0826-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Aug 15, Wednesday

QuickLinks:
Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today’s New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Ian Livengood
THEME: Hump Day … the circled letters in the grid from sets of CAMEL HUMPS, which is quite apt as today (Wednesday) is HUMP DAY:

53A. Middle of the week … or an appropriate title for this puzzle : HUMP DAY

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 02s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. ___ cat : SIAMESE
The exact origins of the Siamese cat aren’t very clear, but it is believed to be from Southeast Asia. The Siamese takes its name from the sacred temple cats of Thailand (once called Siam).

14. Side parts? : CAMEOS
Even in my day, a cameo role was more than just a short appearance in a movie (or other artistic piece). For the appearance to be a cameo, the actor had to playing himself or herself, and was instantly recognizable. With this meaning it’s easy to see the etymology of the term, as a cameo brooch is one with the recognizable carving of the silhouette of a person. Nowadays, a cameo is any minor role played by a celebrity or famous actor, regardless of the character played.

16. Dead Sea documents : SCROLLS
The Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered over a period of years, between 1947 and 1956, in eleven caves on the shores of the Dead Sea. The scrolls are believed to have been written by an ancient Jewish sect called the Essenes, although this has been called into question recently. Many of the texts are copies of writings from the Hebrew Bible.

22. Largest U.S. lake by volume after the five Great Lakes : TAHOE
Lake Tahoe is up in the Sierra Nevada mountains, right on the border between California and Nevada. Lake Tahoe is the largest alpine lake in the country, and the largest lake in general, behind the five Great Lakes. It’s also the second deepest lake, with only the beautiful Crater Lake in Oregon being deeper. Given its location, there are tall casinos that sit right on the shore on the Nevada side of the state line where gambling is legal.

29. Zilch : ZIPPO
The use of the words “zip” and “zippo” to mean “nothing” dates back to the early 1900s when it was student slang for being graded zero on a test.

We use the term “zilch” to mean “nothing”. Our current usage evolved in the sixties, before which the term was used to describe “meaningless speech”. There was a comic character called Mr. Zilch in the 1930s in “Ballyhoo” magazine. Mr. Zilch’s name probably came from the American college slang “Joe Zilch” that was used in the early 1900s for “an insignificant person”.

30. Turkey hen’s mate : TOM
A male turkey is called a “tom”, taking its name from a “tomcat”. The inference is that like a tomcat, the male turkey is relatively wild and undomesticated, sexually promiscuous and frequently getting into fights.

31. Writer Dinesen : ISAK
Isak Dinesen was the pen name of the Danish author Baroness Karen Blixen. Blixen’s most famous title by far is “Out of Africa”, her account of the time she spent living in Kenya.

32. Mineral in sheets : MICA
Mica is a mineral, a sheet silicate. Thin sheets of mica are transparent and are used in place of glass in certain applications. This form of mica is called isinglass, and as it has a better thermal performance than glass it is a great choice for “peepholes’ in boilers and lanterns. Mica is also used in the electronics industry, making use of its unique electrical and thermal insulating properties.

37. Andy of cartoons : CAPP
“Andy Capp” is a comic strip from Britain that is syndicated internationally. The strip was created by Reg Smythe in 1957 and is still going strong, despite the fact that Smythe passed away in 1998. Andy Capp and his wife Florrie (also “Flo”) are working class characters who live in the northeast of England. Andy is unemployed and Flo works as a charwoman. “Andy Capp” was my favorite comic strip growing up …

38. Tibetan spiritual guru : LAMA
“Lama” is a Tibetan word, meaning “chief” or “high priest”.

“Guru” is a Hindi word meaning “teacher” or “priest”.

39. Tiny energy unit : ERG
An erg is a unit of energy or mechanical work. “Erg” comes from the Greek word “ergon” meaning “work”.

41. Black hues, in Shakespeare : EBONS
Although William Shakespeare is known as a playwright and poet, he perhaps began his career as an actor in London. Shakespeare definitely acted in some of his own plays early in his career, as well as some plays by other playwrights of the period, and in particular those of Ben Johnson.

43. “Ditto” : SAME
“Ditto” was originally used in Italian (from Tuscan dialect) to avoid repetition of the names of months in a series of dates. So “ditto” is just another wonderful import from that lovely land …

46. One of 100 in a “Winnie-the-Pooh” wood : ACRE
Hundred Acre Wood is where Winnie the Pooh lives with his friends. According to a map illustrating the books by A. A. Milne, Hundred Acre Wood is part of a larger forest, with Owl’s house sitting right at the center.

48. X : CHI
The Greek letter “chi” is the one that looks like our “X”.

49. Planter’s bagful : LOAM SOIL
Loam is soil made up of sand, silt and clay in the ratio of about 40-40-20. Relative to other soil types, loam is is usually rich in nutrients and moisture, drains well and is easy to till. Loam can also be used in constructing houses as it is quite strong when mixed with straw and dried.

