0507-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 7 May 17, Sunday

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Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today’s New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

CROSSWORD CONSTRUCTOR: Natan Last, Finn Vigeland & the J.A.S.A. Crossword Class
THEME: Duality Quality
Each of today’s themed answer comprises two words that are almost identical. Those words differ in that each starts with a different letter. The result is a series of answers that complement the clues, which each comprise two lines ending with words that differ in only their first letters:

22A. “I know my girl enjoys her youth / When this fine sound escapes her mouth” : DAUGHTER LAUGHTER
37A. “Right now, it’s fine, no five-star food, / But this dessert will soon be good!” : BUDDING PUDDING
57A. “This mensch looks up and shouts ‘Delish!’ / While downing snacks with real relish” : KOSHER NOSHER
76A. “Your will to serve must be mature / To be this keeper of nature” : GARDEN WARDEN
92A. “Go down this hallway: There’s a couch / If what you seek’s relaxing touch” : MASSAGE PASSAGE
109A. “This may have been the umpire’s doing; / Now sliding home is easy going” : BASELINE VASELINE
15D. “Kate Upton strikes an alpine pose / And belts this out, with naught to lose” : MODEL YODEL
69D. “I have this duty on my farm / To look as chickens keep eggs warm” : HATCH WATCH

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 28m 26s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Like the 30 Rock building : DECO
Art deco is the name given to a style of design and architecture of the 1920s that actually had its roots in Belgium and then spread throughout Europe before arriving in North America. Celebrated examples of art deco architecture are the magnificent Chrysler Building in New York City completed in 1930, and the GE Building that sits in the middle of Rockefeller Center also in New York City, with the address of “30 Rock”.

9. Jests : JAPES
“To jape” means “to joke or quip”. The exact origins of “jape” are unclear, but it does seem to come from Old French. In the mid-1600’s “to jape” was a slang term meaning “to have sex with”. No joke!

14. Tyrion Lannister of “Game of Thrones” and others : IMPS
HBO’s “Game of Thrones” is a fantasy television drama that is adapted from a series of novels by George R. R. Martin called “A Song of Ice and Fire”. “Game of Thrones” is actually filmed in and around Belfast, Northern Ireland.

19. Rose’s love on old Broadway : ABIE
“Abie’s Irish Rose” is comedy play by Anne Nichols that opened in 1922 on Broadway and ran for over five years. Back then, that made it the longest run for any show in New York. The show then went on tour, and stayed on tour for an amazing 40 years. The play tells of a young Jewish man called Abie Levy who marries an Irish Catholic girl called Rosemary Murphy. Abie lies to his family and pretends that his “Irish Rose” is Jewish.

21. Lady Gaga’s “___ This Way” : BORN
Lady Gaga is the stage name of Stefani Germanotta. Germanotta is a big fan of the band Queen, and she took her stage name from the marvelous Queen song titled “Radio Ga Ga”.

25. Golden calf, e.g. : IDOL
According to the Book of Exodus in the Bible, Aaron made a golden calf as an idol for the Israelites to worship while Moses was on Mount Sinai receiving the Ten Commandments. When Moses returned, he became angry on seeing the calf and destroyed it.

26. Texter’s “Wow!” : OMG
OMG is text-speak for “Oh My Gosh!” “Oh My Goodness!” or any other G words you might think of …

27. Galley propeller : OAR
Galleys were large medieval ships mainly found in the Mediterranean. They were propelled by a combination of sails and oars.

33. Place for a pie to cool : SILL
“Sill plate” or simply “sill” is an architectural term for a bottom horizontal member to which vertical members are attached. A windowsill is a specific sill plate that is found at the bottom of a window opening.

34. Half of a score : TEN
Our verb “to score” meaning “to tally”, comes from the Old Norse “skor”, which is a “mark, notch”. It is likely that items such a livestock were counted by placing a notch in a stick for each set of twenty, hence our use of the noun “score” to mean “twenty”.

35. “___ et veritas” : LUX
“Lux et veritas” translates from Latin as “Light and Truth”. “Lux et veritas” is used as a motto of several universities including Indiana University, the University of Montana and Yale University. However, Yale’s motto is often given in Hebrew, as “Urim and Thummim”.

