0326-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Mar 17, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Tracy Gray & Jeff Chen
THEME: Mixed Results
Today’s themed answers each include a color. That color has been MIXED for us using constituent colors in the grid. Those constituent colors are in pairs that cross each other. So, the colors actually in the grid have to be MIXED in order to give the correct color needed to answer the clue correctly. Complicated!

23A. 1970s TV cartoon series, with “The” : PINK PANTHER SHOW (mixing RED into WHITE)
45A. 1973 #1 hit for Jim Croce : BAD, BAD LEROY BROWN (mixing GREEN into RED)
93A. Title creature in a 1958 #1 Sheb Wooley hit : PURPLE PEOPLE EATER (mixing BLUE into RED)
119A. Dystopian film of 1971 : A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (mixing RED into YELLOW)
15D. “Idaho cakes,” in diner lingo : HASH BROWNS (mixing RED into GREEN)
19D. B-side of Bruce Springsteen’s “Dancing in the Dark” : PINK CADILLAC (mixing WHITE into RED)
66D. Easy-to-peel fruit : MANDARIN ORANGE (mixing RED into YELLOW)
74D. Military decorations featuring George Washington’s profile : PURPLE HEARTS (mixing RED into BLUE)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 58s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Martin Van Buren was the first president who wasn’t one : WASP
The not-so-nice acronym “WASP”,stands for White Anglo-Saxon Protestant. The term is used for Americans with a relatively high position in society, and who are usually of British descent.

Martin Van Buren was the eighth President of the US, and also served as Vice President and Secretary of State under President Andrew Jackson. Although Van Buren was the first president who was born a US citizen, he was the only president whose first language wasn’t English, as he grew up speaking Dutch.

18. Vitamix competitor : OSTER
The Oster brand of small appliances was introduced in 1924 by John Oster. He started out by making manually-powered hair clippers designed for cutting women’s hair, and followed up with a motorized version in 1928. The clippers kept the company in business until 1946 when Oster diversified, buying a manufacturer of liquefying blenders in 1946. The blender was renamed an Osterizer, and was a big hit. Oster was bought up by Sunbeam, which has owned the brand since 1960.

20. Hoity-toity : SNOOTY
Believe it or not, the term “hoity-toity” has been in the English language since the 1660s, but back then it meant “riotous behavior”. It began to mean “haughty” in the late 1800s, simply because the “haughty” sounds similar to “hoity”.

21. Shelley’s “To the Moon,” e.g. : ODE
Percy Bysshe Shelley was an English Romantic poet. Shelley had strong views on vegetarianism. He was dedicated to the cause of all sentient beings, believing that the slaughter of animals by humans for the use of food was a barbaric practice. He wrote a famous essay on the subject called “A Vindication of Natural Diet” in 1813.

22. It’s between the Study and Lounge on a Clue board : HALL
Clue is board game that we knew under a different name growing up in Ireland. Outside of North America, Clue is marketed as “Cluedo”. Cluedo was the original name of the game, introduced in 1949 by the famous British board game manufacturer Waddingtons. There are cute differences between the US and UK versions. For example, the man who is murdered is called Dr. Black (Mr. Boddy in the US), one of the suspects is the Reverend Green (Mr. Green in the US), and the suspect weapons include a dagger (a knife in the US), a lead pipe (lead piping in the US) and a spanner (a wrench in the US). I think it’s a fabulous game, a must during the holidays …

23. 1970s TV cartoon series, with “The” : PINK PANTHER SHOW (mixing RED into WHITE)
The Pink Panther is a character who appears in the main title of most of “The Pink Panther” series of films. The character became so popular that he was featured in a whole series of short films, and even merited his own “The Pink Panther Show”, which was a cartoon series that was shown on NBC on Saturday mornings.

26. World capital whose seal depicts St. Hallvard : OSLO
Hallvard’s Cathedral was built in Oslo, Norway in the first half of the 12th century. In the 1600s, much of Oslo was destroyed in a great fire and so King Christian IV decided to move the city and have it rebuilt a few miles to west. A new cathedral was built, and the old Hallvard’s Cathedral, which was still standing after the fire, fell into disrepair and became a ruin.

