0710-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 10 Jul 16, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Patrick Berry
THEME: Double Quote
The circled letters in today’s grid spell out a famous QUOTE from Yogi Berra. However, we just need one of the two circled letters from each pair, as we have a DOUBLE QUOTE, the quote is given twice. Maybe the circled letters represent two NICKELS side-by-side, which adds up to a DIME, a reference to the quote itself, i.e.

1A. Onetime Scandinavian automaker (containing the first part of the “double quote”) : SAAB
118A Spotted (containing the last part of the “double quote”) : SEEN

A NICKEL AIN’T WORTH A DIME ANYMORE

114A. Speaker of this puzzle’s “double quote” : YOGI BERRA

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 03s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Onetime Scandinavian automaker (containing the first part of the “double quote”) : SAAB
SAAB stands for Svenska Aeroplan AB, which translates into English as Swedish Aeroplane Limited. SAAB was, and still is, mainly an aircraft manufacturer. If you take small hops in Europe you might find yourself on a SAAB passenger plane. The SAAB automotive division was acquired by General Motors in the year 2000, who then sold it to a Dutch concern in 2010. However, SAAB (automotive) finally went bankrupt in 2011. A Chinese consortium purchased the assets of SAAB Automotive in 2012, and so SAAB vehicles are in production again. The new vehicles are using the SAAB name, but cannot use the SAAB griffin logo, the rights to which have been retained by the mother company.

5. Music’s Prince of Soul : GAYE
Marvin Gaye was a singer-songwriter from Washington, D.C. who came to be known as “Prince of Soul” and “Prince of Motown”. Some of Gaye’s biggest hits are “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” (1968), “What’s Going On?” (1971), “Let’s Get It On” (1973) and “Sexual Healing” (1982). Famously, Gaye was shot dead by his father while Marvin was sitting on his mother’s bed just talking to her. Marvin had given the gun to his father as a Christmas gift.

9. Precious Australian exports : OPALS
97% of the world’s opals come from Australia, so it’s no surprise perhaps that the opal is the national gemstone of the country. The state of South Australia provides the bulk of the world’s production, about 80%.

14. Abandon détente : REARM
“Détente” is a French word meaning “loosening, reduction in tension” and in general it is used to describe the easing of strained relations in a political situation. In particular, the policy of détente came to be associated with the improved relations between the US and the Soviet Union in the seventies.

22. 2015 Oscar winner Morricone : ENNIO
Ennio Morricone is an Italian composer best known for writing music for films and television shows. It was Morricone who wrote the fabulous scores for the Spaghetti Westerns of Sergio Leone, including the theme for “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly”.

24. Dream of many Koreans : UNIFICATION
Korea was occupied by the Japanese military from 1910 until Japan surrendered at the end of WWII in 1945. While the UN was working towards a trusteeship administration for Korea, the Soviet Union managed the Korean Peninsula north of the 38th parallel and the US managed the south. The UN’s plans came to naught as the Cold War dictated the establishment of the two separate states of North Korea and South Korea. North Korea invaded the South in 1950, leading to the Korean War. After three years of fighting, the border between the two states became the demarcation line between the two military forces on the day the Armistice Agreement was signed. That line runs diagonally across the 38th parallel, and is better known as the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ).

26. Youngest “Brady Bunch” daughter : CINDY
Former child actress Susan Olsen played Cindy Brady on the sitcom “The Brady Bunch”. There’s an urban legend that Olsen became an adult film star in later life. While that’s not true at all, what is true is that she made spaceship sound effects for a porn movie one time, as a favor for a friend in the technical side of the business.

29. “___ Fideles” : ADESTE
The lovely Christmas hymn “Adeste Fideles” (translated from Latin as “O Come, All Ye Faithful”) was written by one John Francis Wade in the 13th century. Well, he wrote the original four verses, with four more verses being added over time.

31. “Key Largo” gangster Johnny : ROCCO
Johnny Rocco was the notorious gangster in the 1948 film noir “Key Largo”, and was played by Edward G. Robinson.

36. Time periods in a polo match : CHUKKERS
A game of polo is divided into periods of play called chukkers (sometimes “chukkas”). The game usually lasts for two hours, and the time between the chukkers is used to change horses.

