1009-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 9 Oct 16, Sunday

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Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
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Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Michael Ashley
THEME: Movie Doubles
Each of today’s themed answers is the title of a MOVIE, but with one letter DOUBLED:

23A. One working for Supercuts? : AMERICAN SNIPPER (from “American Sniper”)
35A. Barista’s big reveal? : THE LATTE SHOW (from “The Late Show”)
64A. Search for a really funny person? : HOOT PURSUIT (from “Hot Pursuit”)
96A. Declaration at Ringo’s birth? : A STARR IS BORN (from “A Star Is Born”)
114A. Photographer’s impossible task? : A SHOOT IN THE DARK (from “A Shot in the Dark”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 57s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Brand in the freezer aisle : EGGO
Eggo is the brand name of a line of frozen waffles made by Kellogg’s. When they were introduced in the 1930s, the name “Eggo” was chosen to promote the “egginess” of the batter. “Eggo” replaced the original name chosen, which was “Froffles”, created by melding “frozen” and “waffles”.

9. “Well, blimey!” : I SAY!
When I was a kid in London, a pretty common expression of surprise was “gor blimey”, a euphemism for “God blind me”.

13. Masked hero : ZORRO
The character Zorro was created by Johnston McCulley in 1919 for a series of stories and pulp fiction, the first title being “The Curse of Capistrano”. The name “Zorro” is the secret identity of a Spanish colonial nobleman called Don Diego de la Vega.

18. ___ land : LA-LA
“La-la land” is a euphemism for a state of unconsciousness.

22. Indo-___ : ARYAN
The Indo-Aryans are a collection of peoples that speak languages that share the same linguistic roots, traced back to the ancient Indo-Iranian peoples. Included in the Indo-Aryan group of peoples are the Bengali people, the Gurkhas, the Kashmiri people and the Punjabi people.

23. One working for Supercuts? : AMERICAN SNIPPER (from “American Sniper”)
Chris Kyle was a Navy SEAL who served four tours in Iraq, and then wrote a 2012 autobiography called “American Sniper”. The book was adapted into an equally successful 2014 movie of the same name. Kyle was murdered in 2013 by a US Marine suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder on a public shooting range.

26. Crusader’s foe : SARACEN
The Ancient Romans first used the term “Saracen”, to describe the non-Arab people of Syria. Usage expanded over time so that during the Crusades, the term was used to describe anyone of the Muslim faith.

27. Longtime “60 Minutes” reporter : STAHL
Lesley Stahl has worked on “60 Minutes” since 1991. She is married to author “Aaron Latham”. As a journalist, it was Latham who wrote the article that inspired the movie “Urban Cowboy”.

29. “Always be a poet, even in ___”: Baudelaire : PROSE
Charles Baudelaire was a French poet, noted not only for his own work but also for translating the work of American poet Edgar Allen Poe.

35. Barista’s big reveal? : THE LATTE SHOW (from “The Late Show”)
“The Late Show” is a 1977 mystery film starring Art Carney and Lily Tomlin. Carney plays an aging private detective investigating the murder of his ex-partner. I haven’t seen this one …

The person who serves coffee in a coffee shop is often called a “barista”. “Barista” is the Italian for “bartender”.

49. Lead-in to -drome : AERO-
Aerodrome is a general term for a facility where aircraft take off and land. An aerodrome could be a small airstrip, a large commercial airport or even a military airbase. The term “aerodrome” is used quite often in the UK, but rarely here in the US.

51. Who says “O, what a noble mind is here o’erthrown!,” in Shakespeare : OPHELIA
In William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”, Ophelia is courted by Hamlet, the man himself. Ophelia is the daughter of nobleman Polonius. She dies …

54. British terminals? : ZEDS
The letter named “zed” has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation of “zee” used in America today first popped up in the 1670s.

59. Winning gesture : V-SIGN
One has to be careful making that V-sign depending where you are in the world. Where I came from, the V for victory (or peace) sign has to be made with the palm facing outwards. If the sign is made with the palm facing inwards, it can be interpreted as a very obscene gesture.