28. It might give you a shock : EEL
Electrophorus electricus is the biological name for the electric eel. Despite its name, the electric “eel” isn’t an eel at all, but rather what is called a knifefish, a fish with an elongated body that is related to the catfish. The electric eel has three pairs of organs along its abdomen, each capable of generating an electric discharge. The shock can go as high as 500 volts with 1 ampere of current (that’s 500 watts), and that could perhaps kill a human.

29. Missile Command maker : ATARI
“Missile Command” is a fun arcade game that was introduced by Atari in 1980. Playing the game involves protecting six cities that are being attacked by ballistic missiles. The original game’s design featured six cities in California, namely Eureka, San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles and San Diego.

30. Scintilla : WHIT
A “scintilla” is a small amount. The term can also be used to describe a spark or a flash (as in “to scintillate”). The term came into English from Latin, in which language it means “spark, particle of fire, atom”.

31. Filmer in a stadium : SKYCAM
Skycam is a brand name, which now tends to be used generically. “Skycam” refers to that TV camera mounted on cables over say a football field that allows for some very cool shots as the camera seems to swoop down to the play to follow the action, almost like it’s part of a video game.

33. Noodle dish : RAMEN
Ramen is a noodle dish composed of Chinese-style wheat noodles in a meat or fish broth flavored with soy or miso sauce. Ramen is usually topped with sliced pork and dried seaweed.

45. 1973 #1 hit for Jim Croce : BAD, BAD LEROY BROWN (mixing GREEN into RED)
“Bad, Bad Leroy Brown” is a song written and first performed by Jim Croce; a number-one hit for him in 1973.

51. Téa of “Madam Secretary” : LEONI
Téa Leoni is an American actress. One of Leoni’s early parts was in the great film “A League of Their Own” (a minor role, Racine at first base). She also played the fiancée of Sam Malone from “Cheers” on the spinoff sitcom “Frasier”. A leading role on the big screen was opposite Adam Sandler in “Spanglish”. My favorite of her more prominent movie roles was as Jane in “Fun with Dick and Jane”. Leoni is now playing the title role in the drama series “Madam Secretary”, a show that I really enjoy …

“Madam Secretary” is TV show that first aired in 2014. It is about an ex-CIA analyst who is appointed as US Secretary of State. Téa Leoni plays the title role, ably supported by a favorite actress of mine, Bebe Neuwirth. I like this show …

56. First and last word of the Musketeers’ motto : ALL
“All for one, and one for all” is a motto associated with the title characters in the Alexandre Dumas novel “Three Musketeers”. Actually, it is the motto of the Three Musketeers along with their comrade d’Artagnan …

Alexandre Dumas’ “Three Musketeers” are Athos, Porthos and Aramis, although the hero of the novel is their young protégé is D’Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, the three “musketeers” really don’t use their muskets, and are better known for prowess with their swords.

70. Jury-rigged : STOPGAP
“To jury-rig” (sometimes “jerry-rig”) is to execute a makeshift repair or to manufacture a temporary contrivance. The term comes from sailing ships in which a jury rig is an improvised mast and yards that is erected as a replacement when the original mast is damaged or lost.

82. James of NBC’s “The Blacklist” : SPADER
“The Blacklist” is an entertaining, albeit a little formulaic, crime drama TV show starring James Spader and Megan Boone. Spader plays a successful criminal who surrenders to the FBI in order to help catch a “blacklist” of high-profile criminals.

84. One side in golf’s Ryder Cup : USA
The Ryder Cup trophy was donated to the game of golf by Samuel Ryder, an English entrepreneur. Ryder made his money selling garden seeds in small packets. He only took up golf when he was in his fifties but became quite the enthusiast and eventually donated the trophy in 1927, when it was valued at 100 guineas. The Ryder Cup is a biennial tournament played between teams from the US and Europe.

