0508-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 8 May 16, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: David J. Kahn
THEME: Liquid Condensation … we have a rebus puzzle today, with a twist. The letters HHO (the formula for “water”) are found in several squares. These letters are used as is to make sense of an answer in the down-direction, and are used as WATER in the across-direction. The answer in the across-direction is a well-known phrase, but with WATER inserted:

27A. Advice to captains plagued by pirates? : CHANGE YOUR WATERWAYS (from “change your ways”)
35A. Direction taken by a large pipe? : WATER MAIN COURSE (from “main course”)
63A. Container to keep a canine cool? : DOGGY WATER BAG (from “doggy bag”)
72A. Telegrams sent by those in trouble? : HOT WATER WIRES (from “hot-wires”)
95A. Conservative’s opinion of the Republican presidential candidates? : GOOD AS GOLDWATER (from “good as gold”)
108A. Oceans? : SALT WATER OF THE EARTH (from “salt of the earth”)

3D. Somatotropin, e.g. : GROWTH HORMONE
13D. Bait holders : FISHHOOKS
46D. How excellent students graduate : WITH HONORS
52D. Home on the range : RANCH HOUSE
69D. Passover, e.g. : JEWISH HOLIDAY
88D. Causes of congestion : RUSH HOURS

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 27m 14s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

9. Opened a bit : AJAR
Our word “ajar” is thought to come from Scottish dialect, in which “a char” means “slightly open”.

13. Presto : FAST
On a musical score, presto is used to indicate a fast tempo. “Presto” is the Italian word for “quick”.

17. Central courts : ATRIA
In modern architecture an atrium (plural “atria” or “atriums”) is a large open space usually in the center of a building and extending upwards to the roof. The original atrium was an open court in the center of an Ancient Roman house. One could access most of the enclosed rooms of the house from the atrium.

23. City in “Slumdog Millionaire” : AGRA
The Indian city of Agra is home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites:

– The Taj Mahal: the famous mausoleum built in memory of Mumtaz Mahal.
– Agra Fort: the site where the famous Koh-i-Noor diamond was seized.
– Fatehpur Sikri: a historic city that’s home to well-preserved Mughal

The brilliant film “Slumdog Millionaire” is a screen adaptation of a 2005 novel by Indian author Vikas Swarup. This low-budget movie won eight Oscars in 2008. I reckon it turned a profit …

33. The Dixie Chicks, e.g. : TRIO
The Dixie Chicks are a country music trio comprising sisters Martie Maguire and Emily Robison, along with lead singer Natalie Maines. The band hit the headlines in 2003 during a London concert that took place around the time of the invasion of Iraq. Maines expressed her opposition to the war to the general acclaim of the British audience, and the general disapproval of conservatives back in the US.

41. Class taken for kicks? : KARATE
“Karate”, means “open hand”, and the related word “karaoke” means “open orchestra”.

47. Musical ___ : SCALE
50. Segment of the 47-Across : RE, MI
The solfa syllables are: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la & ti.

51. Bibbled : DRANK
“To bibble” is to tipple, to drink alcohol habitually. The term probably comes from the Latin “bibere” meaning “to drink”.

55. How many a medical problem ends? : -ITIS
The suffix “-itis” is used to denote inflammation, as in laryngitis (inflammation of the larynx) and sinusitis (inflammation of the sinuses).

56. With 36-Down, New England college town : ORONO
(36D. See 56-Across : MAINE)
The town of Orono is home to the University of Maine, founded in 1862. The college is actually located on an island (Marsh island) lying between the Penobscot and Stillwater rivers. The town of Orono is named after Joseph Orono, a chief of the Penobscot Nation.

58. Santa ___, Calif. : ANA
Santa Ana is the county seat of Orange County, California and takes its name from the Santa Ana River that runs through the city.

