0910-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 10 Sep 17, Sunday


Constructed by: Brendan Emmett Quigley

Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Syndicated Crossword

Complete List of Clues/Answers

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Theme: Size Matters

Each of today’s themed answers is a well-known phrase, but with a “SIGH” sound inserted:

  • 22A. Spin class activity? : STATIC CYCLING (from “static cling”)
  • 32A. Number of appearances in a grain holder? : SILO FREQUENCY (from “low frequency”)
  • 50A. Storms that don’t offend? : PC CYCLONES (from “PC clones”)
  • 86A. Makes a quick map of an Egyptian peninsula? : DRAWS SINAI (from “draws nigh”)
  • 100A. Opening performers that are all mimes? : SILENT SUPPORT (from “lent support”)
  • 116A. Rod-and-reel event in old Vietnam? : SAIGON FISHING (from “gone fishing”)
  • 3D. Order to a pool hustler to suck up some broth? : SHARK, SIPHON SOUP (from “shark’s fin soup”)
  • 48D. Government group on offspring? : SCION COMMISSION (from “on commission”)

Bill’s time: 21m 35s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

7. Comic Sweeney : JULIA

Comic Julia Sweeney is perhaps best known for playing the androgynous character Pat on “Saturday Night Live”. Pat appeared in a 1994 movie called “It’s Pat”, which is one of the worst films of all time, or so I am told …

18. Getaway for meditation : ASHRAM

“Ashram” is a Hindu term that traditionally describes a place of spiritual retreat, one that is typically located in a remote location conducive to spiritual instruction and meditation.

21. Fruit dessert : COMPOTE

A compote is a fruit mixture stewed in syrup. The word “compote” comes to us from French and has the same etymology as our word “compost”! “Composte” is an Old French word for “mixture”.

24. City with one of the SUNY schools : ONEONTA

The State University of New York (SUNY) is the largest system of third-level colleges and universities in the world, with almost 500,00 students attending over 60 campuses across the state.

26. TV host Gibbons : LEEZA

Leeza Gibbons has her own radio show called “Hollywood Confidential”, and used to have her own talk show on NBC television that aired from 1994 to 2000. Gibbons is the founder of a nonprofit group called Leeza’s Place which supports people giving care to patients with memory disorders. Since 2007 she has been a board member of California’s stem cell research agency, appointed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger.

27. What Siri runs on : IOS

Siri is a software application that works with Apple’s iOS operating system. “Siri” is an acronym standing for Speech Interpretation and Recognition Interface. You’ve probably seen the ads on television, with folks talking to their iPhones asking for information and responding with a voice. I hear that Google is a little scared by Siri, as Siri is non-visual. There’s no need to touch a screen or a keyboard to work with Siri, no opportunity to click on one of Google’s ads! By the way, voice-over artist Susan Bennett revealed herself as the female American voice of Siri not that long ago. The British version of Siri is called Daniel, and the Australian version is called Karen. Also, “Siri” is a Norwegian name meaning “beautiful woman who leads you to victory”, and was the name the developer had chosen for his first child.

29. SC Johnson product with a lightning bolt in its logo : RAID

Raid insecticide has been killing bugs since 1956.

32. Number of appearances in a grain holder? : SILO FREQUENCY (from “low frequency”)

“Silo” is a Spanish word that we absorbed into English, originally coming from the Greek word “siros” that described a pit in which one kept corn.

38. ___ Tomé (African capital) : SAO

The Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe is an island nation off the west coast of Africa comprising mainly two islands: São Tomé and Príncipe. São Tomé and Príncipe is located in the Gulf of Guinea, off the coast of Gabon. It was colonized by Portugal after POrtuguese explorers discovered the islands in the 15th century. After gaining independence in 1975, São Tomé and Príncipe is now the smallest Portuguese-speaking country in the world.

44. River near the start of an alphabetical list : AAR

The Aar (also called the “Aare” in German) is the longest river entirely in Switzerland. The Aar is a major tributary of the Rhine, and flows through Bern, the nation’s capital.

45. Primordial universe matter : YLEM

Back in the 1940s, cosmologists George Gamow and Ralph Alpher used the term “ylem” to describe the primordial plasma that was presumed to exist right after the Big Bang.

49. Au courant, once : HEP

“Au courant” means “up-to-date” and comes into English directly from French, in which language it has the same meaning.

