1016-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 16 Oct 16, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Tom McCoy
THEME: Emotion
Each of today’s themed answers is a well-known phrase with a letter E set in MOTION, i.e. moved around in one of the words making up that phrase:

23A. Goodyear’s carefully guarded secrets? : TRICKS OF THE TREAD (from “tricks of the trade”)
33A. Revision that satisfies both author and publisher? : BALANCED EDIT (from “balanced diet”)
48A. What a pianist uses for triple-time pieces? : MINUET HAND (from “minute hand”)
63A. Result of a Morton’s factory explosion? : GREAT SALT LEAK (from “Great Salt Lake”)
70A. Skater boys? : MALES ON WHEELS (from “meals-on-wheels”)
84A. Dating site? : MATE MARKET (from “meat market”)
99A. Privileged time period? : THE CHOSEN EON (from “the chosen one”)
112A. Color used by teams from both San Jose and Jacksonville? : A TEAL OF TWO CITIES (from “A Tale of Two Cities”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 24m 40s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. Shampooing, e.g. : HAIRCARE
Back in the 1760s, the verb “to shampoo” was an Anglo-Indian word meaning “to massage”. A century later we started to shampoo our hair.

16. Hemsworth of “The Hunger Games” : LIAM
Liam Hemsworth is an Australian actor who is best known these days for playing Gale Hawthorne in “The Hunger Games” series of films. Hemsworth met Miley Cyrus while working on the movie “The Last Song”, and the two actors were engaged for a while. Liam is a younger brother of actor Chris Hemsworth, who plays the superhero “Thor” on the big screen.

22. ___-European : INDO
The Indo-European languages are a large group that includes most of the major languages of Europe, the Iranian plateau and South Asia. The Indo-European is the largest grouping of languages in the world.

23. Goodyear’s carefully guarded secrets? : TRICKS OF THE TREAD (from “tricks of the trade”)
The Goodyear tire company was founded in 1898. The company was named for Charles Goodyear, the man who invented vulcanized rubber in 1839. Despite the Goodyear name, Charles Goodyear himself had no connection with the company.

25. Neutral tone : ECRU
The Goodyear tire company was founded in 1898. The company was named for Charles Goodyear, the man who invented vulcanized rubber in 1839. Despite the Goodyear name, Charles Goodyear himself had no connection with the company.

26. Title for Palpatine or Amidala in “Star Wars”: Abbr. : SEN
In the “Star Wars” series of films, the characters Palpatine and Amidala were both Galactic Senators.

Palpatine is the Dark Lord of the Sith in the “Star Wars” universe. In most of the films in the series, Palpatine is played by Scottish actor Ian McDiarmid. In “The Empire Strikes Back”, he was actually played by a woman, the wife of special makeup effects artist Rick Baker, and voiced by New Zealand actor Clive Revill.

In the “Star Wars” universe, Padmé Amidala is the Queen of the planet Naboo. Played very ably by Natalie Portman, Padmé becomes the secret wife of Anakin Skywalker, later revealed to be Darth Vader. As such, Padmé is also the mother of Luke Skywalker and his sister, Princess Leia Organa.

28. Novelist Pierre : LOTI
Pierre Loti was a French writer, and also an officer in the French Navy.

29. Polynesian inn locale, maybe : LAGOON
A lagoon is a shallow body of water, usually separated from the sea by sandbar or reef. The term comes from the Italian “laguna”, the word for a pond or lake. The original “laguna” is the “Laguna Veneta”, the enclosed bay in the Adriatic Sea on which Venice is located. In 1769, Captain Cook was the first to apply the word “lagoon” to the body of water inside a South Seas atoll.

40. Amer. money : USD
The “$” sign was first used for the Spanish American peso, in the late 18th century. The peso was also called the “Spanish dollar” (and “piece of eight”). The Spanish dollar was to become the model for the US dollar that was adopted in 1785, along with the “$” sign.

41. U.F.O. pilots : ETS
One might speculate that an unidentified flying object (UFO) is flown by an extraterrestrial (ET).

