0806-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 6 Aug 17, Sunday

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Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Patrick Berry
THEME: Anchors Away!
Each of today’s answers are nautical phrases featuring seagoing vessels, and each sounds like a common expression:

24A. Sailing vessels that Cap’n Crunch might commandeer? : GALLEONS (gallons) OF MILK
31A. Heavily armored vessels getting married? : WARSHIPS (worships) AT THE ALTAR
54A. Kids’ game in which small vessels attack each other? : ROCK ‘EM SOCK ‘EM ROWBOATS (Robots)
66A. Fishing vessel that can pull only half a net behind it? : SEMI-TRAWLER (trailer)
76A. Recreational vessel that’s never left the harbor? : AIN’T SEEN NOTHING YACHT (yet)
100A. Luxury vessel with a pair of decks, both of which need swabbing? : DIRTY DOUBLE CRUISER (crosser)
111A. Cargo vessel full of iPads? : APPLE FREIGHTER (fritter)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 21m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. “Cease!,” on the seas : AVAST!
“Avast” is a nautical term used to tell someone to stop or desist from what they are doing. The word comes from the Dutch “hou vast” meaning “hold fast”.

9. Walk on the edge? : CURB
“Curb” is another of those words that I had to learn when I came to the US. We park by the “kerb” on the other side of the Atlantic. Oh, and the “pavement”, that’s what we call the “footpath” (because the footpath is “paved”!). It’s very confusing when you arrive in this country from Ireland, and a little dangerous when one has been taught to “walk on the pavement” …

17. Clubs with strobes : DISCOS
Discotheques first appeared during WWII in Occupied France. American-style music (like jazz and jitterbug dances) was banned by the Nazis, so French natives met in underground clubs that they called discotheques where records were often played on just a single turntable. After the war, these clubs came out into the open. One famous Paris discotheque was called “Whiskey a Gogo”. In that Paris disco, non-stop music was played using two turntables next to a dance-floor, and this concept spread around the world.

19. Hieroglyphic bird : IBIS
The ibis is a wading bird that was revered in ancient Egypt. “Ibis” is an interesting word grammatically speaking. You can have one “ibis” or two “ibises”, and then again one has a flock of “ibis”. And if you want to go with the classical plural, instead of two “ibises” you would have two “ibides”!

The prefix “hiero-” comes from the Greek word “hieros” meaning sacred or holy. The classic use of the prefix is in the term “hieroglyphics”, meaning “sacred carving”, the writing system that uses symbols and pictures.

21. ___ O’s (chocolaty cereal brand) : OREO
Oreo O’s were made by Post from 1998 to 2007. Oreo O’s were basically O-shaped (like Cheerios) but chocolate-flavored, dark brown in color and with white sprinkles on them. Oh, and lots of sugar.

22. Asian territory in the game Risk : URAL
Risk is a fabulous board game, one first sold in France in 1957. Risk was invented by a very successful French director of short films called Albert Lamorisse. Lamorisse called his new game “La Conquête du Monde”, which translates into English as “The Conquest of the World”. A game of Risk is a must during the holidays in our house …

24. Sailing vessels that Cap’n Crunch might commandeer? : GALLEONS (gallons) OF MILK
The first Cap’n Crunch commercials aired in 1963, at the time the product line was launched. The Cap’n’s full name is Captain Horatio Magellan Crunch, would you believe? Crunch’s voice was provided for many years by Daws Butler, the same voice actor who gave us Yogi Bear and Huckleberry Hound. Cap’n Crunch is commander of the S.S. Guppy.

27. Cuzco builders : INCAS
Cusco (also “Cuzco”) is a city in the southeast of Peru. Historically, Cusco was the historic capital of the Inca Empire, and was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983.

29. Tetris piece : BLOCK
Tetris is a very addictive video game that was developed in the Soviet Union in 1984. The name Tetris comes from a melding of the prefix “tetra-” (as all the game pieces have four segments) and “tennis” (a favorite sport played by the developer). Since 2005 there have been more than 100 million copies of the game installed on cell phones alone.

35. Smelter input : ORE
Metals are found in ore in the form of oxides. In order to get pure metal from the ore, the ore is heated and the metal oxides within are reduced (i.e. the oxygen is removed) in the chemical process known as smelting. The oxygen is extracted by adding a source of carbon or carbon monoxide which uses up the excess oxygen atoms to make carbon dioxide, a waste product of smelting (and, a greenhouse gas).