43. Some ancient writings : PAPYRI
The papyrus plant was commonly found in the Nile Delta of Europe. The pith of the plant was used to make a thick, paper-like material on which one could write. This writing material, which became known as papyrus (plural “papyri”), became a competitor for the most popular writing surface of the day known as parchment, which was made from animal skins.

48. Spa accessory : LOOFA
The loofah (also “loofa”, “lufah” and “luffa”, all Arabic words) is a vine, with fruit that’s very popular in Asia and Africa. If the fruit is allowed to mature, it can be processed to remove everything but the more rigid xylem structure (remember your high school botany class?) leaving a soft, sponge-like mass that is used as a skin polisher.

49. Some Wall St. deals : LBOS
A leveraged buyout (LBO) is a transaction in which an investor acquires a controlling volume of stock in a company, but buys that stock with borrowed funds (hence “leveraged”). Often the assets of the acquired company are used as collateral for the borrowed money. There is a special form of LBO known as a management buyout (MBO) in which the company’s own management team purchase the controlling interest.

50. Kylo ___ (“Star Wars” villain) : REN
Adam Driver is an actor best known for playing Adam Sackler on the TV show “Girls” that airs on HBO. Driver’s career got a huge boost in 2015 when he played villain Kylo Ren in “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”.

54. Shangri-la : EDEN
Shangri-La is the earthly paradise in the mountains of Tibet described by James Hilton in his novel “Lost Horizon”. Shangri-La is “edenic” (perfect, like the Garden of Eden from the Book of Genesis). Frank Capra directed a wonderful screen adaptation of “Lost Horizon” in 1937 starring Ronald Colman.

57. “This mensch looks up and shouts ‘Delish!’ / While downing snacks with real relish” : KOSHER NOSHER
According to Jewish dietary law, “kosher” food is fit to eat, and food that is not fit to eat is referred to as “treif” (or “tref”).

“Mensch” is yet another word that comes to us via Yiddish, ultimately derived from the German “mensch” meaning “human being”. We use the term to mean someone of integrity and honor.

59. Actor Elgort of “The Fault in Our Stars” : ANSEL
“The Fault in Our Stars” is a 2014 film based on a novel of the same by John Green. Both film and novel are about two teenage cancer patients who fall in love with each other. The leads are played by Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort.

61. Due + sei : OTTO
In Italian, “due + sei” (two + six) equals “otto” (eight).

63. Acronym for a class taught over the Internet : MOOC
Massive open online course (MOOC)

69. Skin dyes : HENNAS
Henna has been used for centuries as a dye, not just for leather and wool, but also for the hair and skin. In modern days, henna is also used for temporary tattoos.

72. Tassel movers : GRADS
Tasseled mortarboards, or square academic caps, are associated with school graduations all over the world, although traditions do differ. For example in Ireland (where I come from), mortarboards are only worn by female graduates.

80. Intimidate : COW
The verb “to cow” means to intimidate, to scare. The exact etymology of the term seems unclear.

82. Like Uncle Sam : GOATEED
A goatee is a beard formed by hair on just a man’s chin. The name probably comes from the tuft of hair seen on an adult goat.

The Uncle Sam personification of the United States was first used during the War of 1812. The “Uncle Sam” term was so widely accepted that even the Germans used it during WWII, choosing the codeword “Samland” for “America” in intelligence communiques.

84. “Al ___ Lado del Río” (2004 Oscar-winning song) : OTRO
“Al otro lado del río” won the 2004 Oscar for Best Original Song. It was performed by Jorge Drexler from Uruguay for the movie “The Motorcycle Diaries”.

90. Hooter or honker : SCHNOZ
“Schnoz” is a slang term for a nose, particularly a large one.

95. “See-saw, Margery ___” (old nursery rhyme) : DAW
“See Saw Margery Daw” is a nursery rhyme that goes:

See Saw Margery Daw,
Jacky shall have a new master;
Jacky shall earn but a penny a day,
Because he can’t work any faster.

