0925-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 25 Sep 16, Sunday

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Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today’s New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jim Holland & Jeff Chen
THEME: Adding On
We ADD the suffix “-ING” ONTO well-known phrases to arrive at today’s themed answers:

29A. Hoopster observing Ramadan? : FASTING FORWARD (from “fast forward”)
46A. Gangster Luciano performing a risqué prank? : LUCKY STREAKING (from “lucky streak”)
68A. Hobo at the wheel? : BUM STEERING (from “bum steer”)
88A. Where to buy certain Christmas decorations? : STOCKING MARKET (from “stock market”)
105A. Mild form of corporal punishment? : LIGHT SWITCHING (from “light switch”)
15D. Cheering done in a plaza? : SQUARE ROOTING (from “square root”)
57D. Big fan of the “Lord of the Flies” author? : GOLDING DIGGER (from “gold digger”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 31s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 3

  • GHOST (Ghist)
  • GONER (gomer)
  • TONE LOC (Time Loc!!!)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Lament after being backstabbed : ET TU?
It was Shakespeare who popularized the words “Et tu, Brute?” (And you, Brutus?), in his play “Julius Caesar”, although the phrase had been around long before he penned his drama. It’s not known what Julius Caesar actually said in real life just before he was assassinated on the steps of the Senate in Rome.

18. Classic word game : GHOST
In the word game “Ghost”, players take turns in adding letters to a word fragment. The intent is not to complete a word, even though the fragment itself must be the start of some real word. I have never played it, I must admit …

20. Dollar competitor : ALAMO
The third largest car rental company over recent years is Alamo, a relative newcomer that was founded in 1974. Alamo made inroads (pun!) into the market by popularizing the idea of “unlimited mileage”.

24. Glossy fabric : SATIN
The material known as “satin” takes its name from “Zayton”, the medieval Arabic name for the Chinese port city of Quanzhou. Quanzhou was used for the export of large amounts of silk to Europe.

25. Dancer’s leader : SANTA
We get the names for Santa’s reindeer from the famous 1823 poem called “A Visit from St. Nicholas”, although we’ve modified a couple of the names over the years. The full list is:

  • Dasher
  • Dancer
  • Prancer
  • Vixen
  • Comet
  • Cupid
  • Donder (originally “Dunder”, and now often “Donner”)
  • Blitzen (originally “Blixem”)

Rudolph was added to the list by retailer Montgomery Ward, would you believe? The store commissioned Robert L. May to create a booklet that could be handed out to children around Christmas in 1939, and May introduced us to a new friend for Santa, namely Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

26. The Bulldogs of the S.E.C. : UGA
The sports teams of the University of Georgia are called the Bulldogs. The team mascot is known as Hairy Dawg. “Forbes” magazine lists Hairy Dawg as the third best Sports Mascot. Impressive …

29. Hoopster observing Ramadan? : FASTING FORWARD (from “fast forward”)
Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, and is traditionally a period of fasting. The faithful that observe Ramadan refrain from eating, drinking and sexual relations from dawn to dusk everyday, a lesson in patience, humility and spirituality.

32. Electric ___ : EEL
Electrophorus electricus is the biological name for the electric eel. Despite its name, the electric “eel” isn’t an eel at all, but rather what is called a knifefish, a fish with an elongated body that is related to the catfish. The electric eel has three pairs of organs along its abdomen, each capable of generating an electric discharge. The shock can go as high as 500 volts with 1 ampere of current (that’s 500 watts), and that could perhaps kill a human.

33. Shepherd’s pie bit : PEA
Shepherd’s pie, also known as cottage pie, is one of my favorite dishes. It is a meat pie (although my wife makes a vegetarian version), with a crust made from mashed potato.

35. River through Seoul : HAN
Seoul is the capital city of South Korea. The Seoul National Capital Area is home to over 25 million people and is the second largest metropolitan area in the world, second only to Tokyo, Japan.

37. Nearly dried-up Asian sea : ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

38. Country whose name becomes its language when you drop its last letter : LAOS
The official name for the country of Laos is the Lao People’s Democratic Republic. In the Lao language, the country’s name is “Meuang Lao”. The French ruled Laos as part of French Indochina, having united three separate Lao kingdoms. As there was a plural of “Lao” entities united into one, the French added the “S” and so today we tend to use “Laos” instead of “Lao”.