50. Storms that don’t offend? : PC CYCLONES (from “PC clones”)

In the early days of desktop computing, an IBM clone (also “PC clone”) was a computer built by an IBM competitor that was designed to function just like an IBM, but without using any copyrighted material or trade secrets that were the intellectual property of IBM. Clones were always a competitive issue for IBM, and perhaps were part of the reason that IBM doesn’t make desktop computers today …

53. Actress Christina : RICCI

Christina Ricci is an American actress who found fame on the big screen at an early age, playing the very young Wednesday Addams in the 1991 movie version of “The Addams Family”.

55. God, to Hebrews : YAHWEH

“Tetragrammaton” is a Greek word meaning “consisting of four letters” It is the name given to the four-letter word in Hebrew for the name God. The four letters are usually translated into English as YHWH, with “Yahweh” used as the ancient pronunciation. Another pronunciation that has been used is “Jehovah”.

57. Staple of Hawaiian cuisine : POI

The corm of some taro plants is used to make poi, the traditional Hawaiian dish (that I think tastes horrible). When a taro plant is grown as an ornamental, it is often called Elephant Ears due to the shape of its large leaves.

58. Mammals with webbed feet : OTTERS

Male and female otters are known as dogs and bitches, with the offspring called pups. Males and females are are sometimes referred to as boars and sows. A collection of otters is a bevy, family, lodge or perhaps a romp. When in water, a collection of otters can be called a raft.

62. French 101 verb : AVOIR

Avoir is French for “to have”.

66. RC, for one : COLA

Nehi Corporation was the nickname for the Chero-Cola/Union Bottle Works that introduced the Nehi drink in 1924. Years later the company developed a new brand, Royal Crown Cola (also known as RC Cola). By 1955, RC Cola was the company’s flagship product, so the “Nehi Corporation” became the “Royal Crown Company”. In 1954, RC Cola became the first company to sell soft drinks in cans.

69. Lesley of CBS News : STAHL

Lesley Stahl first appeared on “60 Minutes” in 1991. She is married to author “Aaron Latham”. As a journalist, it was Latham who wrote the article that inspired the movie “Urban Cowboy”.

71. Nonsense : BLARNEY

Blarney is a town in County Cork in the south of Ireland. Blarney is home to Blarney Castle, and inside the castle is the legendary Blarney Stone. “Kissing the Blarney Stone” is a ritual engaged in by oh so many tourists (indeed, I’ve done it myself!), but it’s not a simple process. The stone is embedded in the wall of the castle, and in order to kiss it you have to sit on the edge of the parapet and lean way backwards so that your head is some two feet below your body. There is a staff member there to help you and make sure you don’t fall. The Blarney Stone has been labelled as the world’s most unhygienic tourist attraction! But once you’ve kissed it, supposedly you are endowed with the “gift of the gab”, the ability to talk eloquently and perhaps deceptively without offending. The term “blarney” has come to mean flattering and deceptive talk.

73. Second hand: Abbr. : ASST

Assistant (asst.)

76. 2016 Disney hit : MOANA

“Moana” is a 2016 animated feature film, the 56th animated Disney movie. The title character is the daughter of a Polynesian chief who heads off in search of the demigod Maui, hoping that he can save her people.

78. George who founded Industrial Light & Magic : LUCAS

Industrial Light & Magic (ILM) is a visual effects company that was founded by George Lucas in 1975. Lucas set up the company when he started production of the movie “Star Wars”. For many years, ILM led development in the world of computer-generated imagery (CGI).

82. Schedule inits. : TBA

Something not yet on the schedule (“sked” or “sched.”) is to be advised/announced (TBA).

83. Europe’s largest lake : LADOGA

Lake Ladoga is located in the very northwest of Russia, just outside Saint Petersburg. Lake Ladoga is the largest freshwater lake located entirely within the continent of Europe.

84. Region of ancient Egypt : NUBIA

Nubia is a region shared by Egypt and Sudan that lies along the Nile river. The name “Nubia” comes from the Nuba people who settled in the area in the 4th century.

86. Makes a quick map of an Egyptian peninsula? : DRAWS SINAI (from “draws nigh”)

The Sinai Peninsula is in the eastern part of Egypt, and is a triangular peninsula bounded by the Mediterranean to the north and the Red Sea to the south. It is the only part of Egypt that lies in Asia as opposed to Africa. The eastern land border of the peninsula is shared with Israel, and Israel occupied the Sinai during the 1956 Suez Crisis and the Six Day War of 1967.

