0510-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 10 May 15, Sunday

Happy Mother’s Day, to all the moms out there!


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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jacob Stulberg
THEME: Literary Circles … the circled letters in the grid give us the full text of a very “compact” poem called “THE LOCUST TREE IN FLOWER” by WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS:

23A. California’s Rancho ___ : CUCAMONGA
28A. At a high rate : OFTEN
33A. Making environmentally friendly : GREENING

46A. Relative of a Great Dane : MASTIFF
48A. Like cars in a used car lot : RESOLD
55A. Clinton secretary of state : ALBRIGHT

66A. An airbag can prevent it : BROKEN RIB
75A. Diverge : BRANCH OFF
79A. Look good on : BECOME

95A. Kind of omelet : EGG-WHITE
97A. 1990 Mike Leigh comedy/drama : LIFE IS SWEET
103A. “Would you let me take a look?” : MAY I SEE

117A. From the top : OVER AGAIN

Among
of
green

stiff
old
bright

broken
branch
come

white
sweet
May

again

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 41m 38s!!!
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

11. Mountain-to-mountain transport : ROPEWAY
“Ropeway” is another name for an aerial tramway.

18. Sch. with a Manchester campus : UNH
The University of New Hampshire (UNH) is the largest university in the state. It was founded as the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts in 1866.

19. Apple product : NANO
The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been seven versions of the Nano to date and the current Nano as well as playing tunes is an FM player, records voice memos, has a pedometer and can connect with external devices (like a heart monitor, maybe) using Bluetooth technology.

22. “Spoon River Anthology” poet Edgar ___ Masters : LEE
Edgar Lee Masters was a poet and biographer from Kansas. His best known collection of poems is “Spoon River Anthology”, which was first published in 1915. He also wrote biographies of Abraham Lincoln, Mark Twain and Walt Whitman.

23. California’s Rancho ___ : CUCAMONGA
Jack Benny had a running gag going on his radio show, “The Jack Benny Program”, in which he made fun of the city name “Rancho Cucamonga”. He had Mel Blanc (also famous as the voice of Bugs Bunny and other cartoon characters) make a fake train station announcement, faltering over the name “Cuc …. amonga”. The city loved the publicity, and named a street there Jack Benny Way. Outside the city’s minor league baseball stadium, on Jack Benny Way, they also erected a bronze statue of Jack Benny. The statue has since been moved, so if you are in town, it’s in now in the Victoria Gardens Cultural Center,

29. “___ Folks,” Charles Schulz’s first strip : LI’L
“Li’l Folks” was the first comic strip created by Charles M. Schulz, who also created the incredibly successful strip “Peanuts”. “Li’l Folks” was published from 1947 to 1950 in the “St. Paul Pioneer”, which was Schulz’s hometown paper. Readers familiar with “Peanuts” who read “Li’l Folks” will see some similar characters.

38. No. expert : CPA
Certified public accountant (CPA)

46. Relative of a Great Dane : MASTIFF
There are a number of Mastiff breeds of dog, all of which are noted for their large size. Even though modern Mastiffs generally have an easy temperament, over the centuries the Mastiff breeds have been used as guard dogs and war dogs, even back to Ancient Roman times.

47. 6 letters? : MNO
The letters MNO are found on the 6-key on a telephone keypad.

49. Source of feta cheese : EWE
Feta is a Greek cheese made from sheep’s milk, or a mixture of sheep’s and goat’s milk. The cheese is salted and cured in a brine solution for several months before it is eaten.

51. Prominent parts : SALIENCES
A “salience” is a prominent part of an object, a part that projects.

55. Clinton secretary of state : ALBRIGHT
Madeleine Albright was appointed Secretary of State by President Clinton, making her the first woman to hold the post. Albright is a very capable woman when it comes to languages, being fluent in English, French, Russian and Czech, and able to hold her own in Polish and Serbo-Croat as well.

