0911-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 11 Sep 16, Sunday

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Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ned White & George Barany
THEME: Sack Time
The black squares in the middle of today’s grid signifies a BED, and under it we have a MONSTER and a DUST BUNNY. Other themed answers contain words related to the SACK (i.e. to bed).

49A. Pajama party : SLEEPOVER
64A. Snore loudly : SAW LOGS
70A. What a child may think is under the [puzzle’s central image] : MONSTER
86A. What a parent may think is under the [puzzle’s central image] : DUST BUNNY

22A. Magazine’s lead : COVER STORY
24A. Rock Hudson/Doris Day romantic comedy : PILLOW TALK
32A. There are no ifs, ands or buts about it : BLANKET STATEMENT
101A. Rained cats and dogs : CAME DOWN IN SHEETS
115A. Item on a telephone stand : MESSAGE PAD
118A. Line at the end of a day’s diary : AND SO TO BED

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 18m 49s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2

SPELEOLOGY (spellology)
FEY (fly)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Figaro, e.g. : BARBER
Figaro is the title character in at least two operas: “The Barber of Seville” by Rossini, and “The Marriage of Figaro” by Mozart. The two storylines are based on plays by Pierre Beaumarchais, with one basically being a sequel to the other.

10. ___ Trueheart (Dick Tracy’s wife) : TESS
In the “Dick Tracy” comic strip, Tess Trueheart was Dick’s love interest, and later his wife (and still his love interest, I am sure!).

14. Ahab’s post : HELM
Captain Ahab is the obsessed and far from friendly captain of the Pequod in Herman Melville’s “Moby-Dick”. The role of Captain Ahab was played by Gregory Peck in the 1956 John Huston film adaptation. Patrick Stewart played Ahab in a 1998 miniseries in which Peck made another appearance, as Father Mapple.

19. Jungle menace : BOA
Boa constrictors are members of the Boidae family of snakes, all of which are non-venomous. Interestingly, the female boa is always larger than the male.

21. Lollapalooza : ONER
A “lollapalooza” is something outstanding, one of a kind, as is a “dilly”.

24. Rock Hudson/Doris Day romantic comedy : PILLOW TALK
“Pillow Talk” is a marvelous romantic comedy from 1959 that stars Rock Hudson and Doris Day, with Tony Randall in a supporting role. The same trio of actors starred in a trio of movies together: “Pillow Talk” (1959), “Lover Come Back” (1961) and “Send Me No Flowers” (1964).

27. Roosevelt of note : ELEANOR
Eleanor Roosevelt was the daughter of Elliot, brother to President Theodore Roosevelt. Eleanor met Franklin D. Roosevelt, who was her father’s fifth cousin, in 1902, and the two started “walking out together” the following year after they both attended a White House dinner with President Roosevelt.

29. Fear of a claustrophobe, for short : MRI
MRI scans can be daunting for many people as they usually involve the patient lying inside a tube with the imaging magnet surrounding the body. Additionally, the scan can take up to 40 minutes in some cases. There are some open MRI scanners available that help prevent a feeling of claustrophobia. However, the image produced by open scanners are of lower quality as they operate at lower magnetic fields.

30. Month before juin : MAI
In French, the month of “mai” (MAY) comes before “juin” (June).

35. Craft the U.S. government has never recognized : UFO
In 1952, the USAF revived its studies of reported sightings of unidentified flying objects (UFOs) in a program called Project Blue Book. Project Blue Book ran from 1952 until it was shut down in 1969 with the conclusion that there was no threat to national security and that there were no sightings that could not be explained within the bounds of modern scientific knowledge.

38. Tryster with Tristan : ISOLDE
According to Arthurian legend, Iseult (also “Isolde”) was the adulterous lover of Sir Tristan, one of the Knights of the Round Table. Iseult was an Irish Princess who fell in love with Tristan who had been sent to win Iseult’s hand in marriage for King Mark of Cornwall. The tale was used as the basis for Richard Wagner’s celebrated opera “Tristan und Isolde”.