102. Bygone NBC drama : LA LAW
“L.A. Law” ran on NBC from 1986 to 1994, and was one of the network’s most successful drama series. It took over from the equally successful “Hill Street Blues” in the Thursday night 10 p.m. slot until, after a six-year run, it was itself replaced by yet another respected drama, “E.R.” The opening credits showed that famous California licence plate. The plate was on a Jaguar XJ for most of the series, but moved onto a Bentley towards the end of the run. For each series the registration sticker was updated, so no laws were being broken.

113. Oct. pennant race : ALCS
American League Championship Series (ALCS)

116. Color of el mar : AZUL
In Spanish, “el mar” (the sea) is “azul” (blue).

117. Old pop : NEHI
The Nehi cola brand has a name that sounds like “knee-high”, a measure of a small stature. Back in the mid-1900’s the Chero-Cola company, which owned the brand, went for a slightly different twist on “knee-high” in advertising. The logo for Nehi was an image of a seated woman’s stockinged legs, with her skirt pulled up to her knees, to hint at “knee-high”.

118. New York county with Lake Placid : ESSEX
The beautiful Lake Placid in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State borders the village of Lake Placid, which famously was host of the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics. Here in the US, the most memorable event of the 1980 Winter Games was the “Miracle on Ice”, in which an amateur US hockey team beat the very professional USSR team in a semi-final matchup, and went on to win gold. A lesser known fact from the 1980 Games is that the Lake Placid Middle/High School served as a private bar for the Olympics. It is the only high school in the US to have been issued a license to serve alcohol.

Down
1. Blockhead : DODO
The dodo was a direct relative of the pigeon and dove, although the fully-grown dodo was usually three feet tall. One of the reasons the dodo comes to mind when we think of extinction of a species, is that it disappeared not too long ago (last recorded alive in 1681) and humans were the reason for its demise. The dodo lived exclusively on the island of Mauritius and when man arrived, we cut back the forests that were its home. We also introduced domestic animals, such as dogs and pigs, that ransacked the dodo’s nests. The dodo was deemed to be an awkward flightless bird and so the term “dodo” has come to mean a dull-witted person.

2. Cheese sometimes paired with pinot noir : EDAM
Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

The Pinot noir wine grape variety takes its name from the French for “pine” and “black”. The grapes grow in tight clusters shaped like pine cones, and are very dark in color. The Pinot noir grape is most closely associated with Burgundy wines in France, although in recent years the popularity (and price) of California Pinot noir wine has soared after it featured so prominently in the wonderful, wonderful 2004 movie “Sideways”. Grab a bottle of Pinot, and go rent the DVD…

4. URL suffix : ORG
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

6. Ride offerer : UBER
Uber is a ridesharing service that was founded in 2009 and is based in San Francisco. The service is somewhat controversial and has been described as an illegal taxicab operation. Central to Uber’s service is the company’s mobile app, which can use the client’s GPS location to help find the nearest available ride. Uber’s main competitor is Lyft. Personally, I love the service and have only had good experiences …

10. Post-marathon feeling : ACHE
The marathon commemorates the legendary messenger-run by Pheidippides from the site of the Battle of Marathon back to Athens, and is run over 26 miles and 385 yards. The first modern Olympic marathon races were run over a distance that approximated the length of the modern-day Marathon-Athens highway, although the actual length of the race varied from games to games. For the 1908 Olympics in London, a course starting at Windsor Castle and ending in front of the Royal Box at White City Stadium was defined. This course was 26 miles and 385 yards, the standard length now used at all Olympic Games. Organizers of subsequent games continued to vary the length of the race, until a decision was made in 1921 to adopt the distance used in London in 1908.

13. “The Iron Lady” star : STREEP
“The Iron Lady” is a 2011 biopic about Margaret Thatcher, former British Prime Minister. The marvelous Meryl Streep does a wonderful job playing the title role. I had great expectations for this film and found that it didn’t quite deliver, despite a great cast.

