0115-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 15 Jan 17, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Joel Fagliano
THEME: Grammar Lesson
Today’s themed answers will bring back those LESSONS in GRAMMAR from our schooldays. Each answer is a GRAMMATICAL term, one that has been reinterpreted in way that’s unrelated to GRAMMAR:

24A. Utopia? : FUTURE PERFECT
31A. Piece still under consideration for a magazine? : INDEFINITE ARTICLE
50A. “Village” newspaper that’s namby-pamby? : PASSIVE “VOICE”
66A. Santa’s nieces and nephews? : RELATIVE CLAUSES
89A. Like shoppers worrying about getting the right gift? : PRESENT-TENSE
103A. Jailhouse? : SENTENCE STRUCTURE
113A. The Prada that one really wants? : OBJECTIVE CASE

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 20s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

24. Utopia? : FUTURE PERFECT
The word “Utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More for his book “Utopia” published in 1516 describing an idyllic fictional island in the Atlantic Ocean. More’s use of the name Utopia comes from the Greek “ou” meaning “not” and “topos” meaning “place”. By calling his perfect island “Not Place”, More was apparently making the point that he didn’t think that the ideal could actually exist.

26. Part of the Dept. of Transportation : FAA
The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was set up in 1958 (as the Federal Aviation Agency). The agency was established at that particular time largely in response to an increasing number of midair collisions. The worst of these disasters had taken place two years earlier over the Grand Canyon, a crash between two commercial passenger airplanes that resulted in 128 fatalities.

29. Packers’ grp.? : NRA
National Rifle Association (NRA)

“Packing” and “packing heat” are underworld slang for “carrying a gun”.

30. Old tabloid fodder : UFOS
Unidentified flying object (UFO)

Tabloid is the trademarked name (owned by Burroughs, Wellcome and Co,) for a “small tablet of medicine”, a name that goes back to 1884. The word “tabloid” had entered into general use to mean a compressed form of anything, and by the early 1900s was used in “tabloid journalism”, applied to newspapers that had short, condensed articles and stories printed on smaller sheets of paper.

37. Org. concerned with water quality : EPA
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

40. Balsa or balsam : TREE
Balsa is a very fast growing tree that is native to parts of South America. Even though balsa wood is very soft, it is actually classified as a hardwood, the softest of all the hardwoods (go figure!). Balsa is light and strong, so is commonly used in making model airplanes. Amazingly, in WWII a full-size British plane, the de Havilland Mosquito, was built largely from balsa and plywood. No wonder they called it “The Wooden Wonder” and “The Timber Terror”.

The Balsam fir is an evergreen tree that is native to eastern and central North America. The Balsam is commonly used as a Christmas tree, especially in the northeastern US.

42. Signal meaning “no disease on this ship” : YELLOW FLAG
In a set of international maritime signal flags, the “Q” flag is a plain yellow square. In modern usage, a ship entering port might fly the yellow flag as a declaration that the vessel is free from disease and to request inspection by the port’s authorities.

49. “___ Must Die” (Claude McKay poem) : IF WE
Claude McKay was a Jamaican-American novelist and poet whose name is very much associated with the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s.

50. “Village” newspaper that’s namby-pamby? : PASSIVE “VOICE”
“The Village Voice” is a free newspaper distributed in New York City. It had a great advertising slogan in the eighties: “Some people swear by us … other people swear AT us”.

53. Bull’s urging : BUY
The terms “bull” and “bear” markets come from the way in which each animal attacks. A bull thrusts his horns upwards (an “up” market), whereas a bear swipes with his paws downward (a “down” market).

54. Fashion guru Tim : GUNN
Tim Gunn is a fashion consultant, and these days a television personality as well. He makes regular appearances on the reality TV show “Project Runway”, and is so popular a character that he now has his own show called “Tim Gunn’s Guide in Style”.

59. Jacket material : TWEED
Tweed is a rough woolen fabric very much associated with Scotland in the UK, and County Donegal in Ireland. The cloth was originally called “tweel”, the Scots word for “twill”. Apparently a London merchant misinterpreted some handwriting in the early 1800s and assumed the fabric was called “tweed”, a reference to the Scottish River Tweed, and the name stuck …

62. The “kid” in “Here’s looking at you, kid” : ILSA
“Here’s looking at you, kid” is a line spoken in “Casablanca” by Rick (Humphrey Bogart) to Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman).