62. 7 1/2-foot Ming : YAO
Yao Ming is a retired professional basketball player from Shanghai who played for the Houston Rockets. At 7’6″, Yao was the tallest man playing in the NBA.

64. Item extending over a gunwale : OAR
The “gunwale” is the top edge of the side of a boat. Back in the days of sailing warships, that top edge was called the “gun ridge”, with the strengthening applied to the structure being called the “wale”.

65. “Sesame Street” subjs. : RRR
Reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmetic …

70. Fixer-upper’s need, for short : TLC
Tender loving care (TLC)

72. Counterpart of Aurora : EOS
In Greek mythology, Eos is the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos is Aurora.

84. Camera option, for short : SLR
SLR stands for “single lens reflex”. Usually cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

85. She’s courted in “The Courtship of Miles Standish” : PRISCILLA
John Alden is said to have been the first person to disembark from the Mayflower and to have set foot on Plymouth Rock in 1620. Alden himself was not a Pilgrim as such, and was a carpenter working on the Mayflower before it sailed. He apparently decided to travel with the ship at the last minute, perhaps in pursuit of the passenger who would become his wife, Priscilla Mullens. Alden ended up in a love triangle with Priscilla and Captain Miles Standish, a relationship which is recounted in the Longfellow poem “The Courtship of Miles Standish”. John and Priscilla were the parents of a son, John Alden, who was later to be accused during the Salem witch trials.

89. Country that’s won the most medals in the history of the Winter Olympics : NORWAY
The first Winter Olympic Games was held in 1924, in Chamonix, France. The Winter and Summer Games were held in the same year until 1992, after which they were staggered so that we have an Olympic Games every two years.

97. 1990 Mike Leigh comedy/drama : LIFE IS SWEET
“Life is Sweet” is a British movie released in 1990 starring the great Jim Broadbent and Alison Steadman. Both the critics and the audiences loved this film, and somehow I’ve never seen it. It’s on the list …

100. Maven : PRO
I’ve always loved the word “maven”, another word for an expert. Maven comes into English from the Yiddish “meyvn” meaning someone who appreciates and is a connoisseur.

101. First word of Dante’s “Inferno” : NEL
The first line of Dante’s “Inferno” is “Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita”, which translates as “Halfway along our life’s path”.

Dante Alighieri’s “Divine Comedy” is an epic poem dating back to the 14th century. The first part of that epic is “Inferno”, which is the Italian word for “Hell”. In the poem, Dante is led on a journey by the poet Virgil, starting at the gates of Hell on which are written the famous words “Abandon all hope, ye who enter here”.

102. “E.T.” boy and others : ELLIOTTS
1982’s classic science fiction movie “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” was directed by Steven Spielberg. The idea behind the film came from Spielberg himself, and the character E.T. was based on an imaginary friend that he conjured up as a child after his parents divorced in 1960.

111. Lady in “Lady and the Tramp,” e.g. : SPANIEL
The Cocker Spaniel originated in the UK, where the breed was developed for hunting the Eurasian Woodcock. It is the hunting of the woodcock that led to the breed’s name.

“Lady and the Tramp” is a classic animated feature from Walt Disney, released in 1955. Who can forget the scene where the Tramp and Lady are “on a date” and together eat that one strand of spaghetti? So cute!

122. Org. concerned with toy safety : SPCA
Unlike in most developed countries, there is no “umbrella” organization in the US with the goal of preventing cruelty to animals. Instead there are independent organizations set up all over the nation using the name SPCA. Having said that, there is an organization called the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) that was originally intended to operate across the country, but really it now focuses its efforts in New York City.

The toy group of dogs is made up of the smallest breeds. The smallest breeds are sometimes called “Teacup” breeds.

123. ___ Search (Bing forerunner) : MSN
Bing is the search engine from Microsoft. Bing is the latest name for an engine that Microsoft used to call Live Search, Windows Live Search and MSN Search.

124. Renaissance fair wear : CORSETS
A corset is a close-fitting undergarment that is stiffened with a material such as whalebone. Corsets are more usually worn by women, to shape the body. The word “corset” is a diminutive of the Old French “cors” meaning “body”.

