0522-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 22 May 16, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Victor Barocas & Andy Kravis
THEME: Rise and Fall
The circled letters in today’s grid spell out the names of mountains in the top half, and the names of valleys in the bottom half. And, those names visually represent a mountain or a valley, as appropriate:

70A. Classic song with the repeated line “If you need me, I will be nearby” … shown symbolically in this puzzle : MOUNTAIN HIGH, VALLEY LOW

MOUNT SINAI
According to the Bible, Mount Sinai is the mountain on which Moses was given the Ten Commandments. The Biblical Mount Sinai is probably not the mountain in Egypt that today has the same name, although this is the subject of much debate. The Egyptian Mount Sinai has two developed routes that one can take to reach the summit. The longer gentler climb takes about 2 1/2 hours, but there is also the steeper climb up the 3,750 “steps of penitence”.

MOUNT SAINT HELENS
Only two volcanoes in the Cascade Range in the northwest have erupted in the 20th century: Mount St. Helens in 1980 and Mount Lassen in 1915. The last significant eruption of Mount Shasta, a third volcano in the Cascades, was about 200 years ago. The 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens resulted in ash being deposited in eleven US states and 5 Canadian provinces, and sadly led to the death of 57 people. The latter was the deadliest volcanic event in US history.

MOUNT EVEREST
Mount Everest was named by the Royal Geographical Society in 1865. The peak is named for Welsh surveyor George Everest, who had served as Surveyor General of India from 183o through 1843. Everest was first summited in 1953 by New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Nepalese sherpa Tenzing Norgay. Hillary and Norgay were part of an expedition from which two pairs of climbers were selected to make a summit attempt. The first pair were Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans, and they came within 330 feet of their goal but had to turn back. The expedition sent up the second pair two days later, and history was made on 29 May 1953.

SILICON VALLEY
The Santa Clara Valley, just a few miles from me at the south of San Francisco Bay, is better known as “Silicon Valley”. The term “Silicon Valley” dates back to 1971 when it was apparently first used in a weekly trade newspaper called “Electronic News” in articles written by journalist Don Hoefler.

SAN FERNANDO VALLEY
The San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles County is home to almost 2 million people. Back in the 1970s, the Valley was home to a multibillion-dollar pornography industry and many adult film production companies. This gave rise to some inventive nicknames, such as Porn Valley, Silcone Valley and San Pornando Valley.

DEATH VALLEY
Death Valley is a spectacular desert valley in California that is part of the Mojave Desert. Badwater Basin in Death Valley is lowest point in North America, sitting at 282 feet below sea level. Remarkably, Badwater Basin is located just 84 miles from Mount Whitney, the highest point in the contiguous United States.

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME:25m 57s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 4

GLOSSA (glossi)
CELESTA (celeste)
MATTEA (Mattei)
ARIOSO (erioso)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. “Hooked on Classics” record promoter : K-TEL
I know that a lot of people detested the “Hooked on Classics” albums, but to be honest, I found them to be a lot of fun. But then again, I liked disco! The original “Hooked on Classics” album was recorded in 1981 by the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra from London. The music was a selection of recognizable extracts from the world of classical music played over a continuous, disco beat.

5. Japanese electronics giant : EPSON
Seiko Epson is a Japanese company, one of the largest manufacturers of printers in the world. The company has its roots in the watch business, roots that go back to 1942. Seiko was chosen as the official timekeeper for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and was asked to supply a timer that produced a printed record. This request brought Seiko into the business of printer production. The company developed the world’s first mini-printer for the 1964 Games and called it EP-101 (EP standing for Electronic Printer). In 1975 Seiko introduced the next generation of EP printers which was called EPSON, from “SON of EP”. Cute, huh?

13. Director Apatow : JUDD
Judd Apatow is known for producing the TV series “Freaks and Geeks” and “Undeclared”. Those shows aren’t my cup of tea, but he also collaborated with Lena Dunham to create the show “Girls”. “Girls” is my cup of tea …

17. View from the Uffizi Gallery : ARNO
The Uffizi Gallery is one of the oldest art museums in the western world and is housed in the Palazzo degli Uffizi in Florence, Italy. The Palazzo was built in 1560, intended to house the offices of the Florentine magistrates. This original usage gave the gallery its name, as “uffizi” is Italian for “offices”.

