1023-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 23 Oct 16, Sunday

QuickLinks:
Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today’s New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ellen Leuschner & Jeff Chen
THEME: Over/Under
Today’s themed answers have clues that refer to a nearby answer that is either UNDER or OVER:
22A. Over the 27-Across : NO SPRING CHICKEN (over the hill)
27A. Rise : HILL

29A. Rev : GUN
34A. Under the 29-Across : FACING A DEADLINE (under the gun)

57A. Over the 62-Across : BEYOND BELIEF
62A. Dreidel, e.g. : TOP

67A. Put on the back burner : TABLE
76A. Under the 67-Across : ON THE DOWNLOW (under the table)

94A. Over the 104-Across : IN SEVENTH HEAVEN (over the moon)
104A. Sky light : MOON

105A. Sculpture medium for Calder : WIRE
112A. Under the 105-Across : AT THE LAST MINUTE (under the wire)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 29m 03s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Some subjects in Scheherazade’s stories : ARABS
Scheherazade was a Persian queen of legend, and the storyteller in the wonderful “One Thousand and One Nights”.

18. Mother-of-pearl source : ABALONE
The large edible sea snails that we call abalone are called ormer in the British Isles, and is served as “awabi” at a sushi bar. The abalone shell resembles a human ear, giving rise to the alternative names “ear shell” and “sea ear”.

Mother-of-pearl is another name for nacre. Nacre is the strong iridescent material laid down by some mollusks on the inside of their shells, and it’s also what makes up pearls. The creature lays down nacre as a defensive mechanism, protecting the soft tissue of its body from the rough surface of the outer shell. Similarly, it uses nacre to encapsulate harmful debris or a parasite that penetrates the shell, and that’s how a pearl is formed.

20. Words preceding “We stand on guard for thee” : O CANADA
Canada’s national anthem “O Canada” was commissioned in 1880 by the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec, so the original words are in French. The first English translation was made in 1906. The current English lyrics have been revised a few times, but the French version remains the same as it did back in 1880.

O Canada! Our home and native land!
True patriot love in all thy sons command.
With glowing hearts we see thee rise,
The True North strong and free!
From far and wide, O Canada,
We stand on guard for thee.
God keep our land, glorious and free!
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee;
O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

21. “Skyfall” singer : ADELE
I have not been a fan of Daniel Craig as James Bond (preferring Sean Connery and Pierce Brosnan in the role). However, I saw “Skyfall” when it first came out and have been won over. “Skyfall” is one of the best Bond films so far, in my humble opinion. And, Adele’s rendition of the title song is an added plus …

38. Certain swinger, informally : ORANG
Orangutans (also “orangs”) are arboreal creatures, in fact the largest arboreal animals known to man. They are native to Indonesia and Malaysia, living in the rain forests. Like most species in rain forests these days, orangutans are endangered, with only two species surviving. The word “orangutan” is Malay, meaning “man of the forest”.

42. Spanish bear : OSO
In Spanish, “osa” is a female bear, and “oso” is a male. An “oso” might be found in “un zoológico” (a zoo).

43. Castor ___ (“Popeye” guy) : OYL
“Thimble Theater” was the precursor comic strip to the famous “Popeye” drawn by E. C. Segar. Before Popeye came into the story, the brother and sister characters Castor Oyl and Olive Oyl were the protagonists. And then along comes a sailor …

44. Balance sheet abbr. : YTD
Year-to-date (YTD)

The balance sheet of a company is a snapshot (single point in time) view of a company’s financial position. The balance sheet lists all the company’s liabilities, all of its assets, and all of its ownership equity. The assets of a company, less its liabilities equals the ownership equity. The term “balance” is used because assets always balance out with the sum of liabilities and shareholder equity.

45. Friday, on old TV: Abbr. : SGT
Jack Webb played Sergeant Joe Friday on “Dragnet” on both TV and radio … and what a voice he had! Off the screen Webb was a lover of jazz, and he played the cornet. It was within the world of jazz that he met and fell in love with Julie London, the famous singer with “the smoky voice”. The couple married and had two kids together.

47. Olympics venue between London and Tokyo : RIO
Rio de Janeiro is the second largest city in Brazil (after São Paulo). “Rio de Janeiro” translates as “January River”. The name reflects the discovery of the bay on which Rio sits, on New Year’s Day in 1502.

48. Many a Jazz fan : UTAHN
The Utah Jazz professional basketball team moved to their current home in Salt Lake City in 1979. As one might guess from the name, the team originated in New Orleans, but only played there for five seasons. New Orleans was a tough place to be based because venues were hard to come by, and Mardi Gras forced the team to play on the road for a whole month.

