0705-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 5 Jul 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Elizabeth C. Gorski
THEME: Heads of State … each of today’s themed answers refers to MOUNT RUSHMORE national memorial. Four of the down-answers are the nicknames of the four presidents whose heads are depicted in the memorial, and they are in the same order from left-to-right in the grid as they are on MOUNT RUSHMORE:

18D. What 15-Down is … or a hint to the answers to the four starred clues in left-to-right order : HOME OF MOUNT RUSHMORE
15D. See 18-Down : KEYSTONE, SOUTH DAKOTA

4D. *Nickname for Thomas Jefferson : THE MAN OF THE PEOPLE
9D. *Nickname for Abraham Lincoln : THE GREAT EMANCIPATOR
22D. *Nickname for George Washington : AMERICAN CINCINNATUS
33D. *Nickname for Theodore Roosevelt : HERO OF SAN JUAN HILL

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 37s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

9. Many a Theravada Buddhist : THAI
The Buddhist tradition has two major branches. The Theravada is “the School of the Elders”, and the Mahayana is “the Great Vehicle”. The Theravada is the older of the two schools, whereas the Mahayana split from the Theravada around the 1st century CE.

13. Indiana city where auto manufacturing was pioneered : KOKOMO
The city of Kokomo, Indiana was named after a member of the Miami Native American nation called Ma-Ko-Ko-Mo, which translates to “Black Walnut”.

16. Ruler in Richard Strauss’s “Salome” : HEROD
Richard Strauss’s opera “Salome” is based on the play of the same name by Oscar Wilde. The opera created quite a fuss in its early performances due to its erotic “Dance of the Seven Veils”.

21. Art of flower arranging : IKEBANA
The Japanese art of flower arranging is very much focused on minimalism, the use of a minimum number of blooms arranged among a few stalks and leaves.

23. Red-wrapped imports : EDAMS
Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

24. Prince of Darkness : EVIL ONE
“Prince of Darkness” is a term used for the Devil. Prince of Darkness is a translation of the Latin “princeps tenebrarum”, a phrase used in the fourth century work entitled the “Acts of Pilate”.

26. Tea made by Peter Rabbit’s mother : CAMOMILE
Beatrix Potter was an English author, famous for the children’s books she wrote and illustrated. The most famous character in her stories was Peter Rabbit, whose sisters were Flopsy, Mopsy and Cottontail. Potter put her talent as an artist to good use in the scientific world as well. She recorded many images of lichens and fungi as seen through her microscope. As a result of her work, she was respected as an expert mycologist.

29. Part of CBS: Abbr. : SYST
CBS used to be called the Columbia Broadcasting System. CBS is the second-largest broadcaster in the world, second only to the BBC in the UK. CBS introduced its “eye” logo in 1951.

34. “The Untouchables” role : NESS
“The Untouchables” is a crime series that originally ran on television from 1959 to 1963. Star of the show is Robert Stack who plays Eliot Ness.

35. Table d’___ : HOTE
On a restaurant menu, items that are “à la carte” are priced and ordered separately. A menu marked “table d’hôte” (also called “prix fixe”) is a fixed-price menu with limited choice.

40. “Smack That” singer : AKON
Akon is a Senegalese American R&B and hip hop singer, who was born in St. Louis but lived much of his early life in Senegal. Akon is a stage name, and his real name is Aliaune Damala Bouga Time Bongo Puru Nacka Lu Lu Lu Badara Akon Thiam. Got that?

42. Shunned ones : PARIAHS
“Pariah” is an anglicized version of the Tamil word “Paraiyar”. The Paraiyar are a social group of about 9 million people found in some Indian states and in Sri Lanka. The term “pariah” came to be a general term for members of the lowest caste in society, outcasts.

43. Pharma fraud police : FDA
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) started out as the Food, Drug and Insecticide organization in 1906, after President Theodore Roosevelt signed into law the Food and Drug Act. The main driver behind the Act was concern over public hygiene.

Big Pharma is the nickname for the pharmaceutical industry. The nickname comes from the acronym for the lobbying group for the industry, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA).

48. Half-___ (java order) : CAF
Back in 1850, the name “java” was given to a type of coffee grown on the island of Java, and the usage of the term spread from there.