Down
1. Dutch pot contents : TULIP
Tulip festivals are held in a few cities around the world. The largest of these is the Canadian Tulip Festival that is held every year in the capital city of Ottawa. The tradition of growing tulips in Ottawa really started at the end of WWII. The Dutch royal family presented the city with 100,000 tulip bulbs as an act of thank for having sheltered Princess Juliana and her children while the Nazis occupied the Netherlands. The first Canadian Tulip Festival took place in 1953.

2. Toll : KNELL
The word “knell” is used for a solemn ring from a bell, often associated with death or a funeral. “Knell” comes the Old English “cnell” and is probably imitative in origin, sounding like a peal from a large bell.

3. 1935 poem with one word per line … as spelled out by this puzzle’s circled letters : THE LOCUST TREE IN FLOWER
“The Locust Tree in Flower” is a minimalist poem by William Carlos Williams that has but one word per line:

Among
of
green

stiff
old
bright

broken
branch
come

white
sweet
May

again

6. Sullied : UNCLEAN
“To sully” is to stain, tarnish. The term is often used in the context of sullying or tarnishing a reputation.

7. Extinct wingless bird : MOA
Moas were flightless birds native to New Zealand that are now extinct. The fate of the Moa is a great example of the detrimental effect that humans can have on animal populations. The Maoris arrived in New Zealand about 1300 AD, upsetting the balance of the ecosystem. The Moa were hunted to extinction within 200 years, which had the knock-on effect of killing off the Haast’s Eagle, the Moa’s only predator prior to the arrival of man. Moas were huge creatures, measuring up to 12 feet tall with their necks stretched upwards.

8. California’s ___ Freeway : VENTURA
The Ventura Freeway in Southern California is officially known as State Route 134.

10. Blue shade : CYAN
“Cyan” is short for “cyan blue”. The term comes from the Greek word “kyanos” meaning “dark blue, the color of lapis lazuli”.

11. Piece of Tin Pan Alley music : RAG
Ragtime music was at the height of it popularity in the early 1900s. It takes its name from its characteristic “ragged” rhythms. The most famous ragtime composer was Scott Joplin, who had a big hit with his “Maple Leaf Rag” when it was published in 1899. He followed that up with a string of hits, including the “Pine Apple Rag” (sic). Ragtime fell out of favor about 1917 when the public turned to jazz. It had a resurgence in the forties when jazz musicians started to include ragtime tunes in their repertoires. But it was the 1973 movie “The Sting” that brought the true revival, as the hit soundtrack included numerous ragtime tunes by Scott Joplin, including the celebrated “The Entertainer” originally published in 1902.

Tin Pan Alley was originally a specific location, West 28th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenue in Manhattan. The area was associated with the music publishing business from about 1885 to the start of the Great Depression The name itself is possibly a reference to the tinny sound of cheap pianos that were common at the time.

12. Midwest tribe : OTO
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

13. Ahab, e.g. : PEGLEG
“Moby-Dick; or, The Whale” is an 1851 novel by Herman Melville. The title refers to a sperm whale that has been dubbed “Moby Dick” by Captain Ahab. The giant whale bit off Ahab’s leg, and so the captain is obsessed with revenge.

15. Writer of 3-Down : WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS
William Carlos Williams was somewhat unique as a poet, in that he also worked full time as a pediatrician and general practitioner. Williams was a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and never gave up his medical practice, even when he earned recognition in the world of literature.

17. Pay stub abbr. : YTD
Year-to-date (YTD)

20. Remove, in a way : DOFF
One doffs one’s hat, usually as a mark of respect. To doff is to take off, with “doff” being a contraction of “do off”. The opposite of “doff” is “don” meaning “to put on”.

24. Mad magazine cartoonist Drucker : MORT
Mort Drucker is a caricaturist and longtime contributor to “Mad” magazine. A very long time in fact, since 1956.