89. Very, in Veracruz : MUY

Veracruz is one of Mexico’s 31 states, and is located in the east of the country east coast. The state takes its name from the city of Veracruz, which is a major port city in the state. Veracruz is not the state capital, however, That honor goes to the city of Xalapa.

92. Action at a bris : SNIP

A mohel is a man who has been trained in the practice of brit milah (circumcision). Brit milah is known as “bris” in Yiddish. The brit milah ceremony is performed on male infants when they are 8-days old.

93. Popular website that explains the news : VOX

Vox is a news and opinion website that was founded by former “Washington Post” journalist Ezra Klein in 2014. “Vox” is Latin for “voice”.

94. Lille women: Abbr. : MMES

Lille is a large city in the very north of France sitting right on the border with Belgium. The name “Lille” is a derivation of the term “l’isle” meaning “the island”. The name “L’Isle” dates back to 1066, and is a reference to a castle that once stood on an island in the Deûle river that runs through the city. The city grew around the island and the castle.

104. Orchestra tuner : OBOIST

When you hear an orchestra tuning before a performance, you’ll note (pun intended!) that the oboe starts off the process by playing an “A”. The rest of the musicians in turn tune to that oboe’s “A”.

107. Brand with a rabbit symbol : TRIX

Trix is a corn-based breakfast cereal that has been around since 1954, produced by General Mills. Ads for the cereal featured Trix Rabbit, who would try hard to get hold of bowls of the cereal. He would always get caught though, and be admonished with, “Silly rabbit, Trix are for kids!” With 46% sugar content, the rabbit probably wouldn’t have liked it anyway …

108. “___ little confused” : I’M A

… but I’m used to it.

121. North and South Korea, e.g. : ENEMIES

Korea was occupied by the Japanese military from 1910 until Japan surrendered at the end of WWII in 1945. While the UN was working towards a trusteeship administration for Korea, the Soviet Union managed the Korean Peninsula north of the 38th parallel and the US managed the south. The UN’s plans came to naught as the Cold War dictated the establishment of the two separate states of North Korea and South Korea. North Korea invaded the South in 1950, leading to the Korean War. After three years of fighting, the border between the two states became the demarcation line between the two military forces on the day the Armistice Agreement was signed. That line runs diagonally across the 38th parallel, and is better known as the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ).

123. Indian appetizer : SAMOSA

A samosa is quite a tasty appetizer, usually a triangular-shaped savory that often has a vegetarian filling. The word “samosa” is primarily used on Indian menus, and the name comes from “sanbosag”, the name for the dish in Persia.

124. Prince Edward’s earldom : WESSEX

Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex is British Queen Elizabeth II’s youngest child. When Prince Edward married Sophie Rhys-Jones in 1999, Buckingham Palace announced the intention that the prince will one day inherit his father’s title as Duke of Edinburgh.

125. Belief : TENET

A tenet is an article of faith, something that is held to be true. “Tenet” is Latin for “he holds”.

Down

3. Order to a pool hustler to suck up some broth? : SHARK, SIPHON SOUP (from “shark’s fin soup”)

A pool shark is a player who hustles others in a pool hall, aiming to make money unfairly in competition. The term used to be “pool sharp”.

Shark finning is a cruel fishing practice driven by the demand for Chinese shark fin soup. Millions of sharks every year are captured, have their fins sliced off at sea and are then thrown back into the ocean still alive. The mutilated sharks don’t last very long and are usually eaten because they cannot maneuver very easily without their dorsal fins.

4. “So vast is ___, so narrow human wit”: Alexander Pope : ART

Alexander Pope was an English poet who was famous for his own compositions as well as for a translation of Homer’s works. One of Pope’s most notable poems is “Ode on Solitude” that opens with:

Happy the man, whose wish and care
A few paternal acres bound,
Content to breathe his native air,
In his own ground.

Pope wrote that when he was just twelve years old!