51. Sculptor who pioneered Dadaism : HANS ARP
Hans Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn’t the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both “Hans” and “Jean” translate into English as “John”. In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. Arp was sent home …

58. Playwright John who wrote “Look Back in Anger” : OSBORNE
“Look Back in Anger” is a play by John Osborne first performed in 1956, adapted for the big screen in 1959. The British film version starred the Richard Burton and Claire Bloom, who gave very gritty performances.

60. Canadian airline with a directional name : WESTJET
WestJet is the second largest airline in Canada, after the country’s flag carrier Air Canada.

Down
2. Part of X-X-X : TIC
When I was growing up in Ireland we played “noughts and crosses” … our name for the game tic-tac-toe.

4. Israeli novelist of “A Perfect Peace” : AMOS OZ
Amos Oz is an Israeli writer. Oz has written 18 books in Hebrew and his works have been translated into 30 languages, including Arabic.

5. Ball V.I.P. : BELLE
A “belle” is the girlfriend of a “beau”, with both being terms we’ve imported from French.

6. World capital half of which consists of forest : OSLO
Oslo is the capital of Norway. The city of Oslo burns trash to fuel half of its buildings, including all of its schools. The problem faced by the city is that it doesn’t generate enough trash. So, Oslo imports trash from Sweden, England and Ireland, and is now looking to import some American trash too. Oslo is also a large city with a relatively small population. As a result, about two-thirds of the city’s land area comprises protected forest, hills and lakes.

7. Campaign line of 2008 : YES WE CAN
The 2008 campaign that resulted in the election of President Barack Obama used the slogan “Change we can believe in”, along with the associated chant “Yes We Can”. The words “Yes We Can” were perhaps borrowed from the United Farm Workers, which organization uses the motto “Sí, se puede”. “Sí, se puede” translates as “Yes, it is possible” and is a phrase very much associated with labor leader Cesar Chavez.

10. U.N. member between Norway and Pakistan alphabetically : OMAN
Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the OAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Oman is the largest sultanate in the world.

12. Modern energy sources : SOLAR PANELS
Solar panels make use of what’s known as the photovoltaic effect. We all learned about the photoelectric effect in school, in which electrons were ejected from the surface of some materials when it was exposed to light or other forms of radiation. The photovoltaic effect is related but different. Instead of being electrons ejected from the surface, in the photovoltaic effect electrons move around in the material creating a difference in voltage.

22. Bicep image, briefly : TAT
The word “tattoo” (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word “tatau” into our “tattoo”.

The biceps muscle is made up of two bundles of muscle, both of which terminate at the same point near the elbow. The heads of the bundles terminate at different points on the scapula or shoulder blade. “Biceps” is Latin for “two-headed”.

28. Pronto : ASAP
As soon as possible (ASAP)

The Spanish, Italian (and now English) word “pronto” is derived from the Latin “promptus” meaning “ready, quick”.

29. Onetime Coors alcopop : ZIMA
Zima is a clear alcoholic beverage with about the same strength as beer. Zima is sold in beer bottles but is marketed as “not” a beer. It has a lemon-lime flavor and is referred to as an “alcopop”, a portmanteau word from “alcohol” and “pop”. Zima was made by Coors, but they stopped US production in 2008. However, it is still quite popular in Japan.

32. Passing web fancy : MEME
A “meme” (short for “mineme”) is a cultural practice or idea that is passed on verbally or by repetition from one person to another. The term lends itself very well to the online world where links, emails, files etc. are so easily propagated.

35. “Password” or “Pyramid” : GAME SHOW
“Password” was a game show that aired in the sixties, with Allen Ludden as host. “Password” was revived twice in the eighties, and once more from 2008 to 2009.

Donny Osmond hosted the game show “Pyramid” from 2002-2004. This was the most recent revival of the show which first aired in 1973. The host most commonly associated with “Pyramid” is Dick Clark, who anchored the show from 1973 to 1988.

36. Image in the Timberland logo : TREE
The Timberland Company was founded in 1957 by Nathan Swartz, a shoemaker from Boston. The business’s first successful product was the waterproof boot called the Timberland. It was so successful that the company adopted Timberland for its name.

42. Religion founded in 19th-century Persia : BAHA’I
The Baha’i faith is relatively new in the grand scheme of things, and was founded in Persia in the 1800s. One of the tenets of the religion is that messengers have come from God over time, including Abraham, the Buddha, Jesus, Muhammad, and most recently Bahá’u’lláh who founded the Baha’i Faith.

44. Khmer Rouge leader : POL POT
Pol Pot led the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia from 1963 until 1997. After the Khmer Rouge captured Phnom Penh in 1975, they set up a state within Cambodia named Democratic Kampuchea, and Pol Pot was installed as prime minister. Pol Pot’s government then forced city dwellers to work on collective farms, with disastrous results. The policies led to the death of 1-3 million people, about a third of Cambodia’s population.