50. Preserver of bugs : RESIN
Amber’s technical name is “resinite”, reflecting its composition and formation. Amber starts out life as soft sticky tree resin but then under high temperature and pressure from overlying layers of soil, it fossilizes. The sticky resin can trap organisms or other plant matter, and this material can sometimes remain virtually intact inside the amber fossil giving us a unique gift from the past.

52. Caffè ___ : ITALIANO
A caffè Americano is espresso to which is added hot water, bringing the coffee to a similar strength as drip coffee. Caffè Italiano is a similar drink, but a little stronger, with a 1:1 ratio of espresso to hot water.

59. Prestigious mil. award : DSM
The Distinguished Service Medal (DSM) is the highest (non-valorous) decoration awarded for services to the US military.

60. International observance in 20-Down, informally : UN DAY
The Charter of the United Nations was signed by the member states in San Francisco in June 1945 and came into force on 24 October 1945. October 24 was chosen as United Nations Day in 1947. In 1971 the United Nations further resolved to make UN Day a public holiday in all UN member states.

62. Dreidel, e.g. : TOP
A dreidel is a spinning top with four sides, often associated with the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah. Each of the four sides on a dreidel bears a letter from the Hebrew alphabet (nun, gimel, hei and shin). The four letters are the initials of the Hebrew phrase “Nes Gadol Hayah Sham” meaning “a great miracle happened there”. According to tradition, children would be taught Torah while hiding in caves away from the Greeks. When Greek soldiers approached, the children would hide their torah scrolls and play with their dreidels instead.

63. Cataract : FALLS
A cataract is a large waterfall. “Cataract” is of Greek origin coming into English via the Latin “cataracta” meaning waterfall.

64. Parisian sibling : FRERE
“Frère” is the French word for “brother”.

67. Put on the back burner : TABLE
These “tabling” and “shelving” idioms drive me crazy, because they are often misused. If a topic is shelved, it is set aside. If a topic is tabled, it is brought “off the shelf” and put “on the table” for discussion. But, maybe it’s just me …

70. Verizon subsidiary : AOL
AOL was a leading Internet Service Provider (ISP) in the 1980s and 1990s. The company does still provide dial-up access to the Internet for some subscribers, but most users now access AOL using faster, non-AOL ISPs.

The telecommunications company that we know today as Verizon was founded in 1983 as Bell Atlantic, and was one of the “Baby Bells” that were formed after the breakup of AT&T. Bell Atlantic merged with fellow Baby Bell NYNEX in 1997, and then merged with GTE in 2000 to form Verizon. The new company name is a portmanteau of “veritas” (“truth” in Latin) and “horizon”.

72. Old line in Russia : TSARS
The term czar (also tsar) is a Slavic word that was first used as a title by Simeon I of Bulgaria in 913 AD. “Czar” is derived from the word “Caesar”, which was synonymous with “emperor” at that time.

73. ___ Victory (tourist attraction in Portsmouth, England) : HMS
Portsmouth in Hampshire is located on Portsea Island just off the south coast of England. Portsmouth is the only island city in the whole country and is a major naval port, home to the headquarters of the Royal Navy. If you visit the city, be sure to take a tour of HMS Victory, Admiral Lord Nelson’s flagship.

76. Under the 67-Across : ON THE DOWN LOW
Something described as “on the down low” is “secret”. The phrase “on the DL” can mean “on the down low”. “On the DL” can also mean “on the disabled list” in sports.

79. Single-masted pleasure craft : CATBOATS
A catboat is a sailing vessel, one with the mast mounted very near the bow.

86. Abbr. in many Québec city names : STE
“Sainte” (ste.) is French for “saint”, when referring to a female.

87. Potus #34 : DDE
Future US president Eisenhower was born in Denison, Texas in 1890 and given the name David Dwight, but by the time he made it to the White House he was going by the name Dwight D. Eisenhower (DDE). Growing up, his family called him Dwight, and when “Ike” enrolled in West Point he himself reversed the order of his given names.

President of the United States (POTUS)

92. Competitor of Sapporo and Kirin : ASAHI
Asahi is a beer, and the name of the brewery that produces it. “Asahi” is Japanese for “morning sun”. Asahi introduced a “dry beer” in 1987, igniting a craze that rocketed the brewery to the number one spot in terms of beer production in Japan, with Sapporo close behind.