48. What a pianist uses for triple-time pieces? : MINUET HAND (from “minute hand”)
A minuet is a dance that originated in France. At some point, the middle section of the minuet was routinely scored for just a trio of instruments. The resulting composition was known as a minuet and trio, and in the Classical Era was commonly chosen as the third movement of a symphony.

50. “Principia Discordia” figure : ERIS
In Greek mythology, Eris is the goddess of discord. The name “Eris” is derived from the Greek word for strife, and translates into Latin as “Discordia”. In Greek her counterpart is Harmonia, and in the world of the Roman gods, Concordia. The largest dwarf planet in our solar system is called Eris, named after the goddess.

Despite the Latin title, “Principia Discordia” is a 1963 work touted as the official bible of Discordianism, with Discordianism described as the religion for these screwed-up times.

51. ___ donna : PRIMA
The Italian operatic term “prima donna” is used for the lead female singer in an opera company. “Prima donna” translates from Italian as “first lady”. The lead male singer is known as the “primo uomo”. The term “prima donna assoluta” is reserved for a prima donna who is generally accepted as being an outstanding performer. We tend to use “prima donna” for a female performer who has an inflated ego.

57. Country with the smallest national capital in the European Union (about 9,000 people) : MALTA
Valletta is the capital city of the island state of Malta in the Mediterranean Sea. The city is named in honor of Jean Parisot de Valette, a French nobleman who commanded the resistance against the Ottomans at the Great Siege of Malta in 1565. With a population of about 9,000 (excluding the metro area), Valletta is the smallest national capital in the European Union.

59. Fall times: Abbr. : OCTS
October is the tenth month in our calendar but was the eighth month in the old Roman calendar, hence the name “Octo-ber”. Back then there were only ten months in the year. “Ianuarius” (January) and “Februarius” were then added as the eleventh and twelfth months of the year. Soon after, the year was reset and January and February became the first and second months.

60. Scalawag : RASCAL
The American word “scalawag” meaning “rogue” was originally borrowed as a nickname for southern white people who supported reconstruction after the Civil War.

63. Result of a Morton’s factory explosion? : GREAT SALT LEAK (from “Great Salt Lake”)
The Great Salt Lake in Utah is extremely shallow, and so the area of the lake fluctuates greatly with the changing volume of water. Back in 1963 the lake shrunk to 950 square miles, whereas in 1988 the area was measured at a whopping 3,300 square miles.

Morton Salt started doing business in 1848 in Chicago, and now is the largest producer of salt in North America. The product’s logo is the Morton Salt Girl, a young girl walking with an open umbrella in the rain, scattering salt behind her from a cylinder.

69. “Stay” singer Lisa : LOEB
The singer Lisa Loeb was discovered by actor Ethan Hawke, who lived just across the street from her in New York City. Hawke took a demo of her song “Stay (I Missed You)” and gave it to director Ben Stiller, who in turn used it over the ending credits of his 1994 movie “Reality Bites”. The movie was a hit, the song went to number one, and Loeb became the first artist ever to hit that number one spot without having signed up with a record label. Good for her!

76. Count in Lemony Snicket books : OLAF
Lemony Snicket is a pen name used by Daniel Handler, a novelist from San Francisco, California. Snicket also appears as the narrator of his books, including the best known of the works: “A Series of Unfortunate Events”. Count Olaf is the antagonist in “A Series of Unfortunate Events”.

79. First in command? : CEE
The first letter in the word “command” is the letter C (cee).

83. ___ Kringle : KRIS
“Kris Kringle” is the name sometimes used here in North America for Santa Claus. “Kris Kringle” is an anglicised form of “Christkind”, the bringer of gifts in many other countries including Austria, the Czech Republic and parts of Germany. “Christkind” is German for “Christ-child”.

90. Unleavened cornbread : PONE
“Pone” is another word for corn bread, from the Powhatan word “apan” meaning “something baked”.

