0719-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 19 Jul 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Tom McCoy
THEME: The Short Form … each of our themed answers is a common phrase, but with one word taking THE SHORT FORM, a standard abbreviation. This gives us a new meaning for the phrase, as defined in the clue:

23A. “Belt it out, Adam!”? : FIRST PERSON SING (from “first person singular”)
38A. “I forbid you from providing special access”? : DONT GIVE AN IN (from “don’t give an inch”)
42A. Your father’s blockheadedness? : POP DENSITY (from “population density”)
66A. Coin flip with a penny? : TURN OF THE CENT (from “turn of the century”)
92A. Emotional problem that is surprisingly fitting? : APT COMPLEX (from “apartment complex”)
94A. Prepared some amazing Mediterranean fruit? : CUT QUITE A FIG (from “cut quite a figure”)
112A. Do a bad job as a watchman? : LOOK OUT FOR NO ONE (from “look out for number one”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 37s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Polite Indian form of address : SAHIB
“Sahib” is most recognized as a term of address in India, where it is used in much the same way as we use “mister” in English. The term was also used to address male Europeans in the days of the British Raj. The correct female form of address is “sahiba”, but in the colonial days the address used was “memsahib”, a melding of “ma’am” and “sahib”

10. Ending for many a scandal : -GATE
The Watergate scandal is so named because it involved a break-in at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters in the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. The Watergate complex is made up of five units, three of which are apartment buildings, one an office building, and one a hotel-office building (which housed the DNC headquarters). Watergate led to the “-gate” suffix being used for many subsequent scandals.

21. Border river between China and Russia : AMUR
The Amur is a river that serves as the border between Russia and China in Manchuria. On one side of the border is Outer Manchuria (in Russia) and on the other is Inner Manchuria (in China).

22. Hackneyed : STALE
Hackney is a location in London that probably gave it’s name to a “hackney”, an ordinary type of horse carriage around 1300. By 1700 a “hackney” was a person hired to do routine work, and “hackneyed” meant “kept for hire”. Around the same time, “hackneyed” came to describe something so overused that it is no longer interesting. Sort of like crossword answers that turn up a little too often …

29. Fleur-de-___ : LIS
“Lys” (also “lis”) is the French word for “lily”, as in “fleur-de-lys”, the heraldic symbol often associated with the French monarchy.

33. Delhi bread : NAAN
Naan (also “nan”) bread is very popular in Indian restaurants, as well as in other West, Central and South Asian cuisines. Indian Naan is traditionally baked in a clay oven known as a tandoor.

New Delhi is the capital city of India. New Delhi resides within the National Capital Territory of Delhi (otherwise known as the metropolis of Delhi). New Delhi and Delhi, therefore, are two different things.

35. 1970s-’80s Dodge : OMNI
The Dodge Omni is basically the same car as the Plymouth Horizon, and was produced by Chrysler from 1978-90. The Omni is a front-wheel drive hatchback, the first in a long line of front-wheel drive cars that were very successful for Chrysler. The Omni was actually developed in France, by Chrysler’s Simca division. When production was stopped in the US in 1990, the tooling was sold to an Indian company that continued production for the Asian market for several years.

45. It comes between ads : DEUCE
In tennis, if the score reaches “deuce” (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the “advantage”. If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that’s two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. If the one of the players is calling out the score then if he/she has the advantage then that player announces “ad in” or more formally “advantage in”. If the score announcer’s opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is “ad out” or “advantage out”. Follow all of that …?

46. Mao ___-tung : TSE
Mao Zedong (also “Mao Tse-tung”) was born on December 16, 1893 in the Hunan Province of China. As Mao was the son of a peasant farmer, his prospects for education were limited. Indeed he left school at age 13 to work on the family farm but did eventually get to secondary school in Changsha, the provincial capital. In the years following, Mao continued his education in Beijing and actually turned down an opportunity to study in France.

47. Liquids that burn easily : ETHERS
Ethers are a whole class of organic compounds, but in the vernacular “ether” is specifically diethyl ether. Diethyl ether was once very popular as a general anesthetic.