39. U people? : PROFS
Professors (profs) work at a university (U).

47. In the doldrums : SAD
The doldrums are a band of generally light winds and calms that span the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans near the equator. More formally known as the Intertropical Convergence Zone, the phenomenon occurs at the interface between the northeast and southeast trade winds. We have some to use the term “doldrums” colloquially, to describe a state of listlessness, inactivity or stagnation.

50. Golden calf’s maker : AARON
According to the Book of Exodus in the Bible, Aaron made a golden calf as an idol for the Israelites to worship while Moses was on Mount Sinai receiving the Ten Commandments. When Moses returned, he became angry on seeing the calf and destroyed it.

51. Birds with throat pouches : PELICANS
The pelican is an example of a “piscivore”. A piscivorous animal is actually a carnivore, but one that lives on fish.

54. Comp-sci acronym : ASCII
ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) lists codes for 32 “control” characters, as well as the 95 printable characters. These binary codes are the way that our computers can understand what we mean when we type say a letter, or a number. Unicode is a more contemporary standard, and is like “Ascii on steroids”, encompassing more characters.

57. Sitcom whose title character was Fran Fine : THE NANNY
“The Nanny” is a sitcom that originally aired in the nineties and starred Fran Drescher in the title role, playing the character Fran Fine. The show was created and produced by Peter Marc Jacobson, who was Drescher’s husband at the time.

59. Perfumery oils : ATTARS
Attar is a fragrant essential oil obtained from flowers, and the term often particularly refers to attar of roses.

60. ___-Cat : SNO
The brand name Sno-Cat is owned by the Tucker company. All “snowcats” are tracked vehicles built to work in snow, famously used in expeditions to the polar regions. The modern Sno-Cat from Tucker differs from its competitors in that it has four, independently-mounted tracks.

61. First secretary of homeland security : TOM RIDGE
Immediately following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, President Bush created the Office of Homeland Security. He called on Pennsylvania Governor Tom Ridge to head that office. The office was elevated to cabinet level in 2003, with Ridge being appointed the first Secretary of Homeland Security. Ridge resigned at the end of 2004, later claiming in a memoir that he did so in response to pressure to raise the nation’s terror alert for political reasons.

67. First-chair violinist, perhaps : SOLOIST
In an orchestra, the first violins are led by the concertmaster, often referred to as the “first chair” in US. The first chair is usually regarded as the most skilled of the first violin section, and will usually play any solo passages (unless a guest soloist is performing a violin concerto).

71. Political org. dating to 1854 : GOP
The Republican Party has had the nickname Grand Old Party (GOP) since 1875. That said, the phrase was coined in the “Congressional Record” as “this gallant old party”. The moniker was changed to “grand old party” in 1876 in an article in the “Cincinnati Commercial”. The Republican Party’s elephant mascot dates back to an 1874 cartoon drawn by Thomas Nast for “Harper’s Weekly”. The Democrat’s donkey was already an established symbol. Nast drew a donkey clothed in a lion’s skin scaring away the other animals. One of the scared animals was an elephant, which Nast labeled “The Republican Vote”.

75. Painkiller first sold in 1950 : PERCODAN
Percodan is a trade name for the combination drug oxycodone/aspirin. Percodan was introduced to the market in 1950, but has largely been replaced by Percocet, a combination of oxycodone with paracetamol.

80. Image Awards org. : NAACP
The NAACP Image Awards are presented annually to recognise people of color in the worlds of film, television, music and literature. The first awards were presented in 1967, and the ceremony usually takes place in Los Angeles.

81. Hall of announcing : EDD
Edd Hall is most famous as the former announcer for Jay Leno on “The Tonight Show”. Hall replaced Ed McMahon when Johnny Carson retired from the show.

82. Pan’s home, in myth : ARCADIA
Pan was the god of shepherds in Greek mythology, and lived in the rustic surroundings of Arcadia. Arcadia was a mountainous region of Ancient Greece, well known for the innocence and contentment of its people who lived a simple, pastoral life. Arcadia has been used ever since as the name of a place offering peace and simplicity.

84. Minority branch of Islam : SHIITES
The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family, and favoured the Prophet’s son-in-law Ali.

86. Longtime Texas politico Phil : GRAMM
US Senator Phil Gramm of Texas entered congress in 1979 as a Democratic congressman. Gramm’s voting record was consistently conservative, despite his party affiliation, and this contributed to his being thrown off the House Budget Committee in 1983. Gramm responded by resigning his seat in the House, and then stood as a Republican in a special election for that same seat. Gramm won back his place in Congress, and the following year was elected (again as a Republican) to the US Senate.