59. Beethoven’s “Kreutzer,” for one : SONATA
Beethoven’s Violin Sonata No. 9 in A major is best known as the “Kreutzer Sonata”. The sonata was originally dedicated to Beethoven’s friend, violinist George Bridgetower who performed the piece at its premiere in 1803. After the performance, the two friends were drinking together and Bridgetower happened to insult the reputation of a female friend of the composer. As a result, Beethoven removed the dedication, changing it to violinist Rodolphe Kreutzer, so there is no longer a “Bridgetower Sonata”.

60. Fraction of time: Abbr. : NSEC
“Nanosecond” is more correctly abbreviated to “ns”, and really is a tiny amount of time: one billionth of a second.

63. Container to keep a canine cool? : DOGGY WATER BAG (from “doggy bag”)
A “water bag” is a container, often made from canvas or animal skin, that is used to carry water while keeping it cool.

65. Timeout sign : TEE
A basketball player or coach might make a “letter T” with his or her hands to signal a timeout.

66. Magazine with an annual “500” list : INC
“Inc.” is a business magazine that specializes in articles about growing companies. “Inc.” publishes a list of the 500 fastest-growing private companies in the country each year, calling it the “Inc. 500”. The “Inc 5000” is an expanded list also published by the magazine.

68. Noggin : NOB
The slang term “nob” has been used for “head” for over 300 years, and is a variant of “knob”.

A slang term for a “head” might be “bean” or “noggin”.

69. Part of Pres. Monroe’s signature : JAS
James Monroe was the fifth US President, and the last of the Founding Fathers to hold the highest office. Famously, he presided over the Era of Good Feelings, when there was very little partisan strife in Washington. President Monroe racked up a lot of debt while in politics and so when he retired he had to sell off a lot of his property and struggled financially for the remainder of his life. Monroe was one of three US presidents to pass away on American Independence Day (along with Thomas Jefferson and John Adams). Monroe died on July 4th 1831.

72. Telegrams sent by those in trouble? : HOT WATER WIRES (from “hot-wires”)
To hot-wire a vehicle is to start it by bypassing the keyed ignition.

80. Nonstandard: Abbr. : IRR
Irregular (irr.)

82. Help badly? : ABET
The word “abet” comes into English from the Old French “abeter” meaning “to bait” or “to harass with dogs” (it literally means “to make bite”). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of “abet”, meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

83. Country music’s K. T. ___ : OSLIN
Singer K. T. Oslin is best known for her string of country hits in the eighties.

86. “You ___ Seen Nothing Yet” (1974 #1 hit) : AIN’T
“You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet” is a fabulous 1974 chart-topper for Bachman-Turner Overdrive that was written by Randy Bachman.

You ain’t seen nothin’ yet
B-b-b-baby, you just ain’t seen n-n-nothin’ yet
Here’s something that you never gonna forget
B-b-b-baby, you just ain’t seen n-n-nothin’ yet

87. 1982 coming-of-age movie : DINER
The 1982 movie “Diner” is set in a diner in 1959, where a group of five male friends reunite for a wedding. The five friends, now in their twenties, are played by: Steve Guttenberg, Daniel Stern, Mickey Rourke, Kevin Bacon and Timothy Daly.

91. Things held, in a saying : HORSES
Hold your horses!

93. Musical curve : SLUR
In the world of music, a “slur” is curved line that connects neighboring notes that are to be played smoothly, without separation.

95. Conservative’s opinion of the Republican presidential candidates? : GOOD AS GOLDWATER (from “good as gold”)
Barry Goldwater was a five-term US Senator for the state of Arizona noted for this right-wing positions. He was known for a while as “Mr. Conservative”, something that didn’t help him with the electorate in the 1964 race for the White House as he lost to the incumbent President Johnson in a landslide. In fact, the only non-Southern state that Goldwater carried was his native Arizona.

100. Expanses of H2O : SEAS
A water molecule is composed of an oxygen atom with two hydrogen atoms on roughly opposite sides (about a 150-degree angle). So, sometimes the molecule is represented by “HOH”, although more usually it’s “H2O”.