60. Thanksgiving mo. in Canada : OCT
The Canadian Thanksgiving holiday predates the related celebration in the US. The first Canadian Thanksgiving was held in 1578 by an explorer from England named Martin Frobisher. Frobisher was giving thanks for his safe arrival in the New World, and made the observance in the month of October as this was a tradition in England. All this happened 43 years before the pilgrims landed in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

61. Female counterpart of John Doe : JANE ROE
I think that “Jane Roe” is actually the female counterpart of “Richard Roe” …

Although the English court system does not use the term today, John Doe first appeared as the “name of a person unknown” in England in 1659, along with another unknown, Richard Roe. The female equivalent of John Doe is Jane Doe, with the equivalent to Richard Roe being Jane Roe (as in Roe v. Wade, for example).

63. One of the Mannings : ELI
Eli Manning plays as quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning is quarterback for the Denver Broncos. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, who was also a successful NFL quarterback.

66. Coin flip with a penny? : TURN OF THE CENT (from “turn of the century”)
The “turn of the century” is the transition from one century into the next.

72. Old Mideast inits. : UAR
The United Arab Republic (UAR) was a union between Egypt and Syria made in 1958 and dissolved in 1961 when Syria pulled out of the arrangement.

78. Ohio senator who was one of J.F.K.’s eight “Profiles in Courage” : TAFT
William Howard Taft may have been the 27th President of the United States, but his lifelong ambition was to be Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. President Taft was able to realize that dream in 1921, eight years after losing his bid for re-election as president. As Chief Justice, this former US President swore in two new presidents: Calvin Coolidge (in 1925) and Herbert Hoover (in 1929). William Howard Taft is also remembered as the most obese president. In the last year of his presidency, he weighed about 340 pounds (he was 5 feet 11 inches tall). Twelve months after leaving the White House, President Taft had dropped 80 pounds and substantially lowered his blood pressure.

“Profiles in Courage” is 1957 book by John F. Kennedy, who was at that time a US Senator. Kennedy’s collaborator was his speechwriter Ted Sorensen, and most of the research and writing was done in 1954 and 1955 while the Kennedy was bedridden following back surgery. “Profiles in Courage” is a collection of the biographies of eight US Senators, eight Senators who despite criticism and loss of popularity acted in the best interests of the country and its citizens. Kennedy won a Pulitzer in 1957 for the book, making him the only US President to have been so honored.

82. Beige and ecru : NEUTRALS
Our word “beige” comes from the Old French “bege”, a term that applied to the natural color of wool and cotton that was not dyed.

The shade called ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word “ecru” comes from French and means “raw, unbleached”. “Ecru” has the same roots as our word “crude”.

86. Often-contracted phrase : LET US
Let’s …

87. Title parrot in a 1998 film : PAULIE
“Paulie” is a film released in 1998 about the adventures of a talking parrot named Paulie. One of the claims to fame of the movie is that Buddy Hackett makes an appearance, in his last film role.

89. Football stat: Abbr. : INT
Interception (Int.)

90. 1,000 kilograms : TONNE
The “tonne” is also called the “metric ton”, and is equivalent to 1,000 kg. The tonne isn’t an official unit of mass in the metric system, but it is used a lot.

98. Deaf person who uses speech and lip-reading : ORALIST
In the education of deaf students, there are two alternative approaches to communication. Oralism emphasises lip-reading and speech production, and manualism emphasises the use of sign language.

99. Hestia, to Artemis : AUNT
Hestia was the virgin goddess of the hearth and home to ancient Greeks. She was a daughter of Cronus and Rhea, and a sibling of Zeus.

Artemis was an ancient Greek goddess, the equivalent of the Roman Diana. She was a daughter of Zeus and Leto, and the twin sister of Apollo.

101. Middles, in Middlesbrough : CENTRES
Middlesbrough is a large town in the county of North Yorkshire in the north of England. As recently as 1801, Middlesbrough was nothing but a farm. The farmstead was bought by a wealthy coalminer as a site that could be used for housing laborers for a new coal wharf that he built nearby.

105. Old White House nickname : IKE
President Eisenhower was born in Denison, Texas and given the name David Dwight Eisenhower, but by the time he made it to the White House he was going by the name Dwight D. Eisenhower. Growing up, his family called him Dwight, and when “Ike” enrolled in West Point he himself reversed the order of his given names.