6. Run the show : EMCEE

The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an initialism standing for Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

7. Rapper with the music streaming service Tidal : JAY-Z

Jay-Z, as well as being a successful and very rich rap artist, is married to singer Beyoncé. Jay-Z was born Shawn Corey Carter in Brooklyn, New York. As Carter was growing up, he was nicknamed “Jazzy”, a reference to his interest in music. “Jazzy” evolved into the stage name “Jay-Z”. Jay-Z and Beyoncé have a daughter named Blue Ivy Carter, and twins named Rumi and Sir Carter.

13. Black church inits. : AME

The African Methodist Episcopal Zion (AME Zion) Church was formed in New York City. The church was established by African American Christians who faced discrimination when attending other churches. Initially the African American congregations were led by Caucasian Methodist ministers, with the first African American being ordained in 1820.

14. Spot on a fern frond : SPORE SAC

Spores are produced by many bacteria, fungi and non-flowering plants. A spore is a reproductive body encased in a protective shell that is highly resistant to damage, and resistant to heat in particular.

15. TBS late-night show : CONAN

Before Conan O’Brien came to fame as a late night talk show host, he was a writer. He wrote for both “Saturday Night Live” and “The Simpsons”.

16. Room with a slanted roof : ATTIC

An attic or loft is a room or space located below the roof of a building. The term “attic” is a shortened form of “attic story”, the uppermost story or level of a house. This term “attic story” originally applied to a low, decorative level built on top of the uppermost story behind a building’s decorative facade. This use of decoration at the top of buildings was common in ancient Greece, and was particularly important in the Attica style. That Attica style was so called because it originated in the historical region of Attica that encompassed the city of Athens. And that’s how our attics are linked to ancient Greece.

20. Cry to kick off the weekend : TGIF

“Thank God It’s Friday” (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that apparently originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used first by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies. That said, one blog reader wrote me to say that he had been using the phrase in the fifties.

21. “Down goes Frazier!” sportscaster : COSELL

Howard Cosell was one of the most popular of all sports journalists. With his high profile came a lot of controversy as Cosell wasn’t afraid to express his personal opinions. For example, he came out against professional boxing in 1982 after witnessing a one-sided fight between Larry Holmes and Tex Cobb. Two weeks earlier South Korean boxer Duk Koo Kim had died after a match against Ray Mancini.

23. Relating to the abdominal cavity : CELIAC

Our word “celiac” is used for things related to the abdomen. The term is derived from the Greek “koiliakos” meaning “pertaining to the bowels”.

28. Surg. locales : ORS

Surgery (surg.) is usually performed in an operating room (OR).

31. Nonstandard verb from Popeye : YAM

“I yam what I yam …” were words oft spoken by Popeye.

Popeye first appeared in 1929 in a comic strip called “Thimble Theatre”. The strip, created by E. C. Segar, ran for ten years before Popeye made an appearance. Popeye received such a great welcome from readers that he soon “took over” the strip, and eventually even hogged the strip’s title. Before Popeye turned up, Olive Oyl was the main character.

33. Pastoral poet : IDYLIST

An “idyll” (also “idyl”) is a short poem with a pastoral theme, usually depicting the scene in romantic and idealized terms. The word comes from the Greek “eidyllion”, which literally translates to “little picture” but was a word describing a short, poem with a rustic theme.

34. “___ & Stitch” : LILO

“Lilo & Stitch” was released by Disney in 2002. Compared to other Disney feature-length cartoons, “Lilo & Stitch” was relatively cheaply produced, using the voices of lesser-known actors. One interesting change had to take place in the storyline during production, when Lilo was meant to fly a Jumbo Jet through downtown Honolulu in one sequence. This was replaced with a sequence using a spaceship instead, as the producers were sensitive to public sentiment after the September 11 attacks.

35. Common opening bid in bridge : ONE NO

“One no” is short for “one no-trump”, a common bid in the card game of bridge.

37. Fruit with greenish-yellow rinds : UGLIS

The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine, first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruits unsightly wrinkled rind.

44. German lament : ACH!

The German exclamation “ach!” is usually translated into English as “oh!”

46. Workplaces with a need for speed : METH LABS

“Meth” is a street name used for the drug methamphetamine, also called “crank” and “crystal meth”.

48. Government group on offspring? : SCION COMMISSION (from “on commission”)

“Scion” comes from the old French word “sion” or “cion”, meaning “a shoot or a twig”. In botanical terms today, a scion is used in grafting two compatible plants together. In grafting, one plant is selected for its root system (the “rootstock”), and the other plant is selected for its stems, leaves and fruit (the “scion”). The term scion migrated naturally into the world of family history. A scion is simply a descendant, a son or a daughter and therefore a branching point in the family tree.