90. Pennsylvania’s “Gem City” : ERIE
Erie is a city in the very north of Pennsylvania, right on the southern shore of Lake Erie. The city takes its name from the Erie Native American tribe that resided in the area. Erie is nicknamed the Gem City, a reference to the “sparkling” Lake Erie.

92. Director Kurosawa : AKIRA
Akira Kurosawa was an Oscar-winning Japanese film director. His most famous movie to us in the West has to be “The Seven Samurai”, the inspiration for “The Magnificent Seven” starring Yul Brynner, and indeed a basis for “Star Wars: The Clone Wars”.

93. Title creature in a 1958 #1 Sheb Wooley hit : PURPLE PEOPLE EATER (mixing BLUE into RED)
As well as having his huge hit in 1958 called “The Purple People Eater”, Sheb Wooley played Ben Miller in the movie “High Noon” and co-starred in the TV’s “Rawhide”, playing the role of Pete Nolan. Wooley also wrote the theme song for the long-running television show “Hee Haw”.

99. Figure skating jump : LUTZ
In figure skating, a Lutz is a toe-pick-assisted jump that one starts skating backwards and ends skating backwards (there’s more to it that I don’t really understand!). The maneuver is named after Alois Lutz, an Austrian skater who first performed it in competition way back in 1913. Lutz wowed the crowd with a single jump, and today both men and women are landing triple Lutz jumps. No one has landed a clean quadruple Lutz in competition.

106. Control groups : JUNTAS
A junta is a group of military officers that rule a country, usually after having seized power forcibly. “Junta” is a Spanish word meaning “council”.

110. Captain of the Pequod : AHAB
Captain Ahab is the obsessed and far from friendly captain of the Pequod in Herman Melville’s “Moby-Dick”. The role of Captain Ahab was played by Gregory Peck in the 1956 John Huston film adaptation. Patrick Stewart played Ahab in a 1998 miniseries in which Peck made another appearance, as Father Mapple.

111. Actor Reeves : KEANU
Keanu Reeves is a Canadian actor whose most celebrated roles were a metalhead in “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure” (1989), a cop in “Speed” (1994) and the protagonist Neo in “The Matrix” series of films. Although Reeves is a Canadian national, he was born in Beirut, Lebanon. Reeves has some Hawaiian descent, and the name “Keanu” is Hawaiian for “the coldness”.

118. Cameo, for one : PART
Even in my day, a cameo role was more than just a short appearance in a movie (or other artistic piece). For the appearance to be a cameo, the actor had to playing himself or herself, and was instantly recognizable. With this meaning it’s easy to see the etymology of the term, as a cameo brooch is one with the recognizable carving of the silhouette of a person. Nowadays, a cameo is any minor role played by a celebrity or famous actor, regardless of the character played.

119. Dystopian film of 1971 : A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (mixing RED into YELLOW)
“A Clockwork Orange” is a novella by Anthony Burgess, first published in 1962. The story is about a young teenager named Alex, who leads a small gang on violent rampages each night. The story has been adapted for the big and small screens, most famously in a 1971 film by Stanley Kubrick. It’s way too violent for me …

122. Rihanna album featuring “Work” : ANTI
The singer Rihanna was born and grew up on the island of Barbados and moved to the US when she was 16-years-old to pursue a singing career. “Rihanna” is her stage name, as she was born Robyn Rihanna Fenty. The name “Rihanna” is derived from the Welsh name “Rhiannon”.

123. Juice brand whose middle letter is represented as a heart : POM
POM Wonderful is a privately-held company that has been making fruit juice drinks since 2002. The main product line is pomegranate juice, hence the company name.

124. Tushy : HEINIE
The slang term “heinie”, meaning “rear end”, is probably a contraction of “hind end”.

“Tush” is a slang term for the backside, an abbreviation of “tochus” that comes from the Yiddish “tokhes”.

125. Biggest employer in Moline, Ill. : DEERE
Moline is a city in Illinois located on the border with Iowa. The biggest employer in town by far is John Deere, which has its headquarters there.