95. El ___ : CID
Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar was known as El Cid Campeador, which translates as “The Champion” or perhaps “The Lord, Master of Military Arts”. El Cid was a soldier who fought under the rule of King Alfonso VI of Spain (among others). However, he was sent into exile by the King in 1080, after acting beyond his authorization in battle. El Cid then offered his services to his former foes, the Moorish kings, After a number of years building a reputation with the Moors, he was recalled from exile by Alfonso. By this time El Cid was very much his own man. Nominally under the orders of Alfonso, he led a combined army of Spanish and Moorish troops and took the city of Valencia on the Mediterranean coast, making it is headquarters and home. He died there, quite peacefully in 1099.

96. Ones making lots of bucks? : BRONCS
A “bronco” (also “bronc”) is a horse that is untamed. In Mexican Spanish “bronco” is a word for “horse”, and in the original Spanish “bronco” means “rough, rude”.

98. Sap : PATSY
“Sap” is slang for a fool, someone easily scammed. The term arose in the early 1800s in Britain when it was used in “saphead” and “sapskull”. All these words derive from “sapwood”, which is the soft wood found in tree trunks between the bark and the heartwood at the center.

103. Mulligans, e.g. : REDOS
There doesn’t seem to be a definitive account for the origin of the term “Mulligan”, most often used for a shot do-over in golf. There are lots of stories about golfers named Mulligan though, and I suspect one of them may be true.

107. Nary ___ : A ONE
The adjective “nary” means “not one”, as in “nary a soul”.

111. Flock : BEVY
“Bevy” is a collective noun used for a number of types of bird, including quail and swans. “Bevy” is also sometimes used as a collective noun for ladies.

112. Color used by teams from both San Jose and Jacksonville? : A TEAL OF TWO CITIES (from “A Tale of Two Cities”)
The uniforms of both the San Jose Sharks hockey team and the Jacksonville Jaguars football team feature the color teal.

The beautiful color of teal takes it name from the duck called a “teal”, which has dark greenish-blue (teal) markings on its head and wings.

“A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens is the most printed book that was originally written in English. The novel was first published in 1859 in 31 weekly installments in a literary periodical called “All the Year Round”, which Dickens himself produced. The “two cities” in the title are London and Paris.

117. Like much of Chile : ARID
The land of Chile has a very distinctive shape. It is a narrow strip that runs up the west coast of South America. The average width of the country is only a little over 100 miles, and yet its length is about 2,700 miles. Chile is touted as the longest country in the world, although I am not so sure what that means exactly. I mean, Russia extends about 4,800 miles from east-to west, so maybe “longest” implies long in the north-south direction?

118. Strict disciplinarian : MARTINET
A martinet is someone who is a hard taskmaster and someone who sticks to the rules. Our use of the term is said to come from Jean Martinet, an Inspector General in the army of Louis XIV of France. Martinet was a noted drill master and disciplinarian.

119. Rehnquist’s successor as chief justice : ROBERTS
John Roberts is the 17th Chief Justice of the United States. Roberts was a nominee of President George W. Bush and assumed office in 2005. President Bush first proposed Roberts as an Associate Justice to replace the retiring Sandra Day O’Connor. However, Chief Justice Rehnquist died before Roberts could be confirmed, so President Bush instead nominated Roberts for the vacant Chief Justice seat.

William Rehnquist served as an Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court from 1972 when he was appointed by President Nixon. When Chief Justice Warren Burger retired in 1986, President Reagan nominated Rehnquist to fill the vacant position. Rehnquist died in office in 2005 and was replaced as Chief Justice by John Roberts, who was in the process of being confirmed as an Associate Justice at the time.

120. Unit of force : DYNE
A dyne is a unit of force. The name “dyne” comes from the Greek “dynamis” meaning “power, force”. Ergs and dynes are related to each other in that one erg is the amount of energy needed to move a force of one dyne over a distance of one centimeter.

Down
1. Follower of John : ACTS
The Acts of the Apostles is the fifth book of the Christian New Testament. It is believed that the author of the Gospel of Luke was the same person who wrote “Acts”.

“Gospel” is a term that came to us via Old English. The Old English term is “godspel” meaning “good story”, and referred to the glad tidings announced by Jesus. There are four Gospels in the Christian New Testament: the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.

