1001-17 NY Times Crossword Answers 1 Oct 2017, Sunday

Constructed by: Robert Fisher

Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Syndicated Crossword

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Read Comments/Leave a Comment

Theme: That’s One Way to Put It

Each of today’s themed clues is something negative. The corresponding themed answer puts a positive spin on the clue:

  • 24A. Falling down : TESTING GRAVITY
  • 32A. Speeding ticket : AWARD FOR FAST DRIVING
  • 61A. Lying : ECONOMICAL WITH THE TRUTH
  • 87A. Layoff : CAREER-SHIFT OPPORTUNITY
  • 114A. Tax increase : BUDGET REINFORCEMENT
  • 130A. Dead : POST-RETIREMENT

Bill’s time: 20m 56s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

8. Tight garment : CORSET

A corset is a close-fitting undergarment that is stiffened with a material such as whalebone. Corsets are more usually worn by women, to shape the body. The word “corset” is a diminutive of the Old French “cors” meaning “body”.

22. Blogger’s pick for a pic : AVATAR

The Sanskrit word “avatar” describes the concept of a deity descending into earthly life and taking on a persona. It’s easy to see how in the world of “online presences” one might use the word avatar to describe one’s online identity.

23. Utility worker : LINEMAN

A lineman is a worker who specializes in the rigging and maintenance of telephone and electric power lines. According to the Glen Campbell hit “Wichita Lineman” from 1968, a lonely lineman can be missing his loved one that he hears “singing in the wire”. Presumably, the absent lover can be heard in the vibration caused by the wind blowing through the wires.

26. Mean : AVERAGE

In a set of numbers, the mean is the average value of those numbers. The median is the numeric value at which half the numbers have a lower value, and half the numbers a higher value. The mode is the value that appears most often in the whole set of numbers.

28. Earth goddess : GAIA

In ancient Greek religion, Gaia was the Earth goddess, the mother of everything. The Roman equivalent was the goddess Terra.

29. G.P.A. killers : EFS

Grade point average (GPA)

30. “Sprechen ___ Deutsch?” : SIE

“Sprechen Sie Deutsch?” is the German for “Do you speak German?”

31. Robert of “The Sopranos” : ILER

The actor Robert Iler’s most famous role was A.J., son of mob leader Tony Soprano in HBO’s “The Sopranos”. Apparently Iler’s screen persona has spilled over into his personal life, as he was arrested for armed robbery of two tourists in 2001 (and pleaded guilty to a lesser charge).

40. Ball ___ : PEEN

The peen of a hammer is on the head, and is the side of the head that is opposite the striking surface. Often the peen is in the shape of a hemisphere (as in a ball-peen hammer), but usually it is shaped like a claw (mainly for removing nails).

41. Besmirch : TAR

“Besmirch” is a derivative of “smirch”, with both words meaning to “make dirty”. In particular, to besmirch is to sully someone’s reputation.

43. Climbing Mount Everest, e.g. : ORDEAL

Mount Everest was first summited in 1953 by New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Nepalese sherpa Tenzing Norgay. Hillary and Norgay were part of an expedition from which two pairs of climbers were selected to make a summit attempt. The first pair were Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans, and they came within 330 feet of their goal but had to turn back. The expedition sent up the second pair two days later, and history was made on 29 May 1953.

45. Be Kind to Editors and Writers Mo. [for real!] : SEPT

Yep, September is National Be Kind to Writers and Editors Month. I guess that means “Three cheers for Will Shortz, and for all of the folks who construct our crosswords”. Thank you!

48. Notable features of Stockholm and Amsterdam : CANALS

Stockholm is the capital of Sweden and most populous city in the country. Over one fifth of all Swedish residents live in Stockholm.

Amsterdam is the cultural capital and the commercial capital of the Netherlands, but not the administrative capital. That honor goes to the Hague. Amsterdam’s name translates as “Dam on the river Amstel”.

51. It “exists when one goes against one’s conscience,” per Pope Francis : SIN

Pope Francis was elected on 13 March 2013 as the 266th Bishop of Rome and leader of the Roman Catholic church. The new pope is famously taking a much simpler and more modest approach to the office, as he did with his life back in Argentina. Francis is the first pope since 1903 not to reside in the papal residence, choosing to live instead in the less lavish Vatican guesthouse.