105. Chocolate ___ : LAB
The Labrador (Lab) breed of dog has been around at least since 1814, and the chocolate Labrador appeared over a century later in the 1930s.

108. Oceans? : SALT WATER OF THE EARTH (from “salt of the earth”)
Jesus used the metaphors of salt and light in the Sermon on the Mount as recounted in the Gospel of Matthew:

Ye are the salt of the earth: but if the salt have lost its savor, wherewith shall it be salted? it is thenceforth good for nothing, but to be cast out and trodden under foot of men.
Ye are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hid. Neither do [men] light a lamp, and put it under the bushel, but on the stand; and it shineth unto all that are in the house. Even so let your light shine before men; that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father who is in heaven.

112. With 45-Down, jazz singer who worked with Woody Herman : ANITA
(45D. See 112-Across : O’DAY)
Anita O’Day was the stage name of the jazz singer Anita Colton. She chose the name as “O’Day” is Pig Latin for “dough”, a slang term for “money”. O’Day had problems with heroin and alcohol addiction leading to erratic behavior, and earning her the nickname “The Jezebel of Jazz”.

114. 1961 movie featuring Jackie Gleason as Minnesota Fats : THE HUSTLER
Minnesota Fats was the nickname adopted by professional pool player Rudolf Wanderone. The original Minnesota Fats was a character in the Walter Tevis novel “The Hustler”, played in the 1961 film adaptation by Jackie Gleason. Prior to the release of the film, Wanderone had been using the name “New York Fats”. A story emerged that the character “Fats” in the book and movie had been inspired by Wanderone, and so Wanderone stopped using “New York Fats” to become “Minnesota Fats”.

116. Djokovic rival : NADAL
Rafael “Rafa” Nadal is a Spanish tennis player, noted for his expertise on clay courts, earning him the nickname “The King of Clay”.

Novak Djokovic is a Serbian tennis player, currently the world No. 1. Djokovic is quite the character off the court it seems and he is very popular on the talk-show circuit, all around the world. It also helps that Djokovic is fluent in several languages.

117. Canadian rowdy : HOSER
The derogatory term “hoser”, meaning “foolish or uncultivated person”, is apparently attributed to Canadians, although I read that it is rarely used north of the border. Not a term I’ve ever heard of outside of crosswords, I must admit …

118. One of the Saarinens : EERO
Eero Saarinen was a Finnish American architect, renowned in this country for his unique designs for public buildings such as Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Dulles International Airport Terminal, and the TWA building at JFK. The list of his lesser-known, but still impressive, works includes several buildings erected on academic campuses. For example, the Chapel and Kresge Auditorium on the MIT campus, the Emma Hartman Noyes House at Vassar College, the Law School building at the University of Chicago, and Yale’s David S. Ingalls Rink.

119. ___ weight : TROY
The system of troy weights is now only used to measure the mass of precious metals and gemstones. The name “troy” likely came from the French town of Troyes, which was famous for trading with the English as far back as the 9th century.

120. Actress Patricia and others : NEALS
Patricia Neal won her Best Actress Oscar relatively late in her career, for playing the middle-aged housekeeper in 1963’s “Hud”. A few years’ later she was offered the role of Mrs. Robinson in “The Graduate” but turned it down. Famously, Neal had an affair with Gary Cooper who was married at the time. She became pregnant with his child, but he persuaded her to have an abortion. Not long afterwards Neal married British writer Roald Dahl (of “Willy Wonka” fame) and the couple had five children together before divorcing in 1983.

121. Animals in un zoológico : OSOS
In Spanish, “osa” is a female bear, and “oso” is a male. An “oso” might be found in “un zoológico” (a zoo).

122. Reddish-brown : ROAN
A roan horse has an even mixture of white and colored hairs on the body with the head, lower legs, mane and tail having a more solid color.