2. Rhyme for “door” and “more” in the first verse of “The Raven” : LORE
“The Raven” is a narrative poem by Edgar Allan Poe that tells of a student who has lost the love of his life, Lenore. A raven enters the student’s bedchamber and perches on a bust of Pallas. The raven can talk, to the student’s surprise, but says nothing but the word “nevermore” (“quoth the raven, ‘Nevermore’”). As the student questions all aspects of his life, the raven taunts him with the same comment, “nevermore”. Finally the student decides that his soul is trapped beneath the raven’s shadow and shall be lifted “nevermore” …

4. Giving chicken soup or a foot rub, informally : TLC
Tender loving care (TLC)

6. Get in the loop? : LASSO
Our English word “lasso” comes from the Spanish “lazo”, and ultimately from the Latin “laqueum” meaning “noose, snare”.

7. Money in 74-Down : KRONOR
(74. Neighbor of Den. : SWE)
“Krona” translates in English as “crown”, and is the currency of Sweden (plural “kronor”). As a member of the European Union, Sweden is required to adopt the euro as its official currency. Such a move isn’t really popular in Sweden and so the Swedish government has been using a legal loophole to allow the country to retain the krona.

8. URL start : HTTP
“http” are the first letters in most Internet links. “http” stands for HyperText Transfer Protocol.

10. Country whose capital is known to natives as Baile Átha Cliath : IRELAND
The city of Dublin, the capital of Ireland, is known as “Baile Átha Cliath” in Irish (“town of the hurdled ford”). The English name “Dublin” is an anglicized form of the older Irish name for the city “Dubh Linn”, meaning “black pool”.

12. Magna ___ : CARTA
The Magna Carta is a landmark document issued in England in 1215. It represents the first time that an English king had to submit to the will of his subjects, a group of barons who sought to limit the powers of the monarchy. In particular the Magna Carta calls out that no freeman could be punished except through the law of the land. And famously, the Magna Carta was an inspiration for the United States Constitution.

14. Mens ___ : REA
“Mens rea” is Latin for “guilty mind” and is a central concept in criminal law. The concept is expanded to “actus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea” meaning “the act does not make a person guilty unless the mind be also guilty”. In other words, a someone should not be deemed guilty of an act, unless he or she had a “guilty mind”, intended to do wrong.

15. Like the coda of “Hey Jude,” seemingly : ENDLESS
“Hey Jude” was originally a song called “Hey Jules”, written by Paul McCartney. He wrote the original song for John Lennon’s son Julian, in an attempt to comfort the boy during his parents’ divorce. There’s a phenomenal coda in “Hey Jude” after the fourth verse that lasts for over four minutes.

In music, a coda is primarily a passage that brings a movement to a conclusion. “Coda” is Italian for “tail”.

16. Feudal superior : LIEGE
A liege was a feudal lord, one to whom service or allegiance was owed under feudal law. “Liege” was also the term used for one who owed allegiance or service to a lord. Very confusing …

17. 12 9 11 5 20 8 9 19 3 12 21 5 : IN CODE
If we substitute the letter A for 1, B for 2, C for 3, etc., we can decode this series of numbers, getting “LIKE THIS CLUE”. Yep, this clue is IN CODE.

18. Adept : ADROIT
The French for “to the right” is “à droit”, from which we get our word “adroit”. The original meaning of “adroit” was “rightly, properly”, but it has come to mean dexterous and skillful. Someone described as “maladroit” is unskilled and awkward.

31. “Mr.” of “Star Trek” : SULU
Mr Sulu was played by George Takei in the original “Star Trek” series. Takei has played lots of roles over the years, and is still very active in television. Did you know that he appeared in the 1963 film, “Pt-109”? He played the helmsman steering the Japanese destroyer that ran down John F. Kennedy’s motor torpedo boat. From destroyer helmsman to starship helmsman …

32. Athlete on Time’s list of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century : PELE
Pelé is the nickname of Edson de Nascimento, a soccer player who has used the name Pelé for most of his life. Pelé is now retired, and for my money was the world’s greatest ever player of the game. He is the only person to have been part of three World Cup winning squads, and is a national treasure in his native Brazil. One of Pele’s nicknames is “O Rei do Futebol” (the King of Football).