27. Like about 45% of human blood : TYPE O
The most important grouping of blood types is the ABO system. Blood is classified as either A, B, AB or O, depending on the type of antigens on the surface of the red blood cells. A secondary designation of blood is the Rh factor, in which other antigens are labelled as either positive or negative. When a patient receives a blood transfusion, ideally the donor blood should be the same type as that of the recipient, as incompatible blood cells can be rejected. However, blood type O-neg can be accepted by recipients with all blood types, A, B, AB or O, and positive or negative. Hence someone with O-neg blood type is called a “universal donor”.

32. Internet troll, intentionally : ANGERER
In Internet terms, a “troll” is someone who attempts to disrupt online group activities. The fishing term “troll” is used to describe such a person, as he or she throws out off-topic remarks in an attempt to “lure” others into some emotional response.

33. Cells that protect neurons : GLIA
Neuroglia are cells that protect and support nerve cells. The term “glia” comes from the Greek for “glue”, implying that the neuroglia are the “glue” of the nervous system, holding the neurons in place.

36. Levi’s Stadium athlete, informally : NINER
The San Francisco 49ers of the NFL have been playing their home games in the Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara since 2014. The team moved from the famous Candlestick Park, which they had been using since 1971. Levi’s Stadium will get a big boost in January 2016, as it is scheduled to host that year’s Super Bowl.

37. Some Pontiacs : GTOS
The Pontiac GTO was was produced by GM from 1964 to 1974, and again by a GM subsidiary in Australia from 2004 to 2006. The original GTO’s design is credited to Pontiac chief engineer at the time John DeLorean, who later was found the DeLorean Motor Company.

39. One who’s much praised : ALLAH
The term “Allah” comes from the Arabic “al-” and “ilah”, meaning “the” and “deity”. So “Allah” translates as “God”.

42. Capt.’s inferiors : LTS
A lieutenant (lt.) has a lower rank than a captain (capt.).

44. Cause déjà vu, perhaps : RECUR
“Déjà vu” is French for “already seen”.

46. “Family Guy” daughter : MEG
Mila Kunis is a Ukrainian-born, American actress, who plays Jackie Burkhart on “That ’70s Show”. Fans of the cartoon series “Family Guy” might recognize her voicing the Meg Griffin character. In ”Black Swan”, Kunis plays a rival ballet dancer to the character played by Natalie Portman. In her personal life, Kunis dated Macaulay Culkin for 8 years.

52. ___ Period, 1603-1868 : EDO
Edo is the former name of the Japanese city of Tokyo. Edo was the seat of the Tokugawa shogunate, a feudal regime that ruled from 1603 until 1868. The shogun lived in the magnificent Edo castle. Some parts of the original castle remain and today’s Tokyo Imperial Palace, the residence of the Emperor of Japan, was built on its grounds.

53. “___ Arizona Skies” (John Wayne movie) : ‘NEATH
I believe there is an error in the clue here, and the full name of the John Wayne film is “‘Neath the Arizona Skies”.

John Wayne was called Marion Mitchell Morrison at birth, named after his grandfather who was a Civil War veteran. When young Marion was a little boy, a local fireman used to call him “Little Duke” because he was always seen walking with his large dog called “Duke”. Marion liked the name “Duke” and so he called himself Duke Morrison for the rest of his life. That said, Duke Morrison also used John Wayne as a stage name.

56. “Just a minute,” in texts : BRB
Be right back (brb)

57. Cousin of an aardwolf : HYENA
Hyenas have the reputation of being cowardly scavengers. That said, the spotted hyena that lives in Sub-Saharan Africa actually kills about 95% of its food and a pack of spotted hyenas are capable of driving off leopards or lionesses before they can consume their kill.

An aardwolf is a small hyena native to Eastern and Southern Africa. Aardwolf is an Afrikaans name meaning “earth wolf”.