49. Plains Indian : OTO
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

50. Straw mats : TATAMIS
A tatami is a traditional mat used on floors in Japan. The term “tatami” comes from the Japanese word “tatamu” meaning “to fold”, reflecting the fact that the mat is designed to be folded up for storage.

53. Hoppy brew, for short : IPA
India Pale Ale (IPA) is a style of beer that originated in England. The beer was originally intended for transportation from England to India, hence the name.

57. City on Utah Lake : OREM
Orem, Utah was originally known as “Sharon” (a Biblical name), then “Provo Bench”, and in 1914 it was given the family name of a local railroad operator called “Orem”. Orem gave itself the nickname “Family City USA” and sure enough in 2010, “Forbes” rated Orem the 5th best place in the country to raise a family.

59. Duds : TOGS
The verb “tog”, meaning to dress up, comes from the Latin “toga”, the garment worn in Ancient Rome. “Tog” can be use as an informal word for a coat or a cloak. Back in Ireland, togs are what we call swimming shorts.

“Duds” is an informal word for clothing, coming from the word “dudde” that was used around 1300 as the name for a cloak.

60. Astronomer who wrote “Pale Blue Dot” : SAGAN
Carl Sagan was a brilliant astrophysicist and a great communicator. Sagan was famous for presenting obscure concepts about the cosmos in such a way that we mere mortals could appreciate. He also wrote the novel “Contact” which was adapted into a fascinating 1997 film of the same name starring Jodie Foster.

“Pale Blue Dot” is a book about the cosmos by Carl Sagan. The title of the book is taken from the famous “Pale Blue Dot” photograph taken by the Voyager 1 spacecraft from almost 4 million miles from the Earth. In the photo, our planet appears as a tiny “pale blue dot”. NASA had Voyager 1 take the photograph, at the request of Carl Sagan.

62. U.S. 66, e.g.: Abbr. : HWY
The famous old highway called Route 66 has largely been replaced by modern interstates. It ran from Chicago to Los Angeles, right through the heart of America, and so it was often called the “Main Street of America”. The road gained notoriety because of Nat King Cole’s song “(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66”, and also because of the sixties TV show called “Route 66”.

63. Like Fr. words after “la” : FEM
Feminine (fem.)

64. Boston iceman : BRUIN
The Boston Bruins professional ice hockey team goes way back, and has been in existence since 1924. The National Hockey League back then was a Canadian-only league, but was expanded to include the US in 1923. The Bruins were the first US-team in the expanded league.

71. Comcast, e.g., for short : ISP
An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is just what the name indicates, a company that provides its customers with access to the Internet.

Comcast is the largest cable company in the United States. Comcast was founded in 1963 as American Cable systems.

72. Bio subject : DNA
I’ve always been fascinated by the fact that the DNA of living things is so very similar across different species. Human DNA is almost exactly the same for every individual (to the degree of 99.9%). However, those small differences are sufficient to distinguish one individual from another, and to determine whether or not individuals are close family relations.

73. Trial that bombs, informally : N-TEST
There are two classes of nuclear weapons, both of which get the energy for the explosion from nuclear reactions. The first nuclear bombs developed, called atomic bombs (A-bombs), use fission reactions. In an atomic bomb, uranium nuclei are split into smaller nuclei with the release of an awful lot of energy in the process. The second class of nuclear weapons are fusion bombs. Fusion devices are also called thermonuclear weapons or hydrogen bombs (H-bombs). In a fusion reaction, the nuclei of hydrogen isotopes are fused together to form bigger nuclei, with the release of even greater amounts of energy than a fission reaction.

74. Piedmont city : ASTI
Asti is in the Piedmont region of northwest Italy. The region is perhaps most famous for its Asti Spumante sparkling white wine.

75. Stud money : ANTE
Stud poker is the name given to many variants of poker, all characterized by the dealer giving each player a mix of cards face-down and face-up. The cards facing downwards are called “hole cards”, cards only visible to the individual who holds that particular hand. This gives rise to the phrase “ace in the hole”, a valuable holding that only the player with the ace is aware of.

77. G.E. and G.M. : COS
GE (General Electric) and GM (General Motors) are companies (cos.).

78. Singer Carly ___ Jepsen : RAE
Carly Rae Jepsen is a singer/songwriter from Mission, British Columbia. Jepsen got her start on TV’s “Canadian Idol” when she placed third in the show’s fifth season.