36. Whiskey distiller’s supply : RYE
For whiskey to be labelled as “rye” in the US, it has to be distilled from at least 51% rye grain. In Canada however, a drink called rye whiskey sometimes contains no rye at all.

38. Candy in collectible containers : PEZ
PEZ is an Austrian brand name for a particular candy sold in a mechanical dispenser. Famously, PEZ dispensers have molded “heads”, and have become very collectible over the years. The list of heads includes historical figures like Betsy Ross and Paul Revere, characters from “Star Wars” and “Star Trek”, and even British royalty like the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (“William and Kate”). The name PEZ comes from the first, middle and last letters of “Pfefferminz”, the German word for “peppermint”.

39. Mideast monarchy : OMAN
Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the OAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Oman is a monarchy, and the official name of the state is the Sultanate of Oman. All of the country’s legislative, executive and judiciary power resides with the hereditary sultan.

45. Resells ruthlessly : SCALPS
Scalping of tickets, selling them above retail price for an excessive profit, originated in the mid-1800s with scalpers making money off theater tickets. There was also quite a bit of money made by people scalping railway tickets. Railroads gave discounts on tickets for longer journeys, so someone trying to get from San Francisco to Chicago say, might buy a ticket to New York. Once in Chicago the passenger would scalp the remainder of his/her ticket to someone wanting to get to New York, and make his or her invested money back with a bonus. The exact etymology of the term “scalper” seems unclear.

47. Speaker on a car’s dash : GPS
Global positioning system (GPS)

Back in the 1800s, “dashboard” was the name given to a board placed at the front of a carriage to stop mud from “dashing” against the passengers in the carriage, mud that was kicked up by the hoofs of the horses. Quite interesting …

52. Actor Stephen : REA
Stephen Rea is an Irish actor from Belfast. Rea’s most successful role was Fergus in 1992’s “The Crying Game”, for which performance he was nominated for the Best Actor Oscar. In “The Crying Game”, Fergus was a member of the IRA. In real life, Rea was married to IRA bomber and hunger striker Dolours Price at the time he made the movie.

53. Split, e.g. : SUNDAE
The banana split was created in Latrobe, Pennsylvania in 1904. This particular sundae was the idea of David Stickler, a young apprentice pharmacist at the Tassel Pharmacy’s soda fountain.

54. Kids’ game in which small vessels attack each other? : ROCK ‘EM SOCK ‘EM ROWBOATS (Robots)
Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Robots is a toy featuring two robot boxer figures that was introduced in 1964.

59. Rio maker : KIA
Kia have making the subcompact model called a Rio since 2000.

60. Flood survivor : NOAH
According to the Book of Genesis, Noah lived to a ripe old age. Noah fathered his three sons Shem, Ham and Japheth when he was 500 years old, and the Great Flood took place when he was 600.

61. ___ Gold, chief of staff on “The Good Wife” : ELI
“The Good Wife” is a legal drama showing on CBS starring Julianna Margulies as Alicia Florrick, a litigator who returns to practicing the law after spending 13 years as a stay-at-home mom. I binge-watched the show some time back and found it to be well-written, with a great cast and great acting …

62. Often-quoted chairman : MAO
Mao Zedong (also “Mao Tse-tung”) was born on December 16, 1893 in the Hunan Province of China. As Mao was the son of a peasant farmer, his prospects for education were limited. Indeed he left school at age 13 to work on the family farm but did eventually get to secondary school in Changsha, the provincial capital. In the years following, Mao continued his education in Beijing and actually turned down an opportunity to study in France.

70. Bruce of “The Hateful Eight” : DERN
Bruce Dern is a Hollywood actor with quite a pedigree. Dern is the grandchild of former Utah governor and Secretary of War, George Henry Dern. Bruce’s godparents were Adlai Stevenson and Eleanor Roosevelt!

71. Messenger ___ : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

72. Rare craps roll : TWO
If one considers earlier versions of craps, then the game has been around for a very long time and probably dates back to the Crusades. It may have been derived from an old English game called “hazard” also played with two dice, which was mentioned in Geoffrey Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales” from the 1300s. The American version of the game came here courtesy of the French and first set root in New Orleans where it was given the name “crapaud”, a French word meaning “toad”.