62. Biblical kingdom : EDOM
Edom is an ancient Iron Age kingdom located in the south of modern-day Jordan. The area is known for its red-colored sandstone, which gave the kingdom its name. The Hebrew word “Edom” translates as “red”.

63. “___ to Psyche” : ODE
“Ode to Psyche” was one of the so-called “1819 Odes” written by the poet John Keats, a collection that included famous poems such as “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, “Ode to a Nightingale” and “Ode on Melancholy”.

64. Search for a really funny person? : HOOT PURSUIT (from “Hot Pursuit”)
“Hot Pursuit” is an entertaining 2015 comedy film starring Reese Witherspoon and Sofia Vergara. Witherspoon plays an up-tight police officer escorting a key witness (played by Vergara) in drug trial. Hilarity ensues …

68. Monthly check-issuing org. : SSA
The Social Security Administration (SSA) was set up as part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal. The first person to receive a monthly retirement benefit was Ida May Fuller of Vermont who received her first check for the sum of $22.54 after having contributed for three years through payroll taxes. The New Deal turned out to be a good deal for Ms. Fuller, as she lived to 100 years of age and received a total benefit of almost $23,000, whereas her three years of contributions added up to just $24.75.

74. “___ and the Pussycats” : JOSIE
“Josie and the Pussycats” is a comic book aimed at teens, published from 1963 to 1982.

78. Nickname for DiMaggio : JOLTIN’ JOE
Joe DiMaggio was born not too far from here, in Martinez, California, the son of Italian immigrants. The family moved to San Francisco when Joltin’ Joe was just a baby. Joe’s Dad was a fisherman, and it was his hope that all his sons would follow him into his trade. But Joe always felt sick at the smell of fish, so fishing’s loss was baseball’s gain.

84. Humpty Dumpty-shaped : OVOID
Humpty Dumpty is a character in a nursery rhyme, actually an egg although that isn’t specifically called out in the original rhyme:

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
All the king’s horses and all the king’s men
Couldn’t put Humpty together again.

85. Post-Neolithic period : IRON AGE
Ancient societies can be classified by the “three-age system”, which depends on the prevalence of materials used to make tools. The three ages are:

  • The Stone Age
  • The Bronze Age
  • The Iron Age

The actual dates defined by each age depend on the society, as the timing of the transition from the use of one material to another varied around the globe.

86. Astrobiologists’ org. : SETI
SETI is the name given to a number of projects that are searching for extraterrestrial life. The acronym stands for “search for extraterrestrial intelligence”. One of the main SETI activities is the monitoring of electromagnetic radiation (such as radio waves) reaching the Earth in the hope of finding a transmission from a civilization in another world.

88. Actress Amanda of “She’s the Man” : BYNES
Amanda Bynes is an actress that made it big as a teenager on TV shows like “All That” and “The Amanda Show”. She then moved on to playing teen roles on the big screen, particularly in “She’s the Man” and “Hairspray”.

89. Army E-6s: Abbr. : SSGTS
Staff sergeant (SSgt)

95. Program file suffix : EXE
In the Windows Operating System, a file with the extension .exe is an “executable” file.

96. Declaration at Ringo’s birth? : A STARR IS BORN (from “A Star Is Born”)
Ringo Starr’s real name is Richard Starkey. Before he joined the Beatles (replacing drummer Pete Best), Starkey played with the Raving Texans. It was with the Raving Texans that he adopted the name “Ringo Starr”, because he wore a lot of rings and he thought it sounded “cowboyish”. Back then his drum solos were billed as “Starr Time”.

“A Star Is Born” is a 1937 film starring Janet Gaynor as an upcoming Hollywood actress. “A Star Is Born” was remade twice, in 1954 with Judy Garland playing the lead, and in 1976 with Barbra Streisand.

98. Chef Boyardee offering : RAVIOLI
The Chef Boyardee brand of canned food products was named after Ettore Boiardi who introduced the product line in the twenties. Boiardi was an Italian immigrant who owned an Italian restaurant in Cleveland, Ohio. He started the line of canned recipes based on the demand for samples of his dishes from satisfied customers at his restaurant.