87. Free throws, e.g. : SET SHOTS
That would be in basketball.

101. Actress Mason : MARSHA
Actress Marsha Mason’s breakthrough role was the lead in the 1973 movie “Cinderella Liberty”, opposite James Caan. That performance earned her a Oscar nomination, as did her performance in 1977’s “The Goodbye Girl”, this time opposite Richard Dreyfuss. Mason met celebrated playwright Neil Simon in 1973 when he cast her in his Broadway play “The Good Doctor”. That same year, Simon and Marsh became romantically involved and married. More recently, Mason has been playing Patricia Heaton’s mother on the sitcom “The Middle”.

103. Journalist/columnist Carl : HIAASEN
Carl Hiaasen is an investigative journalist, columnist and novelist from Fort Lauderdale Florida who works for the “Miami Herald”.

113. Beeper from “a long time ago,” informally : ARTOO
Artoo’s proper name is R2-D2. R2-D2 is the smaller of the two famous droids from the “Star Wars” movies. British actor Kenny Baker, who stands just 3 ft 8 ins tall, has been the man inside the R2-D2 droid for all six of the “Star Wars” movies.

114. Speaker of this puzzle’s “double quote” : YOGI BERRA
Yogi Berra is regarded by many as the greatest catcher ever to play in Major League Baseball, and has to be America’s most celebrated “author” of malapropisms. Here are some greats:

It ain’t over till it’s over.
90% of the game is half mental.
Nobody goes there anymore. It’s too crowded.
When you come to a fork in the road, take it.
It’s déjà vu all over again.
Always go to other people’s funerals, otherwise they won’t go to yours.
A nickel ain’t worth a dime anymore.

117. Humorist Bombeck : ERMA
Erma Bombeck wrote for newspapers for about 35 years, producing more than 4,000 witty and humorous columns describing her home life in suburbia.

Down
1. Like vindaloo : SPICY
“Vindaloo” is a very spicy Indian curry dish, and one of my favorites. The dish’s name comes from the Portuguese dish “Carne de vinha d’alhos”, which translates as “meat with wine and garlic”. Vindaloo originated in the Indian state of Goa, which was once a Portuguese province.

2. Golfer Palmer, to fans : ARNIE
Arnold Palmer is one of the greats of the world of golf. Palmer is very popular with many fans of the game, and his followers are usually referred to as “Arnie’s Army”. Off the course, Palmer was an avid pilot, but is now retired from flying. He resides in Latrobe, Pennsylvania for much of the year and the local airport is named in his honor: Arnold Palmer Regional Airport.

3. Health care giant : AETNA
When the healthcare management and insurance company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mt. Etna, the European volcano.

4. Disputed North Pole visitor : BYRD
Rear Admiral Richard Byrd was an officer in the US Navy, famous as an aviator and explorer of the polar regions. Byrd was the first person to cross the South Pole by air, in 1929. Three years earlier, Byrd claimed he had flown over the North Pole, and would have been the first person to have done so if this was true. But whether or not Byrd actually made it over the North Pole continues to be the subject of much debate.

5. Sir, in Surrey : GUV
“Guv” is an informal word replacing “governor”, used in the UK. It is usually a friendly address to a man, sort of like our “Mac” or “Dad”.

7. Head guy in “Hamlet”? : YORICK
In Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”, there is a scene when Prince Hamlet holds in his hand the skull of the deceased court jester Yorick. Hamlet starts into a famous monologue at this point:

Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy; he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is …

The opening line is often misquoted as “Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him well.”

11. Technology eschewers : AMISH
The Amish are a group of Christian churches, a subgroup of the Mennonite churches. The Amish church originated in Switzerland and Alsace in 1693 when it was founded by Jakob Ammann. It was Ammann who gave the name to the Amish people. Many Amish people came to Pennsylvania in the 18th century.

13. Reagan-era program, in brief : SDI
One of the positive outcomes of President Reagan’s Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI, also “Star Wars”) was a change in US defense strategy. The new approach was to use missiles to destroy incoming hostile weapons, rather than using missiles to destroy the nation attacking the country. The former doctrine of Mutually Assured Destruction went by the apt acronym of MAD …

15. Crosses the sill : ENTERS
“Sill plate” or simply “sill” is an architectural term for a bottom horizontal member to which vertical members are attached. A “window sill” is specific sill plate that is found at the bottom of a window opening.