64. Kia model : RIO
Kia have making the subcompact model called a Rio since 2000.

65. Common flower that’s poisonous to eat : AZALEA
Azaleas are very toxic to horses, sheep and goats, but strangely enough cause no problem for cats or dogs. And if you go to Korea you might come across “Tug Yonju”, which is azalea wine made from the plant’s blossoms. Azaleas are usually grown as shrubs, but are also seen as small trees, and often indoors.

66. Santa’s nieces and nephews? : RELATIVE CLAUSES
Azaleas are very toxic to horses, sheep and goats, but strangely enough cause no problem for cats or dogs. And if you go to Korea you might come across “Tug Yonju”, which is azalea wine made from the plant’s blossoms. Azaleas are usually grown as shrubs, but are also seen as small trees, and often indoors.

71. Indiana Jones trademark : FEDORA
A fedora is a lovely hat, I think. It is made of felt, and is similar to a trilby, but has a broader brim. “Fedora” was a play written for Sarah Bernhardt and first performed in 1889. Bernhardt had the title role of Princess Fedora, and on stage she wore a hat similar to a modern-day fedora. The play led to the women’s fashion accessory, the fedora hat, commonly worn by women into the beginning of the twentieth century. Men then started wearing fedoras, but only when women gave up the fashion …

George Lucas created a lead character named Indiana Smith for what was to be his “Indiana Jones” series of films. Lucas asked Steven Spielberg to direct the first film, and Spielberg wasn’t too fond of the name “Smith”. Lucas then suggested Jones as an alternative, and Indiana Jones was born.

84. Also-ran for the golden apple, in myth : HERA
According to Greek mythology, the goddess Eris tossed the Golden Apple of Discord into the middle of the table during the feast of the gods at the wedding of Peleus and Thetis. The Golden Apple bore the words “to the fairest”, and the goddesses Hera, Athena and Aphrodite succumbed to their vanity and fought for the title of most fair. This dispute eventually led to the Trojan War.

87. Home to Weber State University : UTAH
Weber State University is located in Ogden, Utah. The school was founded by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and is named for a fur trader named John Henry Weber.

88. Obama’s signature health law, for short : ACA
The correct name for what has been dubbed “Obamacare” is the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” (ACA).

96. Like kitsch : TACKY
Something “tacky” is “in bad taste”. The term derives from the noun “tackey” that was used in the early 1800s to describe a neglected horse.

“Kitsch” is a German word, an adjective that means “gaudy, trash”.

100. Doctor’s orders, for short : RXS
There seems to some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol “Rx” that’s used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter’s blessing to help a patient recover.

101. Japanese soup : MISO
Miso is the name of the seasoning that makes the soup. Basic miso seasoning is made by fermenting rice, barley and soybeans with salt and a fungus to produce a paste. The paste can be added to stock to make miso soup, or perhaps to flavor tofu.

102. Specimen, for example: Abbr. : SYN
The word “specimen” is a synonym (syn.) for the word “example”.

108. Prohibitionists : DRYS
The 18th Amendment to the US Constitution was a great victory for the temperance movement (the “dry” movement), and in 1919 ushered in the Prohibition era. Highly unpopular (with the “wet” movement), Prohibition was repealed in 1933 by the 21st Amendment.

110. Craggy peak : TOR
A tor is a high rocky hill. “Tor” comes from the Old English “torr”, the word for a tower or rock, which in turn comes from the Old Welsh “twrr” meaning a heap or a pile.

111. Several CBS dramas : CSIS
The “CSI” franchise of TV shows has been tremendously successful, but seems to have finally wound down. “CSI: Miami” (the “worst” of the franchise, I think) was cancelled in 2012 after ten seasons. “CSI: NY” (the “best” of the franchise) was cancelled in 2013 after nine seasons. The original “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”, set in Las Vegas, hung in there until 2015 when it ended with a two-hour TV movie. The youngest show in the series was “CSI: Cyber”. It lasted for two season before being canceled in 2016.

112. Short, for short : LIL’
Lil’ is a short form of the word “little”. There are a whole slew of rappers named Lil’ something, like Lil’ Wayne, Lil’ J, and Lil’ Kim.