14. Animal avatar of Thoth : IBIS
The ibis is a wading bird that was revered in ancient Egypt. “Ibis” is an interesting word grammatically speaking. You can have one “ibis” or two “ibises”, and then again one has a flock of “ibis”. And if you want to go with the classical plural, instead of two “ibises” you would have two “ibides”!

15. “Kate Upton strikes an alpine pose / And belts this out, with naught to lose” : MODEL YODEL
Kate Upton is a fashion model from St. Joseph, Michigan. Kate is a niece of US Representative Fred Upton of Michigan.

17. “Celebrity Jeopardy!” show, briefly : SNL
“Saturday Night Live” (SNL)

23. Kachina doll makers : HOPIS
Kachina dolls are wooden figures representing various Hopi spirits and deities. Traditionally, Kachina dolls were made by men and then passed on to the daughters of the village in a ceremony feting a particular spirit.

24. “___ Lang Syne” : AULD
The song “Auld Lang Syne” is a staple at New Year’s Eve (well, actually in the opening minutes of New Year’s Day). The words were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

30. Overly fussy : ANAL
The use of the word “anal” to mean “stiffly conventional” is an abbreviated form of “anal-retentive”, a term derived from Freudian psychology. Regardless, I’m not a big fan of the term …

32. ___ of Solomon : ODES
The “Odes of Solomon” are a group of 42 religious poems that have been attributed to Solomon, one of the Kings of Israel.

33. P.R. task : SPIN
Public relations (PR)

36. Chinese city known for its terra-cotta warriors : XI’AN
Xi’an, the capital of the Shaanxi province of China, is one of the oldest cities in the country, with history going back over 3,000 years. It is home to the Terracotta Army, a huge collection of terracotta sculptures that date back to the 2nd century BCE, and that were discovered buried in the ground around Xi’an. Today, in contemporary China, Xi’an is figuring at the forefront of the country’s participation in the modern world. China’s second aerospace center is being built in Xi’an, for example, and the city is also home to the world’s largest Internet Cafe/Bar, a facility with over 3,000 computers.

37. Light wood : BALSA
Balsa is a very fast growing tree that is native to parts of South America. Even though balsa wood is very soft, it is actually classified as a hardwood, the softest of all the hardwoods (go figure!). Balsa is light and strong, so is commonly used in making model airplanes. Amazingly, in WWII a full-size British plane, the de Havilland Mosquito, was built largely from balsa and plywood. No wonder they called it “The Wooden Wonder” and “The Timber Terror”.

39. Butter in South Asian cuisines : GHEE
Ghee is clarified butter used in South Asian cuisines. The “ghee” comes from Sanskrit, and translates as “sprinkled”.

42. Three-pointer shooter, usually : GUARD
That would be basketball.

44. Funny Amy : POEHLER
Amy Poehler was a cast member on “Saturday Night Live” from 2001 to 2008, notable for appearing in many great sketches, including those where she played Hillary Clinton opposite Tina Fey’s Sarah Palin. Poehler also starred with Fey in the 2008 movie “Baby Mama”. And, Poehler led the cast of the sitcom “Parks and Recreation” for its seven-season run.

47. “Peanuts” boy : LINUS
In Charles Schulz’s fabulous comic strip “Peanuts”, Charlie Brown is friends with at least three members of the van Pelt family. Most famously there is Lucy van Pelt, who bosses everyone around, particularly Charlie. Then there is Linus, Lucy’s younger brother, the character who always has his security blanket at hand. Lastly there is an even younger brother, Rerun van Pelt. Rerun is constantly hiding under his bed, trying to avoid going to school.

53. Astronomer’s sighting : NOVA
A nova is basically a star that suddenly gets much brighter, gradually returning to its original state weeks or even years later. The increased brightness of a nova is due to increased nuclear activity causing the star to pick up extra hydrogen from a neighboring celestial body. A supernova is very different from a nova. A supernova is a very bright burst of light and energy created when most of the material in a star explodes. The bright burst of a supernova is very short-lived compared to the sustained brightness of a nova.

57. Keystone officer : KOP
The Keystone Cops (sometimes “Keystone Kops”) were a band of madcap policemen characters who appeared in silent movies. A 1914 short film called “A Thief Catcher” that was believed lost was rediscovered in 2010. “A Thief Catcher” featured the magnificent Charlie Chaplin in an early role as a Keystone Cop.