94. Over the 104-Across : IN SEVENTH HEAVEN
(104A. Sky light : MOON)
In cosmology associated with some religious traditions, the universe is said to be made up of Seven Heavens. The highest of these is the “seventh heaven”.

100. Commercial prefix with Pen : EPI-
EpiPen is a brand name of epinephrine auto-injector. An EpiPen delivers a measured dose of epinephrine, usually for the treatment of an allergic reaction.

102. With 109-Down, cochlea’s place : INNER
The cochlea is a spiral structure in the inner ear. Included in the cochlea are hair cells that receive sound vibrations, causing them to move. The movement of the hairs is converted into nerve impulses that are interpreted in the brain.

105. Sculpture medium for Calder : WIRE
Alexander Calder was an American sculptor and artist. Calder is famous for having invented the mobile sculpture, a work made up of several pieces hanging on a string in equilibrium. In effect they are what we might known as “mobiles”, operating on the same principle as mobiles that sit over cribs in a nursery. Calder refers to his large, stationary sculptures as “stabiles”.

108. Print tint : SEPIA
Sepia is that lovely rich, brown-grey color so common in old photographs. “Sepia” is the Latinized version of the Greek word for cuttlefish, as sepia pigment is derived from the ink sac of the cuttlefish.The “sepia tone” of old photographs is not the result of deterioration over time. Rather, it is the result of a deliberate preservation process which converts the metallic silver in the photographic image to a more stable silver sulfide. Prints that have been sepia-toned can last in excess of 150 years.

116. John Paul’s successor : ELENA
Elena Kagan was the Solicitor General of the United States who replaced Justice John Paul Stevens on the US Supreme Court. That made Justice Kagan the first female US Solicitor General and the fourth female US Supreme Court justice. I hear she is a fan of Jane Austen, and used to reread “Pride and Prejudice” once a year. Not a bad thing to do, I’d say …

John Paul Stevens retired as an associate justice on the US Supreme Court in 2010 after having served for over 34 years. That made him the third longest serving justice in the history of the court. Stevens had been nominated by President Gerald Ford to replace Justice William O. Douglas, who had been the longest serving justice in the court (at over 36 years).

119. “Me Talk Pretty One Day” humorist : SEDARIS
David Sedaris is a humorist and author from Binghamton, New York who grew up in Raleigh, North Carolina. He is one of my wife’s favorite authors so we attended an event where Sedaris read some of his works a few years back. He was very, very entertaining. David’s sister is actress and comedienne Amy Sedaris who plays the lead in the Comedy Central series “Strangers with Candy”.

“Me Talk Pretty One Day” is a collection of essays by the great humorist David Sedaris, first published in 2000.

123. ___ dish : PETRI
Julius Richard Petri was a German bacteriologist and was the man after whom the Petri dish is named. The petri dish can have an agar gel on the bottom which acts a nutrient source for the specimen being grown and studied, in which case the dish plus agar is referred to as an “agar plate”.

Down
1. Signature Obama legislation, for short : ACA
The correct name for what has been dubbed “Obamacare” is the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” (ACA).

4. House member from the Bay Area beginning in 1987 : PELOSI
Nancy Pelosi is a former Speaker of the House, the 60th person to hold that position. Ms. Pelosi represents a district not far from here, which covers most of San Francisco. She was the first Californian, the first Italian-American and the first woman to be Speaker of the House. As Speaker, she was also second in line, after the Vice President, to take over if President Obama could not finish his term. That made Nancy Pelosi the highest-ranking female politician in US history.

7. Louis Armstrong vocal feature : RASP
Louis Armstrong was born in New Orleans in 1900. Armstrong had a poor upbringing, and only stayed in school till he was 11 years old. The exact origin of Louis’s nickname “Satchmo” seems to be a little unclear. One story is that he used to dance for pennies in New Orleans as a youngster and would hide those pennies in his mouth away from the other kids. For this he earned the nickname “satchel mouth”, which was shortened to “Satchmo”.

9. N.Y.C. div. : BOR
The five boroughs of New York City were created in 1898. The five boroughs are:

  • Manhattan
  • The Bronx
  • Brooklyn
  • Queens
  • Staten Island

12. Political columnist Matt : BAI
Matt Bai is the writer of the “Political Times” column in the “New York Times”.

14. H. H. Munro’s pen name : SAKI
Hector Hugh Munro was a British writer, who actually was born in Burma. He was most famous for his short stories, which he published using the pen name “Saki”. “The Square Egg and Other Sketches” was a collection of short stories published in 1924, nine years after his death.