39. Study of caves : SPELEOLOGY
“Speleology” is the study of caves, coming from “spelaeum”, the Latin for “cave”.

57. French Dadaist : ARP
Jean Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn’t the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both “Hans” and “Jean” translate into English as “John”. In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. Arp was sent home …

60. Buttonless garment : SARI
The item of clothing called a “sari” (also “saree”) is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that’s a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

68. Prince Valiant’s love : ALETA
Aleta is the the wife of Prince Valiant in the long-running comic strip. Edward, Duke of Windsor, called the “Prince Valiant” comic strip the “greatest contribution to English Literature in the past one hundred years”. I’m not so sure …

69. Cocktail sauce ingredient : CATSUP
“Catsup” is an American spelling of “ketchup” that is sometimes used, especially in the south of the country.

77. Positive response to “Parlez-vous anglais?” : YES I DO
“Parlez-vous anglais” is French for “Do you speak English?”

80. Most jump shots : TWO-POINTERS
That would be in basketball.

83. Charisse of “Brigadoon” : CYD
Actress Cyd Charisse was famous for her dancing ability and the many roles she played opposite Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly. Charisse carved out a career based on dance despite the fact that she suffered from polio as a child. In fact, she took up ballet at the age of twelve to help build up her strength as she recovered from the disease.

“Brigadoon” is a Lerner and Loewe stage musical about a Scottish village that only appears for one day every one hundred years. “Brigadoon” was made into a movie in 1954, starring Gene Kelly and Cyd Charisse.

84. Gumbo ingredients : OKRAS
The plant known as okra is mainly grown for it edible green pods. The pods are said to resemble “ladies’ fingers”, which is an alternative name for the plant. Okra is known as “ngombo” in Bantu, a name that might give us the word “gumbo”, the name for the name of the southern Louisiana stew that includes okra as a key ingredient.

87. Lout : YAHOO
Yahoos were brutish creatures introduced by Irish author Jonathan Swift in “Gulliver’s Travels”. Their savage, slovenly ways gave rise of the use of “yahoo” in English to describe a lout or Neanderthal.

89. “What services ___ thou do?”: King Lear : CANST
Shakespeare was inspired to write his famous drama “King Lear” by the legend of “Leir of Britain”, the story of a mythological Celtic king.

91. London home to many John Constable paintings : TATE MUSEUM
The museum known as “the Tate” is actually made up of four separate galleries in England. The original Tate gallery was founded by Sir Henry Tate as the National Gallery of British Art. It is located on Millbank in London, on the site of the old Millbank Prison, and is now called Tate Britain. There is also the Tate Liverpool in the north of England located in an old warehouse, and the Tate St. Ives in the west country located in an old gas works. My favorite of the Tate galleries is the Tate Modern which lies on the banks of the Thames in London. It’s a beautiful building, a converted power station that you have to see to believe.

John Constable is the most English of painters, although during his lifetime his work was more popular in France than it was in his native country. His most famous painting is “The Hay Wain” from 1821, which you can see in the National Gallery in London.

93. “___ on Cards,” classic 1949 book : SCARNE
John Scarne was an American magician who was known in particular for his card tricks. He also wrote a number of books on card games and gambling. Perhaps even more impressive is that he invented the shoe used in a casino for dealing cards. The dealing device is so called because early versions resembled a woman’s high-heel shoe.

100. Letters between two names : AKA
Also known as (aka)

101. Rained cats and dogs : CAME DOWN IN SHEETS
It has been “raining cats and dogs” at least since the 1700s, but no one seems to know the origin of the expression.

