0122-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 22 Jan 17, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Schoenholz
THEME: Mishmash
Each of today’s themed answers starts with a common phrase. The last word in that phrase is the first half of a “mishmash”, a repetitive phrase in which the first half uses the vowel I and the second half uses the vowel A. The second half of the “mishmash” is added to the original phrase, giving us our themed answer:

23A. Witty British judge? : POWDERED WIG WAG (from “powdered wig” & “wigwag”)
38A. Three-legged race, e.g.? : JOINED AT THE HIP HOP (from “joined at the hip” & “hip-hop”)
55A. Nail? : FINGER TIP TOP (from “finger tip” & “tip-top”)
66A. “America”? : “OF THEE I SING” SONG (“Of Thee I Sing” & “singsong”)
81A. Grant a girl permission to dis Drake? : LET HER RIP RAP (from “let her rip” & “riprap”)
98A. Ability to score at Madison Square Garden, e.g.? : NEW YORK KNICK KNACK (from “New York Knick” & “knickknack”)
117A. Diving disaster? : TRIPLE FLIP FLOP (from “triple flip” & “flip-flop”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 53s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

19. Baseball-like game : ONE-A-CAT
One-o’-cat, or more properly “one old cat”, is an abbreviated form of baseball with a home plate and just one base.

22. Et ___ : CETERA
The Latin phrase “et cetera” translates as “and other things”. The term is usually abbreviated to “etc.”

23. Witty British judge? : POWDERED WIG WAG (from “powdered wig” & “wigwag”)
“To wigwag” is to signal with a light or flag using coded movements. The wigwag system was developed by Major Albert J. Myer of the US Army in the 1850s.

25. Conquistador Cortés : HERNAN
Hernán Cortés (also “Hernando Cortez”) led the expedition from Spain to Mexico that eventually led to the fall of the Aztec Empire.

30. Pizza, e.g. : PIE
Pizza was invented in Naples where it has a long tradition that goes back to Ancient Rome. During an 1889 visit to Naples, Queen Margherita of Savoy was served a special pizza that was created with toppings designed to mimic the colors of the Italian flag. The ingredients of tomato (red), mozzarella (white) and basil (green) can still be found together on menus today, on a pie usually named Pizza Margherita after the queen. I do love basil on my pizza …

33. Ortiz of “Ugly Betty” : ANA
“Ugly Betty” is a drama-comedy show that originally aired on television from 2006 to 2010. The show is based on a telenovela soap opera from Colombia called “Yo soy Betty, la fea”. The title role of Betty Suarez is played by America Ferrera

34. Site of Spaceship Earth : EPCOT
Spaceship Earth is perhaps the structure that comes to mind when we think of Epcot in the Walt Disney World Resort. It is the large, white, 18-story geodesic sphere.

37. Language akin to Thai : LAO
Lao is the official language of Laos. Lao is also spoken in the northeast of Thailand, but there the language is known as Isan.

46. “Mr. Blue Sky” band, for short : ELO
The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) is a symphonic rock group from the north of England.

47. World’s most voluminous river : AMAZON
The Amazon River of South America is the world’s largest in terms of volume, and accounts for an amazing one-fifth of the world’s total river flow. Perhaps even more amazing is that there are no bridges across the Amazon! There isn’t even one, mainly because the river flows through tropical rainforest where there are few roads and cities.

48. Chapter in early 20th-century history: Abbr. : WWI
Prior to the outbreak of World War II, what we now know as World War I was referred to as “the World War” or “the Great War”.

49. Property inheritor, legally speaking : ALIENEE
An alienee is one to whom ownership of property is transferred, alienated.

53. Julie of TV’s “Big Brother” : CHEN
As well as co-anchoring “The Early Show”, Julie Chen has been host of the American version of “Big Brother” since it graced our screens in the year 2000.

The “Big Brother” television franchise started out in 1999 in the Netherlands. The term “Big Brother” comes from George Orwell’s novel “Nineteen Eighty-Four”.