15. Leon ___, Henry James biographer : EDEL
Leon Edel wrote a highly respected biography of author Henry James, for which Edel won a Pulitzer Prize. Leon’s younger brother Abraham was a noted philosopher and ethicist.

16. Twain’s “celebrated jumping frog” : DAN’L
“The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” is a short story by Mark Twain, first published in 1865. It was this publication that launched Twain’s career as a writer as it brought him national attention. The title character is a frog that’s given the name “Dan’l Webster”.

18. Crabgrass, e.g. : ANNUAL
Crabgrass may be considered a weed and a scourge of the lawn-loving population, but it has its uses. In Africa, the seeds of some species of crabgrass are toasted and ground into a flour that is used to make porridge, or better still, to make beer.

19. Mushroom variety : ENOKI
Enokitake (also known as enoki) are long and thin white mushrooms often added to soups or salads.

20. Start of the fourth qtr. : OCT
October is the tenth month in our calendar but was the eighth month in the old Roman calendar, hence the name “Octo-ber”. Back then there were only ten months in the year. “Ianuarius” (January) and “Februarius” were then added as the eleventh and twelfth months of the year. Soon after, the year was reset and January and February became the first and second months.

23. Early British actress Nell : GWYN
Nell Gwyn was a popular actress in Restoration England, and the mistress of King Charles II, with whom she had two children. Before becoming an actress, Gwyn worked as an “orange-girl”, selling oranges to theater audiences.

25. Like quiche : EGGY
The classic dish called quiche is made with eggs (“oeufs” in French). Even though the quiche is inextricably linked to French cuisine, the name “quiche” comes from the German word for cake, “Kuchen”. The variant called “quiche lorraine” includes bits of smoked bacon as an ingredient.

30. Title fictional character who “sprang from his Platonic conception of himself” : GATSBY
“The Great Gatsby” is a 1925 novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald that tells of the prosperous life of Jay Gatsby during the Roaring 20s. Gatsby develops an obsessive love for Daisy Fay Buchanan, a girl he met while serving during WWI, and meets again some years later after he has improved his social standing.

31. Clothier Bauer : EDDIE
The Eddie Bauer clothing chain was established in Seattle in 1920 by an outdoorsman called Eddie Bauer (unsurprisingly!). Bauer was the man who patented the first quilted down jacket, in 1940.

40. Front and back, at a golf course : NINES
There’s an urban myth that the standard number of holes on a golf course is 18 because it takes 18 shots to polish off a fifth of scotch whisky. However, the truth is that the standard number of holes in the Old Course at St. Andrews in Scotland happened to settle down over time at 18, and that standard was adopted all around the world.

50. Gerrymanders, say : REDRAWS
Elbridge Gerry was the fifth Vice President of the US, serving under James Madison. Gerry only served 1½ years of his term however, as he died of heart failure while still in office. While Gerry was the governor of his home state of Massachusetts he signed a bill that allowed redrawing of electoral boundaries in such a way that it benefited his Democratic-Republican Party. The “Boston Gazette” wrote an article about the bill and termed the political tactic “Gerry-Mandering”. And “gerrymandering” is a term we still use today, and not just in this country but all over the world.

51. Big Apple paper, for short : NYT
“The New York Times” has been published since 1851. These days a viable alternative to buying the paper is to read the news online. NYTimes.com is the most popular online newspaper website in the country.

Apparently the first published use of the term “Big Apple” to describe New York City dates back to 1909. Edward Martin wrote the following in his book “The Wayfarer in New York”:

Kansas is apt to see in New York a greedy city. . . . It inclines to think that the big apple gets a disproportionate share of the national sap.

Over ten years later, the term “big apple” was used as a nickname for racetracks in and around New York City. However, the concerted effort to “brand” the city as the Big Apple had to wait until the seventies and was the work of the New York Convention and Visitors Bureau.

61. “___ Flux” (Charlize Theron film) : AEON
“Aeon Flux” is a sci-fi film from 2005 starring Charlize Theron in the title role. The movie was inspired by an animated TV series of the same name that aired on MTV in the nineties.

69. Food preservative abbr. : BHT
Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is a food additive that is allowed in our food. BHT is an antioxidant.

71. Letters ending a business name : LLC
A limited liability company (LLC) is a company structure that limits the liability of the owner or owners.