83. Award accepted by J. K. Rowling and turned down by C. S. Lewis : OBE
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is an order of chivalry in the UK that was established in 1917 by King George V. There are five classes within the order, which are in descending seniority:

– Knight Grand Cross (GBE)
– Knight Commander (KBE)
– Commander (CBE)
– Officer (OBE)
– Member (MBE)

85. “___ Ho” (“Slumdog Millionaire” song) : JAI
The brilliant film “Slumdog Millionaire” is a screen adaptation of a 2005 novel by Indian author Vikas Swarup. This low-budget movie won eight Oscars in 2008. I reckon it turned a profit …

87. Big channel in reality programming : TRUTV
truTV is a Turner Broadcasting cable network, launched in 1991 as Court TV. The name was changed to truTV in 2008.

89. Man’s name that’s the code for Australia’s busiest airport : SYD
Australia’s Sydney Airport (SYD) is located just five miles south of the city center, and next to Botany Bay. There have been plans to build a second airport on the outskirts of the city, dating back to the 1940s.

90. Genre of Oasis and the Verve : BRITPOP
Oasis were an English rock band from Manchester in the north of the country. The group was phenomenally successful in the UK, holding the record for the longest run in the UK Top Ten with 22 successive Top Ten hits.

The Verve were an alternative rock band from the Manchester area in the north of England. The band formed in 1989, and it’s biggest hit was 1997’s “Bittersweet Symphony”.

94. Movie dog : ASTA
Asta is the wonderful little dog in the superb “The Thin Man” series of films starring William Powell and Myrna Loy (as Nick and Nora Charles). In the original story by Dashiell Hammett, Asta was a female Schnauzer, but on screen Asta was played by a wire-haired fox terrier called “Skippy”. Skippy was also the dog in “Bringing up Baby” with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn, the one who kept stealing the dinosaur bone. Skippy retired in 1939, so Asta was played by other dogs in the remainder of “The Thin Man” films.

95. Army-Navy stores? : ARSENALS
Our word “arsenal” comes from the Italian “arzenale”, a work adapted from the Arabic for “workshop”. There was a large wharf in Venice called the Arzenale that became associated with the storage of weapons and ammunition, and this led to our contemporary usage of “arsenal”.

97. Kind of tiara and cross : PAPAL
“Triregnum” is the Latin name for the papal tiara that has been worn by Roman Catholic popes since the 8th century. The crown has three tiers, so it is also known as the triple tiara. “Triregnum” is Latin for “three crowns”.

The emblem of the office of the Pope is known as the papal cross. The cross is a vertical staff with three horizontal bars at the top, which get smaller as the top of the staff is approached.

98. Leg bone : SHIN
The tibia is the shin bone, the larger of the two bones right below the knee. The tibia is the strongest weight-bearing bone in the human body. “Tibia” is the Roman name for a Greek flute and it is thought that the shin bone was given the same name because flutes were often fashioned out of the shin bones of animals.

101. Onetime Nair alternative : NEET
The hair removal product “Neet” was launched in Canada in 1901, and was also sold as “Immac”. Today it is sold under the name “Veet”.

Nair is a hair removal product that has some pretty harsh ingredients. The most important active constituents are calcium hydroxide (“slake lime”) and sodium hydroxide (“caustic soda”). Other Nair components seem to be there to soothe the skin after the harsher chemicals have done their job. The name “Nair” probably comes from combining “no” and “hair”.

112. Old crime boss Frank : NITTI
Frank Nitti was one of the top henchmen working for Al Capone. Unlike American-born Capone, Nitti was actually from Italy and was born near the city of Salerno. When Capone was eventually put away for 11 years for tax evasion, Nitti was convicted of the same crime. Nitti was only imprisoned for 18 months, and when released he was labelled as the new head of Capone’s Chicago Outfit. However the truth seems to be that he was just a frontman, with others making the decisions.

113. “I Love Lucy” surname : RICARDO
In the hit television show “I Love Lucy”, Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz played Lucy and Ricky Ricardo. The Ricardos’ best friends were also their landlords, Fred and Ethel Mertz. The Mertz’s were played by William Frawley and Vivian Vance.

