0814-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 14 Aug 16, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ian Livengood
THEME: Moral Thinking
Each of today’s themed answers sounds like a common phrase with an “-al” sound added at the end:

23A. Actress Streep playing a centenarian? : THE OLD GRAY MERYL (“The Old Gray Mare” -al)
31A. Risky business for a compiler of quotations? : BARTLETT PERIL (Bartlett pear -al)
52A. Alaskan beer container? : KODIAK BARREL (Kodiak bear -al)
72A. Promote singer Crow’s music? : MARKET SHERYL (market share -al)
92A. Debt for comedian Will? : BILL OF FERRELL (bill of fare -al)
104A. “I can’t help you, but the Brady Bunch mom will be happy to assist”? : HANDLE WITH CAROL (handle with care -al)
35D. Frost-covered biochemical solid? : ICY STEROL (icy stare -al)
48D. Like actor Flynn post-dieting? : THIN ERROL (thin air -al)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 25m 59s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Southwestern cliff dwellers : HOPI
Many of the Hopi nation live on a reservation that is actually located within the much larger Navajo reservation in Arizona.

13. Meatheads : DODOS
The dodo was a direct relative of the pigeon and dove, although the fully-grown dodo was usually three feet tall. One of the reasons the dodo comes to mind when we think of extinction of a species, is that it disappeared not too long ago (last recorded alive in 1681) and humans were the reason for its demise. The dodo lived exclusively on the island of Mauritius and when man arrived, we cut back the forests that were its home. We also introduced domestic animals, such as dogs and pigs, that ransacked the dodo’s nests. The dodo was deemed to be an awkward flightless bird and so the term “dodo” has come to mean a dull-witted person.

18. A Swiss army knife has a lot of them : USES
Swiss Army knives are multi-tools made by the Swiss company Victorinox. The device was first produced in 1891 when Victorinox’s predecessor company was awarded the contract to supply the knife to the Swiss Army. The name “Swiss Army knife” was actually an American invention as it was the term used by American GIs during and after WWII as an alternative to pronouncing the more difficult German “Schweizer Offiziersmesser” (Swiss Officer Knife).

21. Heads for Britain? : LOOS
It has been suggested that the British term “loo” comes from Waterloo (water-closet … water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of “lanterloo” in which the pot was called the loo!

In old sailing ships the toilet area for the regular sailors was located in the forward part (the head) of the ship, hence the term “head” that has been used since then for any toilet on board a boat.

22. Thick-skinned grazer : RHINO
There are five types of rhinoceros that survive today, and the smaller Javan Rhino is the most rare. The rhinoceros is probably the rarest large mammal on the planet, thanks to poaching. Hunters mainly prize the horn of the rhino as it is used in powdered form in traditional Chinese medicine.

23. Actress Streep playing a centenarian? : THE OLD GRAY MERYL (“The Old Gray Mare” -al)
Meryl Streep has had more nominations for an Academy Award than any other actor, a tribute to her talent and the respect she has earned in the industry. I am not a huge fan of her earlier works but some of her recent movies are now on my list of all-time favorites. I recommend “Mamma Mia!” (you’ll either love it or hate it!), “Julie & Julia”, “It’s Complicated” and ”Hope Springs”.

“The Old Gray Mare” is a traditional folk, although in recent times it has been considered a children’s song.

27. Soup accompaniers, often : SALTINES
F. L. Sommer & Company of St. Joseph, Missouri starting making wafer thin soda crackers in 1876. The crackers were later marketed as Saltines, due to the baking salt that was a key ingredient. Trademark protection of the term “saltine” was subsequently lost.

28. Like the settings of typical Grant Wood paintings : RURAL
The iconic Grant Wood work called “American Gothic” was painted in 1930. It depicts a farmer holding a pitchfork standing beside his spinster daughter. Grant used his sister as a model for the daughter, and his dentist as a model for the farmer. You can see “American Gothic” on display at the Art Institute of Chicago. You can also visit the house depicted in the painting, in the city of Eldon, Iowa. Perhaps predictably, the house is located on American Gothic Street.