73. Incapacitate, in a way : TASE
“To tase” is to use a taser, a stun gun.

74. Growth ring? : LEI
“Lei” is the Hawaiian word for “garland, wreath”, although in more general terms a “lei” is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

84. 1997 action film set on a plane : CON AIR
“Con Air” is an entertaining action movie that was released in 1997. The film tells the story of a bunch of convicts being transported by air who escape and take control of the plane. If you take a look at the movie’s closing credits you’ll see the words “In Memory of Phil Swartz”. Swartz, a welder with the special effects team, was killed in a tragic accident when a static model of the plane used in the movie fell on him.

85. X amount : TEN
“X” is the Roman numeral for “10”.

86. Isaac Newton, e.g. : SIR
Sir Isaac Newton was one of the most influential people in history, the man who laid the groundwork for all of classical mechanics. The story about an apple falling on his head, inspiring him to formulate his theories about gravity, well that’s not quite true. Newton often told the story about observing an apple falling in his mother’s garden and how this made him acutely aware of the Earth’s gravitational pull. However, he made no mention of the apple hitting him on the head.

90. P, to Pythagoras : RHO
Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter “p”, although it is equivalent to the Roman letter R.

Pythagoras of Samos is remembered by most these days for his work in mathematics, and for his famous Pythagorean theorem that states that in any right triangle, the square of the hypotenuse is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides. Although there is very little of Pythagoras’s own work that survives, much has been written by his successors that shows how great his influence was above and beyond mathematics, in the fields of philosophy and religion in particular. In fact, it is believed that Pythagoras coined the word “philosophy”, coming from the Greek for “loving wisdom or knowledge”. On a “timeline” of famous Greek philosophers, Pythagoras was doing his work over a hundred years before Socrates, who was followed by Plato and then Aristotle.

91. Revolver, in Roaring Twenties slang : ROSCOE
Roscoe is a slang term for a gun, especially a handgun when used in gangster circles of old. I wasn’t able to unearth the etymology of the term …

The 1920s are often called the Roaring Twenties, a period of dynamic change across all aspects of life. Things were finally returning to normal after WWI, jazz became popular, some women “broke the mold” by becoming “flappers”, and Art Deco flourished. The whole decade came to a tragic end with the Wall Street Crash of 1929, followed by the Great Depression.

95. Governess at Thornfield : EYRE
“Jane Eyre” is a celebrated novel written by Charlotte Brontë, under the pen name Currer Bell. Over the years, I’ve shared here on my blogs that the “Jane Eyre” story line is a little too dark and Gothic for my taste, but a very persuasive blog reader convinced me to look more at the romantic side of the story and give it a second chance. I watched a wonderful 4-hour television adaptation of the novel made by the BBC a while back and I have to say that because I was focused on the relationship between Jane and Rochester, I was able to push past the Gothic influences (that depress me) so I really enjoyed the story. I thoroughly recommend the 2006 BBC adaptation to fans of the novel.

96. Berkeley institution, briefly : CAL
The University of California, Berkeley (Cal) is the most difficult public university to get into in the world. It opened in 1869 and is named for Anglo-Irish philosopher George Berkeley.

99. No. of interest to some recruiters : GPA
Grade point average (GPA)

106. Malodorous mammal : POLECAT
“Polecat” is a term used for several different animals, most of which are in the weasel family.

109. A&M athlete : AGGIE
Texas A&M is the seventh largest university in the country, and was the first public higher education institute in the state when it accepted its first students in 1876. The full name of the school was the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas and its primary mission used to be the education of males in the techniques of farming and military warfare. That’s quite a combination! Because of the agricultural connection, the college’s sports teams use the moniker “Aggies”. Texas A&M is also home to the George Bush Presidential Library.

110. Matisse who painted “La Danse” : HENRI
Henri Matisse was a French artist renowned for his contribution to modern art. In his early career, Matisse was classed as a “fauve”, one of the group of artists known as the “wild beasts” who emphasized strong color over realism in their works. He was a lifelong friend of Pablo Picasso, and the two were considered to be good-natured rivals so their works are often compared. One major difference between their individual portfolios is that Picasso tended to paint from his imagination, whereas Matisse tended to use nature as his inspiration.