55. D.C. lobby for seniors : AARP

“AARP” is now the official name for the interest group that used to be called the American Association of Retired Persons. The name change reflects the current focus of the group on all Americans aged 50 or over, as opposed to just people who have retired.

57. Locale for two of the Quad Cities : IOWA

The Quad Cities are a group of five cities located on the Iowa-Illinois border and on either side of the Mississippi River. The Iowa cities are Davenport and Bettendorf, and the Illinois cities are Rock Island, Moline and East Moline. The grouping was originally just three cities (Davenport, Rock Island and Moline) and used the name “Tri-Cities”. This changed to “Quad Cities” as East Moline grew to a size comparable to the original three cities. With the growth of Bettendorf, the list of linked cities became five. There has been talk of changing the name to “Quint Cities”, but it doesn’t seem to be catching on.

66. Heat, as to soften metal : ANNEAL

One anneals glass or metal by exposing to a very specific temperature profile, resulting in a tougher or less brittle product.

67. “u r hilarious!” : LMAO

Laughing my a** off (LMAO)

68. How scallops are often prepared : SEARED

A scallop is a marine mollusk that is served as seafood. Scallops are often served baked in milk and this method of preparation has become known as “scalloping”. So, scalloped potatoes are potatoes baked in milk.

69. French horticulturist after whom a variety of fruit is named : BOSC

Bosc is a cultivar of the European pear grown in the northwest of the United States. The Bosc is that pear with a skin the color of a potato, with a long neck. I always seem to use the potato as my point of reference. How Irish am I …?

77. Google ___ : MAPS

Google Maps was developed as a web mapping service for desktops. The (wonderful!) Google Maps mobile app was released in 2008, and is now the most popular smartphone app in the world.

81. Go over in blackjack : BUST

The card game known as “twenty-one” was first referred to in a book by Cervantes, the author famous for writing “Don Quixote”. He called the game “ventiuna” (Spanish for “twenty-one”). Cervantes wrote his story just after the year 1600, so the game has been around at least since then. Twenty-one came to the US but it wasn’t all that popular so bonus payments were introduced to create more interest. One of the more attractive bonuses was a ten-to-one payout to a player who was dealt an ace of spades and a black jack. This bonus led to the game adopting the moniker “Blackjack”.

94. Old sitcom character who was 229 years old : ALF

“ALF” is a sitcom that aired in the late eighties. ALF is a hand-puppet, supposedly an alien from the planet Melmac that crash-landed in a suburban neighborhood. “ALF” stands for “alien life form”.

99. Florae and faunae : BIOTAS

The biota of a region is the total collection of flora and fauna found there.

The fauna is the animal life of a particular region, and the flora is that region’s plant life. The term “fauna” comes from the Roman goddess of earth and fertility who was called Fauna. Flora was the Roman goddess of plants, flowers and fertility.

105. TWA competitor : USAIR

From 1953, what we recently referred to as US Airways was called Allegheny Airlines. In the seventies, customers became very dissatisfied with the company’s service levels as it struggled to manage a rapid expansion in its number of flights. These problems earned the airline the nickname “Agony Air”. Allegheny tried to leave the “agony” behind in 1979 and changed its name to USAir, but commuters then just used the nickname “Unfortunately Still Allegheny”. The name was changed again, in 1997, to US Airways. US Airways merged with American Airlines in 2013, and the “US Airways” brand name was gradually replaced with “American Airlines”.

108. Classic Jag : XKE

Auto manufacturer Jaguar started out as a manufacturer of sidecars for motorcycles back in 1922, when the company was known as the Swallow Sidecar Company (SS for short). The company changed its name to Jaguar after WWII, because of the unfortunate connotations of the letters “SS” in that era (i.e. the Nazi paramilitary organization).

120. Cheers in un estadio : OLES

In Spain, one might hear a shout of “ole!” in “un estadio” (a stadium).

121. Canon camera : EOS

I’ve been using Canon EOS cameras for decades now, and have nothing but good things to say about both the cameras and the lenses. The EOS name stands for Electro-Optical System, and was chosen because it evokes the name of Eos, the Titan goddess of dawn from Greek mythology.