16. Pernod flavoring : ANISE
The drink usually called just “Pernod” is a French beverage more correctly called “Pernod Anise”. The brand name was created by Henri-Louis Pernod in the late 1700s when he opened an absinthe distillery in Switzerland.

18. “Woman With a Parasol” painter : MONET
“Woman With a Parasol” is a famous 1875 oil painting by the Impressionist artist Claude Monet that can be seen at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. The work features the artist’s wife and son, Camille and Jean Monet.

20. Kikkoman product : SOY
Kikkoman is a company headquartered in Japan that is noted in North America as a producer of soy sauce.

25. “Oliver!” director Reed : CAROL
“Oliver!” is stage musical by Lionel Bart that is based on the Charles Dickens novel “Oliver Twist”. “Oliver!” was adapted successfully for the big screen in 1968. The film version won six Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director for Carol Reed. Leading the movie’s cast are Mark Lester in the title role, Ron Moody as Fagin and Oliver Reed as Bill Sikes.

28. “___ any drop to drink”: Coleridge : NOR
“The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is an epic poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge first published in 1798. The publication of “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period of British literature. Perhaps the lines most often quoted from the poem are:

Water, water, every where,
And all the boards did shrink;
Water, water, every where
Nor any drop to drink

34. “Bearded” flower : IRIS
Iris is a genus of flowering plants that come in a wide variety of flower colors. The term “iris” is a Greek word meaning “rainbow”. Many species of irises are called “flags”. One suggestion is that the alternate name comes from the Middle English “flagge” meaning “reed”. This term was used because iris leaves look like reeds.

43. Treated with a preservative, as telephone poles : CREOSOTED
“Creosote” is the name given to chemicals obtained by the distillation of tar. Creosote has two main uses, as an antiseptic and as a wood preservative. The term “creosote” comes from the Greek for “flesh preserver”.

46. Michael’s wife in “The Godfather” : KAY
In the Mario Puzo novel “The Godfather”, the story’s central character is Michael Corleone. Michael’s girlfriend, and eventually his wife, is Kay Adams. In the 1972 film adaptation, Michael Corleone was played by Al Pacino, and Kay Adams-Corleone by Diane Keaton.

47. One who seems responsible but isn’t : SCAPEGOAT
A “scapegoat” is a person chosen to take the blame in place of others. The term comes from the Bible’s Book of Leviticus, which describes a goat that was cast into the desert along with the sins of the community.

51. Reform Party founder : PEROT
Ross Perot graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1953, as president of his class. Perot served his 4-year commitment but then resigned his commission, apparently having become somewhat disillusioned with the navy. He was ranked number 101 on the Forbes 400 List of Richest Americans in 2012, and at that time was worth about $3.5 billion. Back in 1992, Perot ran as an independent candidate for US president. He founded the Reform Party in 1995, and ran as the Reform Party candidate for president in 1996.

52. “Idylls of the King” woman : ENID
“Idylls of the King” is a cycle of twelve poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson that retells the tale of King Arthur. One of the “idylls” is the story of Geraint and Enid. This story is told in two parts: “The Marriage of Geraint” and “Geraint and Enid”. Tennyson’s Enid gave her name to the city of Enid, Oklahoma.

53. Shaver : LAD
“Shaver” is a slang term for a “fellow”, from the sense of “one who shaves”.

57. Explicitly : TO WIT
The verb “to wit” means “to know”. The verb really isn’t used anymore except in the phrase “to wit” meaning “that is to say, namely”.

58. Med. care options : HMOS
Health maintenance organization (HMO)

59. ___ Villa (English football club) : ASTON
Aston Villa is soccer team that was founded in Aston, Birmingham way back in 1874. The UK’s Football League was founded in 1888 by Aston Villa director William McGregor. “Villa” was one of the league’s 12 founding member clubs.

63. Nonhuman 1930s film star : ASTA
Asta is the wonderful little dog in the superb “The Thin Man” series of films starring William Powell and Myrna Loy (as Nick and Nora Charles). In the original story by Dashiell Hammett, Asta was a female Schnauzer, but on screen Asta was played by a wire-haired fox terrier called “Skippy”. Skippy was also the dog in “Bringing up Baby” with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn, the one who kept stealing the dinosaur bone. Skippy retired in 1939, so Asta was played by other dogs in the remainder of “The Thin Man” films.