60. Boston college : EMERSON
Emerson College, located in Boston’s Washington Street Theater District, offers degree programs focused on Arts and Communication. The school was founded in 1880 by Charles Wesley Emerson as the Boston Conservatory of Elocution, Oratory and Dramatic Art.

64. Force on Earth, informally : ONE G
The force of gravity (g-force) that we all feel is referred to as “one G”. As gravity is a actually an accelerating force, acceleration is measured relative to that force of gravity. So, if we are sitting in a vehicle that accelerates at 3G, then we are experiencing a force that is three times that which we feel from the gravitational pull of the earth. Zero-G is weightlessness that is experienced when in space, outside the influence of the earth’s gravity.

65. Vessel often stowed upside down : CANOE
The boat called a canoe takes its name from the Carib word “kenu” meaning “dugout”. It was Christopher Columbus who brought “kenu” into Spanish as “canoa”, which evolved into our English “canoe”.

67. Blue symbol of Delaware : HEN
The Blue Hen has been the state bird of Delaware since 1939. As a result, the athletic teams of the University of Delaware are known as the Delaware Fightin’ Blue Hens.

74. Rapper topper : DO-RAG
Hip-hoppers might wear do-rags today, but they have been around for centuries. If you recall the famous image of Rosie the Riveter, she was wearing a do-rag. The etymology is pretty evident, a piece of cloth (rag) to hold a hairstyle (do) in place.

75. Bulked up, in modern lingo : SWOLE
I know, I know. Makes me mad as well …

76. Party bowlful : GUACAMOLE
Guacamole is one of my favorite dishes, and is prepared by mashing avocados and perhaps adding the likes of tomato, onion and lime juice. The guacamole recipe dates back as early as the 16th century, to the time of the Aztecs. “Guacamole” translates as “avocado sauce”.

77. Gillette ___ Plus : ATRA
Fortunately for crossword constructors, the Atra was introduced by Gillette in 1977, as the first razor with a pivoting head. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

78. “://” preceder : HTTP
“http” are the first letters in most Internet links. “http” stands for HyperText Transfer Protocol.

81. Condition once called “shell shock,” for short : PTSD
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

84. ___ buco : OSSO
“Osso” is the Italian word for bone, as in the name of the dish called osso buco, which features braised veal shanks.

86. Ottoman’s partner : SOFA
The piece of furniture known as an ottoman can be a couch, usually with a head but no back or sides. Here in the US, the term more usually applies to a padded and upholstered seat or bench that can also be used as a footrest. The original ottoman couch came from the Ottoman Empire, hence the name.

91. Dead man walking? : ZOMBIE
A zombie is a corpse that has been brought back to life by some mystical means. Our modern use of the term largely stems from the undead creatures featured in the 1968 horror movie called “Night of the Living Dead”. Now that film I haven’t seen, and probably never will …

94. Country star Jackson : ALAN
Alan Jackson is a country music singer, and a bit of an author too. Jackson married his high school sweetheart in 1979, but they had a parting of the ways about twenty years later due to the pressures on the marriage from Jackson’s career. The pair reconciled, and Jackson wrote a book describing the relationship he has with his wife and his commitment to Christianity. The book is called “It’s All About Him: Finding the Love of My Life”, and it topped the New York Times Bestseller List.

101. Arnaz of 1950s TV : DESI
Desi Arnaz was famous for his turbulent marriage to Lucille Ball. Arnaz was a native of Cuba, and was from a privileged family. His father was Mayor of Santiago and served in the Cuban House of Representatives. However, the family had to flee to Miami after the 1933 revolt led by Batista.