40. Frequent Winter Olympics setting : ALPS
There are eight Alpine countries:

  • Austria
  • Slovenia
  • France
  • Switzerland
  • Liechtenstein
  • Germany
  • Monaco
  • Italy

The first Winter Olympic Games was held in 1924, in Chamonix, France. The Winter and Summer Games were held in the same year until 1992, after which they were staggered so that we have an Olympic Games every two years.

45. Van Susteren formerly of Fox News : GRETA
I remember watching Greta Van Susteren as a legal commentator on CNN during the celebrated O. J. Simpson murder trial. She parlayed those appearances into a permanent slot as co-host of CNN’s “Burden of Proof”, before becoming host of her own show on the Fox News Channel called “On the Record”. Van Susteren parted company with Fox in 2016, and apparently that parting wasn’t a happy one. She was immediately replaced on air, without giving her a chance to bid adieu to her TV audience.

46. Gangster Luciano performing a risqué prank? : LUCKY STREAKING (from “lucky streak”)
Lucky Luciano was an American gangster based in New York City, who had been born in Sicily. One of Luciano’s more significant moves was to split New York City into five regions controlled by different Mafia crime families. This act is considered the birth of modern organized crime in the US.

49. Ankle-exposing pants : CAPRIS
Capri pants first became popular on the island of Capri, apparently. They were invented in Europe in 1948, but only became stylish in the US in the sixties. Mary Tyler Moore often wore Capri pants on “The Dick Van Dyke Show” and to some extent she sparked a fashion trend. After a lull in the seventies and eighties there was a resurgence in sales after Uma Thurman wore them (and danced in them) in “Pulp Fiction”. Can’t stand the look of them myself …

51. Captains on The Atlantic, briefly? : EDS
Editors (eds.)

“The Atlantic” magazine was founded in 1857 in Boston as “The Atlantic Monthly”. The impressive list of founding sponsors of included Ralph Waldo Emerson, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Harriet Beecher Stowe. I guess double-barreled names were all the go back then …

54. Neighbor of N.Y. : ONT
The Canadian province of Ontario takes its name from the Great Lake. In turn, Lake Ontario’s name is thought to be derived from “Ontari:io”, a Huron word meaning “great lake”. Ontario is home to the nation’s capital of Ottawa as well as Toronto, Canada’s most populous city (and the capital of the province).

55. Young swan : CYGNET
An adult male swan is called a “cob”, and an adult female is a “pen”. Young swans are called “swanlings” or “cygnets”.

58. Colleens : LASSES
“Cailín” is the Irish word for “girl”, and is usually anglicized as “Colleen”.

62. Whole ___ : FOODS
The first Whole Foods Market was opened in 1980 by John Mackey and partners in Austin, Texas. For the two years prior to the Whole Foods launch, Mackay was operating his natural foods store that he called “Saferway”, as opposed to “Safeway”. Clever name …

63. I.Q. test name : BINET
The first usable intelligence test was invented by a French psychologist named Alfred Binet. Binet collaborated with Théodore Simon and together they produced the Binet-Simon Intelligence Scale that is still in use today for IQ tests.

64. 1982 #1 hit with the line “Watch out boy she’ll chew you up” : MANEATER
Ostensibly, the 1982 Hall & Oates megahit “Maneater” is about a woman, and that’s how the final lyrics were written. However, John Oates tells us that the song was originally written with New York City in mind, and how the city could “chew you up”.

68. Hobo at the wheel? : BUM STEERING (from “bum steer”)
“Bum steer” is a slang term meaning “misleading advice”.

No one seems to know for sure how the term “hobo” originated, although there are lots of colorful theories. My favorite is that “hobo” comes from the first letters in the words “ho-meward bo-und”, but it doesn’t seem very plausible. A kind blog reader tells me that according to Click and Clack from PBS’s “Car Talk” (a great source!), “hobo” comes from “hoe boy”. Hoe boys were young men with hoes looking for work after the Civil War. Hobos differed from “tramps” and “bums”, in that “bums” refused to work, “tramps” worked when they had to, while “hobos” traveled in search of work.

