0110-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 10 Jan 16, Sunday

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Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Patrick Merrell
THEME: Political Promises … each of today’s themed clues is an oft-heard campaign promise from a politician, with a corresponding answer that might just be what he or she really means!

23A. “Unemployment will be a thing of the past!” : … FOR ME, IF I AM ELECTED!
35A. “No new taxes!” : … JUST MORE OF THE OLD ONES!
54A. “I will maintain a strong defense!” : … WHEN OPPONENTS ATTACK ME!
77A. “Deficit spending must stop!” : … DONATE TO MY CAMPAIGN NOW!
93A. “I’ll slow this country’s spread of drugs!” : … EXPECT CUTS IN MEDICARE!
113A. “Education will be my top priority!” : … I’VE GOT A LOT TO LEARN!

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 30m 03s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

12. Silverstein who wrote “A Boy Named Sue” : SHEL
Author Shel Silverstein had a varied career and did a lot more than write books. Silverstein was a poet, composer, cartoonist and screenwriter among other things. One of his successful children’s books is “The Giving Tree”, which was first published in 1964. “The Giving Tree” tells of a young boy who has a special relationship with a tree in a forest. The message of the book seems to be that the tree provides the little boy with everything he needs.

“A Boy Named Sue” is a classic song by Shel Silverstein that was made famous by Johnny Cash. Cash actually recorded the song at a live concert he gave in 1969 at San Quentin State Prison.

25. Publicity, in Variety-speak : INK
“Variety” is a trade magazine dedicated to the entertainment industry. It was founded in 1905 in New York, but is now based in Los Angeles.

29. Coding molecules : RNAS
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

30. “___ in the Morning” : IMUS
Don Imus’s syndicated radio show “Imus in the Morning” used to broadcast from New York City. Imus has been described as a “shock jock”, a disc jockey who deliberately uses provocative language and humor that many would find offensive . I don’t like shock jocks …

31. Skedaddle : SCOOT
“Skedaddle ” is a slang term meaning “run away” that dates back to the Civil War.

42. Ornithologist James of whom Ian Fleming was a fan : BOND
James Bond was the creation of writer Ian Fleming. Fleming “stole” the James Bond name from an American ornithologist. The number 007 was “stolen” from the real-life, 16th century English spy called John Dee. Dee would sign his reports to Queen Elizabeth I with a stylized “007” to indicate that the reports were for “her eyes only”. There’s an entertaining miniseries that aired on BBC America called “Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond” that details Ian Fleming’s military career, and draws some nice parallels between Fleming’s experiences and aspirations and those of his hero James Bond. Recommended …

43. W.W. II arena: Abbr. : ETO
European Theater of Operations (ETO)

44. Dallas sch. : SMU
Southern Methodist University (SMU) is located in University Park, Texas (part of Dallas), and was founded in 1911. SMU is home to the George W. Bush Presidential Library.

46. ___ buco : OSSO
“Osso” is the Italian word for bone as in the name of the dish Osso Buco: braised veal shanks.

47. Author whose most famous character is introduced as Edward Bear : AA MILNE
Alan Alexander (A.A.) Milne was an English author, best known for his delightful “Winnie-the-Pooh” series of books. Milne had only one son, Christopher Robin Milne born in 1920. The young Milne was the inspiration for the Christopher Robin character in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Winnie-the-Pooh was named after Christopher Robin’s real teddy bear, one that the child initially called Edward Bear. Christopher renamed his cuddly companion after a Canadian black bear called Winnie that the Milnes would visit in London Zoo. The real bear had been named for the city of Winnipeg, home of Winnie’s original owner. Christopher Robin’s Winnie teddy bear is now on display at the main branch of the New York Public Library in New York.

51. Some four-year degs. : BSS
Bachelor of Science (BS)

53. ___-deucey (card game) : ACEY
Acey-deucy is a fast-played variant of backgammon. Apparently the game has been a favorite with members of the armed forces since the days of WWI.

59. Car decoration : DECAL
A decal is a decorative sticker, short for “decalcomania”. The term is derived from the French “décalquer”, the practice of tracing a pattern from paper onto glass or perhaps porcelain.