18. Polo in the 13th century : MARCO
Marco Polo was a merchant from Venice and a famous traveler throughout Asia. Polo journeyed with his father and uncle on an epic tour of Central Asia and China that lasted 24 years. Marco tends to be the member of the party we remember today though, because it was he who documented their travels in a book called “Il Milione”.

20. Annual event at Pebble Beach : PRO-AM
The AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am golf tournament was established as an annual event in 1937, when it was hosted by Bing Crosby, who was a huge fan of the sport. The Bing Crosby name was used for the tournament even after his death in 1977, eventually giving way to corporate sponsor AT&T in 1985.

22. Like a well-off señora : RICA
In Spanish, a “señora” (woman) might be “rica” (rich).

23. Greek philosopher who wrote “Man is the measure of all things” : PROTAGORAS
The philosopher Protagoras of Abdera is considered by many to the greatest of the Sophists of ancient Greece. Sophists were private tutors for the upper-class youths of the day. “Sophist” is the root of our word “sophisticated”.

25. Tomato trouble : EDEMA
Both animals and plants can suffer from edema, a swelling cause by excessive accumulation of fluid.

26. Harrison ___, last person to set foot on the moon : SCHMITT
Astronaut Harrison Schmitt was the Lunar Module pilot for Apollo 17, the final mission of NASA’s Apollo program. He stepped out of the Lunar Module “Challenger” just after Commander Eugene Cernan, meaning that Schmitt was the last person to set foot on the moon’s surface. Schmitt resigned from NASA in 1975 to go into politics, successfully seeking election as US Senator for New Mexico in 1976.

32. Like some brownies and towelettes : MOIST
Apparently the first brownies were created for the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. The recipe was developed by a pastry chef at the city’s Palmer House Hotel. The idea was to produce a cake-like dessert that was small enough and dainty enough to be eaten by ladies as part of a boxed lunch.

38. Country named for one of its patrons : SAN MARINO
San Marino is a small enclave in northern Italy with an area of just under 25 square miles. The city of San Marino was founded in 301 CE as the Titanic Republic by Saint Marinus, whose name was eventually used for the state. It is the oldest sovereign state and constitutional republic in the world, and has the world’s oldest constitution (dating back to 1600). What is most impressive to me is that San Marino has no national debt and a budget surplus. One can only dream …

40. Basic material : ALKALI
The “opposite” of an acid is a base. Acids turn litmus paper red, and bases turn it blue. Acids and bases react with each other to form salts. An important subset of the chemicals called bases are the alkalis, the hydroxides of the alkali metals and of ammonium. The term “alkali” is sometimes used interchangeably with “base”, especially if that base is readily soluble in water.

41. ___ Day (November 19, in Brazil) : PELE
Pelé is the nickname of Edson de Nascimento, a soccer player who has used the name Pelé for most of his life. Pelé is now retired, and for my money was the world’s greatest ever player of the game. He is the only person to have been part of three World Cup winning squads, and is a national treasure in his native Brazil. One of Pele’s nicknames is “O Rei do Futebol” (the King of Football).

44. Coin issued in values of 1 to 500 : YEN
The yen replaced the ryo as the unit of currency in Japan in 1871.

47. Largest labor union in the U.S. : NEA
The National Education Association (NEA) is the largest labor union in the country, and mainly represents public school teachers.

52. Some iPods : NANOS
The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been seven versions of the Nano to date and the current Nano as well as playing tunes is an FM player, records voice memos, has a pedometer and can connect with external devices (like a heart monitor, maybe) using Bluetooth technology.

54. “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy” instrument : CELESTA
A celesta (also “celeste”) is a keyboard instrument in which the keys operate hammers that strike a set of metal plates. The resulting sound is similar to that from a glockenspiel, although it is much softer in tone as the celesta’s plates are suspended over wooden resonators. I’d say that the most famous musical work featuring a celesta is Tchaikovsky’s “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy” from his ballet “The Nutcracker”.

58. Howard Stern rival : DON IMUS
Don Imus’s syndicated radio show “Imus in the Morning” used to broadcast from New York City. Imus has been described as a “shock jock”, a disc jockey who deliberately uses provocative language and humor that many would find offensive . I don’t like shock jocks …

Howard Stern is one of the original “shock jocks” who seems now to have found his niche on uncensored satellite radio (SiriusXM). Apparently Stern is quite a chess player, and was invited to play in the 2010 US Chess Championships.