31. Risky business for a compiler of quotations? : BARTLETT PERIL (Bartlett pear -al)
The Bartlett is the most commonly grown pear outside of Asia, a cultivar of the European pear. Back in the UK, where the Bartlett originated, it is called a Williams Pear, or more completely a Williams’ Bon Chretien (Williams’ good Christian). Several Williams trees were imported to the US in 1799 and planted in Massachusetts. The land on which the trees were planted was eventually bought by one Enoch Bartlett, and he started to distribute the pears and basically introduced the variety to the US. He didn’t know that the pears were called Williams, so he named them after himself!

“Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations” is a popular reference work containing tons of quotations. Bartlett’s was first issued in 1855, and as such is the longest-lived collection of quotations that we have available to us. The book started as a private list of quotes gathered by John Bartlett who ran the University Bookstore in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He kept the list as he was always being asked “who said?” by customers.

39. Evident worrywart : PACER
The term “worrywart”, meaning one who dwells unnecessarily on troubles, comes from a cartoon strip. Worry Wart was a character introduced in 1956 in the strip “Out Our Way” that was drawn by American cartoonist J.R. Williams. The cartoon Worry Wart caused others to do the worrying, which is the opposite of the meaning we give the term today.

44. ___ Kitchen (frozen food brand) : AMY’S
Amy’s Kitchen is a company making organic and easy-to-prepare frozen food. The company was founded in 1987 by Andy and Rachel Berliner, and Amy is their daughter.

46. Attorney general’s investigation target : SCAM
Attorneys General (AGs) head up the Department of Justice (DOJ). When the office of the Attorney General was created in 1789 it was a part-time job, with no departmental support. The Department of Justice came into being in 1870.

47. Like funk, now : RETRO
Funk is a genre of music that originated in the late sixties with African-American musicians, and has been described as a mix of soul, jazz and R&B. One of the more famous names associated with funk was James Brown.

52. Alaskan beer container? : KODIAK BARREL (Kodiak bear -al)
The Kodiak Archipelago is a group of islands in Alaska. The archipelago is named for Kodiak Island, the largest in the group, and the second largest island in the US (after the Big Island of Hawaii).

Brown bears are found over much of northern Europe, Asia, and North America. The biggest subspecies of brown bear is the Kodiak Bear, the largest land-based predator in the world. Named for the Kodiak Archipelago in Alaska, the Kodiak bear grows to about the same size as the enormous polar bear.

59. Vetoes : NIXES
The use of “nix” as a verb, meaning “to shoot down”, dates back to the early 1900s. Before that “nix” was just a noun meaning “nothing”. “Nix” comes from the German “nichts”, which also means “nothing”.

“Veto” comes directly from Latin and means “I forbid”. The word was used by tribunes of Ancient Rome to indicate that they opposed measures passed by the Senate.

63. Typographical no-no : WIDOW
In the world of typesetting, a widow is a short line of type, perhaps one that ends a paragraph, but one that spills over onto the next page or column. It’s a no-no as a “widow” looks a little weird sitting there on “her” own.

64. SiriusXM star : STERN
Howard Stern is one of the original “shock jocks” who seems now to have found his niche on uncensored satellite radio (SiriusXM). Apparently Stern is quite the chess player, and was invited to play in the 2010 US Chess Championships, albeit as a wildcard choice.

65. Some fine wool : MERINO
The Merino breed of sheep is prized for the soft quality of its wool.

67. Charming group? : COVEN
“Coven” is an old Scottish word meaning simply “gathering”. The first known application of the word to witchcraft came during the trial of a Scotswoman in 1662 accused of being a witch. At that time, “coven” came to mean a group of 13 witches.

68. Some True Value purchases : TOOL SETS
True Value is a cooperative, a network of hardware stores that are independently owned. The cooperative was founded in 1948 and is headquartered in Chicago.

71. Bad way to go? : AWOL
The Military Police (MPs) often track down personnel who go AWOL (absent without leave).

72. Promote singer Crow’s music? : MARKET SHERYL (market share -al)
Sheryl Crow famously dated cyclist Lance Armstrong from 2003-2006. Armstrong has stated publicly more than once that Crow’s music cured his cancer.