100. ‘Tis the season : NOEL
The music for the Christmas song “Deck the Halls” is a traditional Welsh tune that dates back to the 16th century. The same tune was used by Mozart for a violin and piano duet. The lyrics with which we are familiar (other than the “tra-la-la”) are American in origin, and were recorded in 19th century. “‘Tis the season to be jolly …”

101. ___ football : ARENA
Arena Football is played indoors, on a smaller field than American (and Canadian) football. The sport was invented in 1981, and the Arena Football League (AFL) was around from 1987 till 2008. There’s a new AFL in business now, which started playing games in 2010.

106. Parthenon feature : FRIEZE
A frieze is an architectural feature found in many Roman and Greek buildings. Inside a room, frieze is the name given to the upper part of the wall, between the picture rail and the crown molding. Outside of a room, the term frieze is the name given to any extended decoration that is positioned above eye level. Perhaps the most famous frieze comes from the Parthenon in Athens. Over a third of this highly decorated feature was removed from Athens and taken to London in the early 1800s by the Earl of Elgin, where they remain on display in the British Museum. These famous “Elgin Marbles” are subject of much controversy as the legality of the removal is in dispute.

109. Singer LaBelle : PATTI
Patti LaBelle is the stage name of singer Patricia Holt-Edwards from Philadelphia. She started her career in the sixties as the lead singer of the vocal group Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles, later changing its name to simply “LaBelle”. When the group disbanded in 1976, Patti launched a remarkably successful solo career.

114. Photographer’s impossible task? : A SHOOT IN THE DARK (from “A Shot in the Dark”)
“A Shot in the Dark” is the second of “The Pink Panther”series, released in 1964. The main character is Inspector Jacques Clouseau, played brilliantly by Peter Sellers. This one is a lot of fun …

117. “Poor Richard’s Almanack” offering : ADAGE
“Poor Richard’s Almanack” was an annual publication authored by none other than Benjamin Franklin. The first edition hit the shelves in 1732, and was very, very successful, selling about 10,000 copies a year. Apparently Napoleon Bonaparte was a big fan.

118. Menace in “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea” : GIANT SQUID
The Jules Verne sci-fi novel “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea” was first published in 1869-1870 as a serial in a French magazine. Star of the novel (to me) is Captain Nemo’s magnificent submarine called the Nautilus. The distance travelled by the Nautilus is the “20,000 leagues” in the title, not a depth. 20,000 leagues is about three times the circumference of the Earth.

120. “This I Promise You” band, 2000 : NSYNC
NSYNC was a boy band from Orlando, Florida that was formed in 1995. The name of the group came from a comment by the mother of band member Justin Timberlake, who said the boys voices sounded “in sync”. But, it’s also true that the letters of the name NSYNC are the last letters of the given names of the five band members:

  • Justin Timberlake
  • Chris Kirkpatrick
  • Joey Fatone
  • Lance “Lansten” Bass
  • JC Chasez

122. Divisions of office bldgs. : STES
Suite (ste.)

Down
2. University in Beaumont, Tex. : LAMAR
Lamar University is located in Beaumont, Texas and is a member of the Texas State University System. Lamar was founded in 1923 as South Park Junior College, and operated on an unused floor of a high school.

3. Old Olds : ALERO
The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made under the Oldsmobile brand. The Alero was produced from 1999 to 2004.

4. Law office staffers, informally : PARAS
A paralegal (sometimes just “para”) is someone who is trained in legal matters sufficiently to assist a lawyer. A paralegal cannot engage in the practice of law and must be supervised by a qualified lawyer.

5. “Look!,” to Livy : ECCE!
Titus Livius (aka Livy) was a Roman historian who lived from 59 BC to AD 17. Livy wrote the definitive history of Rome at that time.

7. Cry at a card table : GIN!
Gin rummy is a variant of the slower game of standard rummy and was introduced in 1909 by one Elwood Baker and his son.