75. Target customer of Yelp : STORE OWNER
yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”.

76. Mount of Greek myth : OSSA
Mount Ossa in Greece is located between Mt. Pelion in the south, and the famed Mt. Olympus in the north. Mount Ossa is also known as Kissavos.

77. R.E.M.’s “The ___ Love” : ONE I
“The One I Love” is a song released in 1987 by the rock band R.E.M. The lyrics are somewhat cynical. The song starts out with “This one goes out to the one I love”, but then the second line is less wholesome, “A simple prop to occupy my time” …

81. Lynn in the Pro Football Hall of Fame : SWANN
After his professional football career with the Pittsburgh Steelers, Lynn Swann became a sportscaster and has been very active in Republican politics in recent years. Swann ran unsuccessfully for Governor of Pennsylvania in 2006. He also publicly declared his interest in running for the House of Representatives in 2008, but bowed out of the race early.

84. Application datum: Abbr. : SSN
Social Security number (SSN)

97. Coat for a dentist : ENAMEL
Tooth enamel covers the crowns of our teeth. Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body. It is composed of 96% crystalline calcium phosphate.

98. What “i.e.” means : THAT IS
“Id est” is Latin for “that is”, and is often abbreviated to “i.e.” when used in English.

99. Charlotte ___, V.I. : AMALIE
Charlotte Amalie is the capital and largest city in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The city was named after the queen consort of King Christian V of Denmark, Charlotte Amalie of Hesse-Kassel.

105. Female W.W. II enlistee : WASP
The Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) were a paramilitary group formed during WWII in 1943. At its largest, the WASP comprised over a thousand female pilots. The group carried out non-combat flying duties such as delivery of aircraft and transportation of cargo. The idea was to free up male pilots for combat duty. Despite a lot of lobbying, the WASP was never given full military status during WWII. That injustice was finally rectified in 1977, and each member of the corps was awarded the WWII Victory Medal in 1984. The WASP was also awarded the Congressional Gold medal in 2009 by President Obama.

107. Some P.O. plans : RTES
Routes (rtes.)

113. Clean energy grp. : EPA
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Take on : ADOPT
6. Some subjects in Scheherazade’s stories : ARABS
11. Humbled : ABASED
17. Playful leap : CAPER
18. Mother-of-pearl source : ABALONE
20. Words preceding “We stand on guard for thee” : O CANADA
21. “Skyfall” singer : ADELE
22. Over the 27-Across : NO SPRING CHICKEN
24. In low spirits : BROKEN UP
26. Guarantee that one will : VOW TO
27. Rise : HILL
28. Sighed line : ALAS
29. Rev : GUN
30. Obsessed with fantasy role-playing games, say : GEEKY
32. “What have we here?!” : OHO!
34. Under the 29-Across : FACING A DEADLINE
38. Certain swinger, informally : ORANG
42. Spanish bear : OSO
43. Castor ___ (“Popeye” guy) : OYL
44. Balance sheet abbr. : YTD
45. Friday, on old TV: Abbr. : SGT
47. Olympics venue between London and Tokyo : RIO
48. Many a Jazz fan : UTAHN
50. Preserver of bugs : RESIN
52. Caffè ___ : ITALIANO
54. “Thinking …” : LET ME SEE …
57. Over the 62-Across : BEYOND BELIEF
59. Prestigious mil. award : DSM
60. International observance in 20-Down, informally : UN DAY
62. Dreidel, e.g. : TOP
63. Cataract : FALLS
64. Parisian sibling : FRERE
65. Exerted : PLIED
67. Put on the back burner : TABLE
70. Verizon subsidiary : AOL
72. Old line in Russia : TSARS
73. ___ Victory (tourist attraction in Portsmouth, England) : HMS
76. Under the 67-Across : ON THE DOWNLOW
79. Single-masted pleasure craft : CATBOATS
82. Keeps up : SUSTAINS
83. Neck and neck : CLOSE
85. Luminous : AGLOW
86. Abbr. in many Québec city names : STE
87. Potus #34 : DDE
88. Conditionals : IFS
89. Melodramatic response : SOB
91. Reagan has one named for him : ERA
92. Competitor of Sapporo and Kirin : ASAHI
94. Over the 104-Across : IN SEVENTH HEAVEN
100. Commercial prefix with Pen : EPI-
102. With 109-Down, cochlea’s place : INNER
103. [snort] : HAH
104. Sky light : MOON
105. Sculpture medium for Calder : WIRE
108. Print tint : SEPIA
110. University of Washington logo : CAPITAL W
112. Under the 105-Across : AT THE LAST MINUTE
116. John Paul’s successor : ELENA
118. Increasing in pitch : STEEPER
119. “Me Talk Pretty One Day” humorist : SEDARIS
120. One who can pick his work? : MINER
121. Impersonate : POSE AS
122. Places for studs : LOBES
123. ___ dish : PETRI