50. Felon, to a cop : PERP

Perpetrator (perp)

51. Drink holders : COASTERS

A coaster is a small mat or plate that goes under a glass or cup. Back in the late 1800s, the original coaster was a small drink stand that sat on a table. As the drink stand “coasted” around from guest-to-guest, it earned the name “coaster”.

52. Greyhound stop: Abbr. : STA

Speaking as someone who lived much of my life outside of the US, I have to say that the Greyhound bus is real symbol of America. I grew up seeing Greyhound buses in so many old movies. In Ireland the official provincial bus service “stole” the famous logo that gracefully adorns the sides of these buses, but uses a running Irish Setter in place of the iconic greyhound.

59. Ex-isle of exile : ELBA

I had a lovely two-week vacation in Tuscany once, including what was supposed to be a two-night stay on the island of Elba. I had envisioned Elba as a place full of history, and maybe it is, but it is also overrun with tourists who use it as a beach getaway. We left after one day and we won’t be going back again …

Napoléon Bonaparte was a military professional from Corsica who rose to prominence after the French Revolution during the French First Republic. He took over the country in 1799 in a coup d’état and installed himself as First Consul. Soon after, he led France in the Napoleonic Wars, conflicts between the growing French Empire and a series of opposing coalitions. He was eventually defeated at the Battle of Leipzig and was forced into exile on the Italian island of Elba off the Tuscan coast. Napoleon escaped in 1815 and regained power, only to be finally defeated a few months later at the Battle of Waterloo. The British dispatched him to the island of Saint Helena in the South Atlantic where he lived out the last six years of his life as a prisoner.

64. Jerry Lewis, notably : HAM

“Jerry Lewis” was the stage name of comedian and actor Joseph Levitch from Newark, New Jersey. Lewis gained fame when he teamed up with straight man Dean Martin in the 1940s. The duo broke up in 1961, largely because Lewis was always in the limelight and Martin’s role became less important in the eyes of the public. The relationship between the two was strained for many years until there was a reconciliation in the late eighties following the death of Martin’s son.

68. Snare drum sound : RAT-A-TAT

Snare drums are so called because they have a set of wire strands (snares) stretching across the bottom surface of the drum. When the drum is struck, the snares vibrate against the bottom drumhead producing a unique sound.

70. Rebel in “Henry IV, Part 1” : HOTSPUR

A hotspur is a fiery or impetuous person. The term has come into English via the nickname of an English rebel called Sir Henry Percy. “Hotspur” led a rebellion against King Henry IV in 1403, although he didn’t get very far. In the Battle of Shrewsbury he raised his visor to get some air, and was hit in the mouth with an arrow, dying instantly. Henry Percy lent his name to so many things, including Tottenham Hotspur Football Club in London (my favorite soccer team growing up) and the “Hotspur” comic book (my favorite read as a youngster).

72. Jai ___ : ALAI

A hotspur is a fiery or impetuous person. The term has come into English via the nickname of an English rebel called Sir Henry Percy. “Hotspur” led a rebellion against King Henry IV in 1403, although he didn’t get very far. In the Battle of Shrewsbury he raised his visor to get some air, and was hit in the mouth with an arrow, dying instantly. Henry Percy lent his name to so many things, including Tottenham Hotspur Football Club in London (my favorite soccer team growing up) and the “Hotspur” comic book (my favorite read as a youngster).

83. Laissez-faire : LAX

“Laissez-faire” is a French term that we use to describe non-interference in the affairs of others. The literal translation is “to let to allow”.

87. Lush’s favorite radio station? : WINO

WINO-FM 89.9 is a repeater station located in Odessa, New York for Binghamton’s WSKG-FM station.

94. French month : MAI

In French, the month of “mai” (May) is in the season of “printemps” (spring).

98. Blinking light : STROBE

A strobe light is a device that produces regular flashes, like the light on top of a police car. The term derives from the Greek “strobos” meaning “twisting, whirling”.