117. “Game of Thrones,” e.g. : SAGA
HBO’s “Game of Thrones” is a fantasy television drama that is adapted from a series of novels by George R. R. Martin called “A Song of Ice and Fire”. “Game of Thrones” is actually filmed in and around Belfast, Northern Ireland.

119. Staple of Shinto rituals : SAKE
We refer to the Japanese alcoholic beverage made from rice as “sake”. We’ve gotten things a bit mixed up in the West. “Sake” is actually the word that the Japanese use for all alcoholic drinks. What we know as sake, we sometimes refer to as rice wine. Also, the starch in the rice is first converted to sugars that are then fermented into alcohol. This is more akin to a beer-brewing process than wine production, so the end product is really a rice “beer” rather than a rice “wine”.

It is perhaps best not to describe Shinto as a religion, but more as a “spirituality of the Japanese people”, a spirituality that encompasses folklore, history and mythology. Having said that, “Shinto” translates literally as “Way of the Gods”. Most people in Japan who are described as practicing Shinto, also practice Buddhism.

123. Deadhead’s hits? : LSD
LSD (known colloquially as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

The Grateful Dead were a rock band from the San Francisco Bay Area that was founded in 1965. “The Dead” disbanded in 1995 following the death of lead guitarist Jerry Garcia. Grateful Dead fans (the ranks of whom include my wife) refer to themselves as “Deadheads”.

Down
7. Addis ___ : ABABA
Addis Ababa is the capital city of Ethiopia. The city is relatively young, having being founded in 1886 by Emperor Menelik II. Addis Ababa holds an important position within the nations of Africa as it is home to many international organizations that are focused on the continent.

9. “You Send Me” singer, 1957 : COOKE
“You Send Me” is a 1957 song written and recorded by Sam Cooke, his debut single. “You Send Me” was originally released as the B-side to a recording by Cooke of “Summertime” from George Gershwin’s opera “Porgy and Bess”. The B-side turned out to be more popular with disk jockeys, and so the subsequent releases had the A-side and B-side designations switched.

12. Libertarian pundit Neal : BOORTZ
Neal Boortz is a radio commentator and author. Boortz is a very vocal libertarian who advocates a complete overhaul of the tax system in the US, as well as the release on non-violent drug offenders.

13. Head honcho : NUMERO UNO
“Honcho” is a slang term for a leader or manager. The term comes to us from Japanese, in which language a “hancho” is a squad (han) leader (cho).

15. D.C.’s National ___ : MALL
The National Mall is a park in downtown Washington, D.C. The National Mall is home to several museums that are part of the Smithsonian, as well as the National Gallery of Art.

16. Chicago-based fraternal order : ELKS
The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (BPOE) was founded in 1868, and is a social club that has about a million members today. It started out as a group of men getting together in a “club” in order to get around the legal opening hours of taverns in New York City. The club took on a new role as it started to look out for poor families of members who passed away. The club now accepts African Americans as members (since the seventies) and women (since the nineties), but atheists still aren’t welcome.

18. Mezzanine access : STAIRS
A mezzanine in a building is a low story between two taller ones. The term came to be used for the lowest balcony in a theater in the 1920s.

20. They hang around the rain forest : SLOTHS
“Sloth”, meaning “indolence, sluggishness”, comes from the Middle English word “slowe”, the same root for our contemporary word “slow”. The animal, the sloth, is so named as it exhibits slow-moving behavior.

26. Pharma watchdog : FDA
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves drugs for specific conditions. It is quite legal for a healthcare professional to prescribe an approved medication for a use that is different to the FDA-approved indication. This usage of the drug is described as “off-label”.

31. Coat in a cote : WOOL
The Old English word “cote” was used for a small house. Our modern word “cottage” comes from “cote”. We now use “cote” to mean a small shelter on a farm for sheep or birds.

33. Longtime retailer hurt by Amazon : SEARS
Richard Sears was a station agent on the railroad. In the late 1800s, he bought up a shipment of unwanted watches that was left at his depot and sold the watches to other agents up and down the line. He was so successful that he ordered more watches and then came up with the idea of using a catalog to promote more sales. The catalog idea caught on, and his success allowed Sears to open retail locations in 1925. By the mid 1900s, Sears was the biggest retailer in the whole country.