60. Girl with a ball : DEB
“Deb” is short for “debutante”, which translates from French as “female beginner”.

61. Sound investments, in more ways than one : CDS
A certificate of deposit (CD) is like a less-flexible and higher-paying savings account. Instead of depositing money into a savings account and earning interest periodically, one can open a CD. With a CD one deposits a minimum amount of money but must leave it there for a specified length of time. In return for committing the funds for a fixed period, one is given a higher interest rate than a savings account and can redeem that interest and the initial deposit when the term has expired. CDs are relatively low-risk investments as they are FDIC insured, just like savings accounts.

The compact disc was developed jointly by Philips and Sony as a medium for storing and playing sound recordings. When the first commercial CD was introduced back in 1982, a CD’s storage capacity was far greater than the amount of data that could be stored on the hard drive of personal computers available at that time.

62. ___ Minor : ASIA
Asia Minor is also known as Anatolia. It is the geographic part of Asia that protrudes out into the west, towards Europe, and is roughly equivalent to modern-day Turkey.

66. “America”? : “OF THEE I SING” SONG (“Of Thee I Sing” & “singsong”)
“Of Thee I Sing” is a musical by George and Ira Gershwin that premiered on Broadway in 1931. “Of Thee I Sing” is about a politician running for president who falls for the “wrong” woman.

The patriotic song “America” is also known by its first line, “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee”. The song was written by Samuel Francis Smith in 1831, and was the de facto national anthem of the country until “The Star-Spangled Banner” was declared the official anthem in 1931. The melody of “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee” is identical with the British national anthem, “God Save the Queen”.

My country, ’tis of thee,
Sweet land of liberty,
Of thee I sing;
Land where my fathers died,
Land of the pilgrims’ pride,
From ev’ry mountainside
Let freedom ring!

71. Hindi word for “spice mix” : MASALA
Masala is the Hindi word for “mixture”, and describes a mixture of spices. A dish named “masala” uses the spices incorporated into a sauce that includes garlic, ginger, onions and chili paste. Who doesn’t love Indian food? Yum …

74. Brief second? : ASST
An assistant (asst.) might be referred to as a “second”.

75. ___ generis : SUI
“Sui generis” is a Latin expression meaning “of its own kind”. The term can be used in a number of fields, and in philosophy it refers to an idea which cannot be included in a wider concept, and idea of its own kind.

76. Theological inst. : SEM
Originally, a “seminary” was where plants were raised from seeds, as “semen” is the Latin for “seed”. The first schools labelled as seminaries were established in the late 1500s. Those first schools were more likely to be academies for young ladies back then, rather than for trainee priests.

79. What Cubs fans get carried away by? : EL TRAIN
The Chicago “L” is the second largest rapid transit system in the US, with the New York City Subway being the largest. The “L” is also the second oldest, again with the New York City Subway system having the honor of being around the longest. Note that the official nickname for the system is the “L” (originally short for “elevated railroad”), although the term “El” is also in common use (especially in crosswords as “ELS”). The L is managed by the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA).

81. Grant a girl permission to dis Drake? : LET HER RIP RAP (from “let her rip” & “riprap”)
“Riprap” is rock or rubble that is laid along a shoreline to protect against erosion.

Drake is the stage name of rapper Aubrey Graham from Toronto.

86. Fortify : GIRD
The phrase “gird your loins” dates back to Ancient Rome. The expression describes the action of lifting “one’s skirts” and tying them between the legs to allow more freedom of movement before going into battle. Nowadays, “gird your loins” (or sometimes just “gird yourself”) is a metaphor for “prepare yourself for the worst”.

90. 1990s Indian P.M. : RAO
P. V. Narasimha Rao was Prime Minister of India from 1991 to 1996. Rao is seen by most as the leader who transformed his country’s economy into the market-driven engine that it is today.

91. Week, on Martinique : SEMAINE
The island of Martinique in the eastern Caribbean is actually a part of France, and is referred to as an “overseas department”. As such, Martinique is part of the European Union and even uses the euro as its currency. The island is fully represented in the French National Assembly and Senate, just like any department within France. It’s sort of like the status of Hawaii within the US.