65. “L’___ del Cairo” (unfinished Mozart opera) : OCA
“L’oca del Cairo” is an unfinished opera by Mozart, one that he started but apparently gave up on as he didn’t like the farcical ending in the libretto with which he was working. With the title translating as “The Goose of Cairo”, the opera tells of a Spanish Marquess who manages to meet up with his imprisoned beloved by smuggling himself inside a large mechanical goose. Sort of a Trojan Horse with feathers …

70. Classic song with the repeated line “If you need me, I will be nearby” … shown symbolically in this puzzle : MOUNTAIN HIGH, VALLEY LOW
“Mountain High, Valley Low” is song most famously released by Eartha KItt in 1952. Kitt’s recording was a cover version of the original performed by Mary Martin in the 1946 Broadway musical “Lute Song”.

The 1946 Broadway musical “Lute Song” wasn’t received that well by critics, although the show is significant for at least a couple of reasons. It was first and only Broadway appearance for future First Lady Nancy Reagan (then Davis). Also, the cast included the unknown actor Yul Brynner. Cast leader Mary Martin was so impressed by Brynner’s performance that she later recommended him to Rodgers and Hammerstein as the main lead for “The King and I”, which premiered in 1951.

75. Ewoks’ home in sci-fi : ENDOR
In the “Star Wars” universe, the moon of Endor is home to the Ewoks. The Ewoks are creatures who first appear in “Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi”. They’re the cute and cuddly little guys that look like teddy bears.

76. Upstate SUNY campus site : OSWEGO
Oswego is a port city in New York State that lies on Lake Ontario. Oswego bills its as “The Port City of Central New York”.

The State University of New York (SUNY) is the largest system of third-level colleges and universities in the world, with almost 500,00 students attending over 60 campuses across the state.

78. Filbert, for one : NUT
The hazelnut is the nut of the hazel tree. The nuts from some hazel species are referred to as cobnuts or filbert nuts.

80. Common plastic base : STYRENE
Styrene is a sweet-smelling, colorless liquid that is used to make the plastic called polystyrene, and the synthetic rubber called styrene-butadiene (SBR).

85. Part of Polynesia : SAMOA
The official name for the South Pacific country formerly known as Western Samoa is the Independent State of Samoa. “Samoa” is the western part of the island group, with American Samoa lying to the southeast. The whole group of islands used to be known as Navigators Island, a name given by European explorers in recognition of the seafaring skills of the native Samoans.

89. Little, twisted part of us all? : DNA
Famously, James Watson and Francis Crick worked out that the structure of DNA is a double helix. Well, it turns out that some strands of DNA can twist into different shapes. For example, the DNA at the ends of our chromosomes can form a rectangular structure called a triplex or quadruplex.

90. Egg, for one : GAMETE
A gamete is a reproductive cell that has half the full complement of genes needed to make a normal cell. In sexual reproduction, it takes two gametes, one from each parent, to fuse into one cell which then develops into a new organism. The female gamete is the ovum, and the male the sperm.

93. Bygone cable inits. : TNN
The Nashville Network (TNN) was a country music cable channel that operated from 1983 to 2003. When TNN closed down it was relaunched with a completely different format as Spike, marketed as “the first television channel for men”.

96. Main ingredient in a Tom Collins : GIN
The cocktail known as a Tom Collins is a mixture of gin, lemon juice, sugar and club soda. The original recipe was supposedly invented by a head waiter called John Collins, in a London hotel in the early 1800s. Called a John Collins back then, the drink’s name was changed around 1869 when a popular recipe specifically called for Old Tom gin.

98. Wenders who directed “Buena Vista Social Club” : WIM
Wim Wenders is a German movie director and producer. Wenders has served as the president of the European Film Academy in Berlin since 1996.

100. Santa ___ (some winds) : ANAS
The Santa Ana winds are the very dry air currents that sweep offshore late in the year in Southern California. Because these air currents are so dry, they are noted for their influence over forest fires in the area, especially in the heat of the fall. The winds arise from a buildup of air pressure in the Great Basin that lies between the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada. Under the right conditions, that air spills over the peaks of the Sierra Nevada and basically “falls” down the side of the Sierra range, heading for the ocean. As the air falls it becomes drier and heats up so that relative humidity can fall to below 10% by the time it hits the coast.