123. Chamber worker: Abbr. : SEN
The Senate Chamber in the US Capitol is the US Senate’s legislative chamber, and has been so since 1859. There is an Old Senate Chamber in the same building, now used mainly as a museum, was the Senate’s legislative chamber from 1810 until 1859, before serving as the Supreme Court chamber from 1860 until 1935.

124. Safe places : ASYLA
“Asylum” (plural “asyla”) is a Latin word, meaning “sanctuary”.

Down
1. One of the Obamas : SASHA
Sasha is the younger of the two Obama children, born in 2001. She is the youngest child to reside in the White House since John F. Kennedy, Jr. moved in with his parents as a small infant. Sasha’s Secret Service codename is “Rosebud”, and her older sister Malia has the codename “Radiance”.

3. Somatotropin, e.g. : GROWTH HORMONE
Growth hormone (GH) is also referred to as human growth hormone (HGH) or somatotropin. GH is secreted by the pituitary gland located at the base of the brain.

4. Samuel Beckett’s homeland : EIRE
An Irishman I may be, but I have sat through so many Samuel Beckett plays (the Irish dramatist) and I have yet to come away feeling satisfied that I spent my time well. Of course I am in the minority, as Beckett’s play “Waiting for Godot” was once voted the most significant English language play of the 20th century. Maybe I will give “Waiting for Godot” another chance one day, but I doubt it …

5. Desert feline : SAND CAT
Sand cats are found primarily in the stony and sandy deserts of northern Africa as well as southwest and central Asia. They are well adapted to their environment, capable for tolerating temperatures ranging from well below freezing to over 125 degrees F. They can survive months without drinking water, absorbing just the water in their food.

6. Very powerful : HIGH-OCTANE
The difference between a premium and regular gasoline is its octane rating. The octane rating is measure of the resistance of the gasoline to auto-ignition i.e. its resistance to ignition just by virtue of being compressed in the cylinder. This auto-ignition is undesirable as multiple-cylinder engines are designed so that ignition within each cylinder takes place precisely when the plug sparks, and not before. If ignition occurs before the spark is created, the resulting phenomenon is called “knocking”. We sometimes use the adjective “high-octane” to mean “intense, dynamic, high-powered”

7. Gillette product : ATRA
Fortunately for crossword constructors, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

8. 1960s secretary of state : DEAN RUSK
Dean Rusk was Secretary of State in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. Rusk served for eight years, making him the second-longest serving Secretary of State in US history.

9. Real estate and the like : ASSETS
In the world of law, there are two main classes of property: personal property and real property. Personal property is basically movable property. Real property is immovable, such as land or buildings and related assets.

10. Hot time : JULY
Our month of July used to be called “Quintilis” in Ancient Rome. “Quintilis” is Latin for “fifth”, and it was the fifth month of the year back then. After the assassination of Julius Caesar, the Roman Senate renamed Quintilis to Julius, in his honor, which evolved into our “July”. The month of August, originally called “Sextilis” in Latin, was renamed in honor of Augustus.

15. Tatamis, e.g. : STRAW MATS
A tatami is a traditional mat used on floors in Japan. The term “tatami” comes from the Japanese word “tatamu” meaning “to fold”, reflecting the fact that the mat is designed to be folded up for storage.

16. Milkman made famous by Zero Mostel : TEVYE
The enduring musical “Fiddler on the Roof” is based on a collection of stories by Sholem Aleichem about Tevye, a milkman living in Tsarist Russia. The musical version of the tales first opened on Broadway in 1964. “Fiddler on the Roof” had such a long run that it became the first musical to reach 3,000 performances.

25. Dwarf planet more massive than Pluto : ERIS
Eris is the largest known dwarf planet in our solar system. It is also the ninth largest body orbiting the sun, a fact that helped relegate Pluto (the tenth largest body) from its status of planet in 2006. Eris was discovered in 2005.