8. W.W. II org. : OSS
The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was formed during WWII in order to carry out espionage behind enemy lines. A few years after the end of the war the OSS functions were taken up by a new group, the Central Intelligence Agency that was chartered by the National Security Act of 1947.

10. Specious reasoning : SOPHISM
A sophist is someone who engages in devious argument. Originally “sophist” described a wise or learned person, but over time it has become a term of contempt. Our word “sophisticate” comes from the same Greek root.

11. University in Garden City, Long Island : ADELPHI
Adelphi University is located in Garden City, New York on Long Island. The university started out as Adelphi Academy in Brooklyn in 1863. By 1929, the academy had moved to Garden City and was a woman’s college. Adelphi reverted to co-education after WWII when it admitted many students under the GI Bill.

13. Frank who was called the “Electric Don Quixote” : ZAPPA
Frank Zappa was an American composer and guitarist, a solo artist as well as the founding member of the rock band Mothers of Invention. You might like to meet his four children: Moon Unit, Dweezil, Ahmet Emuukha Rodan, and Diva Thin Muffin Pigeen.

14. Mountain nymph : OREAD
The Oreads were the nymphs that accompanied the goddess Artemis on her hunting expeditions.

15. Politico Paul : RYAN
Paul Ryan was the Republican nominee for Vice President in the 2012 election, on the ticket with Mitt Romney. Off the political stage, Ryan is famous for his fitness regime. He has shared that much of his motivation to work out and to watch his diet is because there is a history of heart attacks at an early age in his family. Ryan was elected as Speaker of the House of Representatives in 2015 after John Boehner resigned. At 45, Ryan then became the youngest Speaker since 1875.

31. Radii partners : ULNAE
The humerus is the long bone in the upper arm. The bones in the forearm are the radius and ulna. “Ulna” is the Latin word for “elbow”, and “radius” is Latin for “ray”.

37. Philosophical lead-in to -ism : TAO
The Chinese character “tao” translates as “path”, but the concept of Tao (central to Taoism) signifies the true nature of the world.

38. Money in Oregon state coffers? : SALEM’S LOOT (from “‘Salem’s Lot”)
Salem is the state capital of Oregon. It is thought that the city takes its name from the older city of Salem, Massachusetts.

Stephen King’s “’Salem’s Lot” was published in 1975, his second novel. It belongs to the horror genre, so you won’t catch me reading it. The title refers to the Maine town of Jerusalem’s Lot, or ‘Salem’s Lot for short. There’s an interesting story about the actual publication of the first edition. The intended price of $8.95 was changed at the last minute to $7.95, but not all the price changes were made before release. A few copies “escaped” with the dust cover marked $8.95, and they are now worth a lot of money. Go check your bookshelves …

41. Company near the start of the telephone book listings : AAMCO
AAMCO is named after one of the two founders, Anthony A. Martino (AAM). The company was founded in 1963 in Philadelphia, and opened its first franchise in Newark that same year. There are now about 800 franchises, and AAMCO is the largest chain in the world specializing in automotive transmissions.

43. French bachelor? : HOMME ALONE (from “Home Alone”)
“Home Alone” is a 1990 film starring Macaulay Culkin that has become a Christmas classic. Culkin was nominated for a Best Actor Golden Globe for his performance, the youngest actor ever to be so honored.

50. Gets back (to), in a way : RSVPS
RSVP stands for “répondez s’il vous plaît”, which is French for “please, answer”.

52. Katniss’s love in “The Hunger Games” : PEETA
“The Hunger Games” is a 2008 novel by Suzanne Collins, the first in a trilogy of titles that also includes “Catching Fire” (2009) and “Mockingjay” (2010). “The Hunger Games” was adapted into a very successful movie released in 2012, with the sequels following soon after. Amazon.com reports more sales of “The Hunger Games” series books than even the “Harry Potter” series.

54. Morning ___ : ZOO
That wacky radio broadcasting that is so prevalent in the mornings is called “morning zoo”. The format originated in Dallas, Texas at station KZEW-FM with a show called “The LaBella and Rody Show”. KZEW-FM was already known as “the zoo”, so the show soon earned the moniker “the morning zoo”.