46. Line connected to a pump? : AORTA
The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

47. Post-storm detritus : LIMBS
“Detritus” is the loose material that results from the process of erosion. The usage of the term has evolved to man any accumulated material or debris. “Detritus” is Latin for “a wearing away”.

50. River through York : OUSE
York is the biggest city on the River Ouse in Yorkshire. The name “Ouse” comes from the Celtic word “usa” meaning water.

52. ___-Cat : SNO
The brand name Sno-Cat is owned by the Tucker company. All “snowcats” are tracked vehicles built to work in snow, famously used in expeditions to the polar regions. The modern Sno-Cat from Tucker differs from its competitors in that it has four, independently-mounted tracks.

54. Hoops legend with a statue in Philadelphia : DR J
Julius Erving is a retired professional basketball player who was known as “Dr. J”, a nickname he picked up in high school. Dr. J was a trailblazer in many ways, being the first player associated with slam dunking and other moves above the rim.

55. Hydrocarbon suffix : -ANE
The “smaller” alkanes are gases and are quite combustible. Methane (CH4) is the main component of natural gas with ethane (C2H6) being the second largest component. Propane (C3H8) is also found in natural gas and is heavy enough to be readily turned into a liquid by compression, for ease of transportation and storage. Butane (C4H10) is also easily liquefied under pressure and can be used as the fuel in cigarette lighters or as the propellant in aerosol sprays. The heavier alkanes are liquids and solids at room temperature.

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. “Nice job, kid!” : ATTA BOY!
8. Subjects in an intro chemistry class : ATOMS
13. ___ cat : SIAMESE
14. Side parts? : CAMEOS
16. Dead Sea documents : SCROLLS
17. Moved on all fours : CRAWLED
19. Gradually increasing rage : SLOW BURN
21. Leave amazed : AWE
22. Largest U.S. lake by volume after the five Great Lakes : TAHOE
25. “Piece of cake!” : EASY!
26. Beat maker : DRUM
27. Entirely : A TO Z
28. Cause of date night stress : ACNE
29. Zilch : ZIPPO
30. Turkey hen’s mate : TOM
31. Writer Dinesen : ISAK
32. Mineral in sheets : MICA
33. What recently hired bosses are part of : NEW MANAGEMENT
37. Andy of cartoons : CAPP
38. Tibetan spiritual guru : LAMA
39. Tiny energy unit : ERG
41. Black hues, in Shakespeare : EBONS
43. “Ditto” : SAME
44. Cop a ___ : PLEA
45. Subdue : TAME
46. One of 100 in a “Winnie-the-Pooh” wood : ACRE
47. Mislays : LOSES
48. X : CHI
49. Planter’s bagful : LOAM SOIL
51. Sculptor who pioneered Dadaism : HANS ARP
53. Middle of the week … or an appropriate title for this puzzle : HUMP DAY
57. Light : IGNITE
58. Playwright John who wrote “Look Back in Anger” : OSBORNE
59. Pops : SODAS
60. Canadian airline with a directional name : WESTJET

Down
1. Big jerk : ASS
2. Part of X-X-X : TIC
3. Roof coating : TAR
4. Israeli novelist of “A Perfect Peace” : AMOS OZ
5. Ball V.I.P. : BELLE
6. World capital half of which consists of forest : OSLO
7. Campaign line of 2008 : YES WE CAN
8. Charge : ACCUSE
9. Dilly-dally : TARRY
10. U.N. member between Norway and Pakistan alphabetically : OMAN
11. Sound from a 13-Across : MEW
12. Modern energy sources : SOLAR PANELS
15. Finalize : SEW UP
18. Software giveaway : DEMO
20. Sound during a heist : BANK ALARM
22. Bicep image, briefly : TAT
23. Lots : A TON
24. When some kings and queens are crowned : HOMECOMINGS
26. They’re blown on for good luck : DICE
28. Pronto : ASAP
29. Onetime Coors alcopop : ZIMA
31. Chronic pains? : IMPS
32. Passing web fancy : MEME
34. Die down : WANE
35. “Password” or “Pyramid” : GAME SHOW
36. Image in the Timberland logo : TREE
40. ___ pedal : GAS
41. Set in stone, say : ETCH
42. Religion founded in 19th-century Persia : BAHA’I
43. Outdoor painting scenes : SCAPES
44. Khmer Rouge leader : POL POT
46. Line connected to a pump? : AORTA
47. Post-storm detritus : LIMBS
49. Placed : LAID
50. River through York : OUSE
52. ___-Cat : SNO
54. Hoops legend with a statue in Philadelphia : DR J
55. Hydrocarbon suffix : -ANE
56. “And still …” : YET …

Return to top of page

The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections
Amazon.com Widgets

3 thoughts on “0826-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 26 Aug 15, Wednesday”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.