60. “Silent Spring” spray : DDT
DDT is dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (don’t forget now!). DDT was used with great success to control disease-carrying insects during WWII, and when made available for use after the war it became by far the most popular pesticide. And then Rachel Carson published her famous book “Silent Spring”, suggesting there was a link between DDT and diminishing populations of certain wildlife. It was the public outcry sparked by the book, and reports of links between DDT and cancer, that led to the ban on the use of the chemical in 1972. That ban is touted as the main reason that the bald eagle was rescued from near extinction.

67. Bank acct. info : SSN
The main purpose of a Social Security Number (SSN) is to track individuals for the purposes of taxation, although given its ubiquitous use, it is looking more and more like an “identity number” to me. The social security number system was introduced in 1936. Prior to 1986, an SSN was required only for persons with substantial income so many children under 14 had no number assigned. For some years the IRS had a concern that a lot of people were claiming children on their tax returns who did not actually exist. So, from 1986 onward, it is a requirement to get an SSN for any dependents over the age of 5. Sure enough, in 1987 seven million dependents “disappeared”.

70. One of five rhyming Greek letters : PHI
Those five rhyming Greek letters are: xi, pi, phi, chi and psi.

71. Dances accompanied by gourd drums : HULAS
Hula is the name of the Polynesian dance. The chant or song that the dance illustrates, that’s known as the mele.

85. Oblong desserts : ECLAIRS
The name for the pastry known as an “éclair” is clearly French in origin. The French word for lightning is “éclair”, but no one seems to be too sure how it came to be used for the rather delicious bakery item.

86. “Poke-___!” (kids’ book series) : A-DOT
The “Poke-a-Dot” series of children’s book feature plastic “dots” on the illustrations. The idea is that a child can “poke” each dot while counting the characters on the page. Each “poke” elicits a popping sound from the dot, to encourage the child to play along.

87. Film critic Jeffrey : LYONS
Jeffrey Lyons is a TV and film critic from New York City. Interestingly, Lyons spent three season training as a field goal kicker with the New York Giants, and spent seven summers studying bullfighting in Spain.

91. Hellion : IMP
A “hellion” is a mischievous and wild person. “Hellion” is a North American term, probably derived for the word that we use for the same thing on the other side of the Atlantic, which is “hallion”.

101. Breathing disorder : APNEA
Sleep apnea (“apnoea” in British English) can be caused by an obstruction in the airways, possibly due to obesity or enlarged tonsils.

105. A Musketeer : ARAMIS
Alexandre Dumas’ “Three Musketeers” are Athos, Porthos and Aramis, and their young protégé is D’Artagnan. A musketeer was an infantry soldier who was equipped with a musket. Funnily enough, the three “musketeers” really don’t use their muskets, and are better known for their prowess with their swords.

108. L.A. gang member : CRIP
The Crips are a street gang with origins in Los Angeles going back to 1969. It is believed that the Crips have up to 35,000 members today across the country, and there is even a presence in the US military both here and abroad. The main rivals of the Crips are the Bloods.

117. It’s found in sheets or, in softer form, blankets : ICE
I think that the reference is to the flexible “Ice Blanket” made by Rubbermaid and used for keeping things cold, but I could be wrong. I often am …

121. Some 35mm cameras : SLRS
SLR stands for “single lens reflex”. Usually cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

35mm was chosen at the beginning of the 20th century as a standard size for film used in still cameras. 35mm was selected as it already the standard film size for film used in motion pictures.

122. Rogen and Meyers : SETHS
Seth Rogen is a Canadian comedian who got a lot of credit for his supporting role in “The 40-Year-Old Virgin”. That led to him being cast as the lead in the 1970 film “Knocked Up”. I am afraid that I haven’t seen either movie …

Seth Meyers is an actor and comedian who is perhaps best-known for his appearances on “Saturday Night Live” (SNL), for which program he served as head writer. Meyers now hosts his own late night talk show on NBC.

Down
3. Common prefix with phobia : ACRO-
Our prefix “acro-” comes from the Greek “akros” meaning “at the top”. Examples are “acrophobia” (fear of heights) and “Acropolis” (“city at the top”).

4. ___-com : ROM
Romantic comedy (rom-com)

6. One who’s always getting a pass? : SKI BUM
That would be a lift pass, to get up the slopes.

7. Certain game point : AD IN
In tennis, if the score reaches “deuce” (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the “advantage”. If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that’s two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. If the one of the players is calling out the score then if he/she has the advantage then that player announces “ad in” or more formally “advantage in”. If the score announcer’s opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is “ad out” or “advantage out”. Follow all of that …?