34. Ridge with a gentle slope on one side and a steep slope on the other : CUESTA
A “cuesta” is a hill with a gentle slope on one side and a steep slope on the other. The name “cuesta” is Spanish for “slope of a hill”. The steep slope might be referred to as an escarpment.

36. One starting : SHIER
One who “shies, starts, gets startled” might be called a “shier”.

39. Chaps : MEN
“Chap” is an informal term for “lad, fellow”, especially in England. The term derives from “chapman”, an obsolete word meaning “purchaser” or “trader”.

46. The “palm” and “olive” of Palmolive : OILS
Palmolive is a brand of soap and related products. The first product was a soap made from palm oil and olive oil, and introduced in 1898.

47. Orwellian hoi polloi : PROLES
George Orwell introduced us to the “proles”, the working class folk in his famous novel “Nineteen Eighty-Four”. Collectively, the proles make up the section of society known as the proletariat.

“Hoi polloi” is a Greek term, literally meaning “the majority, the many”. In English, “hoi polloi” has come to mean “the masses” and is often used in a derogatory sense.

49. Malicious fictional computer : HAL
In Arthur C. Clarke’s “Space Odyssey” (famously adapted for the big screen as “2001: A Space Odyssey”) the computer system that went rogue was called HAL 9000, or simply “HAL”. HAL stands for Heuristically programmed ALgorithmic computer. Even though, Clarke denied it, there’s a good argument that can be made that the acronym HAL is a veiled reference to IBM, the big player in the world of computing at the time of the novel’s publication (1968). The acronym HAL is just a one-letter shift from the initials “IBM”.

52. Kind of challenge : ICE BUCKET
The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge is a viral phenomenon in which participants are challenged to be filmed having a bucket of ice water poured over their heads. Each participant then gets to nominate up to three other people to do the same. Usually the nominees are given a day or two to comply, but can make a charitable donation is they want to avoid the icy shower. Happily, many participants opt to take the challenge, and also make a donation.

53. N.Y.C. org. that operates 24/7 : MTA
The MTA is the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which has public transportation responsibility in the state of New York (as well as part of Connecticut).

62. “The Price Is Right” airer : CBS
“The Price is Right” is a television game show that first aired way back in 1956.

63. Diamond’s Lou : GEHRIG
Baseball legend Lou Gehrig was known as a powerhouse. He was a big hitter and just kept on playing. Gehrig broke the record for the most consecutive number of games played, and he stills holds the record for the most career grand slams. His durability earned him the nickname “The Iron Horse”. Sadly, he died in 1941 at 37-years-old suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an illness we now call “Lou Gehrig’s Disease”. The New Yankees retired the number four on 4th of July 1939 in his honor, making Lou Gehrig the first baseball player to have a number retired.

65. “… ___ he drove out of sight” : ERE
Here are the closing lines to the Christmas poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas”.

He sprang to his sleigh, to his team gave a whistle,
And away they all flew like the down of a thistle.
But I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight—
“Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night!”

66. Blouse, e.g. : TOP
A blouse is a loose-fitting shirt, particularly worn by women or children. The term “blouse” is French, and originally described a peasant’s smock.

70. 1/, 2/, 3/, etc. : MOS
In the US, dates are often written in the format MM/DD/YYYY.

71. “Da ___ G Show” : ALI
“Da Ali G Show” is a satirical TV series featuring English comedian Sacha Baron Cohen. I wouldn’t be a big fan …

74. Neighbor of Den. : SWE
The country of Sweden emerged during the Middle Ages, and became one of the great powers of Europe in the days of the Swedish Empire in 17th and early 18th century. Since then Sweden’s influence has waned. What was the eastern part of Sweden was lost to Russia in the early 1800s, and is now modern-day Finland. In the 20th century Sweden has adopted a very non-aggressive stance and was neutral in both World Wars. Sweden is not a member of NATO, but is a member of the European Union, although the country does not use the euro as its currency.