58. Army Rangers beret color : TAN
US Army Rangers assigned to the 75th Ranger Regiment wear a distinctive tan beret instead of the standard black beret. The tan beret is worn in memory of Rogers’ Rangers who wore tan buckskin caps during the French and Indian War.

61. Branded footwear : CROCS
Crocs are foam clogs that were originally designed as shoes to be worn at health spas.

73. Liberal arts subj. : SOC
Sociology (soc.)

76. Da ___, Vietnam : NANG
Da Nang is a major Vietnamese port city on the South China Sea. During the Vietnam War, Da Nang was the site of a major air base used by the South Vietnamese and US air forces. At the height of the war, Da Nang was the biggest airport in the whole world.

77. Fright wig wearer : CLOWN
A “fright wig” is a wig in which the hair stands up straight from the head, as if the wearer is terrified.

78. Comic impressionist David : FRYE
David Frye was a comedian and impressionist who specialized in taking off famous American politicians. The list of celebrities that Frye impersonated included Presidents Johnson and Nixon, and Senators Hubert Humphrey and Robert Kennedy.

83. “31 Days of Oscar” network : TCM
Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is one of my favorite television channels, delivering just what its name promises: classic movies.

90. River through Deutschland : RHEIN
The river running through Europe that we know in English as the Rhine, is called “Rhein” in German, “Rhin” in French and “Rijn” in Dutch.

“Deutsch” is the German word for “German”.

93. What a cousin can be twice : REMOVED
In the most general terms, a cousin is anyone with whom one shares a common ancestor. Cousins in one’s immediate family are of course usually called by a more direct term (father, brother, uncle etc.). Two cousins are pinpointed in a family tree by using “degree” and “removal” to describe the relationship. For example, first cousins (first-degree cousins) share a common grandparent, and second cousins share a common great-grandparent, and so on up the tree. If the two cousins share the same common ancestor but there is a generational difference, then the “removal” term is used. So, if you share as a common ancestor your great-grandparent with one of your cousins, that person is your second cousin, unless that cousin is of a different generation in which case the number of generations “removed” is also specified. If that person regards your great-grandfather as his/her great-great grandfather, then you are still second cousins but more specifically are second cousins once removed (i.e. one generation removed). I explained this very badly …

98. What may make you duck down? : EIDERS
Eiders are large sea ducks. Their down feathers are used to fill pillows and quilts, giving the name to the quilt called an “eiderdown”.

99. Certain salt : IODATE
An iodate is a salt that includes an anion made from one iodine atom connected to three oxygen atoms.

100. Falafel holder : PITA
Falafel is a fried ball of ground chickpeas or fava beans served in pita bread. I love chickpeas, but falafel just seems too dry to me.

104. Steppes dwelling : YURT
A yurt is a wood-framed dwelling that is used by nomads in the steppes of Central Asia. Although a yurt is a substantial structure, it is of course extremely portable.

A steppe is a grassland, devoid of trees apart from those growing near rivers and lakes. We would likely call such a geographic feature a prairie in this country.

105. “Beowulf” and others : EPICS
“Beowulf” is an old epic poem from England, although the story is set in Scandinavia. Beowulf fights a battle, defending the Danish King Hrothgar from the ferocious outcast Grendel. Hrothgar had built a great hall for his people in which they could celebrate; singing, dancing and drinking lots of mead. Grendel was angered by the carousing and attacked the hall, devouring many of the incumbent warriors as they slept. A bit of an extreme reaction to noisy neighbors I’d say …

107. It might have an escalator : LEASE
An escalator clause in a contract is a provision dictating that an amount can change under certain conditions. For example, wage rate might be linked with the cost of living index.

110. Artist Maar depicted in Picasso’s “The Weeping Woman” : DORA
Dora Maar was a famous French photographer. She became Pablo Picasso’s lover and muse when she was 29, and Picasso 54. The pair had a complicated relationship that lasted nine years. Picasso painted a portrait of her called “Dora Maar with Cat” that was sold at auction in 2006 for almost $100 million, the second highest price ever paid for a painting.