75. P pronounced like an R : RHO
Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter “p”.

76. Pequod’s co-owner : PELEG
The Pequod is the ship that figures in Herman Melville’s classic novel “Moby Dick”. The ship is owned by a consortium of the citizens of Nantucket Island, including Captains Ahab, Bildad and Peleg.

79. James who sang “Good Rockin’ Daddy” : ETTA
Etta James was best known for her beautiful rendition of the song “At Last”. Sadly, as she disclosed in her autobiography, James lived a life that was ravaged by drug addiction leading to numerous legal and health problems. Ms. James passed away in January 2012 having suffered from leukemia.

80. Throat part : CRAW
“Craw” is another name for the “crop”, a portion of the alimentary tract of some animals, including birds. The crop is used for the storage of food prior to digestion. The crop allows the animal to eat large amounts and then digest that food with efficiency over an extended period. The expression “to stick in one’s craw” is used one when one cannot accept something, cannot “swallow” it.

85. Wilderness Road trailblazer : BOONE
Daniel Boone was a pioneer and folk hero. For frontiersman Boone, the frontier was what we now call the state of Kentucky. He led the building of the Wilderness Road through the famous Cumberland Gap in the Appalachians, a route subsequently taken by hundreds of thousands of migrants into Kentucky. Boone fought in the Revolutionary War with distinction, and after the war returned to Kentucky and got himself into land speculation. He became mired in debt, forcing him to emigrate to Missouri to settle down on land that was at that time owned by the French. It was there that he spent the last decades of his life.

86. Fitness grp. : AMA
American Medical Association (AMA)

89. Nat ___ (channel) : GEO
The National Geographic Channel (Nat Geo) is jointly owned by Fox and the National Geographic Society, and was launched in 2001.

92. Debt for comedian Will? : BILL OF FERRELL (bill of fare -al)
Will Ferrell is a comedian and comic actor from Irvine, California who got his big break as a cast member on “Saturday Night Live” (SNL) in the mid-nineties. While appearing on SNL, Ferrell was noted for several impersonations, including President George W. Bush, Neil Diamond, James Lipton, Ted Kennedy and Janet Reno.

A “bill of fare” is the menu in a restaurant.

97. Celsius of the Celsius scale : ANDERS
Anders Celsius was a Swedish astronomer. The temperature scale that Celsius created was the reverse of that used today, with “zero” representing the boiling point of water and “100” representing water’s freezing point. This scale was “upended” (in 1744) just after Celsius died, by the Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus. The resulting temperature scale then became known as the centigrade scale for over 200 years, until in 1948 it was decided to adopt the “degree Celsius”. So, anyone still using “degrees centigrade” is actually way behind the times …

99. “Hamilton” and “1776” : MUSICALS
“Hamilton” is a 2015 musical based on the life or US Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, as described in the 2004 biography by Ron Chernow. The representations of the main characters is quite ground-breaking. The show is rooted in hip-hop and the main roles such as Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington are all played by African-American and Hispanic actors.

“1776” is a musical by Sherman Edwards that premiered in 1969 on Broadway. It tells the story of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, and in particular the efforts of John Adams to persuade the participants of the Second Continental Congress to do so.

104. “I can’t help you, but the Brady Bunch mom will be happy to assist”? : HANDLE WITH CAROL (handle with care -al)
In TV show “The Brady Bunch”, the mom is Carol Brady, formerly Carol Martin, played by Florence Henderson.

106. ___ Durkheim, so-called “father of sociology” : EMILE
The sociologist Émile Durkheim is often listed with Max Weber and Karl Marx as the founders of sociology, with Durkheim cited as the “father of sociology”.

108. Who wrote “A great flame follows a little spark” : DANTE
The line “A great flame follows a little spark” is from “Divine Comedy” by Dante Alighieri.

Dante Alighieri’s “Divine Comedy” is an epic poem dating back to the 14th century. The first part of that epic is “Inferno”, which is the Italian word for “Hell”. In the poem, Dante is led on a journey by the poet Virgil, starting at the gates of Hell on which are written the famous words “Abandon all hope, ye who enter here”.