28. Long-jawed fishes : GARS
The fish known as a gar is very unusual in that it is often found in very brackish water. What is interesting about gar is that their swim bladders are vascularized so that they can actually function as lungs. Many species of gar can actually be seen coming to the surface and taking a gulp of air. This adaptation makes it possible for them to live in conditions highly unsuitable for other fish that rely on their gills to get oxygen out of the water. Indeed, quite interesting …

37. Chaplin of “Game of Thrones” : OONA
Oona Chaplin is an actress from Madrid in Spain. Chaplin is getting a lot of airtime these days as she plays Talisa Maegyr on HBO’s hit fantasy series “Game of Thrones”. Oona is the granddaughter of Charlie Chaplin, and is named for her maternal grandmother Oona O’Neill. the daughter of playwright Eugene O’Neill.

38. “Dallas” family : EWINGS
The TV soap “Dallas” revolved around the Ewings family. The series that ran for 13 years was originally intended as a five-part mini-series, with the main characters being newlyweds Bobby and Pam Ewing. But, the devious character in the piece, Bobby’s brother J. R., became so popular with audiences that the series as extended with J. R. at the center of the story. The original show ran from 1978 to 1991, and a revival was made starting in 2012. The new version of “Dallas” included some of the old characters, such as Bobby and Pam Ewing, as well as J.R. Larry Hagman, who played J.R. Ewing, passed away at the end of 2012.

41. Longtime “60 Minutes” reporter : KROFT
Journalist Steve Kroft has been a correspondent on the excellent CBS newsmagazine show “60 Minutes” since 1989.

42. High retreat : AERIE
An aerie is the nest of an eagle, and is also known as an “eyrie”.

53. Venetian dignitaries of old : DOGES
Doges were the elected chief magistrates of the former republics of Venice and Genoa.

54. Proscribed : TABOO
The word “taboo” was introduced into English by Captain Cook in his book “A Voyage to the Pacific Ocean”. Cook described “tabu” (likely imitative of a Tongan word that he had heard) as something that was both consecrated and forbidden.

57. Some of this, some of that : OLIO
“Olio” is a term meaning a hodgepodge or a mixture, coming from the mixed stew of the same name. The stew in turn takes its name from the Spanish “olla”, the clay pot used for cooking.

59. Like clogs, say : SOLED
Clogs are shoes made from wood, at least in part. The clog originated as a protective item of footwear for use by farm, factory and mine workers.

63. Poet Mark Van ___ : DOREN
Poet and critic Mark Van Duren was an English professor at Columbia University for almost four decades. Among the list of his students were the Beat Generation writers Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac. Mark’s son Charles Van Doren was the contestant at the center of the “Twenty-One” TV quiz show scandal of the 1950s.

71. Leaves alone, in a way : STETS
“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

72. Trump International, e.g. : HOTEL
There are several Trump International Hotel and Tower properties, in Chicago, Honolulu, New York City and Toronto.

77. Tokyo wrap : OBI
The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied in what is called a butterfly knot.

80. Setting for “The Music Man” : IOWA
“The Music Man” is a musical by Meredith Willson. The show was a big hit on Broadway in 1957. “The Music Man” won the first ever Grammy Award for the “Best Original Cast Album”. The show is set in the fictional River City, Iowa.

85. Marvel Comics hero : THOR
Thor is a superhero who was introduced to us by Marvel Comics in 1962. The character is of course based on the Norse god Thor, and comes complete with a magical hammer. Like so many comic book heroes it seems, Thor has made it to the big screen. Actor Chris Hemsworth played the role in the 2011 film “Thor” directed by the great Kenneth Branagh. Branagh must have needed the cash. Thor’s father Odin is played by Anthony Hopkins. He must have needed the cash too …

92. David Mamet play : OLEANNA
I’ve never seen it, but “Oleanna” sounds like a powerful play to me. Written by David Mamet, it was first performed in 1992. It’s a two-person piece, the tale of a university professor and a female student who accuses him of sexual exploitation.