68. Fanta competitor : NEHI
“Nehi Corporation” was the nickname for the Chero-Cola/Union Bottle Works that introduced the Nehi drink in 1924. Years later the company developed a new brand, Royal Crown Cola (also known as RC Cola). By 1955, RC Cola was the company’s flagship product, so the “Nehi Corporation” became the “Royal Crown Company”. In 1954, RC Cola became the first company to sell soft drinks in cans.

The soft drink “Fanta” has quite an interesting history. As WWII approached, the Coca-Cola plant in Germany had trouble obtaining the ingredients it needed to continue production of the cola beverage, so the plant manager decided to create a new drink from what was available. The new beverage was built around whey (left over from cheese production) and pomace (left over after juice has been extracted from fruit). The inventor asked his colleagues to use their imagination (“Fantasie” in German) and come up with a name for the drink, so they piped up “Fanta!”

69. Quarters : AREAS
We use the term “quarters” for a place of abode, especially housing for military personnel. Back in the late 16th century, quarters were a portion (quarter) of a town reserved for a military force.

74. “We are always the same ___ inside”: Gertrude Stein : AGE
Gertrude Stein was a great American writer who spent most of her life in France. Gertrude Stein met Alice B. Toklas in Paris in 1907 and the two were life partners until Stein died in 1946. Cleverly, Stein published her own memoirs in 1933 but called the book “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas”. It was to become her best selling title.

75. Nth degree? : PHD
PhD is an abbreviation for “philosophiae doctor”, Latin for “teacher of philosophy”.

76. Place for a throne : DAIS
Ultimately our word “dais”, meaning “raised platform for a speaker”, comes from the Latin “discus” meaning a “disk-shaped object”. I guess that many a dais was disc-shaped …

83. Storm shower? : RADAR
Scientists have been using radio waves to detect the presence of objects since the late 1800s, but it was the demands of WWII that accelerated the practical application of the technology. The British called their system RDF standing for Range and Direction Finding. The system used by the US Navy was called Radio Detection And Ranging, which was shortened to the acronym RADAR.

84. “Homeland” network, for short : SHO
“Homeland” is a psychological drama shown on Showtime about a CIA officer who is convinced that a certain US Marine is a threat to the security of the United States. The show is based on a series from Israeli television called “Hatufim” (Prisoners of War”). I saw the first series of this show and highly recommend it …

88. High rollers? : ELS
Elevated railroad (El)

90. Lead-in to -itis : SENIOR
“Senioritis” is the colloquial name given to the tendency of some senior students to lose motivation to study as they head towards the end of high school and college careers.

91. It may contain bugs : AMBER
Amber’s technical name is “resinite”, reflecting its composition and formation. Amber starts out life as soft sticky tree resin but then under high temperature and pressure from overlying layers of soil, it fossilizes. The sticky resin can trap organisms or other plant matter, and this material can sometimes remain virtually intact inside the amber fossil giving us a unique gift from the past.

92. Football Hall-of-Famer Bobby : LAYNE
Bobby Layne was a quarterback who played in the NFL. The Detroit Lions traded Layne to the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1958, much to Layne’s chagrin. He supposedly put a “curse” on the Lions as a result. The Lions are one of the few teams that have never played in a Super Bowl, something that some attribute to “the Curse of Bobby Layne”.

93. Private meeting : TRYST
In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting.

95. Mazda two-seater : MIATA
The Mazda MX-5 is sold as the Miata in North America, and as the Roadster in Japan. I’ve always liked the looks of the Mazda Miata, probably because it reminds me so much of old British sports cars. The Miata is built in Hiroshima, Japan.

100. Underworld figure : SATAN
Satan is the bringer of evil and temptation in the Abrahamic religions. The name “Satan” is Hebrew for “adversary”.

102. Vietnam War copter : HUEY
The military helicopter known as the Bell UH-1 Iroquois is usually referred to as the “Huey”. The Huey was first used by the US Army for medevac and utility operations in the mid-fifties. About 7,000 Hueys saw service in the Vietnam War. The US military phased out the Huey relatively recently, mainly replacing it with the UH-60 Black Hawk.