109. Part of some small buildings : LEGO
Lego is manufactured by Lego Group, a privately held company headquartered in Billund, Denmark. The company was founded by a carpenter called Ole Kirk Christiansen in 1934 and the now-famous plastic interlocking blocks were introduced in 1949. The blocks were originally sold under the name “Automatic Binding Bricks” but I think “Lego” is easier to remember! The name “Lego” comes from the Danish term “leg godt” meaning “play well”.

110. Gulf cash : DINAR
The Dinar is the official currency in many countries, such as Iraq and Serbia. The Gold Dinar dates back to the early days of Islam, with the name deriving from the Roman currency called “denarius” meaning “ten times” (as it was originally a coin worth ten asses).

112. Monopoly holding : DEED
The commercial game of Monopoly is supposedly a remake of “The Landlord’s Game” created in 1903 by a Quaker woman called Lizzie Phillips. Phillips used her game as a tool to explain the single tax theory of American economist Henry George. The Landlord’s Game was first produced commercially in 1924. The incredibly successful derivative game called Monopoly was introduced in 1933 by Charles Darrow, who became a very rich man when Parker Brothers bought the rights to the game just two years later in 1935.

Down
1. Preceder of snaps : HUTS
The quarterback (QB) starts each play in football with a “snap” (also called a “hike”). He announces to his teammates the exact moment of the snap by calling out signals, usually including the word “hut” one or more times in a prearranged sequence.

2. Dept. of Labor branch : OSHA
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

The US Department of Labor (DOL) was founded as the Bureau of Labor in 1889 under the Department of the Interior. The Bureau’s status was elevated to Cabinet level by President William Howard Taft in 1913, with a bill he signed on his last day in office. The DOL has headquartered in the Frances Perkins Building in Washington, D.C. since 1975. The building was named for Frances Perkins who served as Secretary of Labor from 1933 to 1945 and who was the first female cabinet secretary in US history.

4. Uranium 238 and strontium 90 : ISOTOPES
An isotope is a variant of an element. All isotopes of an element have the same number of protons and electrons, but not the same number of neutrons. This means that isotopes of an element have differing atomic weights.

5. Original “S.N.L.” cast member : RADNER
Gilda Radner was a comedian and actress, one of the original cast members of the hit television show “Saturday Night Live”. Radner left her first husband to marry comedic actor Gene Wilder, whom she met while they were both filming the Sidney Poitier movie “Hanky Panky”.

6. Rags-to-riches writer : ALGER
Horatio Alger was an American writer of the late nineteenth century. Alger was a prolific writer of novels for young people and creates tales of poor children making it good in the world, achieving the American dream as it were.

7. January detritus : FIRS
“Detritus” is the loose material that results from the process of erosion. The usage of the term has evolved to man any accumulated material or debris. “Detritus” is Latin for “a wearing away”.

“Detritus” is the loose material that results from the process of erosion. The usage of the term has evolved to man any accumulated material or debris. “Detritus” is Latin for “a wearing away”.

8. Body image grp. : TSA
The TSA is the Transportation Security Administration, the agency that employs the good folks that check passengers and baggage at airports.

11. According to ___ (by the rules) : HOYLE
Edmond Hoyle was a writer, most famous for documenting the rules and play of card games. In particular, Hoyle first wrote a book on the game of whist that was very popular. Such was the success of Hoyle’s treatises that we use the phrase “according to Hoyle” to mean “according to some respected authority”. When the Poker Hall of Fame was founded in 1979, Edmund Hoyle was one of the first inductees, even though the game of power was invented after he died.

12. Subj. for an au pair, maybe : ESL
English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

An “au pair” is a domestic assistant from a foreign country working and living as part of a host family. The term “au pair” is French, and means “on a par”, indicating that an au pair is treated as an equal in the host family.

13. Product possibly named after a real physician : DR PEPPER
Dr Pepper was introduced in 1885 in Waco, Texas, one year before the competing Coca-Cola was released to the market. I spent an entertaining few hours at the Dr Pepper Museum in Waco a while back.

14. One stop on Chicago’s Blue Line : O’HARE
Chicago’s Blue Line is a 27-mile long “L” line that connects the Forest Park suburb to O’Hare International Airport, passing through downtown. The Blue Line is one of only two routes in Chicago on which trains operate 24 hours a day.