106. Body that’s a lot thinner than it used to be : ARAL SEA
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

108. With 7-Down, like some rabbits : LOP
(7D. See 108-Across : EARED)
A creature that is “lop-eared” has bent or drooping ears.

111. Cheri of “S.N.L.” : OTERI
Cheri Oteri was the SNL cast member who regularly appeared with Will Farrell in the skit featuring a pair of Spartan cheerleaders.

116. Coney Island’s ___ Park : LUNA
Luna Park was the second major amusement park to be opened on Coney Island (the first being “Sea Lion Park”), accepting its first guests in 1903. “Luna Park” gained such a reputation that it lent its name to dozens of amusements parks around the globe, many that still operate today. Although there was a ride called “A Trip to the Moon” in the park, with a spacecraft called “Luna”, the park’s name actually came from the sister of one of the park’s designers, Luna Dundy of Des Moines, Iowa.

117. Astrophysicist ___ deGrasse Tyson : NEIL
Neil deGrasse Tyson is an astrophysicist who is noted for his ability to communicate science to the masses. Tyson is well known for his appearances on the great PBS show “Nova”.

118. Source of “Vissi d’arte” : TOSCA
Unlike so many operas, “Tosca” was a big hit right from day one, when it was first performed in 1900 at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome. “Tosca” is currently the eighth-most performed opera in America, although I’ve only seen it once myself …

120. Latin for “let it stand” : STET
“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

121. Shore bird : ERNE
The ern (also erne) is also called the white-tailed eagle or sea-eagle.

122. Travelocity option : HOTEL
Travelocity is my favorite online travel agency, although it’s not the only one I use (one must shop around!). The feature I most like on Travelocity is “Top Secret Hotels”, where one can find hotel rooms at below the regular published online rates, but … the booking is made without knowing the hotel’s name. You get the general location, star-rating, facilities etc. and then “take a chance”. I booked a room in a 4-star hotel in San Jose recently for $120 for the night, when the best online quote I could find for the same hotel was $359. We book Top Secret Hotels (usually way cheaper than that one in San Jose!) on our road trips for I’d say every second night …

…and I am in a 3.5-star Top Secret Hotel right now in El Paso, Texas for which I am paying $45 for the night!

Down
2. “Vissi d’arte,” e.g. : ARIA
“Vissi d’arte” is an aria from Puccini’s “Tosca” that is sung by the title character Floria Tosca. The title translates from Italian as “I lived for art”.

4. 100 things, on average : IQS
Although it is correct these days to say that the abbreviation IQ stands for “intelligence quotient”, the term was actually coined by German psychologist William Stern, so it actually is an abbreviation for the German “Intelligenz-Quotient”.

6. Rodin sculpture of a couple : THE KISS
“The Kiss” is a beautiful sculpture created in 1889 by Auguste Rodin. I’ve had the privilege of standing beside the original, life-size marble work on a few occasions as it is housed in the Rodin Museum, my favorite of all museums in Paris. The Musée Rodin is very special in that the building and garden that hold all of the works were Rodin’s actual home and studio. Well worth a visit if you make it to Paris …

9. It’s driven through something driven : PLOW
A snow plow is drive through the driven snow.

10. Really fun time : GAS
I reckon use of “a gas” to mean something fun must come from Ireland (I couldn’t confirm it though). We use the word “gas” as an adjective meaning “hilarious”. So, we’d say “that’s gas” when describing something very funny.

13. Work units : ERGS
An erg is a unit of energy or mechanical work. “Erg” comes from the Greek word “ergon” meaning “work”. A dyne is a unit of force. The name “dyne” comes from the Greek “dynamis” meaning “power, force”. Ergs and dynes are related to each other in that one erg is the amount of energy needed to move a force of one dyne over a distance of one centimeter.