75. Movie Hall : ANNIE
I suppose if there is any Woody Allen movie that I enjoy watching, it’s “Annie Hall” from 1977. I think Diane Keaton is a great actress and she is wonderful in this film. You’ll see Paul Simon as well, making a rare movie appearance, and even Truman Capote playing himself. The film is also famous for sparking a movement in the fashion world to adopt the “Annie Hall” look, that very distinctive appearance championed by Diane Keaton as the Annie Hall character.

76. Bridge words : I PASS
That would be bridge, the card game.

80. Enliven, with “up” : GIN
“To gin up” is a slang term meaning “to enliven, excite”. The term probably derives from the older “to ginger up”. Gingering up was the rather nasty practice of putting ginger up inside a horse to make it lively and move with a high tail.

84. Sugar suffix : -OSE
Sugars are usually named using the “-ose” suffix e.g. glucose, fructose, sucrose.

85. Flatow of NPR’s “Science Friday” : IRA
“Science Friday” is an excellent talk show broadcast every Friday on NPR, and hosted by Ira Flatow. Flatow is known to television audiences as the host of “Newton’s Apple”, which ran from 1983 to 1998.

86. Drops a line : ANGLES
We use the verb “to angle” to mean “to fish” because “angel” was an Old English word for a hook.

94. Early PC platform : MS-DOS
MS-DOS (short for Microsoft Disk Operating System) was the main operating system used by IBM-compatible PCs in the eighties and for much of the nineties.

96. Accident-investigating agcy. : NTSB
The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is responsible for the investigation of major accidents involving transportation. Included in this broad definition is the transportation of fluids in pipelines. The organization is independent in that it has no ties to other government agencies or departments so that its investigations can be viewed as “impartial”. The NTSB also earns a little money for the US as it hires out its investigation teams to countries who don’t have the necessary resources available on their own soil.

97. Part of STEM, for short : TECH
The acronym STEM stands for the disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. An alternative acronym with a similar meaning is MINT, standing for mathematics, information sciences, natural sciences and technology.

105. Mild form of corporal punishment? : LIGHT SWITCHING (from “light switch”)
Corporal punishment in schools is still legal in 20 US States, mostly in the south of the country.

112. Home of the Pampas: Abbr. : ARG
The Pampas are fertile lowlands covering a large part of Argentina, Uruguay and some of Brazil. “Pampa” is a Quechua word meaning “plain”.

116. Actress Swinton : TILDA
Tilda Swinton is an English actress, quite famous in her native land. Swinton made a big name for herself outside the UK when she played the “baddie” in the 2007 movie “Michael Clayton”, opposite the “goodie” played by George Clooney.

117. Golfer Michelle : WIE
Michelle Wie is an American golfer on the LPGA Tour. Wie began playing golf at the age of four and was the youngest player ever to qualify for an LPGA tour event. She turned pro just before her 16th birthday …

118. “Scooby-Doo” girl : VELMA
“Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!” is a series of cartoons produced for Hanna-Barbera Productions, first broadcast in 1969. The title character is a great Dane dog owned by a young male called Shaggy Rogers. The character’s name was inspired by the famous “doo-be-doo-be-doo” refrain in the Frank Sinatra hit “Strangers in the Night”. Shaggy was voiced by famed disk jockey Casey Kasem.

119. Commercial cow : ELSIE
Elsie the Cow is the mascot of the Borden Company. Elsie first appeared at the New York World’s Fair in 1939, introduced to symbolize the perfect dairy product. Elsie was also given a husband named Elmer the Bull. Elmer eventually moved over to the chemical division of Borden where he gave his name to Elmer’s Glue.

120. Brownstone feature : STOOP
A stoop is a raised platform at the door of a house. “Stoop” came into American and Canadian English in the mid-1700s from the Dutch “stoep” meaning “flight of steps”.

121. The Bosporus, e.g.: Abbr. : STR
The Dardanelles and Bosphorus (also “Bosporus”) are two straits in Turkey. The Bosphorus and the Dardanelles lie either side of the Sea of Marmara, allowing continuous navigation from the Aegean Sea to the Black Sea. The Turkish Straits also form the boundary between Europe and Asia.

Down
2. “Walden” writer : THOREAU
Henry David Thoreau is a personal hero of mine. Thoreau is best known for his book called “Walden” published in 1854. The book outlines his philosophy of life and details his experiences living in a cabin near Walden Pond just outside Concord, Massachusetts.