111. Kwik-E-Mart clerk : APU
The fictional Kwik-E-Mart store is operated by Apu Nahasapeemapetilon on “The Simpsons” TV show. Apu is married to Manjula, and the couple have eight children. The convenience store owner doesn’t seem to be making much use of his Ph.D in computer science that he earned in the US. Apu’s undergraduate degree is from Caltech (the Calcutta Technical Institute), where he graduated top of his class of seven million students …

112. Like Verdi’s “Caro nome” : IN E
“Caro nome” (“Dearest name”) is an aria from Verdi’s opera “Rigoletto”.

“Rigoletto” is one of Giuseppe Verdi’s most famous and oft-performed operas. The storyline comes from a Victor Hugo play called “Le roi s’amuse” (usually translated as “The King’s Fool”). Rigoletto is the king’s fool, the jester.

125. “Auld Lang ___” : SYNE
The song “Auld Lang Syne” is a staple at New Year’s Eve (well, actually in the opening minutes of New Year’s Day). The words were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

Down
1. Big feature of Popeye, informally : BICEP
The biceps muscle is made up of two bundles of muscle, both of which terminate at the same point near the elbow. The heads of the bundles terminate at different points on the scapula or shoulder blade. “Biceps” is Latin for “two-headed”.

Popeye first appeared in 1929 in a comic strip called “Thimble Theatre”. The strip, created by E. C. Segar, ran for ten years before Popeye made an appearance. Popeye received such a great welcome from readers that he soon “took over” the strip, and eventually even hogged the strip’s title. Before Popeye turned up Olive Oyl was the main character.

5. Galway Bay locale, to locals : EIRE
“Éire”, is the Irish word for “Ireland”. The related “Erin” is an anglicized version of “Éire” and actually corresponds to “Éirinn”, the dative case of “Éire”.

Galway Bay is a large inlet on the west coast of Ireland. The city of Galway is located on the northeast side of the bay. Fans of the film “The Quiet Man” might recognize the song “Galway Bay”.

If you ever go across the sea to Ireland
Then maybe at the closing of your day
You will go and see the moon rise over Claddagh
Or see the sun go down at Galway Bay.

6. QB guarders : RTS
In American football, right tackles (RTs) guard the quarterback (QB).

7. Menace in 2014 news : EBOLA
The Ebola virus causes a very nasty form of hemorrhagic fever. The name of the virus comes from the site of the first known outbreak, in a mission hospital in the Ebola River Valley in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The disease is transmitted from human to human by exposure to bodily fluids. In nature, the main carrier of Ebola is the fruit bat.

8. Record six-time David di Donatello Award winner for Best Actress : LOREN
Sophia Loren certainly has earned her exalted position in the world of movies. In 1962 Loren won an Oscar for Best Actress for her role in the Italian film “Two Women”, the first actress to win an Academy Award for a non-English speaking performance. She received a second nomination for Best Actress for her role in “Marriage Italian-Style”, another Italian-language movie, released in 1964.

9. Popular airfare finder : KAYAK
KAYAK is a travel search engine that was founded in 2004 and has been owned by the Priceline Group since 2012.

10. Yen : THIRST
The word “yen”, meaning “urge”, has been around in English since the very early 1900s. It comes from the earlier word “yin” imported from Chinese, which was used in English to describe an intense craving for opium!

12. 2014 Oscar-nominated film set in Alabama : SELMA
“Selma” is a 2014 film about the Selma to Montgomery marches of 1965.

The Bloody Sunday march took place between Selma and Montgomery, Alabama on 7 March 1965. The 600 marchers involved were protesting the intimidation of African-Americans registering to vote. When the marchers reached Dallas County, Alabama they encountered a line of state troopers reinforced by white males who had been deputized that morning to help keep the peace. Violence broke out with 17 marchers ending up in hospital, one nearly dying. Because the disturbance was widely covered by television cameras, the civil rights movement picked up a lot of support that day.

13. ___ Life, “Porgy and Bess” character : SPORTIN’
“Porgy and Bess” is an opera with music by George Gershwin, lyrics by Ira Gershwin, and libretto by DuBose Heyward. The storyline of the opera is based on the novel “Porgy” written by DuBose Heyward and and wife Dorothy. “Porgy and Bess” was first performed in 1935, in New York City, but really wasn’t accepted as legitimate opera until 1976 after a landmark production by the Houston Grand Opera. The most famous song from the piece is probably the wonderful aria “Summertime”.