94. Some vintage autos : REOS
The REO Motor Company was founded by Ransom Eli Olds (hence the name REO). The company made cars, trucks and buses, and was in business from 1905 to 1975 in Lansing, Michigan. Among the company’s most famous models were the REO Royale and the REO Flying Cloud.

96. Second-largest moon of Uranus : OBERON
All of the twenty-seven moons of the planet Uranus are named for characters from literature, characters created by William Shakespeare and Alexander Pope. The five major moons are so large that they would be considered planets in their own right if they were orbiting the sun directly. The names of these five moons are:

– Miranda (from Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”)
– Ariel (from Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” and Pope’s “The Rape of the Lock”)
– Umbriel (from Pope’s “The Rape of the Lock”)
– Titania (from Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”)
– Oberon (from Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”)

97. Designer of Spain’s Guggenheim Museum : GEHRY
Frank Gehry is an architect from Toronto who is based in Los Angeles. Listed among Gehry’s famous creations are the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao in Spain, The Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and his own private residence in Santa Monica, California. He is currently working on the upcoming Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial that will be placed in Washington, D.C. I hope to see that one day …

98. Tallinn native : ESTH
I think that implication here is that an “Esth” is a native of Estonia. I am not sure that is true, but I could be wrong (yet again!) …

Tallinn is the largest city in the former Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR) of Estonia, and is now the nation’s capital. Tallinn is sometimes referred to as the Silicon Valley of Europe, and indeed it was in Tallinn that the video chat service Skype was developed. It is also home to NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence that is sponsored by several NATO members, including the US.

99. Google rival : YAHOO!
Jerry Yang and David Filo called their company “Yahoo!” for two reasons. Firstly, a Yahoo is a rude unsophisticated brute from Jonathan Swift’s “Gulliver’s Travels”. Secondly, Yahoo stands for “Yet another Hierarchical Officious Oracle”.

102. Fifth-century pontiff : ST LEO
The first pope named Leo is now known as Pope Saint Leo the Great. Leo I is famous for meeting with the feared Attila the Hun and persuading him to turn back his invading force that was threatening to overrun Western Europe.

107. Model wood : BALSA
Balsa is a very fast growing tree that is native to parts of South America. Even though balsa wood is very soft, it is actually classified as a hardwood, the softest of all the hardwoods (go figure!). Balsa is light and strong, so is commonly used in making model airplanes. Amazingly, in WWII a full-size British plane, the de Havilland Mosquito, was built largely from balsa and plywood. No wonder they called it “The Wooden Wonder” and “The Timber Terror”.

109. Baseball executive Epstein : THEO
Theo Epstein was hired as General Manager in 2002 by the Boston Red Sox. Epstein was only 28 years at the time, making him the youngest GM in the history of Major League Baseball.

110. Olympian deity : HERA
In Greek mythology, Hera was the wife of Zeus and was noted for her jealous and vengeful nature, particularly against those who vied for the affections of her husband. The equivalent character to Hera in Roman mythology was Juno. Hera was the daughter of Cronus and Rhea.

Mount Olympus is the highest peak in Greece. In Greek mythology, Mount Olympus was home to the gods, and in particular home to the principal gods known as the Twelve Olympians.