124. Some W.S.J. topics : IPOS

An initial public offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

“The Wall Street Journal” (WSJ) is a daily newspaper with a business bent that is published in New York City by Dow Jones & Company. The WSJ has a larger US circulation than any other newspaper, with “USA Today” coming in a close second place.

135. Pasta recipe phrase : AL DENTE

The Italian expression “al dente” literally means “to the tooth” or “to the bite” and is used to describe not only pasta, but also vegetables that are cooked so that they are tender and yet still crisp.

Down

1. New Testament book : ACTS

The Acts of the Apostles is the fifth book of the Christian New Testament. It is believed that the author of the Gospel of Luke was the same person who wrote “Acts”.

3. Radio host John : TESH

John Tesh is a pianist and composer, as well as a radio and television presenter. For many years Tesh presented the show “Entertainment Tonight”. For “ET” he once covered the filming of an episode of “Star Trek: The Next Generation”. As part of the piece, he volunteered to act as a Klingon warrior. If you see the “Star Trek: TNG” episode called “The Icarus Factor” in reruns, watch out for John Tesh engaging in ritual torture with Mr. Worf as his victim.

4. Life in the big city, to some : RAT RACE

We use “rat race” figuratively to describe an endless, pointless pursuit. The term comes from the laboratory, where one might imagine rats racing around a maze in search of some cheese.

6. Dance with a kick : CONGA

The conga line is a dance that originated as a Cuban carnival march. It became popular in the US starting in the thirties. The dance is apparently named after the Congo region of Africa, and it was originated by slaves who were brought from there to Cuba.

7. John Irving protagonist portrayed by Robin Williams : TS GARP

John Irving’s 1978 novel “The World According to Garp” is somewhat biographical. In fact, Irving’s mother found parts of the novel difficult to read, recognizing elements of herself in Garp’s mother Jenny Fields.

13. Five-point rugby play : TRY

In the game of rugby, a try is scored by grounding the ball behind the opposition’s goal line. A try is similar to a touchdown in American football, although in rugby the ball must be manually placed on the ground by the player making the score. The term “try” is used as originally that act of touching the ball to the ground simply qualified a team for a “try at goal”, an opportunity to kick the ball at goal to make the score.

14. Stripes mismatch, traditionally : PLAID

Tartan is sometimes called “plaid” over here in the US, a word not used in the same sense outside of this country. In Scotland a “plaid” is a blanket or a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder.

15. Amazon, e.g. : RIVER

The Amazon River of South America is the world’s largest in terms of volume, and accounts for an amazing one-fifth of the world’s total river flow. Perhaps even more amazing is that there are no bridges across the Amazon! There isn’t even one, mainly because the river flows through tropical rainforest where there are few roads and cities.

18. Charlotte ___, Virgin Islands : AMALIE

Charlotte Amalie is the capital and largest city in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The city was named after the queen consort of King Christian V of Denmark, Charlotte Amalie of Hesse-Kassel.

25. André ___, 1947 Literature Nobelist : GIDE

André Gide was an author from Paris who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1947. His works weren’t popular with the Roman Catholic church, and were placed on the Index of Forbidden Books in 1952.

33. Part of an accusation in Clue : WEAPON

Clue is board game that we knew under a different name growing up in Ireland. Outside of North America, Clue is marketed as “Cluedo”. Cluedo was the original name of the game, introduced in 1949 by the famous British board game manufacturer Waddingtons. There are cute differences between the US and UK versions. For example, the man who is murdered is called Dr. Black (Mr. Boddy in the US), one of the suspects is the Reverend Green (Mr. Green in the US), and the suspect weapons include a dagger (a knife in the US), and a spanner (a wrench in the US). I think it’s a fabulous game, a must during the holidays …

34. Laker named to the Basketball Hall of Fame in 2016 : O’NEAL

Retired basketball player Shaquille O’Neal now appears regularly as an analyst on the NBA TV show “Inside the NBA”. Shaq has quite a career in the entertainment world. His first rap album, called “Shaq Diesel”, went platinum. He also starred in two of his own reality show: “Shaq’s Big Challenge” and “Shaq Vs.”