16. Cadillac founder Henry : LELAND
Henry Leland was an automotive industry icon, as well as an inventor. One of Leland’s inventions was the electric barber clippers. At the other end of the scale, Leland created the Cadillac automobile and then founded the Lincoln automotive company, later purchased by Ford..

17. Title character in a “Sgt. Pepper” song : MR KITE
“Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!” is a song released in 1967 by the Beatles on the “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” album. John Lennon was largely responsible for writing the song, inspired by 19th-century circus poster. The poster announced a show given by the circus for the benefit of Mr. Kite, a circus employee who had just passed away.

25. Late author and Peace Nobelist : WIESEL
Elie Wiesel was a holocaust survivor, best known for his book “Night” that tells of his experiences in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.

28. PBS supporter, for short : NEA
The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is an agency funded by the federal government that offers support and financing for artistic projects. The NEA was created by an Act of Congress in 1965. Between 1965 and 2008, the NEA awarded over $4 billion to the arts, with Congress authorizing around $170 million annually through the eighties and much of the nineties. That funding was cut to less than $100 million in the late nineties due to pressure from conservatives concerned about the use of funds, but it is now back over the $150 million mark. I wonder how long that will last though …

33. Tribal figures : TOTEMS
“Totem” is the name given to any entity that watches over a group of people. As such, totems are usually the subjects of worship. Totem poles are really misnamed, as they are not intended to represent figures to be worshiped, but rather are heraldic in nature often celebrating the legends or notable events in the history of a tribe.

34. Sloughs : MORASSES
A slough is a depression in the ground filled with deep mud.

36. Elflike : FEY
“Fey” is such a lovely word, meaning magical or fairy-like. It comes from the Middle English word “feie” which has a less pleasant definition, “fated to die”. The term has been extended over the past century to mean “effeminate”.

42. Acid : LSD
LSD (colloquially known as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

47. New England state sch. : URI
The University of Rhode Island (URI) was first chartered as an agricultural school, back in 1888. URI’s main campus today is located in the village of Kingston.

50. 1970s-’80s TV’s “The ___ Club” : PTL
“The PTL Club” was a daily television show hosted by televangelists Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker. PTL is short for both “Praise the Lord” and “People that Love”. The show ended its run of over ten years in 1987 when it was revealed that Jim Bakker was involvement in financial and sexual scandals. Bakker served 5 years in jail, part of an 18-year sentence.

54. Hodgepodge : PASTICHE
“Hochepot” is an Old French word for stew or soup, and this gave rise to an Anglo-French legal term for a collection of property that was gathered prior to being divided up. This became our “hodgepodge” in the early 1400s.

55. “Roger that” : I READ YOU
The term “roger”, meaning “yes” or “acknowledged”, comes from the world of radiotelephony. The British military used a phonetic alphabet in the fifties that included “Roger” to represent the letter “R”. As such, it became customary to say “Roger” when acknowledging a message, with R (Roger) standing for “received”.

59. Doctors’ orders : X-RAYS
X-rays were first studied comprehensively by the German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen (also “Roentgen”), and it was he who gave the name “X-rays” to this particular type of radiation. Paradoxically, in Röntgen’s native language of German, X-rays are routinely referred to as “Röntgen rays”. In 1901 Röntgen won the first Nobel Prize in Physics that was ever awarded, recognition for his work on X-rays.

62. Know-it-all : WISEACRE
The word “wiseacre” dates back to the late 1500s, when it was a botched translation of the Middle Dutch word “wijsegger” meaning “soothsayer”. Originally, there was no derogatory connotation to the word, but over time a “wiseacre” had become a know-it-all.

63. Start to -tainment : EDU-
“Edutainment” is educational entertainment, a work that is designed to both educate and to entertain. The Walt Disney Company was the first to embrace the term, using it to describe the “True-Life Adventures” series of films produced from 1948 to 1960.