55. D.O.J. figures : AGS
Attorneys General (AGs) head up the Department of Justice (DOJ). When the office of the Attorney General was created in 1789 it was a part-time job, with no departmental support. The Department of Justice came into being in 1870.

56. Serengeti roamer : GNU
A gnu is also known as a wildebeest, and is an antelope native to Africa. “Wildebeest” is actually the Dutch word for “wild beast”.

The Serengeti is a region in Africa, located in northern Tanzania and southwest Kenya. The name “Serengeti” comes from the Maasai language and means “Endless Plains”.

60. ___ generis : SUI
“Sui generis” is a Latin expression meaning “of its own kind”. The term can be used in a number of fields, and in philosophy it refers to an idea which cannot be included in a wider concept, and idea of its own kind.

61. Cara of “Fame” : IRENE
Irene Cara (as well as acting in “Fame”) sang the theme songs to the hit movies “Fame” and “Flashdance”.

69. River spanned by the Pont Neuf : SEINE
Paradoxically, Pont Neuf is the oldest bridge standing today that crosses the River Seine in Paris. The paradox is that the name translates to “new bridge”. The bridge is in two parts, as it crosses from the Left Bank to the Île de la Cité (on which stands Notre Dame) and then from the Île de la Cité to the Right Bank.

72. Magazine founder Eric : UTNE
The “Utne Reader” is known for aggregation and republishing of articles on politics, culture and the environment from other sources in the media. The “Utne Reader” was founded in 1984, with “Utne” being the family name of the couple that started the publication.

73. Members of la familia : TIAS
In Spanish, a “tia” (aunt) is a member of “la familia” (the family).

77. Redbox offerings : DVDS
Redbox is known for renting DVDs from automated retail kiosks placed in locations such grocery stores and fast food restaurants. Perhaps in an obvious move, Redbox now offers a video streaming service called “Redbox Instant”, a joint-venture with Verizon.

79. Serengeti roamer : ORYX
The oryx is a large antelope species, mainly found in Africa but also in the Arabian Peninsula. One species was introduced by man into the White Sands Missile Range. As a result, the oryx is now considered an invasive species in the neighboring White Sands National Monument.

83. Daughter of Tantalus : NIOBE
In Greek mythology, when her children were killed, Niobe fled to Mount Sipylus where she was turned into stone and wept for eternity. There is in fact a Niobe’s Rock on Mount Sipylus (in modern-day Turkey) that resembles a female face, and so is known as “The Weeping Rock”.

86. Cold War land: Abbr. : SSR
Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR)

The term “Cold War” was first used by the novelist George Orwell in a 1945 essay about the atomic bomb. Orwell described a world under threat of nuclear war as having a “peace that is no peace”, in a permanent state of “cold war”. The specific use of “cold war” to describe the tension between the Eastern bloc and the Western allies is attributed to a 1947 speech by Bernard Baruch.

91. Son of Sir Lancelot : GALAHAD
Sir Galahad is one of the Knights of the Round Table of Arthurian legend. Galahad is the illegitimate son of Sir Lancelot, so appears a little later in the tales. He is very gallant and noble, and some see him as the embodiment of Jesus in the Arthurian tradition. Indeed, legend has it that his soul was brought to heaven by Joseph of Arimathea, the man who donated his own tomb for the burial of Jesus according to the Gospels.

92. Large sea snails : TRITONS
Tritons are large sea snails, sometimes referred to as “Triton’s trumpets”. Triton, the Greek god of the sea, is sometimes portrayed using a large seashell as a trumpet, hence the name.

94. Bit of attire for Roy Rogers : BOLO TIE
I’ve never worn a bolo tie, and was surprised to discover that it is a relatively recent invention. The first bolo tie was apparently produced in Wickenburg, Arizona in the late 1940s by a silversmith. The bolo takes its name from the boleadora, an Argentine lariat.

Cowboy actor and singer Roy Rogers’ real name was Leonard Franklin Slye, and his nickname was “King of the Cowboys”. Roy Rogers married Dale Evans in 1947. Evans’ nickname was “Queen of the West”.