15. Breastbones : STERNA
“Sternum” (plural “sterna”) is the Latin name for the breastbone.

24. Alternatives to commas, informally : PARENS
Parentheses (parens.)

36. Tarzan’s adopters : APES
“Tarzan” is the title character in the series of books created by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The line “Me Tarzan, you Jane” never appeared in the books, and indeed doesn’t even figure in the movies. Apparently Johnny Weissmuller (who played Tarzan in the thirties and forties) saw Maureen O’Sullivan (“Jane”, to Weissmuller’s “Tarzan”) struggling with a suitcase in the parking lot during filming. He grabbed the bag from her, jokingly saying “Me Tarzan, you Jane”, and people have been quoting those words ever since.

38. Cannon who married Cary Grant : DYAN
The actress Dyan Cannon is perhaps best known for playing Alice in the 1969 film “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice”, for which she received a Best Actress Oscar nomination. Cannon is also famous for having been on Cary Grant’s long list of wives, from 1965 to 1968 (and he was 33 years her senior).

39. Here, in Haiti : ICI
“Ici” is French for “here”.

The Republic of Haiti occupies the smaller, western portion of the island of Hispaniola in the Caribbean. The rest of the island is taken up by the Dominican Republic. Haiti is one of only two nations in the Americas to have French as an official language, the other being Canada.

51. One of 100 in “The Divine Comedy” : CANTO
A canto is a section of a long poem, and is a term first used by the Italian poet Dante. “Canto” is the Italian for “song”.

Dante Alighieri’s “Divine Comedy” is an epic poem dating back to the 14th century. The first part of that epic is “Inferno”, which is the Italian word for “Hell”. In the poem, Dante is led on a journey by the poet Virgil, starting at the gates of Hell on which are written the famous words “Abandon all hope, ye who enter here”.

52. Domain of Charles V: Abbr. : HRE
The Holy Roman Empire (HRE) existed from 962 to 1806 AD and was a territory of varying size over the centuries that centered on the Kingdom of Germany. The HRE was a successor to the western half of the Ancient Roman Empire. The empire dissolved in 1806 when Holy Roman Emperor Francis II abdicated after a military defeat by the French under Napoleon at Austerlitz.

Charles V ruled the Holy Roman Empire (HRE) from 1519 until 1556. Charles also ruled the Spanish Empire as Charles I. Charles’ parents had colorful names: Philip the Handsome and Joanna the Mad …

54. Herculean : HARD
“The Twelve Labors of Hercules” is actually a Greek myth, although Hercules is the Roman name for the hero that the Greeks called Heracles. The first of these labors was to slay the Nemean Lion, a monster that lived in a cave near Nemea. Hercules had a tough job as the lion’s golden fur was impenetrable to normal weapons. One version of the story is that Hercules killed the lion by shooting an arrow into its mouth. Another version says that Hercules stunned the monster with a club and then strangled him with his bare hands.

61. Wrangler, for one : JEEP
Chrysler’s Jeep Wrangler is a direct descendent of the military “Jeep” vehicle that was heavily relied on during WWII.

The Jeep is the original off-road vehicle. It was developed by the American Bantam Car Company in 1940 at the request of the US government who recognized the upcoming need for the armed forces as American involvement in WWII loomed. The Bantam Company was too small to cope with demand, so the government gave the designs to competing car companies. The design and brand eventually ended up with AMC in the seventies and eighties.

64. Old frozen dinner brand : LE MENU
Le Menu was a line of frozen dinner produced by Swanson.

67. Very liberal : FAR LEFT
The concept of left-right politics started in France during the French Revolution. When members of France’s National Assembly convened in 1789, supporters of the King sat to the President’s right, and supporters of the revolution to the President’s left. The political terms “left” and “right” were then coined in the local media and have been used ever since.

71. The “O” in Ogden Nash’s alphabet of baseball players : OTT
The poet Ogden Nash is well known for his light and humorous verse. One of his works was a poem dedicating each letter to the alphabet to an iconic Major League Baseball player. for example:

O is for Ott
Of the restless right foot.
When he leaned on the pellet,
The pellet stayed put.

74. Math set with an unspecified number of elements : N-TUPLE
In mathematics, a sequence of values is known as a tuple. If there are say, four values, then the sequence is 4-tuple or quadruple. In general though, a sequence with an unknown number of values, n, is an n-tuple sequence.

77. ___ beetle : STAG
Stag beetles are so called as the males of the species have large mandibles that resemble the antlers of stags.