37. 12 cc, maybe : DOSE

Cubic centimeters (ccs)

38. Country star Church : ERIC

Eric Church is a country singer/songwriter from Granite Falls, North Carolina. Church’s second album is titled “Carolina”.

44. Draw, as a scene : LIMN

“To limn” is to describe, or portray in a painting or a drawing. “Limn” has the same root as “illuminate”, in the sense of illuminating a manuscript.

46. Ratcheting wheel mechanism : PAWL

In a ratchet, there’s a rotating gear over which runs a spring-loaded finger, the piece of metal that makes the clicks as the gear rotates. That finger is called a “pawl”.

47. Adjust with Photoshop, maybe : TRIM

Photoshop is a wonderful piece of software used for editing graphics. When I first bought a copy of Photoshop, it was really expensive (about $300, ten years ago), but now there are cost-effective, stripped-down versions available. Also, the full version of Photoshop is now only available as a monthly subscription service.

49. Japanese drama : NOH

Noh is a form of musical drama in Japan that has been around since the 14th century. Many of the Noh performers are masked, allowing all the roles to be played by men, including the female parts.

56. School support grps. : PTAS

Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

60. Most profs : PHDS

PhD is an abbreviation for “philosophiae doctor”, Latin for “teacher of philosophy”. Often, candidates for an earned PhD already hold a bachelor’s and a master’s degree, so a PhD might be considered a “third degree”.

62. Mother-of-pearl : NACRE

Nacre is the strong iridescent material laid down by some mollusks on the inside of their shells, and it’s also what makes up pearls. The creature lays down nacre as a defensive mechanism, protecting the soft tissue of its body from the rough surface of the outer shell. Similarly, it uses nacre to encapsulate harmful debris or a parasite that penetrates the shell, and that’s how a pearl is formed.

63. Out in court : ALIBI

“Alibi” is the Latin word for “elsewhere” as in, “I claim that I was ‘elsewhere’ when the crime was committed … I have an ‘alibi’”.

64. Boost the horsepower of : HOP UP

The unit of horsepower was introduced along with the steam engine, where the output of the engine was compared with the power of draft horses. Largely, this comparison with the horse was a marketing ploy, as the intent was to demonstrate that one steam engine could negate the need for a number of draft horses used for work.

65. Dish served with chopsticks in a bowl : RAMEN

Ramen is a noodle dish composed of Chinese-style wheat noodles in a meat or fish broth flavored with soy or miso sauce. Ramen is usually topped with sliced pork and dried seaweed. The term “ramen” is a also used for precooked, instant noodles that come in single-serving, solid blocks.

69. Florida beach city, informally : BOCA

The name of the city of Boca Raton in Florida translates from Spanish as “Mouse Mouth”. There doesn’t seem to be a definitive etymology of the name but one plausible explanation is a nautical one. “Boca”, as well as meaning “mouth” can mean “inlet”. “Ratón”, as well as meaning “mouse” was also used to describe rocks that chewed away at a ship’s anchor cable. So possibly Boca Raton was named for a rocky inlet.

71. Lowly worker : SERF

A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. “Serf” comes from the Latin “servus”, meaning “slave”.

75. Those, in Tijuana : ESOS

Tijuana is the largest city in the Mexican state of Baja California, and lies just across the US-Mexico border from San Diego. Tijuana is also the most westerly of all Mexican cities. A lot of Tijuana’s growth took place in the twenties as tourists flocked south of the border during the days of prohibition in the US. One of the many casinos and hotels that flourished at that time was Hotel Caesar’s in the Avenida Revolución area. Hotel Caesar’s claims to be the birthplace of the now ubiquitous Caesar Salad.

76. Complaining fish? : CARP

The word “carp” used to mean simply “talk” back in the 13th century, with its roots in the Old Norwegian “karpa” meaning “to brag”. A century later the Latin word “carpere” meaning “to slander” influenced the use of “carp” so that it came to mean “find fault with”.

Carp are freshwater fish that are used as food around the world, although they aren’t very popular in North American kitchens. The ornamental fish that we know as goldfish and koi are all types of carp.

