0503-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 3 May 15, Sunday

QuickLinks:
Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today’s New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Schoenholz
THEME: Non-Starters … each of today’s themed answers are common phrases starting with the letter N, but that letter N has been dropped to suit the clue. In other words, there’s “no n-starter” in these phrases:

23A. Arctic hideaway? : A NOOK OF THE NORTH (from “Nanook of the North”)
34A. Neck-stretching yoga position? : EAR TO ONE’S HEART (from “near to one’s heart”)
45A. Big win for a prominent TV financial adviser? : ORMAN CONQUEST (from “Norman Conquest”)
65A. Like makers of one-way street signs? : ARROW-MINDED (from “narrow-minded”)
85A. Environmentalists’ concern in northern France? : OISE POLLUTION (from “noise pollution”)
96A. Igloo, e.g.? : ICE PIECE OF WORK (from “nice piece of work”)
111A. One sending money from France or Germany? : EURO TRANSMITTER (from “neurotransmitter”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 28m 06s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Schnozzolas : BEAKS
“Schnoz” is a slang term for a nose, particularly a large one. The term comes from the Yiddish “shnoitsl” meaning “nose”, which in turn comes from the German “Schnauze” meaning “snout”.

11. Mali, mostly : SAHARA
The name “Sahara” means “greatest desert” in Arabic and it is just that, a great desert covering almost 4 million square miles of Northern Africa. That’s almost the size of the United States.

The Republic of Mali is a landlocked country in western Africa, south of Algeria. Formerly known as French Sudan, the nation’s most famous city is Timbuktu. Mali is the third-largest producer of gold on the continent, after South Africa and Ghana.

17. Variety of primrose : OXLIP
The plant known as the oxlip is more properly called Primula elatior. The oxlip is often confused with its similar-looking cousin, the cowslip.

18. New York Giants founder who’s in the Pro Football Hall of Fame : TIM MARA
Tim Mara founded the New York Giants in 1925, after having purchased the NFL franchise for the city for the princely sum of $500, which is somewhere between $12,000 and $13,000 in today’s money.

22. Philadelphia’s ___ Ross Bridge : BETSY
The Betsy Ross Bridge crosses the Delaware River from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Pennsauken, New Jersey. The bridge was opened in 1976 and was named for Betsy Ross, who is reputedly created the the first American flag two hundred years earlier, in 1776.

Legend has it that Betsy Ross made the first American flag for General George Washington. However, this story only surfaced during the centennial celebrations of 1876, and although Betsy Ross was indeed one of several flag makers in Philadelphia in the days of George Washington, sadly there’s no definitive evidence that Ross provided that first Stars and Stripes.

23. Arctic hideaway? : A NOOK OF THE NORTH (from “Nanook of the North”)
Nanook is a character from Inuit mythology, the master of the bears. The name “Nanook” came into the general consciousness of the public with the release of the silent documentary film “Nanook of the North” in 1922.

26. Higgledy-piggledy : AMOK
The phrase “to run amok” (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for “attacking furiously”, “amuk”. The word “amok” was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were “frenzied”. Given Malaya’s troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy …

28. Mother of Hermes : MAIA
Maia is one of the Pleiades of Greek mythology, and is the eldest of the Seven Sisters.

The Seven Sisters of Greek mythology are also known as the Pleiades. The Seven Sisters were the daughters of the titan Atlas, who had been forced to carry the heavens on his shoulders. In an act of kindness, Zeus transformed the sisters first into doves, and then into stars so that they could provide comfort for their father. There is indeed a cluster of seven stars in the night sky named for the myth and known as the Pleiades.

Hermes was the Greek god of transitions and boundaries, one who intercedes between mortals and the divine. The Roman equivalent to Hermes was the god Mercury.

32. R&B’s Peniston : CECE
CeCe Peniston is a recording artist noted for the prevalence of her music in dance clubs. Her most successful song is “Finally”, released in 1991. Supposedly Peniston wrote the lyrics for “Finally” while she was still at school, during a chemistry class!

33. Restrained : BATED
“Bated breath” is breath that has lessened in intensity, “abated”.

38. Constellation next to Scorpius : ARA
The constellation of Ara takes its name from the Latin word for “altar”.

40. Many a candidate, briefly : POL
Politician (pol.)

41. Hersey novel setting : ADANO
“A Bell for Adano” is a novel written by John Hersey. Hersey’s story is about an Italian-American US Army officer, Major Joppolo, who found a replacement for a town’s bell stolen by fascists. “A Bell for Adano” was made into a film in 1945, the same year the novel won a Pulitzer.