69. Corporate tech head, for short : CIO
Chief Information Officer (CIO)

70. Alternative to boeuf or poulet : MOUTON
In French, “mouton” (lamb) is an alternative to “boeuf” (beef) or “poulet” (chicken).

75. Geographical eponym of an insurance company : ETNA
When the healthcare management and insurance company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mt. Etna, the European volcano.

78. Former Laker Lamar : ODOM
Lamar Odom is a basketball forward in NBA. Apparently Odom loves candy, and that’s how he earned his nickname, “The Candy Man”. Odom is married to Khloé Kardashian, and the couple’s wedding featured on an episode of the reality show “Keeping Up with the Kardashians”. Not a show that I have ever seen …

81. O.E.D. contents: Abbr. : WDS
The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) defines a lot of words (wds.).

82. Companion to whiskey in “American Pie” : RYE
Don McLean released his greatest hit, “American Pie”, back in 1971. Despite the song’s iconic position in the pop repertoire, McLean has been remarkably reticent about its origins and the meaning of the lyrics. We do know that it was inspired by the death of Buddy Holly in a plane crash (“the day the music died”). McLean has also told us that he first read about the death of his idol when delivering newspapers the day after the crash (“February made me shiver/with every paper I’d deliver”). Although the lyrics have been analyzed and interpreted in depth by many, McLean’s stance remains that it is just a poem set to music.

Bye, bye Miss American Pie
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry
And them good ole boys were drinking whiskey and rye
Singin’ this’ll be the day that I die
This’ll be the day that I die

85. New Mexico’s ___ National Laboratories : SANDIA
Sandia National Laboratories are two major research and development labs doing work for for US Department of Energy. The original lab was born out of the Manhattan Project that developed the first atomic bomb. Located on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, that first lab was named for the nearby Sandia Mountains. Sandia’s second facility is located a few miles from where I live, and is adjacent to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California.

90. Motel sign filler : NEON GAS
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

92. “No ___!” (“I give!”) : MAS
“No mas!” translates from Spanish as “no more!”.

93. Shrimp ___ : SCAMPI
The Italian dish known as “scampi” is a serving of shrimp in garlic butter and dry white wine.

94. Shenanigans : CAPERS
I suppose one could be forgiven for thinking that “shenanigan” is an Irish term, as it certainly sounds Irish. Usually written in the plural, shenanigans are acts of mischief, pranks. Apparently the word is of uncertain derivation but was coined in San Francisco and Sacramento, California in the mid-1800s.

97. Lively, on a score : VIVACE
“Vivace” is a musical direction indicating a lively mood and fast tempo. The term is Italian for “lively, vivid”.

98. Battery part : ANODE
A battery is a device that converts chemical energy into electric energy. A simple battery is made up of three parts: a cathode, an anode and a liquid electrolyte. Ions from the electrolyte react chemically with the material in the anode producing a compound and releasing electrons. At the same time, the electrolyte reacts with the material in the cathode, absorbing electrons and producing a different chemical compound. In this way, there is a buildup of electrons at the anode and a deficit of electrons at the cathode. When a connection (wire, say) is made between the cathode and anode, electrons flow through the resulting circuit from the anode to cathode in an attempt to rectify the electron imbalance.

99. D-Day vessel: Abbr. : LST
LST stands for Landing Ship, Tank. LSTs were the large vessels used mainly in WWII that had doors at either ends through which tanks and other vehicles could roll off and onto beaches. The design concept persists to this day in the huge fleet of commercial roll-on/roll-off car ferries, all inspired by the LST.

103. ___ bar (popular candy) : HEATH
The Heath candy bar was created by brothers Bayard and Everett Heath in the 1920s.