112. MCAT topic: Abbr. : ANAT
The acronym MCAT stands for the Medical College Admission Test.

114. Intro to biology? : EXO-
Exobiology is the study of life in the universe, and central to the work of exobiologists is the search for life beyond earth. A fascinating field, I would imagine …

115. Screen : VET
The verb “to vet” comes from the term “veterinarian”. The idea is that to “vet” something is to subject it to careful examination, like a veterinarian checking out an animal.

116. Lib. listings : EDS
One might find plenty of editions (eds.) of some books in a library (lib.).

118. Astronomer’s std. : GST
GST is Greenwich Sidereal Time.

Astronomers use sidereal time to know where to locate given stars in the night sky. Sidereal time is a time scale that takes into account the Earth’s rotation relative to stars with a fixed location in the night sky.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Theater purchase: Abbr. : TKT
4. Fertility doctor’s focus : OVUM
8. Little sucker? : VAC
11. Mountain-to-mountain transport : ROPEWAY
18. Sch. with a Manchester campus : UNH
19. Apple product : NANO
20. Fail to grant, in court : DENY
21. Showed humility : ATE DIRT
22. “Spoon River Anthology” poet Edgar ___ Masters : LEE
23. California’s Rancho ___ : CUCAMONGA
25. Appeared amazed : GOGGLED
26. Tattler’s threat : I’LL TELL!
28. At a high rate : OFTEN
29. “___ Folks,” Charles Schulz’s first strip : LI’L
30. Scheme : PLOY
31. Visibly sad : TEARFUL
33. Making environmentally friendly : GREENING
38. No. expert : CPA
40. One in a jungle trail : ANT
41. Walk with swaying hips : ROLLING GAIT
43. Arduous : GRUELING
46. Relative of a Great Dane : MASTIFF
47. 6 letters? : MNO
48. Like cars in a used car lot : RESOLD
49. Source of feta cheese : EWE
51. Prominent parts : SALIENCES
54. Put-on : ACT
55. Clinton secretary of state : ALBRIGHT
59. Ingratiate : ENDEAR
60. Like the American pronunciation of many Polish names : BUTCHERED
62. 7 1/2-foot Ming : YAO
64. Item extending over a gunwale : OAR
65. “Sesame Street” subjs. : RRR
66. An airbag can prevent it : BROKEN RIB
70. Fixer-upper’s need, for short : TLC
72. Counterpart of Aurora : EOS
74. Good part of a record : WIN
75. Diverge : BRANCH OFF
79. Look good on : BECOME
82. Citizen : NATIONAL
84. Camera option, for short : SLR
85. She’s courted in “The Courtship of Miles Standish” : PRISCILLA
88. Shipping unit: Abbr. : CTN
89. Country that’s won the most medals in the history of the Winter Olympics : NORWAY
91. + or – thing : ION
92. How-to aid : DIAGRAM
95. Kind of omelet : EGG-WHITE
97. 1990 Mike Leigh comedy/drama : LIFE IS SWEET
100. Maven : PRO
101. First word of Dante’s “Inferno” : NEL
102. “E.T.” boy and others : ELLIOTTS
103. “Would you let me take a look?” : MAY I SEE
106. Plagues : ILLS
109. Funny : ODD
110. Coffee mate? : DONUT
111. Lady in “Lady and the Tramp,” e.g. : SPANIEL
113. Fix, as a braid : REWEAVE
117. From the top : OVER AGAIN
119. Battery size : AAA
120. Put forth : EXERTED
121. 107-Down subject : RENT
122. Org. concerned with toy safety : SPCA
123. ___ Search (Bing forerunner) : MSN
124. Renaissance fair wear : CORSETS
125. Put on : ADD
126. Road ___ : TEST
127. Where costumes are worn : SET