117. Smooth fabric : SATEEN
Sateen is a cotton fabric, with a weave that is “four over, one under” meaning that most of the threads come to the surface giving it a softer feel.

120. Prosciutto, e.g. : HAM
Parma is a city in northern Italy, famous for its ham (prosciutto) and cheese (parmesan).

Down
2. Non-PC office purchase : IMAC
The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an “all-in-one” design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such strawberry, blueberry and lime.

3. Beautiful butterfly : MONARCH
The monarch butterfly has very recognizable orange and black wings, and is often seen across North America. The monarch is the state insect of several US states and was even nominated as the national insect in 1990, but the legislation was not enacted.

4. *Nickname for Thomas Jefferson : THE MAN OF THE PEOPLE
President Thomas Jefferson earned the nickname “Man of the People” perhaps for several reasons related to his political positions and his demeanor. While in office he was known to greet his guests in very informal attire, often sporting a simple robe and slippers.

6. It flows to the Caspian : URAL
The Ural River rises in the Ural Mountains in Russia and flows for half its length through Russian territory until it crosses the border into Kazakhstan, finally emptying into the Caspian Sea.

8. Campus grp. formed in 1960 : SDS
Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) was an activist group in the sixties. The SDS organized the largest student strike in the history of the United States on 26 April 1968, with about a million students staying away from class that day. The “Students for a Democratic Society” name was revived in 2006 with the foundation of a new US-based student organization with left wing beliefs. Today’s SDS was founded by a pair of high school students from Greenwich Village, New York.

9. *Nickname for Abraham Lincoln : THE GREAT EMANCIPATOR
President LIncoln’s actions that resulted in the freeing of slaves led to him earning the nickname “the Great Emancipator”.

The Emancipation Proclamation was issued by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863 during the Civil War. The order freed slaves in Confederate territory, but did not apply to the five slave states that were not in rebellion. Slavery became illegal in the whole of the United States in December 1865 when the Thirteenth Amendment to the US Constitution was ratified.

11. Seed cover : ARIL
The casing surrounding many seeds is called the aril, and it may be quite fleshy. This fruit-like characteristic makes it desirable as a food and aids in the dispersion of the seeds.

13. Capital on the Congo : KINSHASA
Kinshasa is the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The city was formerly known as Léopoldville. Kinshasa is the third largest city in Africa, after Cairo in Egypt and Lagos in Nigeria.

15. See 18-Down : KEYSTONE, SOUTH DAKOTA
The town of Keystone, South Dakota was founded as a mining town in 1883. Keystone’s economy today is driven by its proximity to Mount Rushmore National Memorial, which brings many, many tourists to the town all year round.

18. What 15-Down is … or a hint to the answers to the four starred clues in left-to-right order : HOME OF MOUNT RUSHMORE
The four presidents whose faces are carved in the granite face of Mount Rushmore are (from left to right) George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. Each of the presidents is about 60 feet in height, although they might have been larger. The original intent was for the presidents to be depicted from head to waist, but the project lost funding.

19. Black birds : ANIS
The tropical bird called the ani is related to the cuckoo, although anis don’t go around robbing other birds nest as do the cuckoos.

20. Hanoi celebrations : TETS
The full name for the New Year holiday in Vietnam is “Tet Nguyen Dan” meaning “Feast of the First Morning”, with the reference being to the arrival of the season of spring. Tet usually falls on the same day as Chinese New Year.

22. *Nickname for George Washington : AMERICAN CINCINNATUS
President George Washington is sometimes referred to as “the American Cincinnatus”. Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus was farmer in ancient Rome who left his land to serve as Consul and then lawful dictator of Rome during a war emergency, before happily handing back power to the Senate after the war was won. After the defeat of the British in the American War of Independence, George Washington similarly resigned as commander-in-chief, only returning to power on his election as the nation’s first president.

27. Union Pacific headquarters : OMAHA
The Union Pacific Railroad is the largest railroad in the US. Union Pacific operates over 8,000 locomotives, and all of that rolling stock operates west of Chicago and New Orleans. The company’s headquarters are in Omaha, Nebraska.