Down
1. Signature Obama legislation, for short : ACA
2. Gosh-darn : DAD BLASTED
3. Floor-length formalwear : OPERA COATS
4. House member from the Bay Area beginning in 1987 : PELOSI
5. Quite the hike : TREK
6. Be plentiful : ABOUND
7. Louis Armstrong vocal feature : RASP
8. High point of a European vacation? : ALP
9. N.Y.C. div. : BOR
10. Cry annoyingly : SNIVEL
11. Cause for a blessing : ACHOO
12. Political columnist Matt : BAI
13. Debate moderator’s day job, typically : ANCHOR
14. H. H. Munro’s pen name : SAKI
15. Leon ___, Henry James biographer : EDEL
16. Twain’s “celebrated jumping frog” : DAN’L
18. Crabgrass, e.g. : ANNUAL
19. Mushroom variety : ENOKI
20. Start of the fourth qtr. : OCT
23. Early British actress Nell : GWYN
25. Like quiche : EGGY
28. In conflict : AFOUL
30. Title fictional character who “sprang from his Platonic conception of himself” : GATSBY
31. Clothier Bauer : EDDIE
33. Fired bullets, informally : HOT LEAD
35. ___ too happy : NONE
36. Blinker : EYE
37. Abbr. on a company’s sign : ESTD
39. Thin as ___ : A RAIL
40. Front and back, at a golf course : NINES
41. Silly billy : GOOF
46. Bull session : GABFEST
49. “Thinking …” : HMM …
50. Gerrymanders, say : REDRAWS
51. Big Apple paper, for short : NYT
52. Situated : IN PLACE
53. Badly : ILL
55. Informal acknowledgment of responsibility : SURE DID
56. Portland-to-Spokane dir. : ENE
58. “That was dumb of me” : OOPS
61. “___ Flux” (Charlize Theron film) : AEON
64. Debugger : FLEA DIP
66. Man’s name that’s the reverse of 117-Down : IRA
67. Woodworking fasteners : T-NUTS
68. Clueless : AT SEA
69. Food preservative abbr. : BHT
71. Letters ending a business name : LLC
72. Buy-one-get-one-free deal : TWOFER
73. Selfish sort : HOG
74. Villainous : MALEVOLENT
75. Target customer of Yelp : STORE OWNER
76. Mount of Greek myth : OSSA
77. R.E.M.’s “The ___ Love” : ONE I
78. Kind of branch : OLIVE
80. Sweets : BABE
81. Lynn in the Pro Football Hall of Fame : SWANN
84. Application datum: Abbr. : SSN
89. Fashions : SHAPES
90. “Um … fancy meeting you here” : OH HI
93. [Look what I got away with!] : HEE HEE!
95. Small swigs : NIPS
96. Huffs : SNITS
97. Coat for a dentist : ENAMEL
98. What “i.e.” means : THAT IS
99. Charlotte ___, V.I. : AMALIE
101. British ___ : ISLES
105. Female W.W. II enlistee : WASP
106. Stick ___ : IT TO
107. Some P.O. plans : RTES
109. See 102-Across : EAR
110. Antidote : CURE
111. Bank clock info : TEMP
113. Clean energy grp. : EPA
114. Ringing words? : I DO
115. Catch : NAB
117. Man’s name that’s the reverse of 66-Down : ARI

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7 thoughts on “1023-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 23 Oct 16, Sunday”

  1. 50:11, no errors. Also had problems, usually filling in an incorrect answer, then changing it later. Odd because I am NO SPRING CHICKEN and a University of Washington alum. Minor technical nit, we do not refer to the logo as a CAPITAL W, it is a block W.

  2. Only one mistake. I had STES (thinking "streets") for RTES. The cross was WIRE (I had WISE) so I guess that is two mistakes. I gave up too easily on that mistake. If I had been a little more patient and thought about it a while longer I could have had a perfect score.

  3. An enjoyable Sunday grid – I like these kinds of combinatorial clues. However…

    The syndicated edition in our local rag omitted the clue number for 3 Down so I put that together with the theme (over-under) and decided that there was some sort of up-down relationship between adjacent answers. NOT!!!! Talk about chasing your tail.

    I guess I'll just chalk it up as a bonus challenge – like I need that.

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