129. Wild Turkey and Jim Beam : RYES
Wild Turkey is a brand of Kentucky straight bourbon whiskey that has been distilled in and around Lawrenceburg, Kentucky since 1869. Wild Turkey’s Master Distiller is Jimmy Russell, who is now the longest-serving master distiller in the whole world.

Jim Beam is the world’s highest-selling brand of bourbon. Jim Beam whiskey has roots going back to around 1795 when Jacob Beam sold his first corn whiskey. The whiskey took on the name “bourbon”, possibly after Bourbon County in Kentucky.

Down
2. Word both before and after “to” : ASHES
“Ashes to ashes, dust to dust” is a phrase used in the Anglican tradition during a burial service.

4. Little Rascals’ ring-eyed pooch : PETEY
Hal Roach made a whole series of comedy shorts with “The Little Rascals”, also known as “Our Gang”. The gang included a Pit Bull Terrier that we should remember, as he had that distinctive ring around his eye. When the dog first appeared on screen, he was called “Pansy”, but the name was soon changed to “Pete the Pup”, or sometimes simply “Petey”.

5. Big airport inits. : TSA
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is the agency that employs the good folks that check passengers and baggage at airports.

6. Hathaway of “The Intern” : ANNE
“The Intern” is an entertaining comedy released in 2015 starring Robert De Niro in the title role, a 70-year-old retired executive who joins a senior citizen intern program. De Niro’s young boss is played by Anne Hathaway. The initial plan had been to cast Michael Caine and Tina Fey as leads, but things worked out just fine with the “replacements”, I’d say …

10. Image on the back of a dollar bill : PYRAMID
Conspiracy theorists love to point out “suspicious” symbols on the one-dollar bill. The pyramid on the bill is unfinished, with 13 steps. The number 13 has been associated with the occult, but it is also the number of original colonies that declared independence from Britain forming the United States. Not so suspicious after all …

11. Lindsay of “Freaky Friday” : LOHAN
“Freaky Friday” is a well-known children’s novel, written by Mary Rodgers and published in 1972. The basic story is that one Friday, a mother and her teenage daughter have their bodies switched due to the effects of an enchanted fortune cookie. Hilarity ensues! In the 2003 screen adaptation, Jamie Lee Curtis plays the mother, and Lindsay Lohan the daughter.

14. Hearty soups : CHOWDERS
The type of soup known as “chowder” may be named for the pot in which it used to be cooked called a “chaudière”, a French term.

15. “Idaho cakes,” in diner lingo : HASH BROWNS (mixing RED into GREEN)
Diner lingo, the verbal slang used by the staff, can be very colorful. Here are a few examples:

  • Adam & Eve on a raft: two poached eggs on toast
  • Adam & Eve on a raft and wreck ’em: two scrambled eggs on toast
  • Burn one: put a hamburger on the grill
  • Burn one, take it through the garden and pin a rose on it: hamburger with lettuce, tomato and onion
  • Down: on toast
  • Whiskey down: on rye toast
  • Cluck and grunt: ham and eggs

16. Slapstick sidekick of old comedy : OLLIE
Oliver Hardy was born Norvell Hardy in 1892 in Harlem, Georgia. Hardy used the stage name “Oliver” as a tribute to his father Oliver Hardy. His early performances were credited as “Oliver Norvell Hardy”, and off camera his nickname was “Babe Hardy”. Hardy appeared in several films that also featured the young British actor Stan Laurel, but it wasn’t until 1927 that they teamed up to make perhaps the most famous double act in the history of movies. The Laurel and Hardy act came to an end in 1955. That year, Laurel suffered a stroke, and then later the same year Hardy had a heart attack and stroke from which he never really recovered.

19. B-side of Bruce Springsteen’s “Dancing in the Dark” : PINK CADILLAC (mixing WHITE into RED)
“Dancing in the Dark” is a 1984 Bruce Springsteen song, and his biggest hit. If you take a look at the music video released at the same time, it features Springsteen performing the song on stage. At the end of the video, the singer brings a fan on stage and dances with her, and that fan is played by actress Courtney Cox.