The constitutional monarchy of Denmark consists of not only the country of Denmark, but also the autonomous constituent countries of the Faroe Islands and Greenland.

78. Was humiliated : ATE CROW
The phrase “eat crow”, an alternative to “eat humble pie”, perhaps refers to the fact that cooked crow may be edible, but is not a great food choice.

80. Place to buy handmade goods online : ETSY
Etsy.com is an e-commerce website where you can buy and sell the kind of items that you might find at a craft fair.

84. What Artemis is the goddess of : MOON
Artemis was an ancient Greek goddess, the equivalent of the Roman goddess Diana. Artemis was a daughter of Zeus and Leto, and the twin sister of Apollo.

85. ___ Taylor (apparel store) : ANN
There was no actual person called Ann Taylor associated with the Ann Taylor line of clothes. The name was chosen by the marketing professionals because “Ann” was considered to be “very New England” back in 1954 when the stores first opened, and “Taylor” suggested that clothes were carefully “tailored”.

86. Pet food brand : ALPO
Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with “Alpo” being an abbreviation for “Allen Products”. Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

87. Nutrition amts. : RDAS
Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII, and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

90. For free : PRO BONO
The Latin term “pro bono publico” means “for the public good”, and is usually shortened to “pro bono”. The term applies to professional work that is done for free or at a reduced fee as a service to the public.

94. Temperature unit : KELVIN
The kelvin is a unit of measurement for temperature, named after British physicist William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin.

96. “God Bless America” composer : BERLIN
Irving Berlin wrote “God Bless America” while serving with the US Army in 1918. Berlin didn’t come across an opportunity to publicize the song until just before WWII. He felt it was the right time to introduce a patriotic song, and famously gave it to singer Kate Smith for a broadcast on Armistice Day in 1938. The song was such a hit that there were even moves to have it adopted as a new national anthem.

97. Term of address with a tilde : SENORA
The equivalent of “Mrs.” in French is “Mme.” (Madame), in Spanish is “Sra.” (Señora) and in Portuguese is also “Sra.” (Senhora).

100. Partner in crime : CLYDE
Bonnie and Clyde were criminals who robbed and killed their way across the central US during the Great Depression. Clyde Barrow was born a desperately poor young boy just south of Dallas, Texas. He was always in trouble with the law, first getting arrested at the age of 16. He met Bonnie Parker in 1930 at a friend’s house, and the smitten Parker followed Clyde into a life of crime. The pair were killed by a posse of Texas police officers just four years later in Louisiana.

107. Part of D.A.: Abbr. : ATTY
District Attorney (DA)

109. Nov. honorees : VETS
Veterans Day used to be known as Armistice Day, and is observed on November 11th each year. This particular date was chosen as the Armistice that ended WWI was signed on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918.

113. Torque symbol : TAU
Torque can be thought of as a turning force, say the force needed to tighten a bolt or a nut. In physics, torque is represented by the Greek letter tau.

114. Like “alumna”: Abbr. : FEM
An “alumnus” (plural … alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is “alumna” (plural … alumnae). The term comes into English from Latin, in which alumnus means foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or an alumnus.