102. First sentence of a news story : LEDE
The opening paragraph in any work of literature is often just called “the lead”. In the world of journalism, this is usually referred to as “the lede”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Like the 30 Rock building : DECO
5. Word said three times while smacking the forehead : DUMB!
9. Jests : JAPES
14. Tyrion Lannister of “Game of Thrones” and others : IMPS
18. It may be whiffed : ODOR
19. Rose’s love on old Broadway : ABIE
20. Little racer : GO CART
21. Lady Gaga’s “___ This Way” : BORN
22. “I know my girl enjoys her youth / When this fine sound escapes her mouth” : DAUGHTER LAUGHTER
25. Golden calf, e.g. : IDOL
26. Texter’s “Wow!” : OMG
27. Galley propeller : OAR
28. Pretext : GUISE
29. Ends : CEASES
31. 2008 Obama catchword : HOPE
33. Place for a pie to cool : SILL
34. Half of a score : TEN
35. “___ et veritas” : LUX
37. “Right now, it’s fine, no five-star food, / But this dessert will soon be good!” : BUDDING PUDDING
43. Some ancient writings : PAPYRI
45. Cry to a cop : ARREST HIM!
46. Injure badly : MAUL
48. Spa accessory : LOOFA
49. Some Wall St. deals : LBOS
50. Kylo ___ (“Star Wars” villain) : REN
51. Part of an underground network : GAS MAIN
54. Shangri-la : EDEN
55. Chump : SAP
56. Off-week, in football : BYE
57. “This mensch looks up and shouts ‘Delish!’ / While downing snacks with real relish” : KOSHER NOSHER
59. Actor Elgort of “The Fault in Our Stars” : ANSEL
61. Due + sei : OTTO
62. Robert of “Tender Mercies” : DUVALL
63. Acronym for a class taught over the Internet : MOOC
66. Veranda : PORCH
68. Wise : SAGE
69. Skin dyes : HENNAS
71. Gefilte fish fish : PIKE
72. Tassel movers : GRADS
76. “Your will to serve must be mature / To be this keeper of nature” : GARDEN WARDEN
78. “Stop right there!” : HEY!
80. Intimidate : COW
81. Places : PUTS
82. Like Uncle Sam : GOATEED
83. “___ all good” : IT’S
84. “Al ___ Lado del Río” (2004 Oscar-winning song) : OTRO
85. Food items often served with 76-Down : TACOS
87. Goofs : ERRS
88. “Just be cool” : ACT CASUAL
90. Hooter or honker : SCHNOZ
92. “Go down this hallway: There’s a couch / If what you seek’s relaxing touch” : MASSAGE PASSAGE
95. “See-saw, Margery ___” (old nursery rhyme) : DAW
96. Backing : FOR
98. Begged : PLED
99. Reporters’ group : POOL
100. French title : MADAME
102. Bygone NBC drama : LA LAW
104. Carry the day : WIN
105. Go “boohoo” : SOB
108. Primary imperative? : VOTE
109. “This may have been the umpire’s doing; / Now sliding home is easy going” : BASELINE VASELINE
113. Oct. pennant race : ALCS
114. Cry of jubilation … or guilt : I DID IT!
115. Hoist : LIFT
116. Color of el mar : AZUL
117. Old pop : NEHI
118. New York county with Lake Placid : ESSEX
119. “Why don’t we?!” : LET’S!
120. Award category word : BEST