104. Muppet with a “rubber duckie” : ERNIE
For many years, I believed that the “Sesame Street” characters Bert and Ernie were named after two roles played in the Christmas classic “It’s a Wonderful Life”. In the movie, the policeman’s name is Bert and his taxi-driving buddy is named Ernie. However, the “Sesame Street” folks have stated that the use of the same names is just a coincidence.

105. Source of some quilt stuffing : EIDER
Eiders are large sea ducks. Their down feathers are used to fill pillows and quilts, giving the name to the quilt called an “eiderdown”.

106. Pride of Lions, for short? : TDS
Touchdowns (TDs)

The Detroit Lions are the NFL team that plays home games at Ford Field in Detroit, Michigan. The team was founded way back in 1929 as the Portsmouth Spartans from Portsmouth, Ohio. The Spartans joined the NFL during the Great Depression as other franchises collapsed. However, the Spartans couldn’t command a large enough gate in Portsmouth so the team was sold and relocated to Detroit in 1934.

108. “___ español?” : HABLA
“Habla español?” is Spanish for “Do you speak Spanish?”

109. Prince ___, Eddie Murphy’s role in “Coming to America” : AKEEM
“Akeem” is an Arabic name meaning “wise”, and is a variation of the name “Hakeem” that is common in Africa.

“Coming to America” is a 1988 comedy film starring Eddie Murphy as Akeem, an African crown prince who comes to the US to find a bride. Murphy also created the story on which the screenplay was based.

110. Roosevelt of note : TEDDY
President Theodore Roosevelt was the first American to win a Nobel Prize in any field. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1906 for his role in negotiating an end to the Russo-Japanese War.

116. Destination for some BART riders, for short : SFO
San Francisco International Airport (SFO) serves as the main base of operations for Virgin America (recently sold to Alaska Airlines), and is also the maintenance hub for United Airlines. SFO was the site of a 2013 crash of an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 that resulted in three fatalities.

Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) serves the San Francisco Bay Area.

117. Put down in writing? : PAN
To pan something is to criticize it harshly.

119. Cause of a tic, for short : OCD
Apparently obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is the fourth most commonly diagnosed mental disorder, making it about as common as asthma.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Figaro, e.g. : BARBER
7. Foal : horse :: calf : ___ : ELK
10. ___ Trueheart (Dick Tracy’s wife) : TESS
14. Ahab’s post : HELM
18. Reply to “Look at that!” : I SEE IT!
19. Jungle menace : BOA
20. Things insomniacs count : SHEEP
21. Lollapalooza : ONER
22. Magazine’s lead : COVER STORY
24. Rock Hudson/Doris Day romantic comedy : PILLOW TALK
26. Habituate : ENURE
27. Roosevelt of note : ELEANOR
29. Fear of a claustrophobe, for short : MRI
30. Month before juin : MAI
31. Hatchery sound : PEEP
32. There are no ifs, ands or buts about it : BLANKET STATEMENT
35. Craft the U.S. government has never recognized : UFO
37. Memo segue : AS TO
38. Tryster with Tristan : ISOLDE
39. Study of caves : SPELEOLOGY
46. One making a pitch? : TUNER
48. In a slapdash way : LAXLY
49. Pajama party : SLEEPOVER
53. Stone, to Caesar : LAPIS
57. French Dadaist : ARP
58. Toss in : ADD TO THE MIX
60. Buttonless garment : SARI
61. Cried over spilled milk, maybe : MEOWED
64. Snore loudly : SAW LOGS
65. Reddish-brown : RUSSET
67. One in front of a train : BRIDE
68. Prince Valiant’s love : ALETA
69. Cocktail sauce ingredient : CATSUP
70. What a child may think is under the [puzzle’s central image] : MONSTER
77. Positive response to “Parlez-vous anglais?” : YES I DO
79. Slushy drink brand : ICEE
80. Most jump shots : TWO-POINTERS
83. Charisse of “Brigadoon” : CYD
84. Gumbo ingredients : OKRAS
86. What a parent may think is under the [puzzle’s central image] : DUST BUNNY
87. Lout : YAHOO
89. “What services ___ thou do?”: King Lear : CANST
91. London home to many John Constable paintings : TATE MUSEUM
93. “___ on Cards,” classic 1949 book : SCARNE
96. Like O’s in most typefaces : OVAL
100. Letters between two names : AKA
101. Rained cats and dogs : CAME DOWN IN SHEETS
107. “Huh?” : WHAT?
111. Kwik-E-Mart clerk : APU
112. Like Verdi’s “Caro nome” : IN E
113. Poll worker’s request : VOTER ID
114. Command to a dog : SHAKE
115. Item on a telephone stand : MESSAGE PAD
118. Line at the end of a day’s diary : AND SO TO BED
120. Choice: Abbr. : PREF
121. Speedily : APACE
122. Twist-___ : TIE
123. Rang : CALLED
124. “That ___ wrong” : IS SO
125. “Auld Lang ___” : SYNE
126. The other woman : HER
127. Super-handsome : DREAMY