93. Game for the goal-oriented? : SOCCER
Soccer (also known as “association football”) is the most popular sport in the world. The term “association football” was introduced in 1863 in England, with the name chosen to distinguish the sport from rugby football. The term “soccer” started to appear about 20 years later in Oxford, as an abbreviation for “association”.

98. Ability to score at Madison Square Garden, e.g.? : NEW YORK KNICK KNACK (from “New York Knick” & “knickknack”)
Madison Square Garden is an arena in New York City used for a variety of events. In the world of sports it is home to the New York Rangers of the NHL, as well as the New York Knicks of the NBA. “The Garden” is also the third busiest music venue in the world in terms of ticket sales. The current arena is the fourth structure to bear the name, a name taken from the Madison Square location in Manhattan. In turn, the square was named for James Madison, the fourth President of the US.

102. Mouse’s resting place : PAD
The first computer mouse was invented at the Stanford Research Institute in 1963, by one Douglas Engelbart. Sadly for him, his patent ran out before mice became standard equipment on computers, so he never made any money from his amazing invention.

104. French ___ : FRY
“French fries” are called “chips” back in the British Isles where I grew up. In France, they’re called “pommes frites” (meaning “fried potatoes”).

105. Title at Topkapi Palace : AGA
The magnificent Topkapi Palace in Istanbul was a residence for the Ottoman sultans for over 400 years, starting in 1459. During its heydey, the palace complex was home to a staggering 4,000 people. The name “Topkapi” translates as “Cannon Gate”.

109. Piano dueler with Donald in 1988’s “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” : DAFFY
Daffy Duck first appeared on the screen in “Porky’s Duck Hunt” in 1937. In the original cartoon, Daffy was just meant to have a small role, but he was a big hit as he had so much sass. Even back then, Daffy was voiced by the ubiquitous Mel Blanc.

“Who Framed Roger Rabbit” was released in 1988, a clever film featuring cartoon characters that interact directly with human beings. The most memorable cartoon characters have to be the goofy Roger Rabbit, and the vampish Jessica Rabbit. The film is based on a novel written by Gary K. Wolf called “Who Censored Roger Rabbit?” There is a prequel floating around that has never been produced, and it’s called “Who Discovered Roger Rabbit”.

112. Quiz bowl fodder : TRIVIA
Trivia are things of little consequence. “Trivia” is the plural of the Latin word “trivium” which means “a place where three roads meet”. Now that’s what I call a trivial fact …

114. Like Serbia and Croatia : BALKAN
The Balkan Peninsula in Southeast Europe is usually referred to as “the Balkans”. The region takes its name from the Balkan Mountains located in present-day Bulgaria and Serbia. “Balkan” is Bulgarian for “mountain”.

127. Speakers’ spots : ROSTRA
A “rostrum” (plural “rostra”) is an elevated platform, particularly one for public speaking. The original rostrum was the platform used by public speakers in the Forum of ancient Rome.

Down
2. Only woman to sing lead vocals on a Beatles song : ONO
“The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill” is a John Lennon song that was recorded by the Beatles. The title character was inspired by a young American who was visiting the same ashram the Beatles were staying at in India while studying with the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. The American stayed in a bungalow next to the Maharishi, and was dubbed “Bungalow Bill” by Lennon and co. There’s a line in the song “Not when he looks so fierce”, which is sung by John Lennon’s wife Yoko Ono. That line marks the only time that a woman provided a lead vocal for a Beatles song.

4. Sierra ___ : MADRE
“The Treasure of the Sierra Madre” is a 1927 novel by German novelist B. Traven. The book was made into a famous 1948 movie of the same name by John Huston, starring Humphrey Bogart and Walter Huston (director John’s father).

6. H.O.V. lane user : CARPOOLER
In some parts of the country one sees high-occupancy vehicle lanes (HOV lanes). Out here in California we refer to them as carpool lanes.