80. Expressions of outrage : FIES
One might exclaim disgust by saying “fie!” or “ptui!”

88. Flower that symbolizes immortality : AMARANTH
Amaranth is a genus of about 60 flowering plants, also known as Amaranthus. The term “amaranth” comes from the Greek words for “unfading” and “flower”.

93. Wii, e.g. : CONSOLE
The Wii is the biggest-selling game console in the world.

95. Physics particles named after a James Joyce coinage : QUARKS
Quarks are elementary atomic particles that combine to make composite particles called “hadrons”. I’m really only familiar with the really stable hadrons i.e. protons and neutrons. There are six types of quarks (referred to as “flavors”). These flavors are up, down, strange, charm, bottom and top. The term “quark” was taken from James Joyce’s book “Finnegans Wake”. However, the word coined by Joyce is pronounced “kwark”, and the particle’s name is pronounced “kwork”.

97. Golfer Aoki : ISAO
Isao Aoki is one of Japan’s greatest golfers, now playing on the senior circuit. Aoki’s best finish in a major tournament was runner-up to Jack Nicklaus in the 1980 US Open.

102. Like some characters in “The Hobbit” : ELFIN
Elves are one of the races inhabiting Middle Earth, J. R. R. Tolkien’s fictional land that appears in “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings”.

“The Hobbit, or There and Back Again” is a children’s fantasy novel by J. R. R. Tolkien that was popular from the time of its first publication in 1937. Included in the early awards for “The Hobbit” was a prize for best juvenile fiction from “The New York Herald Tribune”.

103. Common khakis go-with : POLO
René Lacoste was a French tennis player who went into the clothing business, and came up with a more comfortable shirt that players could use. This became known as a “tennis shirt”. When it was adopted for use in the sport of polo, the shirts also became known as “polo shirts”. And then the “golf shirt” is basically the same thing.

“Khaki” is an Urdu word, translating literally as “dusty”. The word was adopted for its current use as the name of a fabric by the British cavalry in India in the mid-1800s.

107. Character seen in “The Hobbit” : RUNE
A rune is a character in an alphabet that is believed to have mysterious powers. In Norse mythology, the runic alphabet was said to have a divine origin.

113. Kit ___ bar : KAT
I grew up eating Kit Kat bars as a kid, as the chocolate confection has been around since the thirties. Kit Kats didn’t hit the shelves in the US until the seventies. I’ve seen new varieties of Kit Kat over in the UK, such as an orange-flavored version, but haven’t seen anything like that over here.

114. Game-winning row : O-O-O
When I was growing up in Ireland we played “noughts and crosses” … our name for the game tic-tac-toe.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Polite Indian form of address : SAHIB
6. Sub (for) : TEMP
10. Ending for many a scandal : -GATE
14. Wan : ASHEN
19. Saudi neighbor : IRAQI
20. Warmly welcome : HAIL
21. Border river between China and Russia : AMUR
22. Hackneyed : STALE
23. “Belt it out, Adam!”? : FIRST PERSON SING (from “first person singular”)
26. Something “common” that’s not always so common : SENSE
27. Road component : TAR
28. Another shot : TAKE TWO
29. Fleur-de-___ : LIS
30. Advocated, as caution : URGED
31. Log-in requirements : USER IDS
33. Delhi bread : NAAN
35. 1970s-’80s Dodge : OMNI
36. Thinks highly of : ADMIRES
38. “I forbid you from providing special access”? : DONT GIVE AN IN (from “don’t give an inch”)
42. Your father’s blockheadedness? : POP DENSITY (from “population density”)
45. It comes between ads : DEUCE
46. Mao ___-tung : TSE
47. Liquids that burn easily : ETHERS
48. A forum is for ’em : CHATS
50. Go to bat for someone : PINCH-HIT
53. Middling : SO-SO
54. Reprehensible : HEINOUS
56. “___ you embarrassed?” : AREN’T
57. Dry forecast : NO RAIN
60. Thanksgiving mo. in Canada : OCT
61. Female counterpart of John Doe : JANE ROE
63. One of the Mannings : ELI
66. Coin flip with a penny? : TURN OF THE CENT (from “turn of the century”)
69. Heel : END
70. Sent down the ladder : DEMOTED
72. Old Mideast inits. : UAR
73. Target for food : PREY ON
75. Wear one’s heart on one’s sleeve : EMOTE
76. Bind tightly : TRUSS UP
78. Ohio senator who was one of J.F.K.’s eight “Profiles in Courage” : TAFT
82. Beige and ecru : NEUTRALS
86. Often-contracted phrase : LET US
87. Title parrot in a 1998 film : PAULIE
89. Football stat: Abbr. : INT
90. 1,000 kilograms : TONNE
92. Emotional problem that is surprisingly fitting? : APT COMPLEX (from “apartment complex”)
94. Prepared some amazing Mediterranean fruit? : CUT QUITE A FIG (from “cut quite a figure”)
98. Deaf person who uses speech and lip-reading : ORALIST
99. Hestia, to Artemis : AUNT
100. 2 and 3 tsps., e.g. : AMTS
101. Middles, in Middlesbrough : CENTRES
103. “Oh, come on!” : PSHAW!
105. Old White House nickname : IKE
106. Body that’s a lot thinner than it used to be : ARAL SEA
108. With 7-Down, like some rabbits : LOP
111. Cheri of “S.N.L.” : OTERI
112. Do a bad job as a watchman? : LOOK OUT FOR NO ONE (from “look out for number one”)
115. Fun times : LARKS
116. Coney Island’s ___ Park : LUNA
117. Astrophysicist ___ deGrasse Tyson : NEIL
118. Source of “Vissi d’arte” : TOSCA
119. Scale-busting : OBESE
120. Latin for “let it stand” : STET
121. Shore bird : ERNE
122. Travelocity option : HOTEL