104. “___ Flux” (1990s animated series) : AEON
“Aeon Flux” is a sci-fi film from 2005 starring Charlize Theron in the title role. The movie was inspired by an animated TV series of the same name that aired on MTV in the nineties.

105. Cotillion attendee : DEB
“Cotillion” is an American term that we’ve been using since about 1900 for a formal ball. In France a cotillion was a type of dance, with the term deriving from an Old French word for a petticoat. I guess the cotillion dance was one in which the lady would flash her petticoats as she did a twirl!

106. Horatian collection : ODES
A Horatian Ode is an ode with a specific structure, designed to resemble the odes of the Roman poet Horace.

110. “Gone With the Wind” studio : MGM
The Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) film studio was founded in 1924 by Marcus Loew. Loew was already a successful movie theater owner when he purchased Metro Pictures Corporation in 1919, and then Goldwyn Pictures in 1924. Later in 1924, Loew also purchased Louis B. Mayer Pictures, mainly so that Louis B. Meyer himself could run all three merged studios as Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

111. Verdi’s “O patria ___” : MIA
“O patria mia” is an aria from Verdi’s “Aida”. The aria is sung by the title character, with “O patria mia” translating as “O, my homeland”.

58. Not haut : BAS
In French, things can be “bas” (low) or “haut” (high).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Onetime Scandinavian automaker (containing the first part of the “double quote”) : SAAB
5. Music’s Prince of Soul : GAYE
9. Precious Australian exports : OPALS
14. Abandon détente : REARM
19. Victimizes : PREYS UPON
21. Like pets but not strays : NAMED
22. 2015 Oscar winner Morricone : ENNIO
23. Solitary sort : INTROVERT
24. Dream of many Koreans : UNIFICATION
26. Youngest “Brady Bunch” daughter : CINDY
27. “No, no, it’s my treat!” : I INSIST!
29. “___ Fideles” : ADESTE
30. Senatorial vote : YEA
31. “Key Largo” gangster Johnny : ROCCO
33. Church group : CHOIR
35. Break : REST
36. Time periods in a polo match : CHUKKERS
39. U people? : PROFS
41. Authoritarian announcements : DECREES
44. Catch something : TAKE ILL
47. In the doldrums : SAD
50. Golden calf’s maker : AARON
51. Birds with throat pouches : PELICANS
54. Comp-sci acronym : ASCII
56. Steep : BREW
57. Sitcom whose title character was Fran Fine : THE NANNY
59. Perfumery oils : ATTARS
60. ___-Cat : SNO
61. First secretary of homeland security : TOM RIDGE
62. Tank tops? : GAS CAPS
64. Make noise while asleep : SAW WOOD
66. Corresponding expense? : POSTAGE
67. First-chair violinist, perhaps : SOLOIST
68. Person with an account : NARRATOR
71. Political org. dating to 1854 : GOP
74. Bear witness : ATTEST
75. Painkiller first sold in 1950 : PERCODAN
76. Unable to continue : DONE
77. Nameless network user : GUEST
78. Some dumps : ASH HEAPS
80. Image Awards org. : NAACP
81. Hall of announcing : EDD
82. Pan’s home, in myth : ARCADIA
84. Minority branch of Islam : SHIITES
86. Longtime Texas politico Phil : GRAMM
87. Free throws, e.g. : SET SHOTS
91. ___ horn : ALTO
94. Judges to be : DEEMS
97. Use as a bed : LIE ON
98. Mom-to-aunt term : SIS
101. Actress Mason : MARSHA
103. Journalist/columnist Carl : HIAASEN
105. France : madame :: Italy : ___ : DONNA
107. Request for permission : BY YOUR LEAVE
109. Showing few lights, as cities during W.W. II : DIMMED OUT
112. Follow : ENSUE
113. Beeper from “a long time ago,” informally : ARTOO
114. Speaker of this puzzle’s “double quote” : YOGI BERRA
115. Have another crack at : RETRY
116. Long : YEARN
117. Humorist Bombeck : ERMA
118. Spotted (containing the last part of the “double quote”) : SEEN