3. “Wild Thing” rapper : TONE LOC
Tone Lōc is the stage name of the rapper Anthony Smith.

6. Saint for whom a Minnesota college is named : OLAF
St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota was named for the former king and patron saint of Norway, Olaf II.

7. ___ Hari : MATA
Mata Hari was the stage name used by Margaretha Geertruida Zella, born in the Netherlands in 1876. After an unsuccessful and somewhat tragic marriage, Zella moved to Paris in 1903 where she struggled to make a living. By 1905 she was working as an exotic dancer and using the name Mata Hari. She was a successful courtesan, notably moving in various circles of high-ranking military officers. She apparently worked as a double agent, both for the French and the Germans. When Mata Hari was accused by the French of passing information to the enemy, she was tried, found guilty and executed by firing squad at the height of WW1, in 1917.

8. Powerless group? : AMISH
The Amish are a group of Christian churches, a subgroup of the Mennonite churches. The Amish church originated in Switzerland and Alsace in 1693 when it was founded by Jakob Ammann. It was Ammann who gave the name to the Amish people. Many Amish people came to Pennsylvania in the 18th century.

11. Party handouts : SWAG BAGS
“Swag” is “loot, stolen property”, a term that started out as criminal slang in England in the 1830s. Swag is also the name given to the promotional freebies available at some events.

13. ___ Chigurh, villain in “No Country for Old Men” : ANTON
American novelist Cormac McCarthy published the novel “No Country for Old Men” in 2005, and saw it adapted into a very successful film of the same name released in 2007. The title comes from the opening line of the William Butler Yeats poem “Sailing to Byzantium”, which we Irish schoolkids all had to read and learn to recite …

16. Baked with breadcrumbs and cheese : AU GRATIN
To cook “au gratin” is to prepare something in a shallow dish with a crust of bread or cheese on top. In America we tend to think mainly of potatoes prepared this way, but the technique can be used for many different dishes. Notably, what we call French onion soup is called a “gratinée” in France, an onion soup with some bread and cheese baked on top.

31. ___ speed : WARP
In the “Star Trek” universe, the warp speed achieved by the warp drive engines is very much like our real-world Mach number. Just as a plane traveling at Mach 1 is moving at the speed of sound, a starship traveling at warp factor 1 is moving at the speed of light. Mach 2 is twice the speed of sound, and warp factor 2 is twice the speed of light. Cool, huh …?

34. Cockpit datum: Abbr. : ALT
Altitude (alt.)

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the original “cockpit” was a pit used for fighting cocks. The term was then applied nautically, as the name for the compartment below decks used as living quarters by midshipmen. The cockpit of a boat today, usually on a smaller vessel, is a sunken area towards the stern in which sits the helmsman and others (who can fit!). The usage extended to aircraft in the 1910s and to cars in the 1930s.

42. Carried chairs : SEDANS
A sedan chair is a litter that was used in England. Being a litter means that it had no wheels and was powered by humans. Most sedan chairs were built for one passenger, with two men providing the “lift”. Henry VIII had a sedan chair, but towards the end of his opulent life he needed four strong men to carry it.

44. Nephew of Cain : ENOS
According to the Bible, Adam and Eve had several children, although only the first three are mentioned by name: Cain, Abel and Seth. Enos was the son of Seth, and therefore the grandson of Adam and Eve. According to the ancient Jewish work called the Book of Jubilees, Enos married his own sister Noam.

45. King who’s a friend of Oprah : GAYLE
Gayle King is a co-anchor on the news magazine show “CBS This Morning”. King met Oprah Winfrey in 1976, with the pair now describing each other as best friends.

47. First name in fashion : YVES
Yves Saint-Laurent (YSL) was a French fashion designer, actually born in Algeria. Saint-Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint-Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from hospital, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story …

53. ___ of Glamis, title in Shakespeare : THANE
Thanes were Scottish aristocrats. The most famous thanes have to be the Shakespearean characters Macbeth (the Thane of Glamis, later Thane of Cawdor) and MacDuff (the Thane of Fife). Other thanes in “Macbeth” are Ross, Lennox and Angus, as well as Menteith and Caithness.

55. Corp. money pros : CFOS
Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

56. One holding many positions : YOGI
A yogi is a practitioner of yoga.

57. Big fan of the “Lord of the Flies” author? : GOLDING DIGGER (from “gold digger”)
“Lord of the Flies” is such a great story! William Golding wrote the novel as an allegory of society. The most famous screen adaptation was made in 1963, directed by Peter Brook.