104. Good thing to get from Moody’s : AAA RATING
Moody’s is a credit rating agency which ranks the creditworthiness of borrowers, a service also provided by Standard & Poor’s. Moody’s was started in 1909 by John Moody when he published a book containing analysis of railroad securities.

110. Six-time All-Star Garciaparra : NOMAR
Nomar Garciaparra is one of only thirteen players to have hit two grand slams during a single game in the Majors. He accomplished the feat in 1999 for the Boston Red Sox against the Seattle Mariners.

112. French mime : PIERROT
A pierrot is character appearing often in pantomimes, particularly of the French variety. A pierrot is a man dressed in white, in a loose blouse with large buttons down the center. He also wears heavy white makeup, and behaves somewhat like a buffoon.

119. Insurance giant : AFLAC
In 1999, Aflac was huge in the world of insurance but it wasn’t a household name, so a New York advertising agency was given the task of making the Aflac brand more memorable. One of the agency’s art directors, while walking around Central Park one lunchtime, heard a duck quacking and in his mind linked it with “Aflac”, and that duck has been “Aflacking” ever since …

124. Prefix with -plasm : ECTO-
In the real world, ectoplasm is part of the cytoplasm of a cell. In the paranormal world, ectoplasm is that spiritual energy that some people claim to be able to see, that emanates from ghostly characters. It’s that ethereal shape that is sometimes seen in photographic images, which can be interpreted as the energy of some spirit from “the other side”. Spooky stuff …

125. Subject of an annual festival in Holland, Mich. : TULIP
There are many tulip festivals around the US, almost all taking place in cities originally inhabited by Dutch settlers. The biggest of these is the Tulip Time Festival that has been held annually since 1929.

127. Instrument at Rick’s Café : PIANO
The movie “Casablanca” was released in January of 1943, timed to coincide with the Casablanca Conference, the high-level meeting between Roosevelt and Churchill. The film wasn’t a box-office hit, but gained critical acclaim, winning three Oscars including Best Picture. The signature song “As Time Goes By” was written many years earlier for a 1931 Broadway musical called “Everybody’s Welcome”, and was a hit in 1931 for Rudy Vallee. But today we all remember the Casablanca version, sung by Dooley Wilson (who played “Sam” in the film). Poor Dooley didn’t get to record it as a single, due to a musician’s strike in 1943, so the 1931 Rudy Vallee version was re-released that year and became an even bigger hit second time round.

131. Animal sought in 2016’s “Zootopia” : OTTER
“Zootopia” is a 2016 Disney animated film about a rabbit police officer and a red fox con artist who team up.

Down
1. Limestone areas with sinkholes and caverns : KARSTS
A “karst” is a geological formation in which limestone has eroded away leaving sinkholes, underground streams and caverns. The term “karst” comes from such a formation in southwestern Slovenia and northeastern Italy called the Karst Plateau.

2. One of the Nixons : TRICIA
President Richard Nixon and First Lady Pat Nixon had two daughters. The eldest daughter is Tricia. Tricia married Harvard law student Edward Cox in a ceremony in the White House Rose Garden in 1971.

5. Caveat ___ : EMPTOR
“Caveat emptor” is a Latin expression meaning “Let the buyer beware”. It is used when someone buys something, emphasizing that after the deal is closed, there’s no going back.

6. Final installment of “The Hangover” : PART III
“The Hangover” is a comedy film released in 2009. The action revolves around a bachelor party in Las Vegas. The critics liked this one, although I didn’t really enjoy it too much.

7. Sign of theatrical success : SRO
Standing room only (SRO)

8. Fall mo. : OCT
October is the tenth month in our calendar but was the eighth month in the old Roman calendar, hence the name “Octo-ber”. Back then there were only ten months in the year. “Ianuarius” (January) and “Februarius” were then added as the eleventh and twelfth months of the year. Soon after, the year was reset and January and February became the first and second months.

9. Title biblical character played by Russell Crowe : NOAH
The 2014 epic film “Noah” stars Russell Crowe in the title role, and is based on the biblical story of “Noah’s Ark”. The film was largely shot in Southern Iceland. Scenes that included the ark itself were shot in Upper Brookville, New York at the Planting Fields Arboretum.

Russell Crowe is a highly successful actor from New Zealand. Understandably, he doesn’t like people to call him “Australian”, even though it was in Australia that he launched his acting career. Not too long before the 9/11 attacks, the FBI contacted Crowe to inform him that al-Qaeda was plotting to kidnap him as part of a general attack on high-profile “American” icons. For a few months the New Zealander was guarded by Secret Service agents.