Amazon.com is the largest online retailer in the world. The company was founded in 1994 by Jeff Bezos, in his garage in Bellevue, Washington. I’m a big fan of Amazon’s approach to customer service …

41. Choice for an online gamer : AVATAR
The Sanskrit word “avatar” describes the concept of a deity descending into earthly life and taking on a persona. It’s easy to see how in the world of “online presences” one might use the word avatar to describe one’s online identity.

42. Star of “Kinsey,” 2004 : NEESON
Irish actor Liam Neeson got his big break when he played Oskar Schindler in the Spielberg epic, “Schindler’s List”. Neeson was in the news a few years ago when he lost his wife, actress Natasha Richardson, in a tragic skiing accident in 2009.

Alfred Kinsey sure did create a stir with his work and publications. He founded the Institute for Sex Research in 1947, and published the famous “Kinsey Reports” in 1948 and 1953. I enjoyed the 2004 biopic “Kinsey”, starring Irish actor Liam Neeson in the title role.

46. Actress Téa : LEONI
Téa Leoni is an American actress. One of Leoni’s early parts was in the great film “A League of Their Own” (a minor role, Racine at first base). She also played the fiancée of Sam Malone from “Cheers” on the spin-off sitcom “Frasier”. A leading role on the big screen was opposite Adam Sandler in “Spanglish”. My favorite of her more prominent movie roles was as Jane in “Fun with Dick and Jane”. Leoni is now playing the title role in the drama series “Madam Secretary”, a show that I really enjoy …

50. Biathletes do it : SKI
A biathlon is an event requiring expertise in two sporting disciplines. The most common biathlon is the winter sport that combines cross-country skiing with rifle shooting. This traditional biathlon was born out of an exercise for Norwegian soldiers.

57. Measure of purity : KARAT
A karat (also “carat”, the spelling outside of North America) is a measure of the purity of gold alloys, with 24-karat representing pure gold.

63. “___: A Love Story” (1998 George Burns book) : GRACIE
George Burns was the stage name of comedian and actor Nathan Birnbaum. Famously, Burns was married to Gracie Allen, who initially acted as “straight man” in their double act. The duo found that they got more laughs with Gracie acting as “Dumb Dora”, an arrangement that Burns and Allen stuck to for decades.

64. Like soubise sauce : ONIONY
The onion sauce known as soubise sauce is basically a Béchamel sauce with the addition of onion purée.

69. Ehrich ___ a.k.a. Houdini : WEISS
Harry Houdini was the stage name of Hungarian-born escapologist and magician Erik Weisz (later changed to “Harry Weiss”). Many people are under the impression that Houdini died while performing an escape that went wrong, an impression created by the storyline in a couple of movies about his life. The truth is that he died of peritonitis from a burst appendix. It is also true that a few days prior to his death Houdini took a series of punches to his stomach as part of his act, but doctors believe that his appendix would have burst regardless.

92. Like the Gemini flights : ORBITAL
President Kennedy famously launched the Apollo space program in 1961. The Mercury program had been the project that put Americans into space, and NASA decided that more development work was need to bridge the gap in capabilities needed between what was known from Mercury and what was needed to land a man on the moon, the objective of the Apollo program. So, the Gemini program was born, in which astronauts learned to spend extended periods in orbit, rendezvous and dock spacecraft, walk in space, and improve the reentry and landing stage of a space flight.

97. “Around the World in 80 Days” protagonist : FOGG
“Around the World in 80 Days” is a wonderful adventure story, written by French author Jules Verne and first published in 1873. There have been some great screen adaptations of the story, including the 1956 movie starring David Niven as Phileas Fogg. In almost all adaptations, a balloon is used for part of the journey, perhaps the most memorable means of transportation on Fogg’s trip around the world. However, if you read the book, Fogg never used a balloon at all.

103. Vichyssoise vegetables : LEEKS
Vichyssoise is a thick puréed potato soup that can be served hot, but is usually served cold. As well as potatoes, a classic vichyssoise contains leeks, onions, cream and chicken stock. Although the origin is disputed, it seems that the vichyssoise was invented in America, albeit by a French chef. That chef named his soup after the town of Vichy in France.

107. Iridescent stone : OPAL
An opal is often described as having a milky iridescence, known as “opalescence”.

108. Women’s Open org. : LPGA
The Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) was founded in 1950 by a group of 13 lady golfers, and today it is the oldest ongoing women’s sports professional organization in the US.