65. Late author Wiesel : ELIE
Elie Wiesel was a holocaust survivor, best known for his book “Night” that tells of his experiences in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.

77. Hoped-for result of swiping right on Tinder : DATE
Tinder is a matchmaking app that uses Facebook profiles. Users “swipe” photos of potential matches, either to the right (“like”) or to the left (“not interested”). Users who “match” each other can then chat within the app.

79. 75-Down around a saint : NIMBUS
(75D. See 79-Down : AURA)
Nimbus (plural “nimbi”) is another word for a halo, or an aura. “Nimbus” is Latin, and can also translate as “cloud”.

83. TV spinoff of 2002 : CSI: MIAMI
The “CSI” franchise of TV shows has been tremendously successful, but seems to be winding down. “CSI: Miami” (the “worst” of the franchise, I think) was cancelled in 2012 after ten seasons. “CSI: NY” (the “best” of the franchise) was cancelled in 2013 after nine seasons. The original “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”, set in Las Vegas, hung in there until 2015 when it ended with a two-hour TV movie. The youngest show in the series is “CSI: Cyber”, and it’s still on the air.

87. Narrow arm of the sea : LOCH
“Loch” is the Scottish Gaelic word for “lake”. The Irish Gaelic word is “lough”.

89. Part of the inner ear : COCHLEA
The cochlea is a spiral structure in the inner ear. Included in the cochlea are hair cells that receive sound vibrations, causing them to move. The movement of the hairs is converted into nerve impulses that are interpreted in the brain.

90. Channel with “Family Feud” reruns : GSN
Game Show Network (GSN)

“Family Feud” is an American game show that has been remade in countries all over the world. We even make a version in Ireland that we call “Family Fortunes”.

92. Galápagos Islands’ country : ECUADOR
The Galápagos Islands lie over 500 miles west of Ecuador. The Galápagos owe their celebrity to the voyage of HMS Beagle which landed there in 1835, with Charles Darwin on board. It was Darwin’s study of various species on the islands that inspired him to postulate his Theory of Evolution.

93. Setting for many New Yorker cartoons : THERAPY
The world-famous “New Yorker” magazine is published by Conde Nast. It was founded back in 1925 by Harold Ross and his wife Jane Grant, a reporter for “The New York Times”. The venerated magazine has become famous for many aspects of its content, including its stylish covers and its cartoons.

99. Actor Milo : O’SHEA
Milo O’Shea was a great Irish character actor from Dublin who has appeared in everything from “Romeo and Juliet” to “The West Wing”. Sadly, O’Shea passed away in 2013, in New York City.

103. Beer ___ : NUTS
Beer Nuts is the brand name for a snack consisting of peanuts in a sweet-and-salty glaze. There’s no beer in the recipe, just the suggestion that the snack goes well with beer.

106. DVR choice : TIVO
TiVo was introduced in 1999 and was the world’s first commercially successful DVR (Digital Video Recorder).