11. “Billy ___,” 2000 film : ELLIOT
“Billy Elliot” is best known in North America as a stage musical, first produced in 2005. The musical is based on a British drama film that was released in 2000. “Billy Elliot” is all about an 11-year-old boy who lives in a coal mining town in the north of England and the hostility that the boy faces when he decides to learn ballet.

14. First name among celebrity chefs : EMERIL
Emeril Lagasse is an American chef, born in Massachusetts. Lagasse first achieved notoriety as executive chef in Commander’s Palace in New Orleans. Now famous for his television shows, his cuisine still showcases New Orleans ingredients and influences. Lagasse started using his famous “Bam!” catchphrase in order to keep his crew awake during repeated tapings of his show.

15. Acid : LSD
LSD (colloquially known as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

16. Present day figure : SAINT NICK
That “present day” would be Christmas Day, when presents are exchanged.

Saint Nicholas of Myra is the inspiration for Santa Claus. Nicholas was the Bishop of Myra (now in modern-day Turkey) during the 4th century AD, and was known for being generous to the poor. Centuries after he died, his remains were desecrated by Italian sailors and moved to Bari in Italy. One legend has it that the relics were moved again centuries later and reburied in the grounds of Jerpoint Abbey in Co. Kilkenny in Ireland, where you can visit the grave today. I choose to believe that Santa Claus’s relics are indeed buried in Ireland …

17. Ned’s bride on “The Simpsons” in 2012 : EDNA
In “the Simpsons” television show, Bart Simpson’s teacher is one Edna Krabappel. Edna marries Ned Flanders, who is the next-door neighbor to the Simpson family.

18. They’re handled in Asian restaurants : WOKS
“Wok” is a Cantonese word, the name for the frying pan now used in many Asian cuisines.

21. Tithing amounts : TENTHS
Traditionally, a “tithe” is a payment of one tenth of a person’s annual income and is usually given to a church. Tithing is a practice taught in many traditions, and according to a 2002 survey, about 3% of American adults donate 10% or more of their income to a church.

24. Burkina ___ (Niger neighbor) : FASO
Burkina Faso is an inland country in western Africa. The country used to be called the Republic of Upper Volta and was renamed in 1984 to Burkina Faso meaning “the land of upright people”.

29. What a rabble-rouser might be read : RIOT ACT
The Riot Act was a British law that was in force from 1715 to 1967. According to the Riot Act, government entities could declare any gathering of twelve or more people “unlawful”. Our expression “read the Riot Act” is derived from the requirement for the authorities to read out the Riot Act proclamation to an unlawful assembly before the Act could be enforced.

34. H.M.O. figures : MDS
A medical doctor (MD) might work for a health maintenance organization (HMO).

35. Israelites’ leader after Moses : JOSHUA
According to the Bible, after fleeing Egypt the Hebrews were led by Moses to the promised land of Canaan. Moses sent twelve spies into Canaan (one from each of the Twelve Tribes) to report on what awaited them. Ten spies returned with exaggerated stories of giants who would kill the Hebrew army if it entered Canaan. Two spies, Caleb and Joshua, came back with valid reports, that the Hebrews could inhabit the area. As a result of the false reports from the ten spies, the Hebrews did not enter Canaan but instead wandered the desert for another forty years before they finally took up residence in the promised land. At the end of the forty years, Caleb and Joshua were the only adults that survived the forty-year journey, a reward from God for their obedience. Joshua took over the leadership of the Israelites after the death of Moses.

37. San ___, Italy : REMO
The Italian city of San Remo sits on the Mediterranean, right on the border with France. In Italian the city is named Sanremo, just one word, although the spelling of “San Remo” dates back to ancient times.

48. Lhasa ___ (dog breed) : APSO
The Lhasa apso breed of dog originated in Tibet and is named after “Lhasa” (the capital city) and “apso” (a Tibetan word meaning “bearded”). The Lhasa apso has been around since 800 BC and is one of the oldest breeds in the world, one very closely related to the ancestral wolf.