80. “Creme sandwich” introduced over a century ago : OREO

The Oreo cookie was introduced in 1912. The Oreo was intended to be a competitor to the very similar Hydrox cookie which had debuted four years earlier. The Oreo won the resulting battle on the grocery store shelves …

82. Animal depicted in Edwin Landseer’s “The Monarch of the Glen” : STAG

A male deer is usually called a buck, and a female is a doe. However, the male red deer is usually referred to as a stag. The males of even larger species of deer are often called bulls, and females cows. In older English, male deer of over 5 years were called harts, and females of over 3 years were called hinds. The young of small species are known as fawns, and of larger species are called calves. All very confusing …

85. Air-conditioner fig. : BTUS

In the world of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), the power of a heating or cooling unit can be measured in British Thermal Units (BTUs). This dated unit is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water so that the water’s temperature increases by one degree Fahrenheit.

90. Liquid-___ : PLUMR

Liquid-Plumr is a chemical drain opener that is produced by Clorox.

91. Pet food with a paw print logo : IAMS

Iams dog food was introduced by the animal nutritionist Paul Iams. He felt that household pets were suffering somewhat by being fed a diet of table scraps, so he developed a dry dog food that he felt was more nutritious and suitable for pet dogs. He founded the Iams company, now part of Procter & Gamble, in 1946.

92. Where to accent “Laotian” : THE O

The official name for the country of Laos is the Lao People’s Democratic Republic. In the Lao language, the country’s name is “Meuang Lao”. The French ruled Laos as part of French Indochina, having united three separate Lao kingdoms. As there was a plural of “Lao” entities united into one, the French added the “S” and so today we tend to use “Laos” instead of “Lao”.

100. Suffix with brew : -SKI

“Brewski” and “cold one” are slang terms for “beer”.

102. Underbrush clearer : MACHETE

A machete is a large knife, one usually 13-18 inches long. The term “machete” is the diminutive of “macho” meaning “male, strong”.

105. W.W. II shipping worries : U-BOATS

“U-boat” stands for the German “Unterseeboot” (undersea boat). Notably, a U-boat sank the RMS Lusitania in 1915, an event that helped propel the US into WWI.

106. Oman’s leader, e.g. : SULTAN

Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the OAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Oman is a monarchy, and the official name of the state is the Sultanate of Oman. All of the country’s legislative, executive and judiciary power resides with the hereditary sultan.

107. Antarctic penguin : ADELIE

The Adélie penguin is found along the Antarctic coast, and are named after the Antarctic territory called Adélie Land that is claimed by France. Adélie Land was discovered by French explorer Jules Dumont D’Urville in 1840, and he named the territory after his wife Adéle.

109. Officially prohibit : ENJOIN

In legal terms, “to enjoin” means “to prohibit”, to issue an injunction prohibiting a specific act.

112. It goes up to about 1700 : AM DIAL

In telecommunications, a radio signal is transmitted using a sinusoidal carrier wave. Information is transmitted using this carrier wave in two main ways, by varying (modulating) the instantaneous amplitude (signal strength) of the carrier wave, and by modulating the instantaneous frequency of the carrier wave. The former is referred to as an AM signal (for “amplitude modulation”), and the latter as an FM signal (for “frequency modulation”).

115. Aquarium fish : TETRA

The neon tetra is a freshwater fish that is native to parts of South America. The tetra is a very popular aquarium fish and millions are imported into the US every year. Almost all of the imported tetras are farm-raised in Asia and very few come from their native continent.

118. Holy Roman emperor called “the Great” : OTTO I

Charlemagne was the first king to use the title “Holy Roman Emperor”, even though the Holy Roman Empire was not actually founded until over a century later when Otto I was crowned Emperor. Otto was the first of an unbroken line of Holy Roman Emperors who ruled Central Europe until 1806.

119. Country rocker Steve : EARLE

Steve Earle is an American songwriter and performer, with a reputation as a man who has lived a hard life. Earle’s brushes with the law and drug addiction problems have earned him the nickname “the hardcore troubadour”.

125. One of the Ivies : PENN

The University of Pennsylvania (Penn or UPenn) was founded in 1740 by by Benjamin Franklin. Penn was the first school in the country to offer both graduate and undergraduate courses. Penn’s sports teams are known as the Quakers, or sometimes the Red & Blue.