9. Chest pain : ANGINA
“Angina pectoris” is the more complete name for the chest pain that we usually refer to as “angina”. The term can be translated into English as “a strangling feeling in the chest”.

10. Grist for analysts : RAW DATA
When grain has been separated from its chaff, to prepare it for grinding, it is called “grist”. Indeed, the word “grist” is derived from the word “grind”. Grist can be ground into a relatively coarse meal, or into a fine flour. The names can be confusing though. For example, the grist from maize when ground to a coarse consistency is called “grits”, and when ground to a fine consistency is called “corn meal”. There is an idiomatic phrase “grist for one’s mill”, meaning something used to one’s advantage. The grinding mechanism, or the building that holds the mechanism, is known as a “gristmill”.

11. Californie, e.g. : ETAT
In French, “Californie” (California) is an “état” (state).

12. Gaming giant : SEGA
Sega is a Japanese videogame company headquartered in Tokyo. Sega actually started out 1940 in the US as Standard Games and was located in Honolulu, Hawaii. The owners moved the operation to Tokyo in 1951 and renamed the company to Service Games. The name “Sega” is a combination of the first two letters of the words “Se-rvice” and “Ga-mes”.

13. I, to Izaak : ICH
“Ich” is the German for “I”, as in “Ich bin ein Berliner” (I am a Berliner), the famous words of support uttered by President John F. Kennedy in 1963 in a speech in West Berlin. The supposed translation of “Ich bin ein Berliner” as “I am a jelly doughnut” … that’s just an urban myth. President Kennedy’s use of German was perfectly correct.

14. Word for a name-dropper? : NEE
“Née” is the French word for “born” when referring to a female. The male equivalent is “né”.

15. 1960s sitcom set in the 1860s : F TROOP
Relatively few people outside of the US saw the American sitcom “F-Troop”, which was made in the sixties. I remember watching the show as a young lad because it was picked up by the Irish national television service. The only other country that showed “F-Troop” was Australia.

24. Lorna of literature : DOONE
The novel “Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor” was written by Richard Doddridge Blackmore. R. D. Blackmore was an English novelist, very celebrated and in demand in his day (the late 1800s). His romantic story “Lorna Doone” was by no means a personal favorite of his, and yet it is the only one of his works still in print.

28. Codger : GEEZER
Geezer, codger and coot are all not-so-nice terms for an old man.

31. Thyroid need : IODINE
The thyroid gland is found in the neck, just below the Adam’s apple. The gland produces several thyroid hormones, some of which control the rate at which the body uses energy i.e. the body’s rate of metabolism.

36. N.L. Central squad, on scorecards : CIN
The Red Scare (i.e. anti-communist sentiment) following WWII had such an effect on the populace that it even caused the Cincinnati baseball team to change its name from the Reds. The team was called the Cincinnati Redlegs from 1953-1958, as the management was fearful of losing money due to public distrust of any association with “Reds”.

38. Half of a swinging couple? : JANE
Jane Porter is the love interest in the “Tarzan” series of novels penned by Edgar Rice Burroughs. Famously, Jane was played by Maureen O’Sullivan on the big screen, opposite Johnny Weissmuller as Tarzan. In the movies, Jane’s family name was changed from Porter to Parker. Also, Porter is an American in the books, and Parker is an Englishwoman in the films.

40. Alternative to Cinemax : TMC
The Movie Channel is owned by Showtime, which in turn is subsidiary of CBS. The channel’s name is often abbreviated to “TMC”, although this is informal usage.

52. One lifting spirits? : TOASTER
The tradition of “toasting” someone probably dates back to the reign of Charles II, when the practice was to drink a glass of wine to the health of a beautiful or favored woman. In those days, spiced toast was added to beverages to add flavor, so the use of the word “toast” was an indicator that the lady’s beauty would enhance the wine. Very charming, I must say …

57. Chi follower : PSI
The Greek letter psi is the one that looks a bit like a trident or a pitchfork.

59. Diesel in movies : VIN
Vin Diesel is the stage name of actor Mark Sinclair Vincent. He was born in New York City with his twin brother Paul. The twins never knew their father, and their mother is an astrologer. Vincent was given the nickname of “Diesel” by his friends early in his life, as he was said to have a bottomless supply of energy.