15. Greasy spoons : DINERS
“Greasy spoon” is a familiar term for a restaurant, usually a diner, that is less than pristine and that serves cheap food.

20. Caligula, e.g. : TYRANT
Caligula was emperor of Rome after Tiberius, and before Claudius. “Caligula” was actually a nickname for Gaius Germanicus. Gaius’s father was a successful general in the Roman army and his soldiers called young Gaius “Caligula”, meaning “little soldier’s boot”.

24. Gallbladder neighbor : LIVER
The human liver has many functions, one of which is to store vital substances. The list of substances stored in the liver includes glucose (as glycogen), vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin B12, vitamin K, iron and copper.

The human gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ that mainly helps with the digestion of fat. The gallbladder stores and concentrates bile, which is made in the liver. The bile is released from the gallbladder when fat enters the digestive tract. The bile acts as a surfactant, emulsifying the fat in food so that it can be more easily digested.

29. Ruckus : STIR
The word “ruckus” is used to mean a commotion, and has been around since the late 1800s. “Ruckus” is possibly a melding of the words “ruction” and “rumpus”.

31. “Enough!,” to a Roman : BASTA!
“Basta” is Italian for “enough”.

34. Focus of onomastics : NAMES
Onomastics is the study of proper names and their origins. One branch of onomastics is toponomastics, the study of place names.

35. Frost-covered biochemical solid? : ICY STEROL (icy stare -al)
Sterols occur in nature in both plants and animals. The most famous of the animal sterols is cholesterol, found in all animals as it is a vital component of cell walls. Cholesterol is made within the body, so it isn’t a necessary part of the diet.

40. Hell of a location? : HADES
Hades was the god of the underworld to the ancient Greeks. Over time, Hades gave his name to the underworld itself, the place where the dead reside. The term “Hades” was also adopted into the Christian tradition, as an alternative name for hell. But, the concept of hell in Christianity is more akin to the Greek “Tartarus”, which is a dark and gloomy dungeon located in Hades, a place of suffering and torment.

41. Banana Republic competitor : J.CREW
J.Crew is a clothing and accessory retailer. Never been there, but I’ve seen the name turn up on credit card statements somehow …

The Banana Republic clothing retailer is owned by the Gap.

43. Big name in Scotch : DEWAR’S
Dewar’s is a blended Scotch whisky introduced in 1846 by John Dewar. Dewar’s White Label is the company’s most popular Scotch, first created in 1899, with a taste that is described as “heather and honey”. Dewar’s also make some single malts, under the labels Aberfeldy 12 and Aberfeldy 21. Today, Dewar’s is owned by Bacardi.

45. “Love Actually,” e.g. : ROMCOM
“Love Actually” is a wonderful British romantic comedy, a film we watch every Christmas. The movie has a great ensemble cast and was written and directed by Richard Curtis. Curtis was also the man behind “Four Weddings and a Funeral”, Bridget Jones’s Diary” and “Notting Hill”. “Love Actually” is very much in the same style as these earlier films.

46. Battle of Hastings participants : SAXONS
The Battle of Hastings took place in the South East of England in 1066. The battle took place between the native Anglo-Saxons led by King Harold Godwinson, and the Norman-French led by Duke William II of Normandy. William emerged victorious, earning him the moniker William the Conqueror. The victory also launched the Norman conquest of England.

48. Like actor Flynn post-dieting? : THIN ERROL (thin air -al)
Errol Flynn was born 1909 in Tasmania, Australia where he was raised. In his twenties, Flynn lived in the UK where he pursued his acting career. Around the same time he starred in an Australian film “In the Wake of the Bounty” and then appeared in a British film “Murder at Monte Carlo”. It was in the latter film that he was noticed by Warner Brothers who brought him to America. Flynn’s non-American heritage shone through even while he was living the American dream in California. He regularly played cricket, along with his friend David Niven, in the Hollywood Cricket Club.

50. Black ___ : OPS
“Black ops” is the name given to covert operations, activities that are usually outside of standard military protocol and may even be against the law. Funding for black ops is usually provided by a secret “black budget”.

52. Gung-ho : KEEN
Kung ho is a Chinese expression meaning “work together, cooperate”. The anglicized version “gung ho” was adopted by a Major Evans Carlson as an expression of combined spirit for his 2nd Marine Raider Battalion during WWII. From there the term spread throughout the Marine Corps and back to America where it persists to this day.