10. Hit from “Songs in the Key of Life” dedicated to Ellington : SIR DUKE
“Songs in the Key of Life” is an album released by Stevie Wonder in 1976.

12. Dutch beer brand : AMSTEL
Amstel is a Dutch beer and brewery, founded in 1870 in Amsterdam. The brewery takes its name from the Amstel river which runs through the city.

13. Compressed file format : JPEG
The JPEG file format was created by the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), hence the name.

14. Language that gave us “cummerbund” : URDU
A cummerbund is a sash worn around the waist by some men, usually with a dinner jacket or tuxedo. Cummerbands came to us from Afghanistan in the early 1600s.

16. Maidens : DAMSELS
A “damsel” is a young woman, often referring to a lady of noble birth. The term came into English from the Old French “dameisele”, which had the same meaning. The modern French term is “demoiselle”, which in turn is related to the term of address “mademoiselle”.

24. Mother and wife of Uranus : GAEA
The Greek goddess personifying the earth was Gaea (meaning “land” or “earth” in Greek). The Roman equivalent goddess was Terra Mater, “Mother Earth”. Gaea was the wife of Uranus (Father Sky). Gaea and Uranus were the parents of the twelve Titans.

30. Churchill gesture : V-SIGN
The V-sign, made with the palm facing outwards, was used as a victory sign by Winston Churchill during WWII. He was careful to point his palm outwards, as the V-sign made with the palm inwards has a very rude meaning in Britain and Ireland. The same victory sign was adopted as a peace sign in protests against the Vietnam War, a usage that spread and persists to this day.

33. Supercilious sort : SNOB
“Supercilious” is a such a lovely-sounding word, with a not-so-lovely meaning. Some described as supercilious is lofty with pride, haughtily contemptuous. The term derives from the Latin “supercilium” meaning “eyebrow” (actually “above the eyelid), the idea being that a person is prone to raise his or her eyebrows to express haughtiness.

41. In a luxurious manner : POSHLY
No one really knows the etymology of the word “posh”. The popular myth that POSH stands for “Port Out, Starboard Home” is completely untrue, and is a story that can actually be traced back to the 1968 movie “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang”. The myth is that wealthy British passengers travelling to and from India would book cabins on the port side for the outward journey and the starboard side for the home journey. This trick was supposedly designed to keep their cabins out of the direct sunlight.

53. Refugee’s request : ASYLUM
“Asylum” is a Latin word, meaning “sanctuary”.

57. Melodic passage : ARIOSO
An arioso (plural “ariosi”) is a solo vocal piece in a classical work such as an opera or an oratorio. An arioso’s structure lies somewhere between that of a full-blown aria and speech-like recitative.

60. “True Life” airer : MTV
“True Life” is a documentary series on MTV that has been running since 1998. The topics covered by individual episodes seem to vary widely, from drug abuse to martial arts.

62. “Now We Are Six” author : MILNE
“Now We Are Six” is a collection of children’s verses by A. A. Milne, the creator of Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends. It was published in 1927, and illustrated by E. H. Shepard, the man behind the illustrations for the Winnie-the-Pooh stories as well as Kenneth Graham’s equally famous story “The Wind in the Willows”. Indeed, eleven of the verses in “Now We Are Six” are illustrated with images of Winnie the Pooh. Sounds like one for the grand-kids …

63. Love, in the Louvre : AMOUR
The Musée du Louvre has the distinction of being the most visited art museum in the whole world. The collection is housed in the magnificent Louvre Palace which used to be the seat of power in France, until 1682 when Louis XIV moved to Versailles.

72. Reward for Fido : TREAT
“Fido”, the name for many a dog, is Latin for “I trust”.

74. Certification for eco-friendly buildings, for short : LEED
LEED is a green building certification program. The acronym stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design.

81. Minneapolis-St. Paul suburb : EAGAN
Eagan, Minnesota is a suburb of Minneapolis-St. Paul that is known as the Onion Capital of the United States. Eagan used to be an Irish farming community and was named for Patrick Eagan from Tipperary, Ireland. He was the town’s first chairman of the board of supervisors.

88. Chinese dynasty of 1,000 years ago : LIAO
The Liao Dynasty in China ruled over much of the country between the years 916 and 1125. The dynasty was also known as the Empire of the Khitan.