45. Big win for a prominent TV financial adviser? : ORMAN CONQUEST (from “Norman Conquest”)
Suze Orman is a financial advisor who has gotten her message out on television, in books and on the speaking circuit. She often appears on PBS, and indeed is the most successful fundraiser public television has ever had.

The Norman Conquest of England started in 1066 when William, Duke of Normandy defeated King Harold II of England at the Battle of Hastings. William was crowned King William I of England, and was dubbed William the Conqueror.

51. Where Bill and Hillary Clinton met, briefly : YALE U
When Hillary Rodham Clinton was appointed US Secretary of State, she became the first former First Lady to serve in a president’s cabinet. Hillary met her husband, President Bill Clinton, when the two were studying at Yale law school.

52. ___ Domenici, longtime New Mexico senator : PETE
Pete Domenici served in the US Senate for the state of New Mexico from 1873 to 2009, making him the state’s longest-serving US senator in history.

55. Old carrier name : USAIR
From 1953, what today is US Airways was called Allegheny Airlines. In the seventies, customers became very dissatisfied with the company’s service levels as it struggled to manage a rapid expansion in its number of flights. These problems earned the airline the nickname “Agony Air”. Allegheny tried to leave the “agony” behind in 1979 and changed its name to USAir. In 1997 the name was changed again, to US Airways. US Airways merged with American Airlines in 2013, and the “US Airways” brand name will gradually be replaced with “American Airlines”.

56. ___ score (newborn health measure) : APGAR
The Apgar scale is used to assess the health of newborn babies. The newborn is evaluated in five categories that are given by the acronym APGAR, namely:

– Appearance
– Pulse
– Grimace
– Activity
– Respiration

The acronym is actually a “backronym”, as the test is name for Dr. Virginia Apgar who devised it in 1952.

58. Original Beatles bassist Sutcliffe : STU
Stu Sutcliffe was one of the original four members of The Silver Beatles (as The Beatles were known in their early days), along with John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison. Sutcliffe apparently came up with name “Beatles” along with John Lennon, as a homage to their hero Buddy Holly who was backed by the “Crickets”. By all reports, Sutcliffe wasn’t a very talented musician and was more interested in painting. He went with the group to Hamburg, more than once, but he eventually left the Beatles and went back to art school, actually studying for a while at the Hamburg College of Art. In 1962 in Hamburg, Sutcliffe collapsed with blinding headaches. He died in the ambulance on the way to hospital, his death attributed to cerebral paralysis.

59. Padre’s hermano : TIO
In Spanish, an uncle (tio) is the brother of the father or the mother (hermano del padre o de la madre).

61. Something a GPS recalculates: Abbr. : RTE
A Global Positioning System (GPS) might point out a route (rte.).

62. Monk’s hood : COWL
A cowl is a long garment with a hood that is primarily worn by monks in the the Christian tradition.

71. Entry-level position, for short? : CPA
A certified public accountant (CPA) might make entries in the books.

72. High-level, as a farm team : AAA
A, AA and AAA are minor leagues in baseball.

75. Parts of a kingdom : PHYLA
Biological classification is a method used to group organisms by biological type. The method uses a hierarchy of nested classes, with an organism being classified with reference to evolutionary traits. The major taxonomic ranks used are:

– Life
– Domain
– Kingdom
– Phylum (plural “phyla”)
– Class
– Order
– Family
– Genus (plural “genera”)
– Species

77. Thai money : BAHT
The baht is the currency of Thailand, and is subdivided into 100 satang.

79. Certain bond, for short : MUNI
A municipal bond (muni) is one that is issued by a city or local government, or some similar agency. Munis have an advantage over other investments in that any interest earned on the bond is usually exempt from state and federal income taxes.

85. Environmentalists’ concern in northern France? : OISE POLLUTION (from “noise pollution”)
The River Oise rises in Belgium and joins up with the River Seine just outside Paris.

89. Either half of a diphthong : VOWEL
In the world of linguistics, a diphthong is a syllable made from two adjacent vowel sounds. Syllables with only one vowels sound are known as monophthongs.