Down
1. Go (through) : SIFT
2. “Vissi d’arte,” e.g. : ARIA
3. Openly expresses disapproval : HARRUMPHS
4. 100 things, on average : IQS
5. More resentful : BITTERER
6. Rodin sculpture of a couple : THE KISS
7. See 108-Across : EARED
8. Keeps moist, as vegetables in a grocery store : MISTS
9. It’s driven through something driven : PLOW
10. Really fun time : GAS
11. Question asked breathlessly at a meeting : AM I LATE?
12. Making a good pitch? : TUNING UP
13. Work units : ERGS
14. Take on : ASSUME
15. Breastbones : STERNA
16. “Keep up the fight” : HANG IN THERE
17. Alternatively : ELSE
18. Beggary : NEED
24. Alternatives to commas, informally : PARENS
25. Don’t do it : NO NO
32. Like a profile picture : SIDE-ON
34. Plus other things of that sort : AND SUCH
35. Baker : OVEN
36. Tarzan’s adopters : APES
37. Inflict upon : DO TO
38. Cannon who married Cary Grant : DYAN
39. Here, in Haiti : ICI
40. Knows about : IS IN ON
41. Earned : NETTED
43. Strand because of cold weather, say : ICE IN
44. Scatter : THIN OUT
49. “You’re right, though I wish you weren’t” : TOO TRUE
51. One of 100 in “The Divine Comedy” : CANTO
52. Domain of Charles V: Abbr. : HRE
54. Herculean : HARD
55. Volunteers : STEPS UP
58. Staple of the fur trade in the 1700s-1800s : OTTER
59. Lament : RUE
61. Wrangler, for one : JEEP
62. ___ old thing : ANY
63. Paradisiacal : EDENIC
64. Old frozen dinner brand : LE MENU
65. “Later!” : I’M OUTTA HERE!
67. Very liberal : FAR LEFT
68. Piece of the pie : CRUST
71. The “O” in Ogden Nash’s alphabet of baseball players : OTT
74. Math set with an unspecified number of elements : N-TUPLE
77. ___ beetle : STAG
79. “We’re done for” : ALL IS LOST
80. Expressions of outrage : FIES
81. Class work : TEXT
83. Engaged in an activity : AT IT
84. Fate : LOT
85. Leave stealthily : SNEAK OUT
87. One who comes with baggage : PORTER
88. Flower that symbolizes immortality : AMARANTH
91. Skeptic’s challenge : NAME ONE
93. Wii, e.g. : CONSOLE
95. Physics particles named after a James Joyce coinage : QUARKS
96. Injudicious : UNWISE
97. Golfer Aoki : ISAO
101. Do the dishes? : CATER
102. Like some characters in “The Hobbit” : ELFIN
103. Common khakis go-with : POLO
104. Try : STAB
105. Evils : ILLS
107. Character seen in “The Hobbit” : RUNE
109. Formerly : ONCE
110. Ring out : PEAL
113. Kit ___ bar : KAT
114. Game-winning row : O-O-O