101. Chemistry Nobelist Joliot-Curie : IRENE

Along with her husband, Frederick, Irene Joliot-Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935 for their discovery of artificial radioactivity. Irene was the daughter of Marie and Pierre Curie, who also won Nobel Prizes. Irene died when she was 58 years old, suffering from leukemia brought on her exposure to high doses of radiation. Her mother, Marie, died from aplastic anemia, also caused by high exposure to radiation. To this day, Marie’s personal papers are kept preserved in lead-lined boxes as they are highly radioactive, even her personal cookbook.

115. Old law : LEX

“Lex” is Latin for “law”.

120. H.R. offering for employees : HMO

Health Maintenance Organization (HMO)

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. “Watch yourself out there” : BE SAFE

7. Comic Sweeney : JULIA

12. ___ All-Star Race (annual event since 1985) : NASCAR

18. Getaway for meditation : ASHRAM

19. Rub oil on : ANOINT

21. Fruit dessert : COMPOTE

22. Spin class activity? : STATIC CYCLING (from “static cling”)

24. City with one of the SUNY schools : ONEONTA

25. That craft : HER

26. TV host Gibbons : LEEZA

27. What Siri runs on : IOS

29. SC Johnson product with a lightning bolt in its logo : RAID

30. Wireless data and messaging company : SKYTEL

32. Number of appearances in a grain holder? : SILO FREQUENCY (from “low frequency”)

38. ___ Tomé (African capital) : SAO

39. Stuck at a ski lodge, say : ICED IN

41. Wallops : SLUGS

42. Like long chances : SLIM

44. River near the start of an alphabetical list : AAR

45. Primordial universe matter : YLEM

47. What people sing when they don’t know the words : LA LAS

49. Au courant, once : HEP

50. Storms that don’t offend? : PC CYCLONES (from “PC clones”)

53. Actress Christina : RICCI

55. God, to Hebrews : YAHWEH

57. Staple of Hawaiian cuisine : POI

58. Mammals with webbed feet : OTTERS

60. Business with a guestbook : INN

62. French 101 verb : AVOIR

63. Appropriate rhyme for “cache” : STASH

65. Robust : HALE

66. RC, for one : COLA

67. Left college athletics, maybe : WENT PRO

69. Lesley of CBS News : STAHL

71. Nonsense : BLARNEY

73. Second hand: Abbr. : ASST

74. Loads : A LOT

76. 2016 Disney hit : MOANA

78. George who founded Industrial Light & Magic : LUCAS

79. “___-hoo!” : YOO

80. Position on a steamship : STOKER

82. Schedule inits. : TBA

83. Europe’s largest lake : LADOGA

84. Region of ancient Egypt : NUBIA

86. Makes a quick map of an Egyptian peninsula? : DRAWS SINAI (from “draws nigh”)

89. Very, in Veracruz : MUY

90. Sequel to a sequel to a sequel to a sequel : PART V

92. Action at a bris : SNIP

93. Popular website that explains the news : VOX

94. Lille women: Abbr. : MMES

95. Not debut : REAIR

97. Mint : UNUSED

99. War su ___ (boneless chicken dish) : GAI

100. Opening performers that are all mimes? : SILENT SUPPORT (from “lent support”)

104. Orchestra tuner : OBOIST

107. Brand with a rabbit symbol : TRIX

108. “___ little confused” : I’M A

109. It has a lock, stock and barrel : RIFLE

111. Take in : SEE

113. Citroën competitor : RENAULT

116. Rod-and-reel event in old Vietnam? : SAIGON FISHING (from “gone fishing”)

121. North and South Korea, e.g. : ENEMIES

122. Nurse’s outfit : SCRUBS

123. Indian appetizer : SAMOSA

124. Prince Edward’s earldom : WESSEX

125. Belief : TENET

126. High as a kite : STONED

Down

1. Big party : BASH

2. Photorealist painter Richard : ESTES

3. Order to a pool hustler to suck up some broth? : SHARK, SIPHON SOUP (from “shark’s fin soup”)

4. “So vast is ___, so narrow human wit”: Alexander Pope : ART

5. Do not : FAIL TO

6. Run the show : EMCEE

7. Rapper with the music streaming service Tidal : JAY-Z

8. Take out, as wine bottles : UNCASE

9. “Haha” : LOL

10. Due east on an old clock dial : III

11. Common female middle name : ANN

12. Smoking or ___ : NON

13. Black church inits. : AME

14. Spot on a fern frond : SPORE SAC

15. TBS late-night show : CONAN