28. “The ___ Breathe” (2007 drama with Kevin Bacon and Julie Delpy) : AIR I
“The Air I Breathe” is a 2007 film with an interesting structure. Andy Garcia plays a gangster on the streets of Los Angeles who interacts with four individuals whose names aren’t mentioned in the film’s dialog. Each of the four individuals represent the four cornerstones of life according to an ancient Chinese proverb:

– Happiness (Forest Whitaker)
– Pleasure (Brendan Frasier)
– Sorrow (Sarah Michelle Gellar)
– Love (Kevin Bacon)

33. *Nickname for Theodore Roosevelt : HERO OF SAN JUAN HILL
President Theodore Roosevelt was nicknamed “the Hero of San Juan Hill” after he led his Rough Riders up San Juan Hill during the Battle of Santiago de Cuba. Roosevelt’s military commander recommended him for the Medal of Honor for his gallantry at San Juan Hill in 1898, but that recognition did not come until the Medal of Honor was presented posthumously by President Bill Clinton in 2001.

39. Guinness Book suffix : -EST
“The Guinness Book of World Records” holds some records of its own. It is the best-selling, copyrighted series of books of all time and is one of the books most often stolen from public libraries! The book was first published in 1954 by two twins, Norris and Ross McWhirter. The McWhirter twins found themselves with a smash hit, and eventually became very famous in Britain hosting a TV show based on world records.

42. Pay (up) : PONY
“To pony up” means “to pay”. Apparently the term originated as slang use of the Latin term “legem pone” that was once used for “money”. “Legem Pone” was the title of the Psalm that was read out on March 25 each year, and March 25 was the first payday of the year in days gone by.

45. AARP and others: Abbr. : ASSNS
AARP is now the official name for the interest group that used to be called the American Association of Retired Persons. The name change reflects the current focus of the group on all Americans aged 50 or over, as opposed to just people who have retired.

47. Subject of semiotics : SIGNS
Semiotics is a branch of linguistics, and is the study of signs and symbols.

51. Gillette products : ATRAS
Fortunately for crossword constructors, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

61. Cornish of NPR : AUDIE
NPR’s broadcast journalist Audie Cornish has hosted “Weekend Edition Sunday” since 2011, replacing Liane Hansen who hosted the show for over twenty years. Cornish also co-hosts “All Things Considered”.

65. Toaster’s need : GLASS
The tradition of “toasting” someone probably dates back to the reign of Charles II, when the practice was to drink a glass of wine to the health of a beautiful or favored woman. In those days, spiced toast was added to beverages to add flavor, so the use of the word “toast” was an indicator that the lady’s beauty would enhance the wine. Very charming, I must say …

68. Four seasons in Seville : ANO
In Spanish, the year (el año) starts in January (enero) and ends in December (diciembre).

The city of Seville is the capital of Andalusia in southern Spain. Seville is a favored setting for many operas including “The Barber of Seville” by Rossini, “Fidelio” by Beethoven and Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” and “The Marriage of Figaro”.

75. River through Yorkshire : AIRE
The biggest city on the River Aire in Yorkshire is Leeds.

80. Where Northwestern University is : EVANSTON
The city of Evanston, Illinois is a suburb of Chicago. Most famously perhaps, Evanston is home to Northwestern University. The city was named for politician and physician John Evans, whose name was also lent to the city of Evans, Colorado and the summit Mount Evans, also in Colorado.

82. N.F.L. ball carriers: Abbr. : RBS
In football, running backs (RBs) and wide receivers (WRs) often score touchdowns (TDs).

84. Barry of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” : BOSTWICK
The stage and screen actor Barry Bostwick is perhaps best known for playing Brad Majors in the 1975 movie “The Rocky Horror Picture Show”. Bostwick was born not far from here, in San Mateo, California.

“The Rocky Horror Picture Show” has to have the most devout cult-following of any movie ever made. Famously, fans attending a midnight show of the film will dress up in the outrageous costumes used in the film, and bring props with them. The props bear little relation to the storyline, but a tradition of using certain props in a particular way has been established. For example, at one point a character proposes a toast, and the audience throws toast around the theater. Go figure …

88. Blank, as a tabula : RASA
Tabula rasa (plural: tabulae rasae) is the idea that people are born with a “blank slate”, and that knowledge comes from experience and perception.