113. Roulette bet : RED
The name “roulette” means “little wheel” in French, and the game as we know it today did in fact originate in Paris, in 1796. A roulette wheel bears the numbers 1-36. A French entrepreneur called François Blanc introduced the number “0” on the wheel, to give the house an extra advantage. Legend has it that Blanc made a deal with the devil in order to unearth the secrets of roulette. The legend is supported by the fact that the numbers 1 through 36 add up to a total of “666”, which is the “Number of the Beast”. Spooky …

115. Cool, in the ’40s : HEP
The slang term “hep” meaning “cool” has the same meaning as the later derivative term “hip”. The origins of “hep” seem unclear, but it was adopted by jazz musicians of the early 1900s.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. “Cease!,” on the seas : AVAST!
6. “What nonsense!” : BAH!
9. Walk on the edge? : CURB
13. Luminary : NAME
17. Clubs with strobes : DISCOS
19. Hieroglyphic bird : IBIS
21. ___ O’s (chocolaty cereal brand) : OREO
22. Asian territory in the game Risk : URAL
23. Roll out : DEPART
24. Sailing vessels that Cap’n Crunch might commandeer? : GALLEONS (gallons) OF MILK
27. Cuzco builders : INCAS
29. Tetris piece : BLOCK
30. Testing times : ORDEALS
31. Heavily armored vessels getting married? : WARSHIPS (worships) AT THE ALTAR
35. Smelter input : ORE
36. Whiskey distiller’s supply : RYE
37. “The plot thickens!” : OHO!
38. Candy in collectible containers : PEZ
39. Mideast monarchy : OMAN
43. Numbers on right-hand pages : ODDS
45. Resells ruthlessly : SCALPS
47. Speaker on a car’s dash : GPS
48. Polished : SUAVE
49. Fruit mentioned in the “Odyssey” : LOTUS
51. Equal : ARE
52. Actor Stephen : REA
53. Split, e.g. : SUNDAE
54. Kids’ game in which small vessels attack each other? : ROCK ‘EM SOCK ‘EM ROWBOATS (Robots)
59. Rio maker : KIA
60. Flood survivor : NOAH
61. ___ Gold, chief of staff on “The Good Wife” : ELI
62. Often-quoted chairman : MAO
63. A large amount : GOBS
66. Fishing vessel that can pull only half a net behind it? : SEMI-TRAWLER (trailer)
70. Bruce of “The Hateful Eight” : DERN
71. Messenger ___ : RNA
72. Rare craps roll : TWO
73. Incapacitate, in a way : TASE
74. Growth ring? : LEI
76. Recreational vessel that’s never left the harbor? : AIN’T SEEN NOTHING YACHT (yet)
84. 1997 action film set on a plane : CON AIR
85. X amount : TEN
86. Isaac Newton, e.g. : SIR
87. Brings up : REARS
89. Bad at one’s job : INEPT
90. P, to Pythagoras : RHO
91. Revolver, in Roaring Twenties slang : ROSCOE
94. Use scissors on : SNIP
95. Governess at Thornfield : EYRE
96. Berkeley institution, briefly : CAL
97. In place of : FOR
98. It brings people together : HUG
99. No. of interest to some recruiters : GPA
100. Luxury vessel with a pair of decks, both of which need swabbing? : DIRTY DOUBLE CRUISER (crosser)
106. Malodorous mammal : POLECAT
109. A&M athlete : AGGIE
110. Matisse who painted “La Danse” : HENRI
111. Cargo vessel full of iPads? : APPLE FREIGHTER (fritter)
114. Mown strips : SWATHS
117. “Game of Thrones,” e.g. : SAGA
118. Blackens : TARS
119. Staple of Shinto rituals : SAKE
120. Second story? : SEQUEL
121. Rub out : SLAY
122. Not needing a cane, maybe : SPRY
123. Deadhead’s hits? : LSD
124. Foolish : DIPPY