34. Actress Peet : AMANDA
The actress Amanda Peet studied acting with the celebrated Uta Hagen at Columbia University. Peet has appeared in a number of successful films including “The Whole Nine Yards” and “Syriana”. I remember her best from what I thought was a great TV show (but no one seemed to agree!) called “Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip”.

43. Zen master’s query : KOAN
The concept of “koan” appears in the Zen Buddhist tradition. A koan is a story, question or perhaps a statement that is used as an aid to meditation. It often takes the form of a problem or riddle that has no logical solution and is intended to help the meditator break free of reason and develop intuition.

59. Costume worn by Michelle Pfeiffer in “Batman Returns” : CATSUIT
Catwoman is a supervillain who is usually depicted as an adversary of Batman in comics. In the sixties television show “Batman”, Catwoman was first portrayed by actress Julie Newmar, but then the more memorable Eartha Kitt took over, with the marvelously “feline voice”. On the big screen, Catwoman has been played by Lee Meriwether in “Batman” (1966), by Michelle Pfeiffer in “Batman Returns” (1992), by Halle Berry in “Catwoman” (2004) and by Anne Hathaway in “The Dark Knight Rises” (2012).

62. Parisian palace : ELYSEE
The Élysée Palace is the official residence of the French President, and is near the Champs-Élysées in Paris. In the 1800s, there used to be a tunnel between the Élysée Palace and the nearby Tuileries Palace, a tunnel used quite often by Napoleon Bonaparte. While Napoleon lived in the Tuileries Palace, he would meet his mistresses in the Élysée Palace. He was ever the soul of discretion …

67. “Rabbit Is Rich” Pulitzer winner : UPDIKE
The 1960 novel by John Updike called “Rabbit Run” tells the story of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom as he tries to escape from his constraining, middle-class life. “Rabbit Run” is the first in a series of novels from Updike that feature the “Rabbit” character, the others being:

“Rabbit Redux”
“Rabbit is Rich”
“Rabbit at Rest”
“Rabbit Remembered”

72. P.D. dispatch : APB
An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

73. Epstein-___ virus : BARR
The virologists Michael Anthony Epstein and Yvonne Barr discovered what’s now called the Epstein-Barr virus. It is in the herpes family and is one of the most common viruses found in humans. Epstein-Barr causes glandular fever, and is associated with some forms of cancer.

74. Military decorations featuring George Washington’s profile : PURPLE HEARTS (mixing RED into BLUE)
The Purple Heart is a military decoration awarded by the President to members of the US military forces who have been wounded or killed while serving. Today’s Purple Heart was originally called the Badge of Military Merit, an award that was established by George Washington 1782 while he was commander-in-chief of the Continental Army. The Purple Heart is a heart-shaped medal with a gold border bearing a profile of President Washington, and a purple ribbon.

78. Jolly Roger, in “Peter Pan” : BRIG
A brig, short for brigantine, is a type of ship. It was the use of brigantines as prison ships that led to the use of “brig” as the word for a jail or prison cell on a seagoing vessel.

In J. M. Barrie’s play and novel about Peter Pan, Captain Hook and his crew sail on the pirate ship called the Jolly Roger.

79. Indian city whose name is an anagram of some Indian music : AGRA
Agra is a medieval city on the banks of the river Yamuna in India. Agra was also the capital of the Mughal Empire from 1556 to 1658. The city is home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites:

  • The Taj Mahal: the famous mausoleum built in memory of Mumtaz Mahal.
  • Agra Fort: the site where the famous Koh-i-Noor diamond was seized.
  • Fatehpur Sikri: a historic city that’s home to well-preserved Mughal architecture.

Raga isn’t really a type of music, but has been described as the “tonal framework” in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners). Western rock music with a heavy Indian influence might be called raga rock.