113. The Prada that one really wants? : OBJECTIVE CASE
Prada was started in 1913 as a leathergoods shop in Milan, by the two Prada brothers. One of the brothers, Mario Prada, prevented the female members of his family participating in the company as he didn’t believe women should be involved in business (!). When the sexist brother died, his son had no interest in the business so it was his daughter who took over and ran the company for about twenty years, handing it over to her own daughter. I’d say the devil loved that …

118. Part of a postal address for a G.M. plant : FLINT, MI
Flint, Michigan is perhaps best known as the original home to General Motors (now headquartered in Detroit). The city of Flint takes its name from the Flint River on which it lies. The local Native Americans called the river, “River of Flint”, hence the name in English.

121. Thomas of the N.B.A. : ISIAH
Isiah Thomas played his whole professional basketball-playing career with the Detroit Pistons, and he is now the head coach with Florida International University’s Golden Panthers. When you’re out shopping for popcorn, keep an eye out for the Dale & Thomas brand, as it’s co-owned by Isiah Thomas.

122. ___ Aquino, Time’s Woman of the Year in 1986 : CORAZON
Corazon Aquino was the first woman to hold the office of President of the Philippines. She led the popular revolt against President Ferdinand Marcos in 1986 which led to the restoration of democracy in the country. She came to lead the movement against Marcos upon the assassination of her husband, the most visible opponent of Marcos. She took to the role reluctantly, proclaiming herself a “plain housewife”.

123. With 113-Down, product of flax : LINSEED
(113D. See 123-Across : OIL)
Linseed oil is also known as flaxseed oil, as the oil is extracted from the dried seeds of the flax plant.

125. Women’s fashion magazine : INSTYLE
“InStyle” is a monthly fashion magazine for women. I had no idea …

126. Warning before lunging : EN GARDE!
“En garde” is a French term that has been absorbed into the sport of fencing. Originally a warning “on guard!”, it is spoken at the start of an encounter to warn the fencers to take a defensive position.

Down
2. First name in late-night : CONAN
Before Conan O’Brien came to fame as a late night talk show host he was a writer. He wrote for both “Saturday Night Live” and “The Simpsons”.

4. W. Coast air hub : SFO
San Francisco International Airport (SFO) serves as the main base of operations for Virgin America (recently sold to Alaska Airlines), and is also the maintenance hub for United Airlines.

5. When tripled, symbol of evil : SIX
The date 6/6/06 is significant in that “666” is the “number of the beast” that is linked to Satan or the Anti-Christ according to the Book of Revelation in the Bible. The fear of the number 666 has been given a name: Hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia. Don’t forget …

7. Amber, e.g. : RESIN
Amber’s technical name is “resinite”, reflecting its composition and formation. Amber starts out life as soft sticky tree resin but then under high temperature and pressure from overlying layers of soil, it fossilizes. The sticky resin can trap organisms or other plant matter, and this material can sometimes remain virtually intact inside the amber fossil giving us a unique gift from the past.

9. Outback animal : EMU
In Australia, the land outside of urban area is referred to as “the outback” or “the bush”. That said, I think that the term “outback” can also be used for the more remote parts of the bush.

10. Blue Cross competitor : AETNA
When the healthcare management and insurance company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mt. Etna, the European volcano.

The Blue Cross association of health plans was established in 1929 in Dallas, Texas. The first plan put in place was for teachers, and guaranteed 21 days of hospital care if needed, for a premium of $6 a year. One can only dream …

15. Time to go home : CURFEW
Our word “curfew” comes from an Old French word meaning “cover fire”. In medieval days a bell would be ring in the evenings as a signal to bank the hearths in preparation for sleeping. The intent was to prevent uncontrolled fires starting from fireplaces that were not tended during the night.

16. Skinny : INFO
The use of the word “skinny” meaning information, comes from WWII military slang for “the truth”, probably a derivative of the expression “the naked truth” (evocative of “skinny-dipping”).

25. Panegyric : EULOGY
A eulogy is a speech or piece of writing that praises someone who has recently passed away or who is retiring. “Eulogy” comes from the Greek word “eulogia” meaning “praise”.

A “panegyric” was originally a formal speech made in public, the intent of which was to praise some person of some entity. Later, the term came to mean a laudatory verse, such as an ode. “Panegyris” is the Greek for “speech fit for a general assembly”.