113. Dundee disavowals : NAES
The city of Dundee lies on the north bank of the Firth of Tay in Scotland. The origins of the name “Dundee” are a little obscure, although the omnipresent “dùn” in place names all over Scotland and Ireland is the Celtic word for “fort”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Wise ones : SAGES
6. Suffered from : HAD
9. Opened a bit : AJAR
13. Presto : FAST
17. Central courts : ATRIA
18. Dentist’s request : BITE
19. “O.K., I’m game” : SURE
20. Lock opener? : INTER-
22. Like some statements : SWORN
23. City in “Slumdog Millionaire” : AGRA
24. Tricky start to a tennis rally : SLICE SERVE
26. Spoke hesitatingly : HAWED
27. Advice to captains plagued by pirates? : CHANGE YOUR WATERWAYS (from “change your ways”)
29. Slyness : ART
30. When repeated, toy on a track : CHOO
32. Double-crosser : RAT
33. The Dixie Chicks, e.g. : TRIO
34. Sweaty : WET
35. Direction taken by a large pipe? : WATER MAIN COURSE (from “main course”)
39. Give the once-over : SKIM
41. Class taken for kicks? : KARATE
43. Propose tentatively, with “out” : TOSS
44. Impress, and then some : WOW
47. Musical ___ : SCALE
50. Segment of the 47-Across : RE, MI
51. Bibbled : DRANK
53. “Ta-da!” : DID IT!
55. How many a medical problem ends? : -ITIS
56. With 36-Down, New England college town : ORONO
58. Santa ___, Calif. : ANA
59. Beethoven’s “Kreutzer,” for one : SONATA
60. Fraction of time: Abbr. : NSEC
61. Very small distinction : FINE LINE
63. Container to keep a canine cool? : DOGGY WATER BAG (from “doggy bag”)
65. Timeout sign : TEE
66. Magazine with an annual “500” list : INC
67. C.I.A. concern : MOLES
68. Noggin : NOB
69. Part of Pres. Monroe’s signature : JAS
72. Telegrams sent by those in trouble? : HOT WATER WIRES (from “hot-wires”)
74. Handyman’s accessory : TOOL BELT
76. Mediocre : SO-SO
79. Out of business : RUINED
80. Nonstandard: Abbr. : IRR
81. “That smarts!” : YOWIE!
82. Help badly? : ABET
83. Country music’s K. T. ___ : OSLIN
84. Pay “tribute” to, as a comedian : ROAST
86. “You ___ Seen Nothing Yet” (1974 #1 hit) : AIN’T
87. 1982 coming-of-age movie : DINER
89. Dark time for poets : E’EN
90. Clinched, with “up” : SEWN
91. Things held, in a saying : HORSES
93. Musical curve : SLUR
95. Conservative’s opinion of the Republican presidential candidates? : GOOD AS GOLDWATER (from “good as gold”)
98. Give the once-over : EYE
100. Expanses of H2O : SEAS
103. “I need a sweater in here!” : BRR!
104. French suffix that’s an anagram of 4-Down : -IERE
105. Chocolate ___ : LAB
108. Oceans? : SALT WATER OF THE EARTH (from “salt of the earth”)
112. With 45-Down, jazz singer who worked with Woody Herman : ANITA
114. 1961 movie featuring Jackie Gleason as Minnesota Fats : THE HUSTLER
115. Within bounds : FAIR
116. Djokovic rival : NADAL
117. Canadian rowdy : HOSER
118. One of the Saarinens : EERO
119. ___ weight : TROY
120. Actress Patricia and others : NEALS
121. Animals in un zoológico : OSOS
122. Reddish-brown : ROAN
123. Chamber worker: Abbr. : SEN
124. Safe places : ASYLA