91. Like PETA : ANTI-FUR
People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) is a very large animal rights organization, with 300 employees and two million members and supporters worldwide. Although the group campaigns for animal rights across a broad spectrum of issues, it has a stated focus in opposition of four practices:

– factory farming
– fur farming
– animal testing
– use of animals in entertainment

92. Bob Ewell’s daughter in “To Kill a Mockingbird” : MAYELLA
Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “To Kill A Mockingbird” was first published in 1960. The book is a mainstay in English classes all around the world and is a great ambassador for American literature, I’d say.

95. Texans, e.g. : NFLERS
The Houston Texans football team has been in the NFL since 2002. Houston had been home to the Oilers football team, but that franchise moved to Nashville in 1997 to become the Tennessee Titans.

103. A limerick has 13 : FEET
No one knows for sure how the limerick got its name, although there does seem to be agreement the name does indeed come from the city or county of Limerick in Ireland. Try this one for size:

There was a young lady named Bright
who traveled much faster than light.
She set out one day
in a relative way,
and came back the previous night.

121. Bygone record label : EMI
EMI was a British music company, with the abbreviation standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

122. Sauced : LIT
“Lit” and “sauced” are terms meaning “drunk”.

123. Back muscle, briefly : LAT
The muscles known as the “lats” are the latissimi dorsi, the broadest muscles in the back. “Latissimus” is the Latin for “broadest” and “dorsum” is Latin for “back”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. “Hooked on Classics” record promoter : K-TEL
5. Japanese electronics giant : EPSON
10. Swell locale? : SEA
13. Director Apatow : JUDD
17. View from the Uffizi Gallery : ARNO
18. Polo in the 13th century : MARCO
19. Unyielding : FIRM
20. Annual event at Pebble Beach : PRO-AM
22. Like a well-off señora : RICA
23. Greek philosopher who wrote “Man is the measure of all things” : PROTAGORAS
25. Tomato trouble : EDEMA
26. Harrison ___, last person to set foot on the moon : SCHMITT
28. Round of applause : HAND
29. One on a talk show couch, say : TV GUEST
31. Argentine aunt : TIA
32. Like some brownies and towelettes : MOIST
35. Brings out : EDUCES
37. Still : YET
38. Country named for one of its patrons : SAN MARINO
40. Basic material : ALKALI
41. ___ Day (November 19, in Brazil) : PELE
42. Identify, as in a Facebook photo : TAG
43. It’s never free of charge : ION
44. Coin issued in values of 1 to 500 : YEN
45. Tongue, anatomically : GLOSSA
47. Largest labor union in the U.S. : NEA
49. Does a certain dog trick : BEGS
52. Some iPods : NANOS
54. “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy” instrument : CELESTA
58. Howard Stern rival : DON IMUS
61. “Jeez!” : OH MAN!
65. “L’___ del Cairo” (unfinished Mozart opera) : OCA
66. Prefix with lingual : TRI-
68. With full attention : RAPTLY
69. Gooey stuff : SLIME
70. Classic song with the repeated line “If you need me, I will be nearby” … shown symbolically in this puzzle : MOUNTAIN HIGH, VALLEY LOW
75. Ewoks’ home in sci-fi : ENDOR
76. Upstate SUNY campus site : OSWEGO
77. Regret : RUE
78. Filbert, for one : NUT
79. Woman’s floral nickname : ROSIE
80. Common plastic base : STYRENE
82. Vocal cats : MEOWERS
85. Part of Polynesia : SAMOA
87. It’s least palatable when raw : DEAL
89. Little, twisted part of us all? : DNA
90. Egg, for one : GAMETE
93. Bygone cable inits. : TNN
96. Main ingredient in a Tom Collins : GIN
98. Wenders who directed “Buena Vista Social Club” : WIM
100. Santa ___ (some winds) : ANAS
101. Close with a knot : TIE OFF
104. Good thing to get from Moody’s : AAA RATING
108. Disaster area, so to speak : STY
109. Marked down : ON SALE
110. Six-time All-Star Garciaparra : NOMAR
111. Prefix for a revived style : NEO-
112. French mime : PIERROT
115. Go off course : VEER
117. Use as a conclusion : END WITH
119. Insurance giant : AFLAC
120. Find out about : HEAR TELL OF
124. Prefix with -plasm : ECTO-
125. Subject of an annual festival in Holland, Mich. : TULIP
126. French buds : AMIS
127. Instrument at Rick’s Café : PIANO
128. With 132-Across, place to get a date : PALM
129. Spew fire and brimstone, say : RANT
130. Dusk-___-dawn : TIL
131. Animal sought in 2016’s “Zootopia” : OTTER
132. See 128-Across : TREE