91. Bygone Chinese money : TAEL
The Far Eastern measurement known as a tael is used to weigh out precious metals as well as herbal medicines.

96. Old German governments : REICHS
“Reich” is a German word meaning “realm”. “Reich” is the root of the German words “Kaiserreich” meaning “empire”, and “Königreich” meaning “kingdom”. The term also appears in the German names for the countries of France (Frankreich) and Austria (Österreich).

99. Gainsay : DENY
“To gainsay” is to deny or contradict, basically to “say again”.

100. Kind of arch : OGEE
An ogee is a type of S-curve. Specifically it is a figure consisting of two arcs that curve in opposite directions (like an S) but both ends of the curve end up parallel to each other (which is not necessarily true for an S). An ogee arch is composed of two ogees, with one being the mirror of the other and meeting at the arch’s apex.

105. 1977 Electric Light Orchestra hit : DO YA
The Electric Light Orchestra is a symphonic rock group from the north of England. The band’s manager was Don Arden, father of Sharon Osbourne (wife of Ozzy).

108. Westernmost island of the Aleutians : ATTU
Attu is the westernmost island in the Aleutian chain, and so is the westernmost part of Alaska. Japanese forces took the island in October 1942, eventually landing as many as 2,900 soldiers there. In May 1943, the US Army retook the island in twenty days of fighting that is now called the Battle of Attu, the only land battle to take place on US soil during WWII. I am very proud of my father-in-law, who served in the Aleutians in WWII …

109. Org. with rules on eligibility : NCAA
The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) dates back to the Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt. When his son broke his nose playing football at Harvard, President Roosevelt turned his attention to the number of serious injuries and even deaths occurring in college sports. He instigated meetings between the major educational institutions leading to the formation of the Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States (IAAUS) in 1906, which was given the remit of regulating college sports. The IAAUS became the NCAA in 1910.

114. Bread source, for short : ATM
The use of the word “bread” as a slang term for money dates back to the 1940s, and is derived from the term “breadwinner”, meaning the person in the house who puts bread on the table, brings in the money.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Monocle part : RIM
4. Bridge support : TRUSS
9. Many a Theravada Buddhist : THAI
13. Indiana city where auto manufacturing was pioneered : KOKOMO
16. Ruler in Richard Strauss’s “Salome” : HEROD
17. Construction site sight : HARD HAT
21. Art of flower arranging : IKEBANA
23. Red-wrapped imports : EDAMS
24. Prince of Darkness : EVIL ONE
25. Senate vote : NAY
26. Tea made by Peter Rabbit’s mother : CAMOMILE
28. Restriction on Army enlistees : AGE LIMIT
29. Part of CBS: Abbr. : SYST
31. Bring in a new staff for : REMAN
32. Blender sound : WHIR
34. “The Untouchables” role : NESS
35. Table d’___ : HOTE
36. Grouch : CRANK
37. “Fasten your seatbelts …” : HERE WE GO …
40. “Smack That” singer : AKON
41. Jaunty greeting : HI HO!
42. Shunned ones : PARIAHS
43. Pharma fraud police : FDA
46. ___ of time : SANDS
48. Half-___ (java order) : CAF
49. Plains Indian : OTO
50. Straw mats : TATAMIS
52. Senate vote : AYE
53. Hoppy brew, for short : IPA
55. Flawless routine : TEN
57. City on Utah Lake : OREM
59. Duds : TOGS
60. Astronomer who wrote “Pale Blue Dot” : SAGAN
62. U.S. 66, e.g.: Abbr. : HWY
63. Like Fr. words after “la” : FEM
64. Boston iceman : BRUIN
65. Plane folk? : GROUND CREW
68. Pepper spray targets : ASSAILANTS
70. Extols : LAUDS
71. Comcast, e.g., for short : ISP
72. Bio subject : DNA
73. Trial that bombs, informally : N-TEST
74. Piedmont city : ASTI
75. Stud money : ANTE
76. Interminable time : EON
77. G.E. and G.M. : COS
78. Singer Carly ___ Jepsen : RAE
81. Ball-like : SPHERIC
83. Award accepted by J. K. Rowling and turned down by C. S. Lewis : OBE
85. “___ Ho” (“Slumdog Millionaire” song) : JAI
87. Big channel in reality programming : TRUTV
89. Man’s name that’s the code for Australia’s busiest airport : SYD
90. Genre of Oasis and the Verve : BRITPOP
92. Works at the ballpark, maybe : UMPS
94. Movie dog : ASTA
95. Army-Navy stores? : ARSENALS
97. Kind of tiara and cross : PAPAL
98. Leg bone : SHIN
99. Okey-___ : DOKE
101. Onetime Nair alternative : NEET
102. “___ a customer” : ONE TO
103. 10 cc’s and 64 fl. oz. : AMTS
104. The person you want to be : EGO IDEAL
107. Give a thorough hosing : WASH DOWN
110. Away : OUT
111. What the buyer ends up paying : NET COST
112. Old crime boss Frank : NITTI
113. “I Love Lucy” surname : RICARDO
115. Response to “Who, me?” : YEAH YOU
116. Eight-related : OCTAL
117. Smooth fabric : SATEEN
118. Lip : SASS
119. Head of a crime lab? : SKULL
120. Prosciutto, e.g. : HAM