Down
1. Big feature of Popeye, informally : BICEP
2. United : AS ONE
3. Variety show : REVUE
4. Tavern tap handle : BEER PULL
5. Galway Bay locale, to locals : EIRE
6. QB guarders : RTS
7. Menace in 2014 news : EBOLA
8. Record six-time David di Donatello Award winner for Best Actress : LOREN
9. Popular airfare finder : KAYAK
10. Yen : THIRST
11. Fish that can swim forward and backward : EEL
12. 2014 Oscar-nominated film set in Alabama : SELMA
13. ___ Life, “Porgy and Bess” character : SPORTIN’
14. All the rage : HOT
15. Paint choice : ENAMEL
16. Cadillac founder Henry : LELAND
17. Title character in a “Sgt. Pepper” song : MR KITE
20. TV ads : SPOTS
23. Office no. : TEL
25. Late author and Peace Nobelist : WIESEL
28. PBS supporter, for short : NEA
32. Relative of a raspberry : BOO
33. Tribal figures : TOTEMS
34. Sloughs : MORASSES
36. Elflike : FEY
39. Dis : SLAM
40. Trim : PARE BACK
41. The world’s largest is China : EXPORTER
42. Acid : LSD
43. Ma and pa, with “the” : OLDS
44. “___ grip!” : GET A
45. “That hurts!” : YEOW!
47. New England state sch. : URI
50. 1970s-’80s TV’s “The ___ Club” : PTL
51. “I see what you’re doing!” : OHO!
52. Kick back, with “out” : VEG
54. Hodgepodge : PASTICHE
55. “Roger that” : I READ YOU
56. Command to a dog : SIT
58. More than capable : ADEPT
59. Doctors’ orders : X-RAYS
62. Know-it-all : WISEACRE
63. Start to -tainment : EDU-
66. Relative of -let : -ULE
69. Corporate tech head, for short : CIO
70. Alternative to boeuf or poulet : MOUTON
71. Word with black or photo : OPS
72. Sarcasm clarification : NOT!
73. Bro or sis : SIB
74. Fastener designed to leave a flush surface : T-NUT
75. Geographical eponym of an insurance company : ETNA
76. The check that’s in the mail, maybe : RENT
78. Former Laker Lamar : ODOM
81. O.E.D. contents: Abbr. : WDS
82. Companion to whiskey in “American Pie” : RYE
85. New Mexico’s ___ National Laboratories : SANDIA
87. Chortle : YUK
88. All things considered : AS A WHOLE
90. Motel sign filler : NEON GAS
92. “No ___!” (“I give!”) : MAS
93. Shrimp ___ : SCAMPI
94. Shenanigans : CAPERS
95. Tickles : AMUSES
97. Lively, on a score : VIVACE
98. Battery part : ANODE
99. D-Day vessel: Abbr. : LST
102. Teary-eyed : WEEPY
103. ___ bar (popular candy) : HEATH
104. Muppet with a “rubber duckie” : ERNIE
105. Source of some quilt stuffing : EIDER
106. Pride of Lions, for short? : TDS
108. “___ español?” : HABLA
109. Prince ___, Eddie Murphy’s role in “Coming to America” : AKEEM
110. Roosevelt of note : TEDDY
114. Part of a rating : STAR
116. Destination for some BART riders, for short : SFO
117. Put down in writing? : PAN
119. Cause of a tic, for short : OCD

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9 thoughts on “0911-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 11 Sep 16, Sunday”

  1. 30:37, no errors, iPad.