54. Bathroom fixture : BIDET
“Bidet” is a French word that we imported into English. In French, the word “bidet” originally described a small horse or a pony. What we know as a bidet was so called because one can straddle it like a horse in order to use it.

64. Gets ready to do a load, say : SORTS
That would be a load of laundry.

67. Plains dwellers : CREE
The Cree are one of the largest groups of Native Americans on the continent. In the US most of the Cree nation live in Montana on a reservation shared with the Ojibwe people. In Canada most of the Cree live in Manitoba.

68. Arrondissement heads? : TETES
“Tête” is French for “head”.

An “arrondissement” is an administrative division in many French-speaking countries, such as France and Belgium.

69. Macduff, for one : THANE
Thanes were Scottish aristocrats. The most famous thanes have to be the Shakespearean characters Macbeth (the Thane of Glamis, later Thane of Cawdor) and MacDuff (the Thane of Fife). Other thanes in “Macbeth” are Ross, Lennox and Angus, as well as Menteith and Caithness.

74. Katherine who co-starred in “27 Dresses” : HEIGL
Katherine Heigl is best associated with the television show “Grey’s Anatomy” on which she plays Dr. Izzie Stevens. That’s not a show I ever watched, but I did enjoy the espionage show “State of Affairs” in which Heigl played the lead. I guess I was in the minority though, as NBC cancelled “State of Affairs” after only one season …

82. Notable whistle blowers : REFS
Back in the early 17th century, a “referee” was someone who examined patent applications. We started using the same term for a person presiding over a sporting event in the 1820s. “Referee” is derivative of the verb “to refer”, and literally describes someone who has the authority to make a decision by “referring to” a book, archive etc.

83. Green shampoo : PRELL
Prell shampoo was introduced by Procter & Gamble in 1947. Back then it was a clear green concentrate sold in a tube (like toothpaste).

85. ___ acid : BORIC
Boric acid is a weak acid that usually comes as a white powder for domestic use. The powder can be dissolved in water and used as an antiseptic.

87. Little fingers or toes : MINIMI
A “minimus” (plural (minimi”) is a little toe or a little finger.

88. Buzz in space : ALDRIN
Buzz Aldrin is a true American hero, I’d say. He flew 66 combat missions in Korea, shot down two MiGs, earned his Sc. D. degree from MIT, and was one of the two men who landed on the moon for the first time. Now that man, he has lived a life worth living.

93. One-eyed female on “Futurama” : LEELA
“Futurama” is a Fox animated sci-fi show that was co-created by cartoonist Matt Groening, who also created “The Simpsons”. I simply don’t understand either show …

95. The Cascades, e.g. : RANGE
Only two volcanoes in the Cascade Range in the northwest have erupted in the 20th century: Mount St. Helens in 1980 and Mount Lassen in 1915. The last significant eruption of Mount Shasta, a third volcano in the Cascades, was about 200 years ago

96. Monument Valley sighting : BUTTE
“What’s the difference between a butte and a mesa?” Both are hills with flat tops, but a mesa has a top that is wider than it is tall. A butte is a much narrower formation, taller than it is wide.

The spectacular Monument Valley, with it’s magnificent sandstone buttes and mesas, lies within the bounds of the Navajo Nation Reservation near the Four Corners region in the Southwest. The valley has served as a backdrop in many Hollywood movies. I always remember it as the location where Forrest Gump decided to stop running back and forth across the country.

100. Common calculus calculation : AREA
Remember doing calculus at school, and all those derivatives and integrals? Well, you probably also remember that an integral calculates the area under a curve (for example), and a derivative calculates the slope of a tangent at a particular point on a curve.