The term “Ivy League” originally defined an athletic conference, but now it is used to describe a group of schools of higher education that are associated with both a long tradition and academic excellence. The eight Ivy League Schools are: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale.

127. Let stand, editorially : STET

“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

130. U.N. observer since ’74 : PLO

The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) was founded in 1964. The PLO’s early stated goal was the liberation of Palestine, with Palestine defined as the geographic entity that existed under the terms of the British Mandate granted by the League of Nations back in 1923. The PLO was granted observer status (i.e. no voting rights) at the United Nations in 1974.

Return to top of page

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Draw in : ATTRACT

8. Tight garment : CORSET

14. Come before : PREDATE

21. Stingy sorts : CHEAPOS

22. Blogger’s pick for a pic : AVATAR

23. Utility worker : LINEMAN

24. Falling down : TESTING GRAVITY

26. Mean : AVERAGE

27. Very: Ger. : SEHR

28. Earth goddess : GAIA

29. G.P.A. killers : EFS

30. “Sprechen ___ Deutsch?” : SIE

31. Robert of “The Sopranos” : ILER

32. Speeding ticket : AWARD FOR FAST DRIVING

37. Prep for the runway, maybe : DEICE

40. Ball ___ : PEEN

41. Besmirch : TAR

42. Emotionally demanding : NEEDY

43. Climbing Mount Everest, e.g. : ORDEAL

45. Be Kind to Editors and Writers Mo. [for real!] : SEPT

48. Notable features of Stockholm and Amsterdam : CANALS

51. It “exists when one goes against one’s conscience,” per Pope Francis : SIN

52. Fire places : PITS

55. D.C. lobby for seniors : AARP

57. Locale for two of the Quad Cities : IOWA

58. Egyptian cobra : ASP

61. Lying : ECONOMICAL WITH THE TRUTH

66. Heat, as to soften metal : ANNEAL

67. “u r hilarious!” : LMAO

68. How scallops are often prepared : SEARED

69. French horticulturist after whom a variety of fruit is named : BOSC

72. Cause of insomnia, maybe : DRIP

74. Design detail : SPEC

77. Google ___ : MAPS

78. Run too far or lift too much : OVERDO

81. Go over in blackjack : BUST

84. In working order : USABLE

87. Layoff : CAREER-SHIFT OPPORTUNITY

94. Old sitcom character who was 229 years old : ALF

95. Utah’s ___ Canyon : SEGO

96. Get 29-Across : FAIL

97. Railway offshoot : SPUR

98. “So that’s it!” : AHA!