64. Shivering fit : AGUE
An ague is a fever, one usually associated with malaria.

67. Key locale: Abbr. : FLA
A “key” (also “cay”) is a low island offshore, as in the Florida Keys. Our term in English comes from the Spanish “cayo” meaning “shoal, reef”.

69. Manhattan, e.g.: Abbr. : ISL
The island we know as Manhattan was inhabited by the Lenape Indians when the first Europeans explorers arrived in the area. According to the logbook of one of the officers on explorer Henry Hudson’s yacht, the island was called “Manna-hata” in the local language, from which the modern name derives.

70. They’re dubbed : SIRS
Kneel, and the Queen might “dub thee a knight” if you’re lucky. “Dub” is a specific term derived from Old English that was used to mean “make a knight”. As the knight was also given a knightly name at the same time, “dub” has come to mean “give someone a name”.

71. Mullally of “Will & Grace” : MEGAN
Megan Mullally is an actress probably best known for playing Karen Walker on the TV sitcom “Will & Grace”. Mullally also has a recurring role on the sitcom “Parks and Recreation”, playing Tammy Swanson, the ex-wife of Ron Swanson. In real life Tammy and Ron aren’t exes, as Megan Mullally is married to actor Nick Offerman who plays Ron Swanson.

77. It lies between Cleveland, O., and Buffalo, N.Y. : ERIE, PA
Erie is a city in the very north of Pennsylvania, right on the southern shore of Lake Erie. The city takes its name from the Erie Native American tribe that resided in the area. Erie is nicknamed the Gem City, a reference to the “sparkling” Lake Erie.

80. Made out : NECKED
The term “necking” applies to kissing and caressing. I like what Groucho Marx had to say on the subject: “Whoever named it necking was a poor judge of anatomy.”

82. Showy in a cheap way : TACKY
Something “tacky” is “in bad taste”. The term derives from the noun “tackey” that was used in the early 1800s to describe a neglected horse.

93. Measly amount : SOU
A sou is an old French coin. We use the term “sou” to mean “an almost worthless amount”.

94. Guitar Hero activity : RIFFING
A riff is a short rhythmic phrase in music, especially one improvised on a guitar.

Guitar Hero is an amazingly successful series of video games, first published in 2005. It is the third best selling franchise of video games, after Mario and Madden NFL. Sales have dropped in recent years though, and there are no plans for further releases.

96. Wolf (down) : SNARF
“To snarf down” is to gobble up, to eat voraciously. “Snarf” is a slang term that is probably related to “scarf”, which has the same meaning.

99. Mantle, e.g. : YANKEE
Mickey Mantle only played professional baseball for the one team, spending 18 years with the New York Yankees. Mickey Mantle memorabilia is highly prized, especially since he retired from the game in 1969, and even more so since he died in 1995. The only other player memorabilia said to command a higher price is Babe Ruth’s. Mantle holds the record for the most career home runs by a switch hitter, as well as the most World Series home runs.

108. Racer Yarborough : CALE
Cale Yarborough is a former NASCAR driver and owner. Yarborough was the first NASCAR driver to appear on the cover of “Sports Illustrated”.

110. Fig. on a periodic table : AT WT
The atomic weight (at. wt.) of an element is the mass of one atom of the element, relative to the mass of an atom of carbon (which is assumed to have an atomic weight of 12).

111. Mrs., abroad : FRAU
In Germany, a “Mr.” (Herr) is married to a “Mrs.” (Frau), and they live together in a house (Haus).

112. Bedouin shelter : TENT
Bedouin tribes are Arab ethnic groups that predominantly live in the Middle East, in desert areas. Bedouin tribes tend to be nomadic, not settling permanently in one location.