36. Kind of computing : CLOUD
In the world of computing, when one operates “in the cloud”, one’s files and key applications are not stored on one’s own computer, but rather are residing “in the cloud”, on a computer somewhere out on the Internet. I do 90% of my computing in the cloud. That way I don’t have to worry about backing up files, and I can operate from any computer if I have to …

39. Something set in a meeting : AGENDA
“Agenda” is a Latin word that translates as “things to be done”, coming from the verb “agere” meaning “to do”.

45. Knight club : MACE
A mace is a relatively simple weapon in essence, a heavy weight on the end of a handle that is used to deliver powerful blows on an opponent’s body.

46. Car company that owns SolarCity : TESLA
Tesla Motors is a manufacturer of electric vehicles based in Palo Alto, California. Tesla is noted for producing the first electric sports car, called the Tesla Roadster. The company followed the sports car with a luxury sedan, the Model S. The Model S was the world’s best selling plug-in electric vehicle of 2015.

51. “There it is!” : VOILA!
“Voilà” means “there it is”, and “voici” means “here it is”. The terms come from “voi là” meaning “see there” and “voi ici” meaning “see here”.

58. Source for “Book of the Marvels of the World,” circa 1300 : POLO
Marco Polo was a merchant from Venice and a famous traveler throughout Asia. Polo journeyed with his father and uncle on an epic tour of Central Asia and China that lasted 24 years. Marco tends to be the member of the party we remember today though, because it was he who documented their travels in a book called “Il Milione”.

59. Chinese philosopher Mo-___ : TZE
Mozi (also Mo-Tze) was a Chinese philosopher whose positions were often in conflict with Confucianism.

68. HBO political satire : VEEP
“Veep” is a political satire sitcom on HBO that is a remake of the British show “The Thick of It” (Warning: strong language!). “Veep” is set in the office of a fictional Vice President of the United States played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

69. Non-prophet group? : ATHEISTS
The term “atheism”, meaning “disbelief in the existence of a god or gods”, comes from the Greek “atheos” meaning “without god”.

70. Sch. in Knoxville : UTENN
The University of Tennessee (UT, UTenn) is a public school in Knoxville that was founded in 1794. UT is home to the collections of three sets of presidential papers; those of Presidents Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk and Andrew Johnson, all of whom hailed from Tennessee. UT has three primary campuses, in Knoxville, Chattanooga and Martin.

73. Nickname for a Gilded Age businessman with a penchant for jewelry : DIAMOND JIM
“The Gilded Age” was a phrase coined by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner in a book they wrote together. It describes the period of growth in the economy and the population following the Civil War. One of the men to profit during this time of expansion was Diamond Jim Brady. Brady started out as a bellboy and messenger, but at a young age made his fortune. He was known for having a big appetite for jewels (hence the moniker “Diamond Jim”), as well as a huge appetite for food. One restaurateur described him as “the best 25 customers I ever had”.

77. “In Trump We Trust” author, 2016 : ANN COULTER
Ann Coulter is a conservative political commentator. Coulter has written several successful books, including:

  • “High Crimes and Misdemeanors” outlines her case for the impeachment of President Clinton.
  • “Slander” argues that President George W. Bush was given unfair coverage by the media.
  • “Treason” is a reexamination of the Cold War, suggesting that the the extent of Communist infiltration was underestimated.

81. “That deep, blue, bottomless soul,” per Melville : OCEAN
Herman Melville mined his own experiences when writing his novels. Melville sailed from New Bedford, Massachusetts in 1841 on a whaler heading into the Pacific Ocean (a source for “Moby-Dick”). Melville ended up deserting his ship 18 months later and lived with natives on a South Pacific Island for three weeks (a source for “Typee”). He picked up another whaler and headed for Hawaii, where he joined the crew of a US navy frigate that was bound for Boston (a source for “Omoo”).

83. Part of un jour : HEURE
In French, 1/24 of a “jour” (day) is an “heure” (hour).

85. Ghost story? : ATTIC
Ghosts tend to live up in the attic, I’m told …

91. New York City’s ___ River : EAST
The East River is a strait in New York City connecting Upper New York Bay to Long Island Sound, separating Manhattan Island from Long Island. As it connects to Long Island Sound, the East River was once known as the Sound River.