Down
1. Limestone areas with sinkholes and caverns : KARSTS
2. One of the Nixons : TRICIA
3. Captivate : ENCHANT
4. Rich soil : LOAM
5. Caveat ___ : EMPTOR
6. Final installment of “The Hangover” : PART III
7. Sign of theatrical success : SRO
8. Fall mo. : OCT
9. Title biblical character played by Russell Crowe : NOAH
10. Hit from “Songs in the Key of Life” dedicated to Ellington : SIR DUKE
11. End of an ___ : ERA
12. Dutch beer brand : AMSTEL
13. Compressed file format : JPEG
14. Language that gave us “cummerbund” : URDU
15. They impart an innocent look : DOE EYES
16. Maidens : DAMSELS
19. How good times are remembered : FONDLY
21. Country singer Kathy with the #1 “Eighteen Wheels and a Dozen Roses” : MATTEA
24. Mother and wife of Uranus : GAEA
27. Google heading : IMAGES
30. Churchill gesture : V-SIGN
33. Supercilious sort : SNOB
34. Muscular : TONED
36. Shaped like a tube : CANNULAR
39. Long, flowing locks : MANE
41. In a luxurious manner : POSHLY
46. Untethered : LOOSE
48. Lead-in to boy : ATTA
50. More bloody : GORIER
51. Caught : SNAGGED
53. Refugee’s request : ASYLUM
54. Rising star : COMER
55. Money-saving brand prefix : ECONO-
56. Extols : LAUDS
57. Melodic passage : ARIOSO
59. Galaxy rival : IPHONE
60. “True Life” airer : MTV
62. “Now We Are Six” author : MILNE
63. Love, in the Louvre : AMOUR
64. Pond wrigglers : NEWTS
67. Establishes : INSTATES
71. They may keep you awake at night : NOISES
72. Reward for Fido : TREAT
73. It may take a toll: Abbr. : HWY
74. Certification for eco-friendly buildings, for short : LEED
81. Minneapolis-St. Paul suburb : EAGAN
83. Direction of progress : ONWARD
84. “Hold it!” : WAIT!
86. “Same here” : ME TOO
88. Chinese dynasty of 1,000 years ago : LIAO
90. React to, as a shock : GASP AT
91. Like PETA : ANTI-FUR
92. Bob Ewell’s daughter in “To Kill a Mockingbird” : MAYELLA
94. Uselessly, after “to” : NO AVAIL
95. Texans, e.g. : NFLERS
97. “Oh yeah? Give an example!” : NAME ONE!
99. Subcompact : MINICAR
102. Because : IN THAT
103. A limerick has 13 : FEET
105. Sought, as office : RAN FOR
106. Irk : NETTLE
107. Order to a pest : GO HOME
113. It can come in sheets : RAIN
114. A.T.M. printout: Abbr. : RCPT
116. Certain tow job, for short : REPO
118. Shed tears : WEPT
121. Bygone record label : EMI
122. Sauced : LIT
123. Back muscle, briefly : LAT

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6 thoughts on “0522-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 22 May 16, Sunday”

  1. We got them all. I knew about the CELESTA from my mother, who was a classical cellist. I guessed on ARIOSO, thinking it sounded more "music like" than ERIOSO. Kudos to the setter for the very clever theme that took up so many spaces. We noticed some forced words that probably had to be in there to accommodate the theme. MEOWERS, indeed. Sheesh! Overall, a good challenge.

  2. 31:54, with 3 errors: DEAL, EAGAN, and LIAO. Three things you either know or you don't.

    Interesting theme, not too many groaners.

  3. As has become my habit, I did this puzzle a week ago on my iPad and repeated it today on paper (in much less time). When I finished, I could not imagine why the clue "Church leaders" gave the answer KTEL. It was not until I came here that I realized the folks at the Denver Post have, once again (for the third or fourth time now!), inserted the same bogus 1A clue preceding the correct one. You'd think I'd be looking for it by now but, once again, I was confused …

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