49. Upstream on the Mississippi River, along Miss. : NNE
The Mississippi River runs right through the Midwest. It originates in Lake Itasca, Minnesota and flows into the Gulf of Mexico about a hundred miles below New Orleans. The name Mississippi is a corruption of a Native American name “misi-ziibi”, meaning “Great River”.

50. Abbr. for those not mentioned : ETC
Et cetera (etc.)

52. Seine-___, department bordering Paris : ST-DENIS
Seine-Saint-Denis is a department located just to the northeast of Paris. It is department number 93 of the 96 departments in metropolitan France, and so locals sometimes refer to Seine-Saint-Denis as “ninety-three” or “nine three” (“quatre-vingt treize” or “neuf trois”, in French).

56. Coll. fraternity : SAE
Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE) is the largest college fraternity in the US today. The SAE headquarters is on the campus of Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, but it was founded at the University of Alabama back in 1856. It is the only college fraternity in existence today that was founded in the South before the Civil War.

66. Object of a hunt in “Lord of the Flies” : BOAR
What a story “Lord of the Flies” is! William Golding wrote the novel as an allegory of society. The most famous screen adaptation was made in 1963, directed by Peter Brook.

67. Tool used in the evening? : SANDER
A sander is used “in the evening”, to make a surface even.

68. Lackey : STOOGE
We use the term “stooge” these days to for an unwitting victim, or perhaps the straight man in a comedy duo. The first “stooges” were simply stage assistants, back in the early 1900s.

A lackey is someone quite servile, or a male servant. The term probably comes from the Middle French “laquais”, a word used for a footman or servant.

69. Some witches like their eyes : NEWTS
The witches in Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” have some lovely lines as they boil up and evil brew and cast a spell:

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and cauldron bubble.

Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the cauldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
Adder’s fork, and blind-worm’s sting,
Lizard’s leg, and howlet’s wing,–
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.

72. Oven cleaner ingredient : LYE
What we call “lye” is usually sodium hydroxide, although historically the term was used for potassium hydroxide. Lye has many uses, including to cure several foodstuffs. Lye can make olives less bitter, for example. The chemical is also found in canned mandarin oranges, pretzels and Japanese ramen noodles. More concentrated grades of lye are used to clear drains and clean ovens. Scary …

73. Org. for Duke : ACC
Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC)

Duke University was founded in 1838 as Brown’s Schoolhouse. The school was renamed to Trinity College in 1859, and to this day the town where the college was located back then is known as Trinity, in honor of the school. The school was moved in 1892 to Durham, North Carolina in part due to generous donations from the wealthy tobacco industrialist Washington Duke. Duke’s donation required that the school open its doors to women, placing them on an equal footing with men. Trinity’s name was changed to Duke in 1924 in recognition of the generosity of the Duke family.

76. Forensic facility : DNA LAB
I’ve always been fascinated by the fact that the DNA of living things is so very similar across different species. Human DNA is almost exactly the same for every individual (to the degree of 99.9%). However, those small differences are sufficient to distinguish one individual from another, and to determine whether or not individuals are close family relations.

78. First gemstone mentioned in the Bible : ONYX
“Onyx stone” is mentioned in the Book of Genesis 2:12 “And the gold of that land is very good: there is found bdellium, and the onyx stone.”

79. Novices : NEOPHYTES
A “neophyte” is a recent convert to a particular doctrine or practice.

80. It might be patted on the back : TALC
Talc is a mineral, actually hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” is also made from cornstarch.

81. Bambino’s first word : MAMMA
In Italian, a “bambino” (male child) might call his mother “Mamma”.

82. Prop for Popeye or Santa : PIPE
Popeye first appeared in 1929 in a comic strip called “Thimble Theatre”. The strip, created by E. C. Segar, ran for ten years before Popeye made an appearance. Popeye received such a great welcome from readers that he soon “took over” the strip, and eventually even hogged the strip’s title. Before Popeye turned up Olive Oyl was the main character.

The Santa Claus with whom we are familiar today largely comes from the description in the 1823 poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas”, and from the 1863 caricature created by the political cartoonist Thomas Nast. Nast is also responsible for locating Santa’s workshop at the North Magnetic Pole, a fact that he revealed to the world in a series of drawings in 1879.

88. Fi preceder : SCI-
Science fiction (sci-fi)

90. John of Fox’s “Grandfathered” : STAMOS
Actor John Stamos is best known as the star of the sitcom “Full House”, although he also played Dr. Tony Gates on the medical drama “ER”.