    I have made several attempts to follow "Prince Valiant" in the comic pages and have not been successful. I must agree with Bill's assessment of it. Perhaps the Duke was being facetious?

    Only other comment: I have never, ever heard anyone refer to his or her parents as "the olds". Where did that come from? And is it possible to send it back? (I have now seen it twice in crossword puzzles and it has set my teeth on edge both times.)

  2. gabaglu fey felt the same way looked it up and to my surprise.

    Fey is a word that defies its own meaning, since it has yet to even come close to the brink of death after being in our language for well over 800 years. In Old and Middle English it meant "feeble" or "sickly." Those meanings turned out to be fey themselves, but the word lived on in senses related to death, and because a wild or elated state of mind was once believed to portend death, other senses arose from these. The word fay, meaning "fairy" or "elf," may also have had an influence on some senses of "fey." Not until the late 20th century did the word's most recent meanings, "precious" and "campy," find their way onto the pages of the dictionary.

  3. 45:34, and no errors. Was a slog, to be honest. Nothing it seems, came easily. I agree with the irritation at the FEY fill. Nothing "elf-like" about it. Just another example of the truly poor, cynical editing designed to trick, rather than to [fairly] challenge. You know Shortz has the mental capacity and vocabulary to find any number of better clues, but he goes for the "stumper" or the esoteric first. Bad form, I must say.

  4. 36:37, no errors. Lost a lot to time with similar fills, where I always seemed to pick the wrong one. 7D ECOLI/EBOLA; 51D AHA/OHO.

    I was only comfortable with 36D FEY because of my familiarity with World of Warcraft creatures; which include elf-like Fey Dragons, etc.

    1D 'Big feature of Popeye' = BICEP; Unless there are bicep muscles in the forearms, they are not a big feature of Popeye. My understanding is that biceps are in the upper arms, and Popeye's upper arms were extremely scrawny, until he ate his spinach.

  5. I have the same problem that Dave Kennison has with "the OLDS." Where does this come from? Who says it to whom? Never mind.

    The Duke of Windsor was not known as one of the royal family's brightest bulbs. His hyperbolic praise of the comic strip might have been seriously meant. Whatever the case, I find the strip beautifully drawn, and worthwhile for that reason, but very slow in its story-telling.

  6. I imagine I'm posting this too late in the day for anyone to see it (and maybe that's just as well), but …

    The clue for 36D immediately suggested FEY to me; it was one of the gimmes. I can't say when or where I have seen the word used in the sense suggested, but I must have seen it repeatedly for it to have sunk in so deep. Moreover, just now, I did a Google search on "define fey" and turned up more than one site using either the word "elfin" or "elflike" in one of the definitions given. So I have to disagree with @gabaglu and @Anonymous.

    Now, in regard to the contention that this puzzle was the result of "poor" or "cynical" editing designed to unfairly trick, rather than challenge, us poor solvers: In the past, several posters, including me, have tried to explain why we do these puzzles and what it is that we like about them, and I'm not in the mood to repeat myself. The question in my mind is this: Why would anyone who apparently hates the puzzles so much as to criticize them so dismissively continue to try to do them? (Admittedly, I have to have a certain begrudging respect for such a person's persistence, but I find it a bit painful to witness the process.)

  7. No errors. I actually thought today's puzzle was relatively easy. Relativly, I say. I usually don't do very well on the Sundays. Either I am getting better or the puzzles are getting easier. I admit that I take a few minutes to gloat when I do as well as I did today.

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