99. Vehicle at a ski resort : SNO-CAT
The brand name Sno-Cat is owned by the Tucker company. All “snowcats” are tracked vehicles built to work in snow, famously used in expeditions to the polar regions. The modern Sno-Cat from Tucker differs from its competitors in that it has four independently-mounted tracks.

106. Covered in frost : RIMED
Rime is that beautiful coating of ice that forms on surfaces like roofs, trees and grass, when cold water freezes instantly under the right conditions.

114. Troop grp. : BSA
As every little boy (of my era) knows, the Scouting movement was founded by Lord Baden Powell, in 1907. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) soon followed, in 1910. And, the Boy Scouts motto is “Be Prepared”.

115. Roll call response in une école : ICI
In French, one might respond “ici” (here) to a roll call at “une école” (a school).

116. Wernher ___ Braun : VON
Wernher von Braun was a renowned scientist who is credited with inventing the V-2 rocket for Nazi Germany during WWII and the Saturn V rocket for the US during the Space Race. While living in his native Germany, von Braun was a member of the Nazi Party, and later a member of the SS. AS Germany’s defeat became inevitable, von Braun and his team managed to arrange relocation to Austria where in order to surrender to the Americans and avoid capture by the Russians. The scientists were then relocated to the US as part of an OSS program called Operation Paperclip, which ultimately transferred over 1,500 scientists from Germany and the rest of occupied Europe just after WWII. The V-2 team were settled eventually in Huntsville, Alabama where von Braun was to live and work for the next twenty years.

117. Scale note : SOL
The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

119. Dutch financial giant : ING
ING is a huge Dutch banking institution created via a merger in 1991. The company headquarters is in a spectacular building in Amsterdam called simply ING House. ING stands for Internationale Nederlanden Groep.

120. Govt. org. that offers a monthly “Puzzle Periodical” : NSA
National Security Agency (NSA)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Kind of kick : SCISSOR
8. Product of evaporation : SEA SALT
15. Apple product : CIDER
20. Keep in : CONFINE
21. Brunch menu heading : OMELETS
22. Parts of college courses : UNITS
23. Sources of stress for many modern workers : IN-BOXES
24. Utopia? : FUTURE PERFECT
26. Part of the Dept. of Transportation : FAA
27. Channel buildup : SILT
29. Packers’ grp.? : NRA
30. Old tabloid fodder : UFOS
31. Piece still under consideration for a magazine? : INDEFINITE ARTICLE
37. Org. concerned with water quality : EPA
40. Balsa or balsam : TREE
41. Budgetary excess : FAT
42. Signal meaning “no disease on this ship” : YELLOW FLAG
44. Hurt sharply : SMART
46. Workers in some labs, informally : TECHS
48. Interminable task : SLOG
49. “___ Must Die” (Claude McKay poem) : IF WE
50. “Village” newspaper that’s namby-pamby? : PASSIVE “VOICE”
53. Bull’s urging : BUY
54. Fashion guru Tim : GUNN
55. Behave : ACT
56. ___ of reality : DOSE
57. Admitted (to) : COPPED
59. Jacket material : TWEED
60. Percolate : SEEP
62. The “kid” in “Here’s looking at you, kid” : ILSA
64. Kia model : RIO
65. Common flower that’s poisonous to eat : AZALEA
66. Santa’s nieces and nephews? : RELATIVE CLAUSES
71. Indiana Jones trademark : FEDORA
74. ___ department : REC
75. Uber-owned company that makes self-driving trucks : OTTO
76. Agreement : PACT
80. Result of a year-end review, maybe : RAISE
81. “That so?” : OH YEAH?
84. Also-ran for the golden apple, in myth : HERA
86. “I don’t reckon” : NAH
87. Home to Weber State University : UTAH
88. Obama’s signature health law, for short : ACA
89. Like shoppers worrying about getting the right gift? : PRESENT-TENSE
92. ___ pad : MEMO
93. Top : BEST
95. Scheduled to arrive : DUE IN
96. Like kitsch : TACKY
97. Fleet for many a commuter airline : PROP PLANES
100. Doctor’s orders, for short : RXS
101. Japanese soup : MISO
102. Specimen, for example: Abbr. : SYN
103. Jailhouse? : SENTENCE STRUCTURE
108. Prohibitionists : DRYS
110. Craggy peak : TOR
111. Several CBS dramas : CSIS
112. Short, for short : LIL’
113. The Prada that one really wants? : OBJECTIVE CASE
118. Part of a postal address for a G.M. plant : FLINT, MI
121. Thomas of the N.B.A. : ISIAH
122. ___ Aquino, Time’s Woman of the Year in 1986 : CORAZON
123. With 113-Down, product of flax : LINSEED
124. Miners’ aids : LAMPS
125. Women’s fashion magazine : INSTYLE
126. Warning before lunging : EN GARDE!