113. ___ facto : IPSO
“Ipso facto” is Latin, meaning “by the fact itself”. Ipso facto describes something that is a direct consequence of particular act, as opposed to something that is the result of some subsequent event. For example, my father was born in Dublin and was an Irish citizen ipso facto. My son was born in California and is an Irish citizen by virtue of being the son of an Irish citizen (“not” ipso facto).

116. ___ Yost, 2015 World Series-winning manager : NED
Ned Yost is the manager of the Kansas City Royals, and a former Major League Baseball catcher. Yost played baseball at high school in Dublin, California, just a few miles from where I am now right now.

118. Mauna ___ : LOA
Mauna Loa on the “big island” of Hawaii is the largest volcano on the planet (in terms of volume). The name “Mauna Loa” is Hawaiian for “Long Mountain”.

119. Poland’s main airline : LOT
LOT Polish Airlines is the country’s flag carrier. Founded way back in 1929, it is one of the oldest airline in the world that is still operating. “Lot” is a Polish word meaning “flight”.

120. Start of the Lord’s Prayer : OUR
“Our Father …” (“Pater noster” in Latin) are the opening words of the Lord’s Prayer, which is probably the best-known prayer in the Christian tradition.

121. Education support grp. : PTA
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Inconceivably vast : COSMIC
7. Hard looks : STARES
13. Stream, as of revenue : INFLOW
19. Baseball-like game : ONE-A-CAT
21. Flowery : ORNATE
22. Et ___ : CETERA
23. Witty British judge? : POWDERED WIG WAG (from “powdered wig” & “wigwag”)
25. Conquistador Cortés : HERNAN
26. Copies, informally : REPROS
27. It shows who’s who or what’s what : ID TAG
29. Perform a full-body scan? : OGLE
30. Pizza, e.g. : PIE
32. Quest of 25-Across : ORO
33. Ortiz of “Ugly Betty” : ANA
34. Site of Spaceship Earth : EPCOT
37. Language akin to Thai : LAO
38. Three-legged race, e.g.? : JOINED AT THE HIP HOP (from “joined at the hip” & “hip-hop”)
44. School chum, say : OLD PAL
46. “Mr. Blue Sky” band, for short : ELO
47. World’s most voluminous river : AMAZON
48. Chapter in early 20th-century history: Abbr. : WWI
49. Property inheritor, legally speaking : ALIENEE
51. On point : APT
53. Julie of TV’s “Big Brother” : CHEN
54. “One of the most civilized things in the world,” per Hemingway : WINE
55. Nail? : FINGER TIP TOP (from “finger tip” & “tip-top”)
58. Consider anew, as a decision : REVISIT
60. Girl with a ball : DEB
61. Sound investments, in more ways than one : CDS
62. ___ Minor : ASIA
65. A- : NINETY
66. “America”? : “OF THEE I SING” SONG (“Of Thee I Sing” & “singsong”)
71. Hindi word for “spice mix” : MASALA
74. Brief second? : ASST
75. ___ generis : SUI
76. Theological inst. : SEM
79. What Cubs fans get carried away by? : EL TRAIN
81. Grant a girl permission to dis Drake? : LET HER RIP RAP (from “let her rip” & “riprap”)
86. Fortify : GIRD
87. Page (through) : LEAF
90. 1990s Indian P.M. : RAO
91. Week, on Martinique : SEMAINE
92. Alias inits. : AKA
93. Game for the goal-oriented? : SOCCER
95. Keeps in the loop, in a way : CCS
97. Worn out : DONE IN
98. Ability to score at Madison Square Garden, e.g.? : NEW YORK KNICK KNACK (from “New York Knick” & “knickknack”)
102. Mouse’s resting place : PAD
103. Take a timeout : PAUSE
104. French ___ : FRY
105. Title at Topkapi Palace : AGA
106. Egg container : SAC
107. Religious image : ICON
109. Piano dueler with Donald in 1988’s “Who Framed Roger Rabbit” : DAFFY
112. Quiz bowl fodder : TRIVIA
114. Like Serbia and Croatia : BALKAN
117. Diving disaster? : TRIPLE FLIP FLOP (from “triple flip” & “flip-flop”)
122. Maintain : ALLEGE
123. Bawdy : WANTON
124. Gently show the door : EASE OUT
125. Give a new tournament ranking : RE-SEED
126. Pulls on, as heartstrings : TUGS AT
127. Speakers’ spots : ROSTRA