90. 1970s sitcom production co. : MTM
MTM Enterprises was a television production company founded in 1969 by Mary Tyler Moore, originally to produce the “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. The company subsequently produced the likes of “The Bob Newhart Show”, “Rhoda”, “WKRP in Cincinnati”, “Hill Street Blues” and “St. Elsewhere”. That’s a lot of great television …

91. Eminem producer, informally : DRE
Dr. Dre is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

92. Dead end? : DEE
There is a letter D (dee) at either end of the word “dead”.

93. Descendant of a son of Noah : HAMITE
According to the Book of Genesis, Noah lived to a ripe old age. Noah fathered his three sons Shem, Ham and Japheth when he was 500 years old, and the Great Flood took place when he was 600.

96. Igloo, e.g.? : ICE PIECE OF WORK (from “nice piece of work”)
The Inuit word for “house” is “iglu”, which we usually write as “igloo”. The Greenlandic (yes, that’s a language) word for “house” is very similar, namely “igdlo”.

101. Milton who led Uganda to independence : OBOTE
Milton Obote was the political leader who led Uganda to independence from British colonial rule in 1962. Oboto served as Prime Minister and then President of the country, until he was overthrown by Idi Amin in 1971.

103. Melees : FRACASES
“Fracas” is a French word that we absorbed into English. In turn, the French usage evolved from the Italian “fracasso” meaning “uproar, crash”.

Our word “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”, and in both languages the word means “confused fight”.

104. State that borders three Can. provinces : MONT
Montana is the only US state that borders three Canadian provinces: Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan.

105. Locale of a 1984 industrial disaster : BHOPAL
Bhopal is a city in India that garnered international attention in 1984 as the site of the perhaps the worst industrial disaster the world has ever witnessed. A Union Carbide pesticide plant leaked deadly methyl isocyanate gas into the air resulting in the deaths of thousands of local residents.

107. Shuffle, e.g. : IPOD
The iPod Shuffle was introduced in 2005 and is the smallest of Apple’s line of audio players. The Shuffle was the first iPod to use flash memory.

111. One sending money from France or Germany? : EURO TRANSMITTER (from “neurotransmitter”)
The European Union (EU) today stands at a membership of 27 states. The Euro is the official currency of only 19 of the 28. The list of states in the EU that don’t use the Euro includes the UK, Denmark and Sweden.

Neurotransmitters are chemicals that transmit signals from one nerve cell to another, across the synapse that lies between them.

114. Bayer brand : ALEVE
Aleve is a brand name used for the anti-inflammatory drug Naproxen sodium.

Bayer AG is a German pharmaceutical company founded in 1863. The company’s most famous product is its original brand of aspirin. The company logo, the Bayer cross, was introduced in 1904. That same logo can be seen on an illuminated sign in Leverkusen where the company is headquartered. It is the largest illuminated sign in the world.

115. Winter vehicle : SNOWCAT
The brand name Sno-Cat is owned by the Tucker company. All “snowcats” are tracked vehicles built to work in snow, famously used in expeditions to the polar regions. The modern Sno-Cat from Tucker differs from its competitors in that it has four, independently-mounted tracks.

117. Roman harvest goddess : CERES
Ceres was a Roman goddess of agriculture and fertility, and was the counterpart of the Greek goddess Demeter. Our modern word “cereal” comes from the name “Ceres”.

120. See 119-Across : HYMNS
A “hymn” is a song of praise or thanksgiving to a deity. The term comes into English via Old French and is ultimately derived from the Greek “hymnos”, the word for an ode or song in praise of the gods. The Greek term is possibly a variant of “hymenaios” meaning “wedding song”, derived from Hymen, the Greek god of marriage.

Down
1. Some haircuts : BOBS
A “bob cut” is a short hairstyle in which the hair is cut straight around the head, at about the line of the jaw. Back in the 1570s a “bob” was the name given to a horse’s tail that was cut short, and about a century later it was being used to describe short hair on humans. The style became very popular with women in the early 1900s (as worn by actress Clara Bow, for example), with the fashion dying out in the thirties. The style reemerged in the sixties around the time the Beatles introduced their “mop tops”, with Vidal Sassoon leading the way in styling women’s hair in a bob cut again. Personally, I like it …

2. C.O.O., e.g. : EXEC
A chief operating officer (COO) is a company executive (exec).

3. Communion spot : ALTAR RAIL
The Communion rite is the part of the Mass in the Roman Catholic tradition. The rite involves distribution of the Communion bread (the host, a wafer) to the faithful.