104. Bunny boss : HEF
Hugh Hefner (often called “Hef”) is from Chicago. His first publishing job was in the military, where he worked as a writer for a US Army newspaper from 1944-46. He went to college after his military service and then worked as a copywriter for “Esquire” magazine. He left “Esquire” to found his own publication that he called “Playboy”, which first hit the newsstands in 1953. “Playboy” has been around ever since.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Southwestern cliff dwellers : HOPI
5. Means of going down a 36-Down : RAFT
9. Have a hole in one’s heart : ACHE
13. Meatheads : DODOS
18. A Swiss army knife has a lot of them : USES
19. Cream of the crop : A-LIST
21. Heads for Britain? : LOOS
22. Thick-skinned grazer : RHINO
23. Actress Streep playing a centenarian? : THE OLD GRAY MERYL (“The Old Gray Mare” -al)
26. News show group : PANEL
27. Soup accompaniers, often : SALTINES
28. Like the settings of typical Grant Wood paintings : RURAL
29. Unruffled : SERENE
30. ___ the top : OVER
31. Risky business for a compiler of quotations? : BARTLETT PERIL (Bartlett pear -al)
33. Good shot? : SNIPER
36. Counterparts of files : RANKS
37. Smart : HIP
38. Not obvious to most : SLY
39. Evident worrywart : PACER
40. Done quickly : HASTY
41. Protested from the stands : JEERED
44. ___ Kitchen (frozen food brand) : AMY’S
45. Not wandering, say : RAPT
46. Attorney general’s investigation target : SCAM
47. Like funk, now : RETRO
51. Low-___ : RES
52. Alaskan beer container? : KODIAK BARREL (Kodiak bear -al)
56. Beat the tar out of : WHUP
57. Honorific for a colleague : ESTEEMED
59. Vetoes : NIXES
60. Lies ahead : AWAITS
62. Co. captains? : EXECS
63. Typographical no-no : WIDOW
64. SiriusXM star : STERN
65. Some fine wool : MERINO
67. Charming group? : COVEN
68. Some True Value purchases : TOOL SETS
71. Bad way to go? : AWOL
72. Promote singer Crow’s music? : MARKET SHERYL (market share -al)
75. P pronounced like an R : RHO
76. Pequod’s co-owner : PELEG
78. Meets with : SEES
79. James who sang “Good Rockin’ Daddy” : ETTA
80. Throat part : CRAW
81. Shade in : DARKEN
83. Layers : PLIES
85. Wilderness Road trailblazer : BOONE
86. Fitness grp. : AMA
89. Nat ___ (channel) : GEO
90. Self-righteous types : PRIGS
91. Hung out : LOLLED
92. Debt for comedian Will? : BILL OF FERRELL (bill of fare -al)
96. Poet : BARD
97. Celsius of the Celsius scale : ANDERS
98. Safe place : VAULT
99. “Hamilton” and “1776” : MUSICALS
103. Beat : TIRED
104. “I can’t help you, but the Brady Bunch mom will be happy to assist”? : HANDLE WITH CAROL (handle with care -al)
106. ___ Durkheim, so-called “father of sociology” : EMILE
107. Nervous people are on it : EDGE
108. Who wrote “A great flame follows a little spark” : DANTE
109. Part of some small buildings : LEGO
110. Gulf cash : DINAR
111. Charges : FEES
112. Monopoly holding : DEED
113. Like a headlining act, typically : LAST

Down
1. Preceder of snaps : HUTS
2. Dept. of Labor branch : OSHA
3. Lose a tan, say : PEEL
4. Uranium 238 and strontium 90 : ISOTOPES
5. Original “S.N.L.” cast member : RADNER
6. Rags-to-riches writer : ALGER
7. January detritus : FIRS
8. Body image grp. : TSA
9. Sirens, e.g. : ALERTS
10. Pinkish orange : CORAL
11. According to ___ (by the rules) : HOYLE
12. Subj. for an au pair, maybe : ESL
13. Product possibly named after a real physician : DR PEPPER
14. One stop on Chicago’s Blue Line : O’HARE
15. Greasy spoons : DINERS
16. Common soccer score : ONE-NIL
17. 100% : SOLELY
20. Caligula, e.g. : TYRANT
24. Gallbladder neighbor : LIVER
25. Like dirty water : MURKY
29. Ruckus : STIR
31. “Enough!,” to a Roman : BASTA!
32. ___ park : THEME
33. “___ me!” : SPARE
34. Focus of onomastics : NAMES
35. Frost-covered biochemical solid? : ICY STEROL (icy stare -al)
36. See 5-Across : RAPID
40. Hell of a location? : HADES
41. Banana Republic competitor : J.CREW
42. Good listeners : EARS
43. Big name in Scotch : DEWAR’S
45. “Love Actually,” e.g. : ROMCOM
46. Battle of Hastings participants : SAXONS