80. Bona fide : REAL
“Bona fide(s)” translates from the Latin as “in good faith”, and is used to indicate honest intentions. It can also mean that something is authentic, like a piece of art that is represented in good faith as being genuine.

94. South American prairie : LLANO
“Llano” is the Spanish word for “plain”.

95. Harem servants, often : EUNUCHS
The word “eunuch” comes from the Greek words “eune” meaning “bed” and “ekhein” meaning “to keep”, so literally a eunuch is a bed-keeper. Indeed, in many early cultures a eunuch was a slave who had been castrated at an early age to render him “safe”, and who was then given lowly domestic tasks such as making the master’s bed, bathing him etc.

96. One of the geeks on “The Big Bang Theory” : RAJ
Raj Koothrappali is a character on the sitcom “The Big Bang Theory” who is played by British-Indian actor Kunal Nayyar. Nayyar is married to Neha Kapur, a former Miss India.

101. Former Big Apple mayor Giuliani : RUDY
Rudy Giuliani became known around the world as he stepped up and led his city during the terrible days following the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York. His actions that September earned him a number of accolades. He was named as “Time” magazine’s person of the year, and was given an honorary knighthood by Queen Elizabeth II.

102. Fruit tree : PAPAW
The papaw (also “pawpaw”) tree is native to North America and has a fruit that looks similar to a papaya. Papaw probably gets its name from the word papaya, but papaw and papaya are two distinct species.

103. 1953 hit film set in Wyoming : SHANE
The classic 1953 western movie called “Shane” was based on the novel of the same name by Jack Schaefer published in 1949. Alan Ladd had a rough end to his life. In 1962 he was found unconscious in a pool of blood with a bullet wound in his chest, an abortive suicide attempt. Two years later he was found dead, apparently having died from an accidental overdose of drugs and sedatives. He was 50 years old.

104. Animal with striped legs : OKAPI
The okapi is closely related to the giraffe, although it does have markings on its legs and haunches that resemble those of a zebra. The okapi’s tongue is long enough to reach back and wash its eyeballs, and can go back even further to clean its ears inside and out.

107. City with a University of Texas campus : TYLER
Tyler, Texas is nicknamed “Rose Capital of the World” as it plays a major role in the US’s rose-growing industry and is home to the country’s largest rose garden. The city is named for President John Tyler in recognition of the support he gave to the admission of Texas into the United States.

108. “Revelations” choreographer : AILEY
Alvin Ailey was a dancer who formed his own group in New York in 1958, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. The most famous work that Ailey choreographed was called “Revelations”. President Barack Obama awarded Ailey the Presidential Medal of Freedom, posthumously in 2014.