4. Fate : KISMET
“Kismet” is a Turkish word, meaning fate or fortune, one’s lot.

6. Takes part in a joint session? : SMOKES POT
“Potiguaya” is the Mexican-Spanish word for “marijuana leaves”. The slang name “pot” comes from “potiguaya”.

7. Kaiser, e.g., for short : HMO
Kaiser Permanente is a health maintenance organization (HMO) based in Oakland, California. Kaiser is the largest provider of managed care in the whole country.

9. Beethoven’s Third : EROICA
Beethoven originally dedicated his Symphony No. 3 to Napoleon Bonaparte. Beethoven admired the principles of the French Revolution and as such respected Bonaparte who was “born” out of the uprising. When Napoleon declared himself Emperor, Beethoven (and much of Europe) saw this as a betrayal to the ideals of the revolution so he changed the name of his new symphony from “Bonaparte” to “Eroica”, meaning “heroic” or “valiant”.

11. Herr’s heirs? : SOHNE
The German word for “boy” is “Junge”, and the word for “son” is “Sohn”.

15. Adjust at Moody’s, say : RERATE
Moody’s is a credit rating agency which ranks the creditworthiness of borrowers, a service also provided by Standard & Poor’s. Moody’s was started in 1909 by John Moody when he published a book containing analysis of railroad securities.

18. Petruchio’s task vis-à-vis Katharina : TAMING
William Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew” is about a courting couple. The male is Petruchio, a gentleman of Verona, and the female is Katharina, the so-called “shrew”. As the play progresses, the “shrew” is “tamed” and becomes an “obedient” bride … a controversial storyline in the contemporary world, to say the least. Regardless, modern adaptations have been made, including 1948’s Broadway musical “Kiss Me Kate” and the 1999 romantic comedy “10 Things I Hate About You”.

21. Herring relatives : SHADS
The shad is also known as the river herring. The eggs (roe) of the female shad are prized as a delicacy in the Eastern US.

24. Mini mints : TIC TACS
Tic Tacs aren’t American candy (as I always mistakenly believed). Tic Tacs are made by the Italian company Ferrero, and were introduced in 1969.

31. Sandpiper’s domain : SHORE
Sandpipers are a family of shore birds that mainly feed on small invertebrates picked out of the sand using their long beaks.

33. Whom the witches deem “lesser than Macbeth, and greater” : BANQUO
Banquo is a character in William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”. Banquo is the thane of the Scottish province of Lochaber. Macbeth has him murdered, only to have Banquo’s ghost return and haunt him.

48. Tombstone figure : EARP
Wyatt Earp is famous as one of the participants in the gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Earp was a city policeman in Wichita, Kansas and also in Dodge City, Kansas. Earp was also deputy sheriff in Tombstone, Arizona where the O.K. Corral gunfight took place. Years later, Earp joined the Alaska Gold Rush and with a partner built and operated the Dexter Saloon in Nome.

50. Image in the “Jurassic Park” logo, familiarly : T REX
The Tyrannosaurus rex (usually written T. rex) was a spectacular looking dinosaur. “Tyrannosaurus” comes from the Greek words “tyrannos” (tyrant) and “sauros” (lizard), and the “rex” is of course Latin for “king”. They were big boys, measuring 42 feet long and 13 feet tall at the hips, and weighing 7.5 tons.

“Jurassic Park” is a 1990 novel by Michael Crichton, adapted into a hugely successful movie by Steven Spielberg in 1993. One of the main premises of the novel is that dinosaur DNA could be harvested from mosquitoes trapped in amber (fossilized tree resin), the DNA coming from the dinosaur blood consumed by the mosquitoes. The dinosaur DNA is then sequenced and used to create clones of the original beasts. A clever idea, but apparently not very practical from what I’ve read …

52. “The Prodigal Son,” for one : PARABLE
The Parable of the Prodigal Son is related in the Gospel of Luke. Someone who is “prodigal” is wasteful or extravagant. The parable tells of a man with two sons. The youngest asks for and receives his share of the family estate, and then spends it all unwisely. The “prodigal” son returns, to an unwelcoming older brother. The father, however, declares happily that his son “was lost and now is found”.

57. Feature of the Nixon tapes : GAP
Famously, there is a gap of 18½ minutes in the Nixon White House tapes. Rose Mary Woods, President Nixon’s secretary, reported that she was reviewing one of the tapes when she accidentally hit record instead of the stop button, causing about 5 minutes of erasure. There is an additional 13 minutes of “buzzing” that she could not explain. There has been much speculation about what actually happened, as a review of notes made in the meeting covered by the tape show that the arrests made at the Watergate were discussed.