48. Like actor Flynn post-dieting? : THIN ERROL (thin air -al)
49. A good thing to get out of : RUT
50. Black ___ : OPS
52. Gung-ho : KEEN
53. Cutting costs? : KNIVES
54. Bathroom fixture : BIDET
55. One of the Jacksons : LA TOYA
58. Banished : EXILED
61. “I’m still waiting …?” : WELL …?
63. Roused : WOKEN
64. Gets ready to do a load, say : SORTS
65. Driving aid : MAP
66. 65-Across producer, maybe : EWE
67. Plains dwellers : CREE
68. Arrondissement heads? : TETES
69. Macduff, for one : THANE
70. Disseminated : SOWED
73. Request from : ASK OF
74. Katherine who co-starred in “27 Dresses” : HEIGL
77. It stops talking : GAG ORDER
80. Telemarketer’s action : COLD CALL
82. Notable whistle blowers : REFS
83. Green shampoo : PRELL
84. Sang gracefully : LILTED
85. ___ acid : BORIC
86. Died down : ABATED
87. Little fingers or toes : MINIMI
88. Buzz in space : ALDRIN
90. Tut-tutters : PRUDES
91. Attacked, with “out” : LASHED
93. One-eyed female on “Futurama” : LEELA
94. Shake : EVADE
95. The Cascades, e.g. : RANGE
96. Monument Valley sighting : BUTTE
99. “Gimme!” : MINE!
100. Common calculus calculation : AREA
101. Signs (on) : LOGS
102. Booking time : SLOT
104. Bunny boss : HEF
105. Small lump of tobacco : WAD

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7 thoughts on “0814-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 14 Aug 16, Sunday”

  1. Embarrassing … on my iPad, 55:13, including all of the time that I spent after getting the "almost there" message. Most of the puzzle seemed unusually easy. I had correctly guessed that "onomastics" had to do with NAMES and that MINIMI referred to little fingers and toes, but I'd never heard of AMY'S, so instead I had AME'S, which gave me ICE STEROL instead of ICY STEROL and couldn't see how to fix it, given that I have always mispronounced "sterol" with a long "e". I finally guessed AMY'S and it then occurred to me that "sterol" might just be pronounced the way it is in "cholesterol", at which point I thought of "icy stare", the lights went on and, once again, I dented my forehead … (gotta stop doing that … 🙂

    I have to say that the usage of "minimi" here is pretty obscure, as it seems to be principally a medical term. Google, given "minimi", wants to tell you all about a type of machine gun; by giving it "define minimi", I was finally able to navigate to the appropriate dictionary definition, but it took awhile. Also, I thought "Fitness grp." for AMA was marvelously deceptive.

  2. The theme in a WORD: STUPID. STOOOOOOPID.

    The name of Ian "Settingbad" goes into my list of poor constructors.

    1 hour 1 min 6 sec and 7 errors on the left side of the puzzle. Not a good start to the week.

  3. 45:21, 4 errors, all in the bottom left. 87D MINITI; 88D ALDREN; 93D LEENA; 106A ETENE.

    I was uncomfortable with the theme, mostly because of pronunciation. I don't pronounce MERYL as MARE-yl, FERRELL as FARE-ell; PERIL as PEAR-il; CAROL as CARE-ol; BARREL as BEAR-el; etc. Maybe the setter does.

  4. Struggled with this today. I had 24 incorrect spaces, some wrong, some unfilled. I usually don't complain about the themes but I though this one was a very, very poor attempt to masquerade as a theme.

  5. What relatively new solvers need to know is that there are experienced solvers and inexperienced solvers. I consider myself an experienced solver in the middle range. That's after 10 years or so of working on NYT x-words. I still get frustrated and irked when I don't finish, which happens more often than I'd like. I've found that the best, if not only, way to become a less frustrated and more adept solver is to keep at it, learn from mistakes, and over time you will improve.

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