98. Blue-collar and pink-slip : IDIOMS
The term “pink-slip” can be used as a verb meaning “to terminate an employee”. No one really seems to know for sure where the term originated, but there are lots of stories.

108. Some med. facilities : CTRS
Center (ctr.)

110. Sparrow, to a sparrow hawk : PREY
The American kestrel is sometimes referred to as the sparrowhawk, and is the most common falcon found on the continent. It is sometimes trained for use in falconry, and is considered a beginner’s bird.

113. Monogram on Christian crosses : IHS
“IHS” is an abbreviation for the name “Jesus Christ” that is sometimes used as a symbol in the Christian tradition, particularly in western Christianity. “IHS” is a Latinized form of the first three letters of “Jesus” written in Greek, i.e. iota-eta-sigma.

114. Amphibious W.W. II vessel : LST
LST stands for Landing Ship, Tank. LSTs were the large vessels used mainly in WWII that had doors at either ends through which tanks and other vehicles could roll off and onto beaches. The design concept persists to this day in the huge fleet of commercial roll-on/roll-off car ferries, all inspired by the LST.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Advisory panels : BOARDS
7. Take down a notch : ABASE
12. Silverstein who wrote “A Boy Named Sue” : SHEL
16. Put on a nonpolitical button, say : SEW
19. Crack open, in a way : UNCORK
20. Some parade performers : DRILL TEAMS
22. Clamor : ADO
23. “Unemployment will be a thing of the past!” : … FOR ME, IF I AM ELECTED!
25. Publicity, in Variety-speak : INK
26. Back : FRO
27. Impose ___ on : A BAN
28. High season in Hawaii : WINTER
29. Coding molecules : RNAS
30. “___ in the Morning” : IMUS
31. Skedaddle : SCOOT
33. “You’re looking at the whole department” : I’M IT
35. “No new taxes!” : … JUST MORE OF THE OLD ONES!
42. Ornithologist James of whom Ian Fleming was a fan : BOND
43. W.W. II arena: Abbr. : ETO
44. Dallas sch. : SMU
45. Circus prop : STILT
46. ___ buco : OSSO
47. Author whose most famous character is introduced as Edward Bear : AA MILNE
51. Some four-year degs. : BSS
53. ___-deucey (card game) : ACEY
54. “I will maintain a strong defense!” : … WHEN OPPONENTS ATTACK ME!
58. Basic car maintenance : TUNE-UPS
59. Car decoration : DECAL
60. “Silent Spring” spray : DDT
61. Muffin variety : OAT
62. Gives off light, as a 65-Across : GLOWS
65. See 62-Across : EMBER
67. Bank acct. info : SSN
70. One of five rhyming Greek letters : PHI
71. Dances accompanied by gourd drums : HULAS
75. Sitting together at the movies, say : ON A DATE
77. “Deficit spending must stop!” : … DONATE TO MY CAMPAIGN NOW!
83. Another time : ANEW
84. When a vampire sleeps : DAY
85. Oblong desserts : ECLAIRS
86. “Poke-___!” (kids’ book series) : A-DOT
87. Film critic Jeffrey : LYONS
89. 120-Across, in Spain : LOS
91. Hellion : IMP
92. Bridge table foursome : LEGS
93. “I’ll slow this country’s spread of drugs!” : … EXPECT CUTS IN MEDICARE!
100. Next in line : HEIR
101. Breathing disorder : APNEA
102. Not much at all : A DAB
103. Pleasures : JOYS
105. A Musketeer : ARAMIS
108. L.A. gang member : CRIP
109. Place with expensive mud : SPA
112. Tiny tunneler : ANT
113. “Education will be my top priority!” : … I’VE GOT A LOT TO LEARN!
117. It’s found in sheets or, in softer form, blankets : ICE
118. Thermometer, e.g. : HEAT SENSOR
119. Consolidated : MERGED
120. 89-Across, in France : LES
121. Some 35mm cameras : SLRS
122. Rogen and Meyers : SETHS
123. They may be measured by the pound : STRAYS