16. Room with a slanted roof : ATTIC

17. All systems go : READY

20. Cry to kick off the weekend : TGIF

21. “Down goes Frazier!” sportscaster : COSELL

23. Relating to the abdominal cavity : CELIAC

28. Surg. locales : ORS

31. Nonstandard verb from Popeye : YAM

33. Pastoral poet : IDYLIST

34. “___ & Stitch” : LILO

35. Common opening bid in bridge : ONE NO

36. Argument : QUARREL

37. Fruit with greenish-yellow rinds : UGLIS

40. TV’s “Tales From the ___” : CRYPT

42. Suddenly start, as in fright : SHY AWAY

43. Strands, as a base runner : LEAVES ON

44. German lament : ACH!

46. Workplaces with a need for speed : METH LABS

48. Government group on offspring? : SCION COMMISSION (from “on commission”)

50. Felon, to a cop : PERP

51. Drink holders : COASTERS

52. Greyhound stop: Abbr. : STA

54. Plotting (with) : IN LEAGUE

56. Alicia of “Urban Legend,” 1998 : WITT

59. Ex-isle of exile : ELBA

61. Denies : NAYSAYS

63. Play alone : SOLO

64. Jerry Lewis, notably : HAM

66. “Oh, fudge” : CRUD

68. Snare drum sound : RAT-A-TAT

70. Rebel in “Henry IV, Part 1” : HOTSPUR

72. Jai ___ : ALAI

75. Green-lit : OK’D

77. Green : NAIVE

80. Tornado warning : SIREN

81. Raised, as a flag : RAN UP

83. Laissez-faire : LAX

85. Pre-practice tests? : BAR EXAMS

87. Lush’s favorite radio station? : WINO

88. Drowse : NOD OFF

91. Santa makes millions of them every Christmas : VISITS

94. French month : MAI

96. Ingredient in an Aunt Agatha : RUM

98. Blinking light : STROBE

99. Attacks : GOES AT

100. Cast about : STREW

101. Chemistry Nobelist Joliot-Curie : IRENE

102. Understudy’s study : LINES

103. Ticket : PASS

105. Ignorance, so they say : BLISS

106. Nerve-racking : TENSE

110. Think tank, e.g.: Abbr. : INST

112. “Heavens!” : EGAD!

114. It may be pulled after a wrong turn : UIE

115. Old law : LEX

117. Do something : ACT

118. Heat : IRE

119. Heater : GUN

120. H.R. offering for employees : HMO

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12 thoughts on “0910-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 10 Sep 17, Sunday”

  1. 36:03, including the time required to fix one error. I had guessed SPYTEL instead of SKYTEL (not something I'm at all familiar with), giving me SHARP instead of SHARK. When I got the "almost there" message, I found and fixed the problem (and, as I did so, finally understood the theme). Not one of my cleaner solves, but I can live with it … 🙂

  2. 65 minutes and change with a few spelling related errors (3 I think). Nevertheless a fun solve. Interesting theme – a bit off the wall.

    I didn't realize Korea was occupied by the Japanese for so long. Korea hasn't really been Korea in over a hundred years, yet it's still a dream….to some there.

    Stunned I'd never heard of an Aunt Agatha. It's RUM, oj and bitters. Sounds pretty good actually.

    This setter does his own puzzles on Mondays and Thursdays on his site at http://www.brendanemmittquigley.com . Apparently the Mondays are themeless, and he has entries that "would never make it into the NYT" – which I assume means they're a bit racier than the NYT allows. I may check out those puzzles.

    Dave – I know that's all you need are more puzzle to do, but these sound interesting I must admit. There go your easy Mondays… 🙂

    Best –

  3. There’s a (BIG) bit more BLARNEY on that puzzle overall — especially in its theme — than only 71-Across! Anyhoo, Bill, this new format appears clear and crisp. Thanks again.

  4. 38:52, and 3 errors in the NW corner.

    Absolutely STUPID theme, especially with the misleading title “Size Matters”.

    This constructor has made it onto my “don’t bother” list.

  5. 43:31, 8 errors (too many to list). Too many clues out of my strike zone today, enjoyed the challenge, would have enjoyed it more with a clean solve.

  6. This was not fun. Got all but two squares in the CELIAC/LEEZA/SKYTEL cluster. Will I continue to slog away at Sunday puzzles? Don’t think so.

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