112. “The Wealth of Nations” subj. : ECON
Adam Smith was a pioneer in the field of “political economy”, an original term used for the study of production and trade and their relationship with law, government and the distribution of wealth. Adam Smith’s great work is called “The Wealth of Nations”, published in 1776. The book was a big hit within his own lifetime and went a long way to earning him the reputation as the father of modern economics and capitalism. Smith coined the phrase “the invisible hand of the market”, describing his assertion that a marketplace tends to self-regulate.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Martin Van Buren was the first president who wasn’t one : WASP
5. Get ready for a long drive : TANK UP
11. I.M. chuckle : LOL
14. Martial arts move : CHOP
18. Vitamix competitor : OSTER
20. Hoity-toity : SNOOTY
21. Shelley’s “To the Moon,” e.g. : ODE
22. It’s between the Study and Lounge on a Clue board : HALL
23. 1970s TV cartoon series, with “The” : PINK PANTHER SHOW (mixing RED into WHITE)
26. World capital whose seal depicts St. Hallvard : OSLO
27. Pull out : SECEDE
28. It might give you a shock : EEL
29. Missile Command maker : ATARI
30. Scintilla : WHIT
31. Filmer in a stadium : SKYCAM
33. Noodle dish : RAMEN
35. Rushes on banks? : SEDGES
37. Medicinal plant : ALOE
39. Possible subject of a French scandal : AMIE
40. German article : DER
41. “Who ___ you?” : ASKED
45. 1973 #1 hit for Jim Croce : BAD, BAD LEROY BROWN (mixing GREEN into RED)
51. Téa of “Madam Secretary” : LEONI
52. Pull (in) : REIN
53. Philosopher who wrote “To be sane in a world of madmen is in itself madness” : ROUSSEAU
55. It may carry a virus : EMAIL
56. First and last word of the Musketeers’ motto : ALL
57. Pour, as wine : DECANT
60. Degree in math? : NTH
61. Wrestler’s wear : SINGLET
63. Claw : TEAR AT
65. Tickles : AMUSES
68. Target protector, perhaps : MALL COP
70. Jury-rigged : STOPGAP
72. Monastery head’s jurisdiction : ABBACY
75. Feudal lords : LIEGES
77. Practice mixology : TEND BAR
81. Chum : PAL
82. James of NBC’s “The Blacklist” : SPADER
84. One side in golf’s Ryder Cup : USA
86. Song of mourning : DIRGE
87. Big, husky sorts : BRUISERS
90. Pennsylvania’s “Gem City” : ERIE
92. Director Kurosawa : AKIRA
93. Title creature in a 1958 #1 Sheb Wooley hit : PURPLE PEOPLE EATER (mixing BLUE into RED)
97. Buick model : REGAL
98. Planter’s aid : HOE
99. Figure skating jump : LUTZ
100. It’s a wrap : SARI
102. False start? : PSEUDO-
105. Words of defiance : CAN SO!
106. Control groups : JUNTAS
110. Captain of the Pequod : AHAB
111. Actor Reeves : KEANU
113. Onetime acquisition of G.E. : RCA
116. Shipping coolant : DRY ICE
118. Cameo, for one : PART
119. Dystopian film of 1971 : A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (mixing RED into YELLOW)
122. Rihanna album featuring “Work” : ANTI
123. Juice brand whose middle letter is represented as a heart : POM
124. Tushy : HEINIE
125. Biggest employer in Moline, Ill. : DEERE
126. Bridge position : WEST
127. Drop-___ : INS
128. GPS, e.g., in military lingo : SAT NAV
129. Wild Turkey and Jim Beam : RYES