Down
1. Blockhead : DODO
2. Cheese sometimes paired with pinot noir : EDAM
3. Suckers’ succors? : COUGH DROPS
4. URL suffix : ORG
5. Job with spreadsheets : DATA ENTRY
6. Ride offerer : UBER
7. Russian peace : MIR
8. Home to King Philippe : BELGIUM
9. Nudges, in a way : JOGS
10. Post-marathon feeling : ACHE
11. Word before or after “down” : PAT
12. Upright : ERECT
13. “The Iron Lady” star : STREEP
14. Animal avatar of Thoth : IBIS
15. “Kate Upton strikes an alpine pose / And belts this out, with naught to lose” : MODEL YODEL
16. One working on the board? : PRO SURFER
17. “Celebrity Jeopardy!” show, briefly : SNL
20. Artisans’ group : GUILD
23. Kachina doll makers : HOPIS
24. “___ Lang Syne” : AULD
30. Overly fussy : ANAL
32. ___ of Solomon : ODES
33. P.R. task : SPIN
36. Chinese city known for its terra-cotta warriors : XI’AN
37. Light wood : BALSA
38. ___ studies (college major) : URBAN
39. Butter in South Asian cuisines : GHEE
40. [!!!!] : I’M SHOCKED!
41. Identify : NAME
42. Three-pointer shooter, usually : GUARD
44. Funny Amy : POEHLER
47. “Peanuts” boy : LINUS
51. Start printing : GO TO PRESS
52. On, as a horse : ASTRIDE
53. Astronomer’s sighting : NOVA
56. Like some light wood : BLOND
57. Keystone officer : KOP
58. Drooping : SAGGY
60. Boston college : EMERSON
64. Force on Earth, informally : ONE G
65. Vessel often stowed upside down : CANOE
67. Blue symbol of Delaware : HEN
69. “I have this duty on my farm / To look as chickens keep eggs warm” : HATCH WATCH
70. Throng : SWARM
73. Not blown up : ACTUAL SIZE
74. Rapper topper : DO-RAG
75. Bulked up, in modern lingo : SWOLE
76. Party bowlful : GUACAMOLE
77. Gillette ___ Plus : ATRA
78. “://” preceder : HTTP
79. Fantasy fiction readers, e.g. : ESCAPISTS
81. Condition once called “shell shock,” for short : PTSD
83. Wasted : ICED
84. ___ buco : OSSO
86. Ottoman’s partner : SOFA
88. Not go out of date, say : AGE WELL
89. In unison : AS ONE
91. Dead man walking? : ZOMBIE
93. Divvy up : SPLIT
94. Country star Jackson : ALAN
97. Goes over : READS
101. Arnaz of 1950s TV : DESI
102. First sentence of a news story : LEDE
103. “The Adventures of ___” (European comics series) : ALIX
104. Float in the air : WAFT
106. Weight : ONUS
107. Wallop : BELT
108. Jones of CNN : VAN
110. Family girl : SIS
111. Go (for) : VIE
112. Test site : LAB

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6 thoughts on “0507-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 7 May 17, Sunday”

  1. At the end, I had V_N/_LCS and guessed the missing letter was either an A or an I, but I tried the I first and then the A, getting rid of the "almost there" message and stopping the clock at 28:16. Except for that, a pretty straightforward puzzle …

  2. 32:24, no errors. Pretty easy for a Sunday.

    The entire theme, I thought, was kind of dumb. I thought it was word pairs that *look* like they would be pronounced the same, but aren't. How that ties in with weak little rhymes (is it because the rhyme's key words ARE pronounced the same?) is also beyond me. No idea what they were trying to accomplish, besides the usual excuse, "cleverness". And it produces the usual results: FAIL.

  3. After reviewing Bill's comments a second time, in a somewhat more leisurely fashion than last week, I realize that I failed to understand all the nuances of the theme: in particular, I didn't notice that the "rhyming" words in the clues, like the pairs of words in the entries, don't actually rhyme (in spite of what our anonymous critic says). For me, the puzzle nicely demonstrates the oddities of English spelling and pronunciation: it's a wonder that people who learn it as a first language – let alone as a second language – manage to cope with all of its eccentricities.

    So … Dumb? Fail? I don't think so. Clever? Yes, by all means!

  4. 33:38, two errors. 84A OTRA, 75D SWALE. MOOC is my new word for the day.

    Agree with Dave, the theme words look like they should rhyme. It is interesting how changing the first letter of some words changes the pronunciation of the remaining letters. Enjoyed todays challenge.

  5. For 188A, Bill wrote "an amateur US hockey team beat the very professional USSR team in a semi-final matchup, and went on to win gold."

    For such a famous event, the details of how USA won gold is usually misunderstood, as it is here. There were, in fact, no finals or semi finals in 1980. Rather, it was a second round robin consisting of the top 2 finishers in each of the 2 main round robin divisions (USA, USSR, Finland, Sweden).

  6. Very clever that the clues, the answers and even the puzzle title are all in the same "rhyme scheme." Well done, Natan Last, Finn Vigeland & the J.A.S.A. Crossword Class.

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