Down
1. Genre for TV’s “Stranger Things” : SCI-FI
2. First name in late-night : CONAN
3. Unseemly : IN BAD TASTE
4. W. Coast air hub : SFO
5. When tripled, symbol of evil : SIX
6. Toddler garment : ONESIE
7. Amber, e.g. : RESIN
8. Hand-held dish that doesn’t crunch : SOFT TACO
9. Outback animal : EMU
10. Blue Cross competitor : AETNA
11. Muddy mixture : SLURRY
12. Makes fizzy : AERATES
13. Network standard for smartphones, for short : LTE
14. Recipe abbr. : TSP
15. Time to go home : CURFEW
16. Skinny : INFO
17. Truck driver? : DIESEL FUEL
18. And so on: Abbr. : ETC
19. Alphabet string : RST
25. Panegyric : EULOGY
28. Boater’s wear : LIFE VEST
32. Is off : ERRS
33. Foul-smelling : FETID
34. Set of principles : ETHIC
35. “Will ya look at that!” : I’LL BE!
36. Kind of computing : CLOUD
38. Foe of the Cheyenne : PAWNEE
39. Something set in a meeting : AGENDA
43. Insect that spends its larval stage inside a fruit : FIG WASP
44. Hot tubs : SPAS
45. Knight club : MACE
46. Car company that owns SolarCity : TESLA
47. Golfer’s need : SCORECARD
51. “There it is!” : VOILA!
52. Grand : EPIC
58. Source for “Book of the Marvels of the World,” circa 1300 : POLO
59. Chinese philosopher Mo-___ : TZE
61. Part of a club selling clubs : PRO SHOP
63. Well-ventilated : AIRY
65. After ___ (to some extent) : A SORT
67. ‘Fore : ERE
68. HBO political satire : VEEP
69. Non-prophet group? : ATHEISTS
70. Sch. in Knoxville : UTENN
71. Dowdies : FRUMPS
72. Cafe : EATERY
73. Nickname for a Gilded Age businessman with a penchant for jewelry : DIAMOND JIM
77. “In Trump We Trust” author, 2016 : ANN COULTER
78. Distillery item : CASK
79. Not we : THEY
81. “That deep, blue, bottomless soul,” per Melville : OCEAN
82. Lacks : HASN’T
83. Part of un jour : HEURE
85. Ghost story? : ATTIC
88. Most fit : ABLEST
90. Awkward time at family movie night : SEX SCENE
91. New York City’s ___ River : EAST
94. Almost falls : TEETERS
98. Amps, with “up” : PSYCHS
99. Vehicle at a ski resort : SNO-CAT
101. Light cotton fabric : MUSLIN
104. Wild : CRAZY
105. Long arm : RIFLE
106. Covered in frost : RIMED
107. Pass over : ELIDE
109. Gather : REAP
113. See 123-Across : OIL
114. Troop grp. : BSA
115. Roll call response in une école : ICI
116. Wernher ___ Braun : VON
117. Scale note : SOL
119. Dutch financial giant : ING
120. Govt. org. that offers a monthly “Puzzle Periodical” : NSA

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5 thoughts on “0115-17 New York Times Crossword Answers 15 Jan 17, Sunday”

  1. What an enjoyable puzzle. Fun theme and not too difficult – nevermind I got tripped up at the nexus of GUNN, FIGWASP and PAWNEE. I won't mention I misspelled AZALiA either….

    I did this while watching the Cowboys-Packers game so I kept insisting to myself that 29A was NFL or NFC, but I eventually figured NRA out for "Packers' group".

    Did not know the origin of bull/bear market terminology. Interesting. Panegyric is a new word, and I always thought LINSEED and flaxseed oil were 2 different things.

    Polk I believe hails from North Carolina, but that part of NC is now known as Tennessee so I guess it's ok that his library is at the Univ of Tennessee.

    Best –

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