Down
1. Dutch pot contents : TULIP
2. Toll : KNELL
3. 1935 poem with one word per line … as spelled out by this puzzle’s circled letters : THE LOCUST TREE IN FLOWER
4. Start of a reminiscence : ONCE
5. Where bills may accumulate : VAULT
6. Sullied : UNCLEAN
7. Extinct wingless bird : MOA
8. California’s ___ Freeway : VENTURA
9. Common pizzeria name : ANGELO’S
10. Blue shade : CYAN
11. Piece of Tin Pan Alley music : RAG
12. Midwest tribe : OTO
13. Ahab, e.g. : PEGLEG
14. Decorative border : EDGING
15. Writer of 3-Down : WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS
16. Exist : ARE
17. Pay stub abbr. : YTD
20. Remove, in a way : DOFF
24. Mad magazine cartoonist Drucker : MORT
27. Like about 45% of human blood : TYPE O
32. Internet troll, intentionally : ANGERER
33. Cells that protect neurons : GLIA
34. Ransack : RIFLE
35. In conclusion: Fr. : ENFIN
36. Levi’s Stadium athlete, informally : NINER
37. Some Pontiacs : GTOS
39. One who’s much praised : ALLAH
42. Capt.’s inferiors : LTS
43. Clutch : GRAB
44. Cause déjà vu, perhaps : RECUR
45. ___ talk : IDLE
46. “Family Guy” daughter : MEG
50. Certain heiress : WIDOW
52. ___ Period, 1603-1868 : EDO
53. “___ Arizona Skies” (John Wayne movie) : ‘NEATH
56. “Just a minute,” in texts : BRB
57. Cousin of an aardwolf : HYENA
58. Army Rangers beret color : TAN
61. Branded footwear : CROCS
63. Circle : ORBIT
67. Cousins : KIN
68. Ones whose work is decreasing? : IRONERS
69. Severe penalty : BAN
71. Harp’s home key : C-FLAT
73. Liberal arts subj. : SOC
76. Da ___, Vietnam : NANG
77. Fright wig wearer : CLOWN
78. Comic impressionist David : FRYE
79. Lie in the hot sun : BROIL
80. Thick : MIDST
81. Group mailing tool : E-LIST
83. “31 Days of Oscar” network : TCM
85. Mound : PILE
86. Code contents : LAWS
87. Barrier to some websites : AGE
90. River through Deutschland : RHEIN
93. What a cousin can be twice : REMOVED
94. Done : AT AN END
96. Flips : GOES APE
98. What may make you duck down? : EIDERS
99. Certain salt : IODATE
100. Falafel holder : PITA
104. Steppes dwelling : YURT
105. “Beowulf” and others : EPICS
107. It might have an escalator : LEASE
108. Bias : SLANT
110. Artist Maar depicted in Picasso’s “The Weeping Woman” : DORA
112. MCAT topic: Abbr. : ANAT
113. ___ room : REC
114. Intro to biology? : EXO-
115. Screen : VET
116. Lib. listings : EDS
118. Astronomer’s std. : GST

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4 thoughts on “0510-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 10 May 15, Sunday”

  1. Too many errors in the NE to declare any type of victory, but a nice jaunt for Sunday. Even with an English major, I do not recall this poem. The early version of Schulz's "LIL People" reminds me a lot of The Family Circus by Bil Keane, a former neighbor of mine.

  2. Pan lokaj,

    Relating to 60A hereon, I wonder how a Butler might've BUTCHERED my Polish surname of Tomczyk .-)

    translate.google.com/#en/pl/Butler

    Jozef

    Ps: Can NYT X-puzzle copies be had from other than their hard-copy?

  3. Hi there, Jozef.

    I promise not try to pronounce any Polish, and hence avoid butchering anything. 🙂

    Electronic version of the NYTimes puzzle are availble at the MYTimes website, but with a paid subscription. Also, the NYTimes puzzle is available online at the Seattle Times website, although it is six weeks behind the NYTimes itself. I hope that helps.

  4. Impossibly vague and based on a formless, artless, grammatically inept and pretty stupid poem, so, no, I had no chance to finish this one.

    Waste of time, to be honest.

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