108. Pluto flyby org. : NASA
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Pluto was discovered in 1930, and was welcomed as the ninth planet in our solar system. Pluto is relatively small in size, just one fifth of the mass of our own moon. In the seventies, astronomers began to discover more large objects in the solar system, including Eris, a “scattered disc object” at the outer reaches. Given that Eris is actually bigger than Pluto, and other objects really aren’t that much smaller, Pluto’s status as a planet was drawn into question. In 2006 there was a scientific definition for a “planet” agreed for the first time, resulting in Pluto being relegated to the status of “dwarf planet”, along with Eris.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Lament after being backstabbed : ET TU?
5. Crack up : GO MAD
10. Test one’s metal? : ASSAY
15. Down : SAD
18. Classic word game : GHOST
20. Dollar competitor : ALAMO
21. Contemptible sort : SWINE
22. “___ linda!” (“How pretty!,” in Spanish) : QUE
23. One who’s dunzo : GONER
24. Glossy fabric : SATIN
25. Dancer’s leader : SANTA
26. The Bulldogs of the S.E.C. : UGA
27. Line at the side of a photo : CREDIT
29. Hoopster observing Ramadan? : FASTING FORWARD (from “fast forward”)
32. Electric ___ : EEL
33. Shepherd’s pie bit : PEA
35. River through Seoul : HAN
36. Bakery buy : BUN
37. Nearly dried-up Asian sea : ARAL
38. Country whose name becomes its language when you drop its last letter : LAOS
40. Frequent Winter Olympics setting : ALPS
43. Sign from a third base coach, say : STEAL
45. Van Susteren formerly of Fox News : GRETA
46. Gangster Luciano performing a risqué prank? : LUCKY STREAKING (from “lucky streak”)
49. Ankle-exposing pants : CAPRIS
50. “___ been thinking …” : I’VE
51. Captains on The Atlantic, briefly? : EDS
52. By and large : MOSTLY
54. Neighbor of N.Y. : ONT
55. Young swan : CYGNET
58. Colleens : LASSES
60. Uncommon spelling for a common greeting : HALLO
62. Whole ___ : FOODS
63. I.Q. test name : BINET
64. 1982 #1 hit with the line “Watch out boy she’ll chew you up” : MANEATER
67. Look lecherously : OGLE
68. Hobo at the wheel? : BUM STEERING (from “bum steer”)
71. Cunningness : WILE
72. Many web advertisements : SIDEBARS
74. Overly indulge in : ABUSE
75. Movie Hall : ANNIE
76. Bridge words : I PASS
77. Evil spirits : DEMONS
79. Gently jabbed : NUDGED
80. Enliven, with “up” : GIN
82. Build-it-yourself auto : KIT CAR
84. Sugar suffix : -OSE
85. Flatow of NPR’s “Science Friday” : IRA
86. Drops a line : ANGLES
88. Where to buy certain Christmas decorations? : STOCKING MARKET (from “stock market”)
94. Early PC platform : MS-DOS
95. Link with : TIE TO
96. Accident-investigating agcy. : NTSB
97. Part of STEM, for short : TECH
98. Long tale : EPIC
99. ___-pah : OOM
100. Subzero, maybe : ICY
102. One whose life is in order? : NUN
104. Lament : RUE
105. Mild form of corporal punishment? : LIGHT SWITCHING (from “light switch”)
110. Poor : SUBPAR
112. Home of the Pampas: Abbr. : ARG
113. “Rumor has it …” : I HEAR …
114. Partner of live : LEARN
116. Actress Swinton : TILDA
117. Golfer Michelle : WIE
118. “Scooby-Doo” girl : VELMA
119. Commercial cow : ELSIE
120. Brownstone feature : STOOP
121. The Bosporus, e.g.: Abbr. : STR
122. Haven : OASIS
123. Change with the times : ADAPT
124. Moving well : SPRY

Down
1. Ovum : EGG CELL
2. “Walden” writer : THOREAU
3. “Wild Thing” rapper : TONE LOC
4. How many college textbooks are bought : USED
5. Lot of fun, informally : GAS
6. Saint for whom a Minnesota college is named : OLAF
7. ___ Hari : MATA
8. Powerless group? : AMISH
9. “It’s worse than you can imagine” : DON’T ASK
10. Org. : ASSN
11. Party handouts : SWAG BAGS
12. Wicked : SINFUL
13. ___ Chigurh, villain in “No Country for Old Men” : ANTON
14. It takes months to complete : YEAR
15. Cheering done in a plaza? : SQUARE ROOTING (from “square root”)
16. Baked with breadcrumbs and cheese : AU GRATIN
17. Bringing up the rear : DEAD LAST
19. Set off, as a security alarm : TRIP
28. China display : TEASET
30. Under the wire, so to speak : IN TIME
31. ___ speed : WARP
34. Cockpit datum: Abbr. : ALT
39. Merely superficial : SKIN-DEEP
41. Olympics events rarely shown in prime time : PRELIMS
42. Carried chairs : SEDANS
44. Nephew of Cain : ENOS
45. King who’s a friend of Oprah : GAYLE
47. First name in fashion : YVES
48. Word after liquid or fixed : ASSET
49. Sword fight sound : CLANG
53. ___ of Glamis, title in Shakespeare : THANE
55. Corp. money pros : CFOS
56. One holding many positions : YOGI
57. Big fan of the “Lord of the Flies” author? : GOLDING DIGGER (from “gold digger”)
59. Mirror buildup, at times : STEAM
61. Dangerous backyard projectile : LAWN DART
63. Pop : BURST
64. Erroneously hit “reply all” instead of “reply,” say : MISSENT
65. Late author Wiesel : ELIE
66. Thatching material : REED
68. Underpinning : BASIS
69. Text on an iPad, say : E-BOOK
70. Collars : RUNS IN
73. Really feels the heat : BAKES
75. See 79-Down : AURA
77. Hoped-for result of swiping right on Tinder : DATE
78. Hot : EROTIC
79. 75-Down around a saint : NIMBUS
80. Wardens enforce them : GAME LAWS
81. Emotionally, if not physically : IN SPIRIT
83. TV spinoff of 2002 : CSI: MIAMI
87. Narrow arm of the sea : LOCH
89. Part of the inner ear : COCHLEA
90. Channel with “Family Feud” reruns : GSN
91. Sound of a pebble hitting water : KERPLOP!
92. Galápagos Islands’ country : ECUADOR
93. Setting for many New Yorker cartoons : THERAPY
95. They get wetter as they dry : TOWELS
99. Actor Milo : O’SHEA
101. Bottom line : YIELD
103. Beer ___ : NUTS
106. DVR choice : TIVO
107. Refrain syllables : TRAS
108. Pluto flyby org. : NASA
109. Enthrall : GRIP
111. They come straight from the horse’s mouth : BITS
115. Bottom line : NET