58. Wee, in Dundee : SMA
The city of Dundee lies on the north bank of the Firth of Tay in Scotland. The origins of the name “Dundee” are a little obscure, although the omnipresent “dùn” in place names all over Scotland and Ireland is the Celtic word for “fort”.

60. First lady McKinley : IDA
Ida Saxton met Bill McKinley at a picnic in 1867, just before she headed off to Europe on a “grand tour”. So, the two had to wait until 1869 before they started courting. The couple married in 1871 in Canton, Ohio, Ida’s hometown. Ida McKinley developed epilepsy before her husband was elected to President of the US and became very dependent on him to provide physical and moral support. She always sat by his side at public functions, breaking with the tradition of the President hosting some of the guests, and the First Lady others. After her husband was assassinated, Mrs. McKinley could not bring herself to attend her husband’s funeral, and then withdrew from public view to her home in Canton. She passed away six years after her husband, in 1907.

62. Guitar accessory : CAPO
A capo is a clamp-like device that is placed around the neck of a guitar to shorten the strings, and hence raise the pitch. The full name, rarely used these days, is “capo tasto”, which is Italian for “head tie”.

66. Island that may have an apostrophe in its name : O’AHU
O’ahu has been called “The Gathering Place”, although the word “O’ahu” has no translation in Hawaiian. It seems that O’ahu is simply the name of the island. One story is that it is named after the son of the Polynesian navigator that first found the islands. The island is made up of two volcanoes, Wai’anae and Ko’olau, joined together by a broad valley, the O’ahu Plain.

67. Light amount? : WATT
James Watt was a Scottish inventor, a man who figured prominently in the Industrial Revolution in Britain largely due to the improvements he made to the fledgling steam engine. The SI unit of power is called the watt, named in his honor.

68. Martial arts level : DAN
Judo is a martial art from Japan that was developed relatively recently, in 1882. The name “judo” translates as “gentle way”. Practitioners of judo proceed through a series of proficiency grades known as the kyu-dan system. At each progression, a different colored belt is awarded.

71. “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” novelist : CAPOTE
The larger-than-life Truman Capote was a celebrated author and comedian. Capote is perhaps most associated with his novella “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” and his true crime novel “In Cold Blood”. Truman Capote grew up in Monroeville, Alabama. There he met, and became lifelong friends with, fellow novelist Harper Lee. Capote was the inspiration for the character “Dill” in Lee’s celebrated work “To Kill a Mockingbird”. In turn, Harper Lee was the inspiration for the character “Idabel” in Capote’s “Other Voices, Other Rooms”.

74. Heads of staff? : G-CLEFS
Clef is the French word for “key”. In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on the stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

76. Archetypal postwar suburb : LEVITTOWN
There are four suburban communities called Levittown in the US, each developed just after WWII by William Levitt. The houses were built primarily for returning veterans and their families. The four Levittowns are located in New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Puerto Rico.

78. ___ Janney, four-time “West Wing” Emmy winner : ALLISON
Allison Janney is a favorite actress of mine who I first encountered on “The West Wing” TV show. She is now playing one of the moms on the sitcom “Mom”.

79. Theme : MOTIF
A motif is a recurring element in an artistic work or design.

82. Nourishment for a plant embryo : ENDOSPERM
The germ of a cereal (like wheat and oat) is the reproductive part that germinates and grows into a new plant. A whole grain has three main parts:

– the germ, the source of the new plant
– the endosperm, the energy store of carbohydrate and protein for initial growth
– the bran, protective outer shell

83. Hessian river : EDER
The Eder is a river in Germany, a tributary of the Fulda River. The Eder has a dam near the small town of Waldeck which holds water in the large Edersee reservoir. This was one of the dams that was attacked by the RAF during WWII with the famous Barnes Wallis bouncing bombs. It was destroyed in the Dam Busters raid in 1943, but rebuilt the same year.

Hesse is a German state. The capital of Hesse is Wiesbaden, although the largest city in the state is Frankfurt.

95. “The Prince and the Showgirl” co-star, 1957 : MONROE
“The Prince and the Showgirl” is a 1957 movie starring Marilyn Monroe and Laurence Olivier. There’s a 2011 film called “My Week with Marilyn” that is set during the filming of “The Prince and the Showgirl”.