Down
1. One of the Obamas : SASHA
2. Battling it out : AT WAR
3. Somatotropin, e.g. : GROWTH HORMONE
4. Samuel Beckett’s homeland : EIRE
5. Desert feline : SAND CAT
6. Very powerful : HIGH-OCTANE
7. Gillette product : ATRA
8. 1960s secretary of state : DEAN RUSK
9. Real estate and the like : ASSETS
10. Hot time : JULY
11. Running rampant : ARIOT
12. Come back : RECUR
13. Bait holders : FISHHOOKS
14. From the start : ANEW
15. Tatamis, e.g. : STRAW MATS
16. Milkman made famous by Zero Mostel : TEVYE
18. Burger topper : BACON
21. Pause : REST
25. Dwarf planet more massive than Pluto : ERIS
28. Long-jawed fishes : GARS
31. Rushed : HIED
36. See 56-Across : MAINE
37. Chaplin of “Game of Thrones” : OONA
38. “Dallas” family : EWINGS
40. Sugar coating? : ICING
41. Longtime “60 Minutes” reporter : KROFT
42. High retreat : AERIE
45. See 112-Across : O’DAY
46. How excellent students graduate : WITH HONORS
48. Be prone : LIE
49. Mac key : ESC
52. Home on the range : RANCH HOUSE
53. Venetian dignitaries of old : DOGES
54. Proscribed : TABOO
57. Some of this, some of that : OLIO
59. Like clogs, say : SOLED
62. Prelude : INTRO
63. Poet Mark Van ___ : DOREN
64. In a masterly manner : ABLY
67. Taking a dig at? : MINING
69. Passover, e.g. : JEWISH HOLIDAY
70. Garment cut : A-LINE
71. Leaves alone, in a way : STETS
72. Trump International, e.g. : HOTEL
73. Magician’s skill : WILE
74. Go from male to female or vice versa : TRANSITION
75. Cooperative leaders? : BOARD
76. In a blue state : SAD
77. Tokyo wrap : OBI
78. Beyond comprehension : SENSELESS
80. Setting for “The Music Man” : IOWA
84. Second and third versions : REDRAFTS
85. Marvel Comics hero : THOR
88. Causes of congestion : RUSH HOURS
90. Ticked : SORE
92. David Mamet play : OLEANNA
94. Some vintage autos : REOS
96. Second-largest moon of Uranus : OBERON
97. Designer of Spain’s Guggenheim Museum : GEHRY
98. Tallinn native : ESTH
99. Google rival : YAHOO
101. Following : AFTER
102. Fifth-century pontiff : ST LEO
106. The tiniest bit : AT ALL
107. Model wood : BALSA
109. Baseball executive Epstein : THEO
110. Olympian deity : HERA
111. Tag in some dictionary definitions : RARE
113. Dundee disavowals : NAES

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5 thoughts on “0508-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 8 May 16, Sunday”

  1. I got the rebus part of it, but the "water" part of the theme on the across answers escaped me. Thanks for the explanation. Aside from the theme, it wasn't good or bad–about averagee for me.

  2. This was a horrible puzzle, made more horrible by the inclusion of rebuses, and made most horrible by the two-way nature of the rebuses. We finally finished it with two minor errors, and without looking anything up. It didn't help us that for a long time we had three wrong answers: ONION instead of BACON, OPEN instead of BITE, and REWRITES instead of REDRAFTS. Our fault, of course. But I have to say that it is disrespectful of Sunday/the Sabbath/the Lord's day to include rebuses on its puzzle. So there.

  3. +1000, Lou. I finished in 55:26, with two errors as well, and had the same misdirections messing me up for a long time. Fortunately, before throwing in the towel, I reread the puzzle's name and figured out the HH0 gag and things fell into place.

    There's a special place in Hell for rebus-using puzzle setters… and their editor. So *there* as well.

  4. 55:35, no errors. Enjoyed this tough Sunday challenge. Many erasures, a lot of alternate answers looked good, until I figured out the theme about 1/2 way through. Also had REWRITES and REPRINTS before finally getting REDRAFTS. Lucky to get away with no errors, the N in the OSLIN/DOREN connection was a guess.

  5. Re your never encountering the term "hosers" outside of crosswords — it was popularized (and possibly created for) the "Bob and Doug McKenzie" segments on the old SCTV show. The Canadian-based and Canadian-starring sketch comedy show was told that, per government regulations, it didn't have enough "Canadian content" in their show, so they created the regular "Great White North" sements, featuring Dave Thomas and Rick Moranis as near-idiot Canadian stereotypes. Needing a regular insult word for them to use which sounded vaguely dirty but wouldn't actually shock anyone, SCTV writers either discovered or invented the "hoser" epitaph, which Bob and Doug then adopted and (over)used. / Denny Lien

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