116. Thrice, in prescriptions : TER
Ter is the Latin word for “three”, commonly used in the medical world on prescriptions as part of the expression “ter in die”. “Ter in die” is Latin for “three times a day”, abbreviated to “TID”. “Bis in die” (BID) would be twice a day, and “quater in die” (QID) would be four times a day.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Full of sound and fury : ALL TALK
8. Shampooing, e.g. : HAIRCARE
16. Hemsworth of “The Hunger Games” : LIAM
20. Mine craft? : COAL CAR
21. Endanger : THREATEN
22. ___-European : INDO
23. Goodyear’s carefully guarded secrets? : TRICKS OF THE TREAD (from “tricks of the trade”)
25. Neutral tone : ECRU
26. Title for Palpatine or Amidala in “Star Wars”: Abbr. : SEN
27. Lose it : SNAP
28. Novelist Pierre : LOTI
29. Polynesian inn locale, maybe : LAGOON
31. Unnerve : SPOOK
33. Revision that satisfies both author and publisher? : BALANCED EDIT (from “balanced diet”)
35. Offspring : ISSUE
38. Jog the memory of : REMIND
40. Amer. money : USD
41. U.F.O. pilots : ETS
42. “Would you like me to?” : SHALL I?
44. Be inclined (to) : TEND
45. Increases : GOES UP
48. What a pianist uses for triple-time pieces? : MINUET HAND (from “minute hand”)
50. “Principia Discordia” figure : ERIS
51. ___ donna : PRIMA
55. Ready : SET
56. Japanese honorific : SAN
57. Country with the smallest national capital in the European Union (about 9,000 people) : MALTA
59. Fall times: Abbr. : OCTS
60. Scalawag : RASCAL
63. Result of a Morton’s factory explosion? : GREAT SALT LEAK (from “Great Salt Lake”)
67. Eng. or hist. : SUBJ
68. Strange and unsettling : EERIE
69. “Stay” singer Lisa : LOEB
70. Skater boys? : MALES ON WHEELS (from “meals-on-wheels”)
74. Absorbs : SOPS UP
76. Count in Lemony Snicket books : OLAF
77. Director’s circle? : BOARD
78. Reaction to a puppy video, say : AWW!
79. First in command? : CEE
81. Nurse : SIP ON
83. ___ Kringle : KRIS
84. Dating site? : MATE MARKET (from “meat market”)
88. Dependent (on) : RIDING
90. Unleavened cornbread : PONE
91. Makeup of many a tribal council : ELDERS
92. “Eww!” : ICK!
95. El ___ : CID
96. Ones making lots of bucks? : BRONCS
98. Sap : PATSY
99. Privileged time period? : THE CHOSEN EON (from “the chosen one”)
103. Mulligans, e.g. : REDOS
105. Purveyor : SELLER
106. Make or break, e.g. : VERB
107. Nary ___ : A ONE
108. Team V.I.P. : MVP
111. Flock : BEVY
112. Color used by teams from both San Jose and Jacksonville? : A TEAL OF TWO CITIES (from “A Tale of Two Cities”)
117. Like much of Chile : ARID
118. Strict disciplinarian : MARTINET
119. Rehnquist’s successor as chief justice : ROBERTS
120. Unit of force : DYNE
121. Self-government : AUTONOMY
122. Place to rub elbows? : ARMREST