99. Florae and faunae : BIOTAS

101. Down : GLUM

103. Mariners : SEAMEN

105. TWA competitor : USAIR

108. Classic Jag : XKE

110. Who “can’t buy you love” in an Elton John hit : MAMA

113. “There, there” : IT’S OK

114. Tax increase : BUDGET REINFORCEMENT

120. Cheers in un estadio : OLES

121. Canon camera : EOS

122. Take off quickly : JET

123. “If I ___ penny for every …” : HAD A

124. Some W.S.J. topics : IPOS

128. Summer Olympics host after Barcelona : ATLANTA

130. Dead : POST-RETIREMENT

133. Custom-fits : TAILORS

134. Took off quickly : LIT OUT

135. Pasta recipe phrase : AL DENTE

136. Show contempt for : SNEER AT

137. At the scene : ONSITE

138. “We should avoid doing that” : LET’S NOT

Down

1. New Testament book : ACTS

2. Pilgrims’ pronoun : THEE

3. Radio host John : TESH

4. Life in the big city, to some : RAT RACE

5. Bee: Prefix : API-

6. Dance with a kick : CONGA

7. John Irving protagonist portrayed by Robin Williams : TS GARP

8. Wine holders : CARAFES

9. Spermatozoa targets : OVA

10. Dance party enthusiast : RAVER

11. Wooden : STIFF

12. Worries no end : EATS AT

13. Five-point rugby play : TRY

14. Stripes mismatch, traditionally : PLAID

15. Amazon, e.g. : RIVER

16. Oklahoma City-to-Tulsa dir. : ENE

17. Develops (from) : DERIVES

18. Charlotte ___, Virgin Islands : AMALIE

19. Very last part : TAG END

20. Pep : ENERGY

25. André ___, 1947 Literature Nobelist : GIDE

30. Narrow waterway : STRAIT

33. Part of an accusation in Clue : WEAPON

34. Laker named to the Basketball Hall of Fame in 2016 : O’NEAL

35. Small anatomical container : SAC

36. Landing post-E.T.A. : IN LATE

37. 12 cc, maybe : DOSE

38. Country star Church : ERIC

39. Alternative to a name: Abbr. : ID NO

44. Draw, as a scene : LIMN

46. Ratcheting wheel mechanism : PAWL

47. Adjust with Photoshop, maybe : TRIM

49. Japanese drama : NOH

50. Knocks over : AWES

53. Even : TIED

54. Trauma reminder : SCAR

56. School support grps. : PTAS

58. Corona, for one : AURA

59. Repeated cry at a dance class : STEP

60. Most profs : PHDS

62. Mother-of-pearl : NACRE

63. Out in court : ALIBI

64. Boost the horsepower of : HOP UP

65. Dish served with chopsticks in a bowl : RAMEN

69. Florida beach city, informally : BOCA

70. Like the head of a tennis racket : OVAL

71. Lowly worker : SERF

73. Bit of wind : PUFF

75. Those, in Tijuana : ESOS

76. Complaining fish? : CARP

79. “Hots” : DESIRE

80. “Creme sandwich” introduced over a century ago : OREO

82. Animal depicted in Edwin Landseer’s “The Monarch of the Glen” : STAG

83. Work, work, work : TOIL

85. Air-conditioner fig. : BTUS

86. Entrap : LURE IN

88. Army NCO : SGT

89. Alien autopsies, crop circles and the like : HOAXES

90. Liquid-___ : PLUMR

91. Pet food with a paw print logo : IAMS

92. Where to accent “Laotian” : THE O

93. Pinstriper : YANK

99. Store blowout : BIG SALE

100. Suffix with brew : -SKI

102. Underbrush clearer : MACHETE

104. Occasionally : AT TIMES

105. W.W. II shipping worries : U-BOATS

106. Oman’s leader, e.g. : SULTAN

107. Antarctic penguin : ADELIE

109. Officially prohibit : ENJOIN

111. Lamb, e.g. : MEAT

112. It goes up to about 1700 : AM DIAL

115. Aquarium fish : TETRA

116. Swelter : ROAST

117. Holiday celebrations : FESTS

118. Holy Roman emperor called “the Great” : OTTO I

119. Country rocker Steve : EARLE

125. One of the Ivies : PENN

126. Not conned by : ONTO

127. Let stand, editorially : STET

129. Neither’s partner : NOR

130. U.N. observer since ’74 : PLO

131. Day-in-and-day-out pattern : RUT

132. D.C. summer setting : EDT

Return to top of page

5 thoughts on “1001-17 NY Times Crossword Answers 1 Oct 2017, Sunday”

  1. 62:36 but no errors and I had a lot of fun with this one – starting with ECONOMICAL WITH THE TRUTH. Interesting theme of euphemisms.

    Did not know Robert ILER aka TJ was arrested for armed robbery. Indeed – took his roll a little too seriously.

    Quite coincidentally, I was at the Las Vegas version of Hotel Caesars earlier this evening. I hadn’t been there in 10 years, but it’s as enormous and lively as ever.

    Best –

  2. 41:12, at least ten minutes of which was spent in finding and fixing an error: I had POSH RETIREMENT (think “a long sleep on a satin bed”) instead of POST RETIREMENT and therefore OTHO (who was a Roman emperor) instead of OTTO (a Holy Roman emperor). Sheesh …

    Anyway, I enjoyed the theme and all the long entries (even the one I got wrong) … 😄

  3. 46:06 and escaped error-free. I squinted at the area centered around ECONOMICAL WITH THE TRUTH for several minutes, unable to finish it off… then, I found the key error: I’d used “TRIP” as the fill for 72A (just having come back from a trip and had to adjust my sleeping patterns to time changes!) instead of DRIP… then the rest came to me.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.