ROSTER
57. Fully : A TO Z
58. Many a Sherpa : NEPALI
59. Big name in campers : ALINER
60. Schools after collèges : LYCEES
62. Terse caution : DON’T!
64. Show tune with the repeated line “Come to me, come to me!” : BALI HA’I
65. Phoenix-to-Albuquerque dir. : ENE
68. Certain terrier, informally : WESTIE
70. More friendly : TIGHTER
73. Laundering investigator, for short : T-MAN
74. Its motto is “Equal rights”: Abbr. : WYO
76. “Oh … come … on!” : GEEZ!
77. William ___ + Co. (brokerage) : O’NEIL
The William O’Neil stock brokeridge firm was formed
80. Sancho’s other : OTRO
82. It’s breath-taking : APNEA
86. One-striper: Abbr. : ENS
87. Cheap-looking : TATTY
88. Hand with two bullets and two deuces, e.g. : ACES UP
89. Try to buy : SHOP FOR
90. End of a shift? : HEMLINE
91. Like food waste : UNEATEN
92. Toddler : TINY TOT
96. School lunchroom, informally : CAF
97. State vices?: Abbr. : LT GOVS
98. Ebb : RECEDE
100. Manly : VIRILE
101. Enter gently : EASE IN
102. Roped in : SNARED
104. Roping event : RODEO
106. Duplicate : XEROX
109. Posted : SENT
110. “Attention!” : LOOK!
111. Kind of child : ONLY
112. Bit of info on the side of a taxi : RATE
114. Neutral color : ECRU
118. Greek god of the wild : PAN
119. Billie Holiday’s “___ Funny That Way” : HE’S

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