99. San Diego State athlete : AZTEC
The San Diego Aztecs are the athletic teams of San diego State university. The team mascot is the Aztec Warrior.

112. Many tenured profs : PHDS
A job in a university that is described as “tenure-track” is one that can lead to a tenured position. A tenured position is a “job for life”. A person with tenure can only be dismissed for cause.

114. Old Turkish commander : AGA
“Aga” (also “agha”) is a title that was used by both civil and military officials in the Ottoman Empire.

115. Some test results, for short : IQS
Although it is correct these days to say that the abbreviation IQ stands for “intelligence quotient”, the term was actually coined by German psychologist William Stern, so it actually is an abbreviation for the German “Intelligenz-Quotient”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Loud sound in a storm : CLAP
5. Brand in the freezer aisle : EGGO
9. “Well, blimey!” : I SAY!
13. Masked hero : ZORRO
18. ___ land : LA-LA
19. Emergency state : CRISIS MODE
22. Indo-___ : ARYAN
23. One working for Supercuts? : AMERICAN SNIPPER (from “American Sniper”)
25. “Later” : PEACE
26. Crusader’s foe : SARACEN
27. Longtime “60 Minutes” reporter : STAHL
28. Beats handily : SPANKS
29. “Always be a poet, even in ___”: Baudelaire : PROSE
30. Bro : DUDE
33. See what one is saying? : LIP-READ
35. Barista’s big reveal? : THE LATTE SHOW (from “The Late Show”)
38. Fall guy : SAP
41. Awful : ABHORRENT
45. Allow : ADMIT
46. Put-away shot : SMASH
48. Pacific farewells : ALOHAS
49. Lead-in to -drome : AERO-
51. Who says “O, what a noble mind is here o’erthrown!,” in Shakespeare : OPHELIA
53. Cry after an owie, maybe : MOMMY!
54. British terminals? : ZEDS
55. Concord : AGREEMENT
57. Wakens : COMES TO
59. Winning gesture : V-SIGN
62. Biblical kingdom : EDOM
63. “___ to Psyche” : ODE
64. Search for a really funny person? : HOOT PURSUIT (from “Hot Pursuit”)
68. Monthly check-issuing org. : SSA
71. Camera setting : AUTO
74. “___ and the Pussycats” : JOSIE
75. Burdened (with) : SADDLED
78. Nickname for DiMaggio : JOLTIN’ JOE
81. Child in Chile : NINO
84. Humpty Dumpty-shaped : OVOID
85. Post-Neolithic period : IRON AGE
86. Astrobiologists’ org. : SETI
87. “That’s it for me” : I’M DONE
88. Actress Amanda of “She’s the Man” : BYNES
89. Army E-6s: Abbr. : SSGTS
93. Writer who specializes in sentimental stories : SOB SISTER
95. Program file suffix : EXE
96. Declaration at Ringo’s birth? : A STARR IS BORN (from “A Star Is Born”)
98. Chef Boyardee offering : RAVIOLI
100. ‘Tis the season : NOEL
101. ___ football : ARENA
106. Parthenon feature : FRIEZE
109. Singer LaBelle : PATTI
111. Best: Lat. : OPTIMUS
113. Send, as payment : REMIT
114. Photographer’s impossible task? : A SHOOT IN THE DARK (from “A Shot in the Dark”)
117. “Poor Richard’s Almanack” offering : ADAGE
118. Menace in “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea” : GIANT SQUID
119. Other than that : ELSE
120. “This I Promise You” band, 2000 : NSYNC
121. Added details : ANDS
122. Divisions of office bldgs. : STES
123. Whole bunch : SLEW