Down
1. Follower of John : ACTS
2. Rhyme for “door” and “more” in the first verse of “The Raven” : LORE
3. Gone flat? : LAIN
4. Giving chicken soup or a foot rub, informally : TLC
5. Comics exclamation : ACK!
6. Get in the loop? : LASSO
7. Money in 74-Down : KRONOR
8. URL start : HTTP
9. Reaction to a foot rub : AHH!
10. Country whose capital is known to natives as Baile Átha Cliath : IRELAND
11. Related in a different way : RETOLD
12. Magna ___ : CARTA
13. Got room service, say : ATE IN
14. Mens ___ : REA
15. Like the coda of “Hey Jude,” seemingly : ENDLESS
16. Feudal superior : LIEGE
17. 12 9 11 5 20 8 9 19 3 12 21 5 : IN CODE
18. Adept : ADROIT
19. Gun supporters : MOUNTS
24. Something not picked up at the beach : FAKE TAN
30. Make sense : ADD UP
31. “Mr.” of “Star Trek” : SULU
32. Athlete on Time’s list of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century : PELE
33. Hamstring : BIND
34. Ridge with a gentle slope on one side and a steep slope on the other : CUESTA
35. Ideologies : ISMS
36. One starting : SHIER
37. You might wish upon it : SANTA’S LAP
39. Chaps : MEN
43. “Hey, whatever pays the bills” : IT’S A JOB
45. Is annoying : GRATES
46. The “palm” and “olive” of Palmolive : OILS
47. Orwellian hoi polloi : PROLES
49. Malicious fictional computer : HAL
50. Something to shoot off : EMAIL
52. Kind of challenge : ICE BUCKET
53. N.Y.C. org. that operates 24/7 : MTA
54. Pose : ASK
58. Words before a chivalrous act : ALLOW ME
61. Try to win : SUE FOR
62. “The Price Is Right” airer : CBS
63. Diamond’s Lou : GEHRIG
64. Orchestra section : REEDS
65. “… ___ he drove out of sight” : ERE
66. Blouse, e.g. : TOP
70. 1/, 2/, 3/, etc. : MOS
71. “Da ___ G Show” : ALI
72. Retirement community restriction : NO KIDS
73. Give a heads-up : WARN
74. Neighbor of Den. : SWE
75. Equals : PEERS
78. Was humiliated : ATE CROW
80. Place to buy handmade goods online : ETSY
82. Ecological role : NICHE
84. What Artemis is the goddess of : MOON
85. ___ Taylor (apparel store) : ANN
86. Pet food brand : ALPO
87. Nutrition amts. : RDAS
89. Model for an artist, maybe : DIORAMA
90. For free : PRO BONO
92. Bleak assessment of a situation : IT’S BAD
93. Optimistic : CHEERY
94. Temperature unit : KELVIN
96. “God Bless America” composer : BERLIN
97. Term of address with a tilde : SENORA
100. Partner in crime : CLYDE
101. Turn inside out : EVERT
102. “Goody!” : NEATO!
104. Ornamentation : DECOR
107. Part of D.A.: Abbr. : ATTY
108. Swamp : MIRE
109. Nov. honorees : VETS
110. Covert “Hey!” : PSST!
113. Torque symbol : TAU
114. Like “alumna”: Abbr. : FEM
115. 49-Down, with each letter shifted one place later in the alphabet (coincidence?) : IBM
116. Thrice, in prescriptions : TER

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6 thoughts on “1016-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 16 Oct 16, Sunday”

  1. 50:32, no errors, iPad. Very slow solve for me, from beginning to end. In my climbing days, I spent an awful lot of time on CUESTAS, but I had never heard the word before now. Near the end, I was missing GREAT SALT LEAK (which should have been a near-gimme), MALTA (a country I often forget is a country), PROLES, MTA, ASK, and OCTS. I think it took me ten minutes from that point on. Did not get the IN CODE gimmick, either. Not a stellar performance … but hey, I finished … a good landing is one you walk away from, right? … 🙂

  2. Couldn't finish this one; got about 70%, with most of the gaps in the lower left quadrant.

    Lots of really poor clues in this one, and some cynical misdirection. 36 DOWN: SHIER, **really***???? How forced can you get? The puns weren't very "satisfying" either. All in all, this puzzle just…. sucked. Not happy to start the weak with this kind of detritus.

  3. 47:21, no errors. Seemed like every time there was a choice between two entries, I selected the wrong one. 8D HTML vice HTTP, 107A NONE vice A ONE, 92A UGH, YUK vice ICK, etc.

  4. Finished but with some help. Took me forever to finish. The most remarkable part of the puzzle was the number of crossovers I ended up making. I'm becoming an expert at changing an R into a B, a C into an O…etc. H's are difficult to morph into other letters. It's a sad statement that I know these things…

    SHIER gave me a headache as well. Overall the grid was difficult, but that's how I like them. If they were too easy, I'd never come back. I'd do word search puzzles instead..

    Best –

  5. I didn't know "etsy" and went with "otsy" as a guess, not getting the cross clue. Otherwise, I got them all. Though I never have the superhuman times of our esteemed blogger or the regular posters here, and didn't today, I do get a sense of satisfaction from finishing.

  6. Like others here, took more time than I liked to slog through this one. And like @Steve C., I was tripped up by the oTSY-ETSY problem, thinking CEo was a good answer for "First in command" clue. I was wrong. Still, (ala Steve again), I can't say I didn't "Get No Satisfaction"(ala Rolling Stones)from an otherwise clean finish.

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