Down
1. Shine up : BUFF
2. Words before “before” : ON OR
3. Common prefix with phobia : ACRO-
4. ___-com : ROM
5. Thought (up) : DREAMT
6. One who’s always getting a pass? : SKI BUM
7. Certain game point : AD IN
8. One piece of a two-piece : BRA
9. Archery asset : AIM
10. Whole lotta : SLEW OF
11. “Billy ___,” 2000 film : ELLIOT
12. Abbr. on a stadium ticket : SECT
13. Give zero stars, say : HATE
14. First name among celebrity chefs : EMERIL
15. Acid : LSD
16. Present day figure : SAINT NICK
17. Ned’s bride on “The Simpsons” in 2012 : EDNA
18. They’re handled in Asian restaurants : WOKS
21. Tithing amounts : TENTHS
24. Burkina ___ (Niger neighbor) : FASO
29. What a rabble-rouser might be read : RIOT ACT
30. Needs no further cooking : IS DONE
31. Take root : SET IN
32. Air-conditioned : COOLED
34. H.M.O. figures : MDS
35. Israelites’ leader after Moses : JOSHUA
36. Still in the outbox : UNSENT
37. San ___, Italy : REMO
38. Prepare for the afterlife : EMBALM
39. Boot : OUST
40. Low-grade?: Abbr. : ELEM
41. Eye inflammation : STYE
42. Greet respectfully : BOW TO
47. Not just theoretical : APPLIED
48. Lhasa ___ (dog breed) : APSO
49. Upstream on the Mississippi River, along Miss. : NNE
50. Abbr. for those not mentioned : ETC
52. Seine-___, department bordering Paris : ST-DENIS
55. Need (to) : OUGHT
56. Coll. fraternity : SAE
57. “What ___!” (“Bummer!”) : A DRAG
63. Question of surprise to a volunteer : WHO, YOU?
64. Total : SUM
66. Object of a hunt in “Lord of the Flies” : BOAR
67. Tool used in the evening? : SANDER
68. Lackey : STOOGE
69. Some witches like their eyes : NEWTS
70. Great Plains Indians : PAWNEES
72. Oven cleaner ingredient : LYE
73. Org. for Duke : ACC
74. Like the ocean : SALINE
76. Forensic facility : DNA LAB
77. Hill’s partner : DALE
78. First gemstone mentioned in the Bible : ONYX
79. Novices : NEOPHYTES
80. It might be patted on the back : TALC
81. Bambino’s first word : MAMMA
82. Prop for Popeye or Santa : PIPE
88. Fi preceder : SCI-
90. John of Fox’s “Grandfathered” : STAMOS
94. Hit the road : TRAVEL
95. Treats vengefully : SPITES
96. Wild : INSANE
97. What eyes and pedestrians may do : DART
98. Blue-collar and pink-slip : IDIOMS
99. Pill type : CAPLET
103. One corner of a Monopoly board : JAIL
104. Start of a reminiscence : ONCE …
106. Raise : REAR
107. Operatives: Abbr. : AGTS
108. Some med. facilities : CTRS
109. Story with many chapters : SAGA
110. Sparrow, to a sparrow hawk : PREY
111. Common connectors : ANDS
113. Monogram on Christian crosses : IHS
114. Amphibious W.W. II vessel : LST
115. “Wonderful!” : OOH!
116. Go wrong : ERR

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6 thoughts on “0110-16 New York Times Crossword Answers 10 Jan 16, Sunday”

  1. 37:22, no errors. Loved the theme – very timely at this silly season of American politics (rather sillier than usual, I would say). Agree with Willie D's comment about the clues: for me, this puzzle involved a bit more than the usual quota of head scratchers. Didn't understand "Org. for Duke" = ACC until I came here. And I had never encountered the word "hallion" in place of "hellion" – interesting.

  2. I believe ice sheet refers to a continental-type glacier, and ice blanket to a blanket of ice (or snow) following an ice (or snow) storm.

  3. Theme was good, and apropos, but I agree the clue editing to be a bit disingenuous.

    However, a first for me: the first time I've cobbled together a full week's (7 consecutive) solves!!! Not totally free from mistakes mind you (I had two days with 4 and 6 errors respectively), but I did complete all seven grids without having been forced (or tricked into) to throw in the towel. Next goal is to complete a week with no errors, and maybe a day I beat Bill's time for good measure! 🙂

  4. @Ralph Brown
    Blanket of ice after an ice storm. You are probably right. Thank you for that. I guess that's what happens to my brain after living so long in sunny California!

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