Down
1. Bowls over : WOWS
2. Word both before and after “to” : ASHES
3. Retriever’s retrieval, maybe : STICK
4. Little Rascals’ ring-eyed pooch : PETEY
5. Big airport inits. : TSA
6. Hathaway of “The Intern” : ANNE
7. Point out : NOTE
8. Cabbage variety : KOHLRABI
9. Rice-Eccles Stadium player : UTE
10. Image on the back of a dollar bill : PYRAMID
11. Lindsay of “Freaky Friday” : LOHAN
12. Sign of decay : ODOR
13. Civil rights icon John : LEWIS
14. Hearty soups : CHOWDERS
15. “Idaho cakes,” in diner lingo : HASH BROWNS (mixing RED into GREEN)
16. Slapstick sidekick of old comedy : OLLIE
17. Movie review revelations : PLOTS
19. B-side of Bruce Springsteen’s “Dancing in the Dark” : PINK CADILLAC (mixing WHITE into RED)
24. Toll : PEAL
25. Shade of gray : STEEL
32. Gaggle : geese :: ___ : emus : MOB
34. Actress Peet : AMANDA
36. Big name in ice cream : EDY’S
38. Rank between viscount and marquess : EARL
41. What may be brewing : ALES
42. Interstate hauler : SEMI
43. Zen master’s query : KOAN
44. Conundrum : ENIGMA
46. Shoulder muscle : DELTOID
47. Lyre-plucking Muse : ERATO
48. Howard of Hollywood : RON
49. Delighting? : OUTAGE
50. Letter header : DATE
54. Stammered syllables : UHS
56. Delta hub, in brief : ATL
58. European language : ERSE
59. Costume worn by Michelle Pfeiffer in “Batman Returns” : CATSUIT
62. Parisian palace : ELYSEE
64. French for “sword” : EPEE
66. Easy-to-peel fruit : MANDARIN ORANGE (mixing RED into YELLOW)
67. “Rabbit Is Rich” Pulitzer winner : UPDIKE
69. Hug : CLASP
71. Org. that usually meets in evenings : PTA
72. P.D. dispatch : APB
73. Epstein-___ virus : BARR
74. Military decorations featuring George Washington’s profile : PURPLE HEARTS (mixing RED into BLUE)
76. Welcomes : GREETS
78. Jolly Roger, in “Peter Pan” : BRIG
79. Indian city whose name is an anagram of some Indian music : AGRA
80. Bona fide : REAL
83. ___ Bowl : PRO
85. Matches, at a table : SEES
88. “Hmm … probably not” : I DOUBT IT
89. Burned rubber : SPED
91. Comic’s asset : RAZOR WIT
94. South American prairie : LLANO
95. Harem servants, often : EUNUCHS
96. One of the geeks on “The Big Bang Theory” : RAJ
101. Former Big Apple mayor Giuliani : RUDY
102. Fruit tree : PAPAW
103. 1953 hit film set in Wyoming : SHANE
104. Animal with striped legs : OKAPI
105. Difficult conditions for sailing : CALMS
107. City with a University of Texas campus : TYLER
108. “Revelations” choreographer : AILEY
109. Hit pay dirt : SCORE
112. “The Wealth of Nations” subj. : ECON
114. Its state song is “Yankee Doodle”: Abbr. : CONN
115. Opera highlight : ARIA
117. ___ milk : EWE’S
120. Mauna ___ : KEA
121. Bandleader Eubanks, familiarly : KEV

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10 thoughts on “0326-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Mar 17, Sunday”

  1. TANK UP was the *least* of the chicanery… you've never tanked up with gas before a long road trip?

    No, I "got" the theme eventually…. and it was kind of "cute"… but just couldn't make it work. Bottom left in particular was just beyond me. I think I need to just steer clear of anything with Jeff Chen's name on it. His trickery just annoys the hell out of me…

  2. Great theme. Saw that RED was the governing color, but had to come here to seen how it combined with the others to produce the hidden color. Lots of WOWs in this one.

    Enjoyment, but not admiration of the constructors, was somewhat diminished in the SE, where SATNAY/KEY and RAJ/JUNTAS/AILEY crossings overmatched me.

  3. I ended up with eleven individual letters that were incorrect. The biggest entry that I missed was the Springsteen song. I was looking for something with "pink ladies" so all of my mistakes were centered around that. I did, however, get the theme and that helped a lot.

  4. No joy for me. The local paper printed the right grid, but all the wrong clues. May not see the correct clue list until next Sunday somewhere in the paper.

  5. DNF on the upper right (9 squares), after about 56min or so (42 minutes or so before I realized I was stuck there). Too much nuttiness there for me to work out.

  6. 25:56, no errors. Got BAD, BAD LEROY *** early, but couldn't see how the theme would relate (couldn't imagine that mixing red/green makes brown). Eventually got to *** PEOPLE EATER crossing with **** HEARTS, and got the red/blue makes purple connection.

    Jim Croce is one of my all-time favorite song writers. Wrote quite a few excellent songs in his short career. Although I am a melody centric guy, his songs are definitely worth checking the lyrics.

    Car Wash Blues:

    Just got out of the county prison,
    doing ninety days for non-support.
    Tried to find an executive position,
    But no matter how smooth I talked,
    He wouldn't listen to the fact that I was a genius,
    Man said he got all that he can use.
    I got them steadily depressin' low down mind messin'
    Workin' at the car wash blues.

  7. Makers Mark and Jim Beam are Bourbons. They are sour mash whiskeys of at least 51% corn, aged for a minimum of 4 years in new, charred oak barrels. There are other restrictions which can be looked up on the net. They are not rye whiskeys.

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