Down
1. Hold up : ROB
2. Non-PC office purchase : IMAC
3. Beautiful butterfly : MONARCH
4. *Nickname for Thomas Jefferson : THE MAN OF THE PEOPLE
5. Debt, symbolically : RED INK
6. It flows to the Caspian : URAL
7. To a degree : SOMEWHAT
8. Campus grp. formed in 1960 : SDS
9. *Nickname for Abraham Lincoln : THE GREAT EMANCIPATOR
10. Eat or drink : HAVE
11. Seed cover : ARIL
12. Not going anywhere : IDLING
13. Capital on the Congo : KINSHASA
14. “I heard you the first time!” : OKAY OKAY!
15. See 18-Down : KEYSTONE, SOUTH DAKOTA
18. What 15-Down is … or a hint to the answers to the four starred clues in left-to-right order : HOME OF MOUNT RUSHMORE
19. Black birds : ANIS
20. Hanoi celebrations : TETS
22. *Nickname for George Washington : AMERICAN CINCINNATUS
27. Union Pacific headquarters : OMAHA
28. “The ___ Breathe” (2007 drama with Kevin Bacon and Julie Delpy) : AIR I
30. Minister (to) : TEND
33. *Nickname for Theodore Roosevelt : HERO OF SAN JUAN HILL
38. “Kapow!” : WHAM!
39. Guinness Book suffix : -EST
42. Pay (up) : PONY
44. Thumb, for one : DIGIT
45. AARP and others: Abbr. : ASSNS
47. Subject of semiotics : SIGNS
51. Gillette products : ATRAS
54. Apartment, informally : PAD
56. Comment regarding a squashed bug : EWW!
58. High-___ image : RES
61. Cornish of NPR : AUDIE
64. Consecrated, to Shakespeare : BLEST
65. Toaster’s need : GLASS
66. Like a stereotypical mobster’s voice : RASPY
67. Alphabet trio : RST
68. Four seasons in Seville : ANO
69. “Am ___ believe …?” : I TO
72. Worthy of pondering : DEEP
75. River through Yorkshire : AIRE
79. Truculent manner : ATTITUDE
80. Where Northwestern University is : EVANSTON
82. N.F.L. ball carriers: Abbr. : RBS
84. Barry of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” : BOSTWICK
86. Stoked, with “up” : AMPED
88. Blank, as a tabula : RASA
91. Bygone Chinese money : TAEL
93. Not too swift : SLOWISH
96. Old German governments : REICHS
97. Unlike most mail nowadays : POSTAL
99. Gainsay : DENY
100. Kind of arch : OGEE
105. 1977 Electric Light Orchestra hit : DO YA
106. Those: Sp. : ESOS
108. Westernmost island of the Aleutians : ATTU
109. Org. with rules on eligibility : NCAA
112. Turndowns : NOS
114. Bread source, for short : ATM

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2 thoughts on “0705-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 5 Jul 15, Sunday”

  1. I got Washington's nickname early because I recently finished a rather lengthy biography of him. In lieu of that 800-page time, I'd suggest David McCullough's "1776" which discusses everything that happened in the colonies that year except the signing of the Declaration. Masterful work.

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