Down
1. Like vindaloo : SPICY
2. Golfer Palmer, to fans : ARNIE
3. Health care giant : AETNA
4. Disputed North Pole visitor : BYRD
5. Sir, in Surrey : GUV
6. Emulate : APE
7. Head guy in “Hamlet”? : YORICK
8. Draw in : ENTICE
9. Difficult duty : ONUS
10. Market problem : PANIC
11. Technology eschewers : AMISH
12. Not secured, as a gate : LEFT OPEN
13. Reagan-era program, in brief : SDI
14. Went over : READ
15. Crosses the sill : ENTERS
16. Pernod flavoring : ANISE
17. Crowd scenes? : RIOTS
18. “Woman With a Parasol” painter : MONET
20. Kikkoman product : SOY
25. “Oliver!” director Reed : CAROL
28. “___ any drop to drink”: Coleridge : NOR
31. Repent of : RUE
32. Consents to : OKS
34. “Bearded” flower : IRIS
36. Celebrate gloatingly : CROW
37. Grown-up pullet : HEN
38. Deceptive police op : STING
40. Freight train component : FLATCAR
41. Delicately applies : DABS
42. Be deserving of : EARN
43. Treated with a preservative, as telephone poles : CREOSOTED
45. Teen spots : ACNE
46. Michael’s wife in “The Godfather” : KAY
47. One who seems responsible but isn’t : SCAPEGOAT
48. Faux sophistication : AIRS
49. Slam : DIS
51. Reform Party founder : PEROT
52. “Idylls of the King” woman : ENID
53. Shaver : LAD
55. Without a date : STAG
57. Explicitly : TO WIT
58. Med. care options : HMOS
59. ___ Villa (English football club) : ASTON
61. Like major generals : TWO-STAR
62. Pushes : GOADS
63. Nonhuman 1930s film star : ASTA
65. Draft picks : ALES
66. Gun full of blanks, maybe : PROP
67. Shirt ornament : STUD
68. Fanta competitor : NEHI
69. Quarters : AREAS
70. Record label owned by Sony : RCA
72. As soon as : ONCE
73. Fires (up) : PEPS
74. “We are always the same ___ inside”: Gertrude Stein : AGE
75. Nth degree? : PHD
76. Place for a throne : DAIS
78. It’s all downhill from here : ACME
79. “I feel that way, too” : SAME HERE
80. Hairsplitter’s objection : NIT
83. Storm shower? : RADAR
84. “Homeland” network, for short : SHO
85. Darling : HON
86. Take a turn for the worse : GO SOUR
88. High rollers? : ELS
89. Add color to, in a way : TIE-DYE
90. Lead-in to -itis : SENIOR
91. It may contain bugs : AMBER
92. Football Hall-of-Famer Bobby : LAYNE
93. Private meeting : TRYST
95. Mazda two-seater : MIATA
96. Fully enjoy : SAVOR
98. [Bo-o-oring!] : SNORE
99. Harden : INURE
100. Underworld figure : SATAN
102. Vietnam War copter : HUEY
104. “___ Flux” (1990s animated series) : AEON
105. Cotillion attendee : DEB
106. Horatian collection : ODES
108. Put : LAY
110. “Gone With the Wind” studio : MGM
111. Verdi’s “O patria ___” : MIA

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8 thoughts on “0710-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 10 Jul 16, Sunday”

  1. Due to being less brilliant than some acrostic solvers, I LOVE to solve the quotation AFTER I have been able to learn the author and title of the quote. Is there a place where I can reliably find out same of a Sunday?

  2. 33:55, no errors, iPad. I solved this without fully understanding the theme: all I knew was that the each of a pair of shaded squares contained the same letter. After the fact, I scratched my head for a bit and figured out how to read the quote (which, I'm embarrassed to admit, took several minutes, in spite of some pretty obvious hints).

    My favorite Yogi Berra quote is, "Nobody goes there anymore; it's too crowded!"

  3. 34:45 for me, and no errors. Like the Yogi quote (all of his are great, aren't they), but the double letter thing was just forced. It helped solve the puzzle, yes, but just doesn't really make any kind of SENSE (cents?). Which is just MY two cents….

  4. 41:02, no errors. Zero errors was a bit of luck; not familiar ENNIO Morricone and 18D was a toss up (for me) between MONET and MANET. Just guessed correctly.

    Lost time trying to force SEMPER into 29A; PERCOCET into 75A; and RAT TRAPS into 78A.

  5. Three errors. That is very good for me considering my skill level. The double letters helped with many answers. Yogi's quote was not clear to me until I had completely finished. But it still would not have made a difference on my errors.

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