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8 thoughts on “0719-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 19 Jul 15, Sunday”

  1. Pretty hard puzzle. We had to look a few of them up, and we totally missed GATE and GAS, even going through the alphabet letter-by-letter looking for the first letter in both words. Sheesh!

  2. Opaque theme, slippery clue editing…. overall very poor, cynical puzzle. I don't feel bad not being able to finish this one.

  3. 47:00, no errors (never google). Had a vague concept of the theme, throughout; but the theme didn't really help solve the puzzle. It did enable to me correct one error during final check, had 15D STERNI, changed it to STERNA to make sense of 38A.

  4. I love and appreciate what Bill does here, but I’ve wondered about the solve times more than once. I, too, thought this was a pretty tough puzzle. It gave me more trouble than usual.

    It seems to me that it’d take a half hour just to read all the clues and write down the answers (I’ve never done it online)—even if you knew all the answers ahead of time. I mean, he’s doing all this without hesitation and never gets stumped? Also, the breadth of knowledge a person would have to possess seems incredible, almost impossible to attain.

    A person like this, it would seem, could go on Jeopardy! and make the likes of Ken Jennings look like an imbecile. He could make millions! Instant recall and a broad range of knowledge are key, so why not give it a shot?

    I used to be a lot faster at them at one time, but I’ve never timed myself. I did the New York Times, The Oregonian and USA Today puzzles every day, pretty much, 20 years ago, and I took an interest in them when I was about 20 (I’m 58). Now I just do the NYT Sunday whenever the spirit moves me (not often enough). On any given day on Jeopardy!, I can answer about 85 percent of the questions and average two to three finals a week. Still, I doubt I will ever be able to move through a crossword puzzle in anything close to his times. Hence, my skepticism…

  5. @Grumpy Greg
    As always, I appreciate you stopping by and leaving a comment on the blog. Given that you're such a faithful follower of the blog, I think I should explain my solving times. They are real, very real. I solve a downloaded version of the puzzle, and use a keyboard instead of pencil/pen, and I think that shaves off 20-30 secs, and also gives me a clock which stops whenthat last letter is filled in. After years of blogging, I seem to be solving Mon-Wed puzzles in 5-7 mins on average, which is a remarkably pedestrian pace compared to the whizkids who solve in 2-3 mins (see the movie "Wordplay" for evidence). I should note that Fri-Sat puzzles can take me over an hour, and I post that time here on the blog. I also own up when I don't finish (rarely these days, admittedly) and any mistake that I make (maybe once every couple of weeks). And one last thing, I used to be a professional crossword constructor, although not of US-type puzzles; the cryptic kind that is popular in Ireland and the UK. For a while there I was setting puzzles for 40 hours a week. That helps!

  6. Grumpy Greg, hat in hand, shuffles towards the exit… As I mentioned earlier, and in all sincerity, Bill, I love and appreciate all you do for us puzzler types. I don't see how you find the time. Believe me, no disrespect intended, just a healthy curiosity, I suppose. I guess I'm not motivated enough to attempt stepping up my game. If nothing else, your site is a great learning tool 🙂

    Thanks for taking the time to respond, and keep up the good work!

    Your humble student Grumpy Greg

  7. Why no analysis of "aptcomplex" as an "emotional state"? For a Sunday puzzle, that was a heck of a reach.

    I am embarrassed that I failed to figure out "deuce" between "ads." I got the answer ok, but I did not know why.

  8. @Grumpy Greg
    No need to apologize at all! I just didn't want you be under the illusion that something was amiss, especially in view of your consistent and long-standing support of the blog. I didn't mean to sound "grumpy" in my reply 🙂 If it helps, I went to my first crossword tournament earlier this year and landed in the bottom 25% of the field …

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