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8 thoughts on “0925-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 25 Sep 16, Sunday”

  1. 41:48, no errors, iPad Mini, but … at about the 25-minute mark, I accidentally filled in the final square (which I was trying to remember not to do, because there were a couple of things I wasn't sure of) and got the "almost there" message. At that point, I had three incorrect letters, and this time they were not just simple typos. Because I didn't know the slang term "dunzo" (a bit of "urban slang" popularized by some TV program called "Parks and Recreation", which I'd never heard of), I had guessed GOMER (from "Gomer Pyle"), giving me TOMELOC. Also, for the clue "Beer ___", I had Guts instead of Nuts, leaving me with _UG for the clue "One whose life is in order", and it was the initial blank that I accidentally filled in. At that point, with a lot of head-scratching, I corrected my errors, ending up, at the time shown above, with GONER, TONELOC, GSN (for the "Family Feud" channel – another unfamiliar thing), NUN, and NUTS. Then, just to complicate the situation, I set the iPad down and, when I picked it up again, I accidentally had it in portrait mode rather than in landscape mode (which I use only for Sunday puzzles, in order to get squares more nearly the size of my finger tip) and that somehow made the app think I had reset the puzzle at some point (which I most definitely had not) and it now shows a time of 22:49 for it! So … a comedy of errors, not all of them mine … 🙂

    Except for all this, I thought the puzzle was a bit easier than usual. (Maybe I should do Sunday puzzles on my iMac … 🙂

  2. Just finished last Sunday's NYT puzzle. Nice way to kill a rainy day where I'm fighting the last effects of a cold. Finished it and even got all the dashes in that one. I think it's my first trick puzzle I figured out and finished. I think the rain and my illness made me more patient for once….

    AMERICAN GOT HI-C had to be my favorite.

    Dave – regarding the term "eschew", surely you've seen the saying "Eschew obfuscation". I think some English writing teacher must have come up with that one…

    Best –

  3. @Jeff … Yes, I always liked the saying you mention. I first saw it on a fairly long list of similar bits of advice. The only other one that comes to mind just now is "Avoid cliches like the plague".

  4. 41:33, and no errors due to a lucky guess on 42 DOWN. Thought that was a really bogus clue, among a few others. Oh well, any time I improve on Bill's accuracy (or time), it's a good day, right?

  5. 53:15, 7 errors (shouldn't watch football while puzzle solving). 106D TISO; 118A SELMA; 79D NIMBOS; 90D GSD; 102A DOM; 103D MUGS; 116A GILDA.

  6. I don't keep my time, because I don't work straight through the puzzle, but take breaks and come back to it. But I had no errors today–which always makes me feel smart, especially when I had fewer errors than Bill!

  7. No errors. This may be the first time I have ever beaten Bill for accuracy. I am nowhere even close to Bill on the time factor, however. Anyway, I'm proud that I actually completed one of these things with no mistakes.

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