Down
1. Kick in : ADD
2. Struggle : VIE
3. Ambitiously sought : ASPIRED TO
4. Noninvasive medical procedures : SCANS
5. Flashlight : U.S. :: ___ : U.K. : TORCH
6. Consequential : BIG
7. Addis ___ : ABABA
8. Lookout point : HILLTOP
9. “You Send Me” singer, 1957 : COOKE
10. Coffee holder : URN
11. Works on as a cobbler might : RESOLES
12. Libertarian pundit Neal : BOORTZ
13. Head honcho : NUMERO UNO
14. It may end on a high note : ARIA
15. D.C.’s National ___ : MALL
16. Chicago-based fraternal order : ELKS
18. Mezzanine access : STAIRS
20. They hang around the rain forest : SLOTHS
25. Return from a trip to the Alps? : ECHO
26. Pharma watchdog : FDA
28. Surveillance aid : SPY CAM
31. Coat in a cote : WOOL
32. Fire : ARDOR
33. Longtime retailer hurt by Amazon : SEARS
34. Coverage provider? : APPAREL
40. Femme’s title : MADAME
41. Choice for an online gamer : AVATAR
42. Star of “Kinsey,” 2004 : NEESON
44. Is downright terrible : SUCKS
46. Actress Téa : LEONI
47. Beauty : GEM
48. Under goer? : SUB
50. Biathletes do it : SKI
52. Uncreative creation : REHASH
53. Forming spiral patterns : SWIRLY
55. Holy Week follower : EASTER
56. ___ State (Alabama’s nickname) : COTTON
57. Measure of purity : KARAT
58. Cheer with an accent : OLE!
63. “___: A Love Story” (1998 George Burns book) : GRACIE
64. Like soubise sauce : ONIONY
65. Coat of arms element : BANNER
67. Flock female : EWE
68. Vogue or Elle : MONTHLY
69. Ehrich ___ a.k.a. Houdini : WEISS
70. Chops up : DICES
75. Elephant ___ (pastry) : EAR
77. It may help remove a curse : TAPE DELAY
78. Hold an assembly : SIT
79. Revival movement prefix : NEO-
80. Not mainstream : NICHE
81. Bellyacher : GROUCH
82. Quits, informally : HANGS IT UP
83. Nonsensical talk : TRIPE
88. Prep for a match : SPAR
90. Dilapidated dwelling : RATTRAP
91. Manhandles, with “up” : ROUGHS
92. Like the Gemini flights : ORBITAL
93. Way out : EGRESS
96. Wares at fairs : CRAFTS
97. “Around the World in 80 Days” protagonist : FOGG
101. Nonpermanent sculpture medium : ICE
102. Flower with rays : DAISY
103. Vichyssoise vegetables : LEEKS
104. Single : UNWED
105. Dialect of Arabic : IRAQI
106. Entry ticket : PASS
107. Iridescent stone : OPAL
108. Women’s Open org. : LPGA
112. Go astray : ERR
113. Roulette bet : RED
115. Cool, in the ’40s : HEP
116. Roguish : SLY

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7 thoughts on “0806-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 6 Aug 17, Sunday”

  1. 54:23. Fun one with a clever theme. This one also had some devious cluing – e.g. "Second story" for SEQUEL and "It may help remove a curse" for TAPE DELAY which wins the prize of the day. Sad story about the making of Con Air.

    Best –

  2. Once I figured out the theme by getting APPLE FREIGHTER, I was able to get most of the other themed clues with only a few letters filled in. That provided so many letters that everything fell into place pretty quickly. Took me less tie to finish than most Sunday's.

    When I had the "DELAY" part of TAPE DELAY based on other clues, I filled in "RAIN DELAY", because in last year's World Series, there was a rain delay before the tenth and final inning of the 7th and final game when the Cubs won their first World Series in 108 years, ending the "curse" that was said to be on them. Afterwards Cub players said the rain delay helped them regroup as a team after blowing a lead in the 9th inning and re-focus on winning when play resumed. But it never seemed right, because the clue said "It may end a curse" not "It helped end a curse". Still, it was close enough that I had a hard time letting go of it. I wonder if the puzzlemaker actually thought of that admittedly rather arcane interpretation and used the phrase "end a curse" rather than "remove a curse" to bait someone like me to think that way?

  3. 51 mins 16 seconds and 8 errors, mostly from early misfills that I didn't see within the grid.

    I must say, this collection of groaner ship puns was dead in the water. Just drudgery to do. Not at all enjoyable.

  4. This was not as good as Patrick Berry's best, but it's a Sunday, and inherently a slog. He kept it interesting enough to keep me plugging on to the finish.

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