Down
1. Bluecoat : COP
2. Only woman to sing lead vocals on a Beatles song : ONO
3. Darn things : SEW
4. Sierra ___ : MADRE
5. Drink commonly served with a spoon-straw : ICEE
6. H.O.V. lane user : CARPOOLER
7. Farm females : SOWS
8. Lateral opening? : TRI-
9. Chest pain : ANGINA
10. Grist for analysts : RAW DATA
11. Californie, e.g. : ETAT
12. Gaming giant : SEGA
13. I, to Izaak : ICH
14. Word for a name-dropper? : NEE
15. 1960s sitcom set in the 1860s : F TROOP
16. From one side to the other : LENGTHWISE
17. Kind of history : ORAL
18. Ebb : WANE
20. Grammy-winning drummer ___ Lyne Carrington : TERRI
24. Lorna of literature : DOONE
28. Codger : GEEZER
30. Opposite of ruddy : PALLID
31. Thyroid need : IODINE
33. Embrace : ADOPT
35. Bus. card info : PHONE NO
36. N.L. Central squad, on scorecards : CIN
37. Don’t work too hard : LOAF
38. Half of a swinging couple? : JANE
39. Goes by : ELAPSES
40. Alternative to Cinemax : TMC
41. “That’ll be the day!” : HAH!
42. Take responsibility for something : OWN IT
43. Atheist’s lack : PIETY
45. Place to hang tools : PEGBOARD
50. Leave a good impression? : ETCH
52. One lifting spirits? : TOASTER
54. Jet measure : WINGSPAN
56. Think tank product : IDEA
57. Chi follower : PSI
59. Diesel in movies : VIN
63. Reeling : IN SHOCK
64. Shivering fit : AGUE
67. Key locale: Abbr. : FLA
68. They’ll take your measure : TAILORS
69. Manhattan, e.g.: Abbr. : ISL
70. They’re dubbed : SIRS
71. Mullally of “Will & Grace” : MEGAN
72. Hard to tell apart : ALIKE
73. Informal measures of popularity : STRAW POLLS
77. It lies between Cleveland, O., and Buffalo, N.Y. : ERIE, PA
78. Nut : MANIAC
80. Made out : NECKED
82. Showy in a cheap way : TACKY
83. Salmon roe, by another name : RED CAVIAR
84. “Don’t worry about me!” : I’M OK!
85. Await resolution : PEND
88. Relative of “Aargh!” : ACK!
89. Wetland : FEN
93. Measly amount : SOU
94. Guitar Hero activity : RIFFING
96. Wolf (down) : SNARF
99. Mantle, e.g. : YANKEE
100. Some vaults : CRYPTS
101. Like cats, typically : AGILE
106. Secure spots : SAFES
107. Certain steel beam : I-BAR
108. Racer Yarborough : CALE
110. Fig. on a periodic table : AT WT
111. Mrs., abroad : FRAU
112. Bedouin shelter : TENT
113. ___ facto : IPSO
115. Common thing to lie about : AGE
116. ___ Yost, 2015 World Series-winning manager : NED
118. Mauna ___ : LOA
119. Poland’s main airline : LOT
120. Start of the Lord’s Prayer : OUR
121. Education support grp. : PTA

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6 thoughts on “0122-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 22 Jan 17, Sunday”

  1. 35:08, no errors. Took a while to see the theme, but then things fells apart quickly.

    I enjoyed watching 'F TROOP' as a teen.

    A minor nit with 79A EL TRAIN. I grew up in New York City, which had both underground (subway) and raised above ground (elevated) transit lines. The elevated lines were always referred to as El's; never as El Trains. Have never been to Chicago. Are they ever referred to as 'El trains' in Chicago?

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