Down
1. Hug : CLASP
2. University in Beaumont, Tex. : LAMAR
3. Old Olds : ALERO
4. Law office staffers, informally : PARAS
5. “Look!,” to Livy : ECCE!
6. Spanish nobleman : GRANDEE
7. Cry at a card table : GIN
8. W.W. II org. : OSS
9. Stuck through : IMPALED
10. Specious reasoning : SOPHISM
11. University in Garden City, Long Island : ADELPHI
12. “___ out!” (ump’s cry) : YER
13. Frank who was called the “Electric Don Quixote” : ZAPPA
14. Mountain nymph : OREAD
15. Politico Paul : RYAN
16. Billiards need : RACK
17. Till compartment : ONES
20. Smaller picture : INSET
21. Canine command : SIT
24. Freezer items : ICE TRAYS
28. Darn, e.g. : SEW
31. Radii partners : ULNAE
32. Saw : DATED
34. Part of an ignition system : ROTOR
36. Timecard measure: Abbr. : HRS
37. Philosophical lead-in to -ism : TAO
38. Money in Oregon state coffers? : SALEM’S LOOT (from “‘Salem’s Lot”)
39. A ___ apple : AS IN
40. Cool, in old slang : PHAT
41. Company near the start of the telephone book listings : AAMCO
42. Relatives : BLOOD
43. French bachelor? : HOMME ALONE (from “Home Alone”)
44. “Goodness!” : OH ME!
46. Spade holder : SHED
47. It might start “Attn.” : MEMO
50. Gets back (to), in a way : RSVPS
52. Katniss’s love in “The Hunger Games” : PEETA
54. Morning ___ : ZOO
55. D.O.J. figures : AGS
56. Serengeti roamer : GNU
58. Slim beachwear : THONG
60. ___ generis : SUI
61. Cara of “Fame” : IRENE
65. Eye: Sp. : OJO
66. Part of a boot : TOE
67. Prefix with -therm : ISO-
69. River spanned by the Pont Neuf : SEINE
70. Member of the genus Vipera : ADDER
72. Magazine founder Eric : UTNE
73. Members of la familia : TIAS
76. Own, so to speak : DOMINATE
77. Redbox offerings : DVDS
78. Be in harmony : JIBE
79. Serengeti roamer : ORYX
80. Country music’s Colter : JESSI
82. “Truly” : IT’S SO
83. Daughter of Tantalus : NIOBE
86. Cold War land: Abbr. : SSR
87. Mediterranean land: Abbr. : ISR
90. Pays a short visit : STOPS IN
91. Son of Sir Lancelot : GALAHAD
92. Large sea snails : TRITONS
94. Bit of attire for Roy Rogers : BOLO TIE
96. Forum greeting : AVE
97. Quick signature: Abbr. : INITS
98. Rule : REIGN
99. San Diego State athlete : AZTEC
102. Coasters, e.g. : RIDES
103. Online shoppers’ destination : E-MALL
104. Sip : NURSE
105. Slightly off : ASKEW
106. Football Hall-of-Famer Tarkenton : FRAN
107. Cold War side : REDS
108. “___ as well” : I MAY
110. Little ‘un : TOT
112. Many tenured profs : PHDS
114. Old Turkish commander : AGA
115. Some test results, for short : IQS
116. Crank : NUT

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7 thoughts on “1009-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 9 Oct 16, Sunday”

  1. 40:56, no errors, iPad. Got the theme early on, but had lots of interruptions to deal with. At this point, the morning after, much of the puzzle looks unfamiliar. My "only-one-joke-necessary" age is rapidly approaching … 🙂

  2. Morning ___ : ZOO say what. Oh my a radio show go figure.

    Best part the Z is with the following 54 across. British terminals? : ZEDS
    The letter named "zed" has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation of "zee" used in America today first popped up in the 1670s.

    I just happen not to be around in 1400 and 1670 other than that a great puzzle. Thanks for your help and input by all users.

  3. Just to show how good we are, now that is funny. Donna my partner and I took 1 hour and 39 minutes.

    never finished until we looked up Morning Zoo and Zeds.

  4. 32:24, 2 errors. 54A MEDS, 54D MOO. Did not think of ZEDS, and have not heard of Morning ZOO. Also not familiar with the expression OH ME; have heard oh my, or ah me; but not OH ME. Minor nit.

  5. Not much fun. It's a too-typical Sunday slog. Big, and because of its size, not often rewarding. I'm considering skipping them.

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