98. Canine protector : ENAMEL
Tooth enamel covers the crowns of our teeth. Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body. It is composed of 96% crystalline calcium phosphate.

The canine teeth of a mammal are also called the eye teeth. The name “canine” is used because these particular teeth are very prominent in dogs. The name “eye” is used because in humans the eye teeth are located in the upper jaw, directly below the eyes.

100. John who founded Methodism : WESLEY
The Methodist movement started within the Church of England in the 1700s, inspired mainly by the teachings of John Wesley and his younger brother Charles.

105. Little nail : BRAD
“Brad” is a name given to the brass fastener that is used to hold sheets of paper together. The brad is used by inserting it through holes punched in the paper, and then spreading out the two legs of the fastener.

106. Chinese dynasty of a thousand years ago : LIAO
The Liao Dynasty in China ruled over much of the country between the years 916 and 1125. The dynasty was also known as the Empire of the Khitan.

110. Hardy heroine : TESS
The full name of Thomas Hardy’s 1891 novel is “Tess of the d’Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented”. When it was originally published, “Tess …” received very mixed reviews, largely because it addresses some difficult sexual themes including rape, and sexual double standards (society’s attitude towards men vs women). I suppose the most celebrated screen adaptation is Roman Polanski’s “Tess” released in 1979. Polanski apparently made “Tess” because his wife, Sharon Tate, gave him Hardy’s novel as her last act before she was murdered by the Manson family. There is a dedication at the beginning of the movie that simply reads “To Sharon”.

112. The Horned Frogs of the Big 12 Conf. : TCU
The athletic teams of Texas Christian University (TCU) are known as the TCU Horned Frogs. The Texas horned lizard is known colloquially as the “horned frog”.

113. Original Dungeons & Dragons game co. : TSR
Dungeons & Dragons is a complex role-playing game first published in 1974, by Tactical Studies Rules Incorporated (TSR). Dungeons & Dragons was probably the first of the modern role-playing games to be developed, and the most successful. It is still played by lots of people today, including my nerdy son …

114. Berlin cry : ACH!
Berlin is the capital and largest city in Germany, and is the second most populous city in the European Union (after London).

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Schnozzolas : BEAKS
6. More reserved : SHYER
11. Mali, mostly : SAHARA
17. Variety of primrose : OXLIP
18. New York Giants founder who’s in the Pro Football Hall of Fame : TIM MARA
20. Jacks or better, say, in poker : OPENERS
22. Philadelphia’s ___ Ross Bridge : BETSY
23. Arctic hideaway? : A NOOK OF THE NORTH (from “Nanook of the North”)
25. Take for a ride : SCAM
26. Higgledy-piggledy : AMOK
27. Nonviolent protests : SIT-INS
28. Mother of Hermes : MAIA
29. Strikes : REDLINES
32. R&B’s Peniston : CECE
33. Restrained : BATED
34. Neck-stretching yoga position? : EAR TO ONE’S HEART (from “near to one’s heart”)
37. Haymakers? : BALERS
38. Constellation next to Scorpius : ARA
39. Hound : NAG
40. Many a candidate, briefly : POL
41. Hersey novel setting : ADANO
43. Took over : SEIZED
45. Big win for a prominent TV financial adviser? : ORMAN CONQUEST (from “Norman Conquest”)
51. Where Bill and Hillary Clinton met, briefly : YALE U
52. ___ Domenici, longtime New Mexico senator : PETE
54. Benefit offsetter : COST
55. Old carrier name : USAIR
56. ___ score (newborn health measure) : APGAR
58. Original Beatles bassist Sutcliffe : STU
59. Padre’s hermano : TIO
61. Something a GPS recalculates: Abbr. : RTE
62. Monk’s hood : COWL
65. Like makers of one-way street signs? : ARROW-MINDED (from “narrow-minded”)
69. High point : APEX
70. Exclamation accented on the second syllable : AHA!
71. Entry-level position, for short? : CPA
72. High-level, as a farm team : AAA
73. Bit of folk wisdom : ADAGE
75. Parts of a kingdom : PHYLA
77. Thai money : BAHT
79. Certain bond, for short : MUNI
81. Hardly Mr. Right : CREEP
85. Environmentalists’ concern in northern France? : OISE POLLUTION (from “noise pollution”)
88. Classic joke target : BLONDE
89. Either half of a diphthong : VOWEL
90. 1970s sitcom production co. : MTM
91. Eminem producer, informally : DRE
92. Dead end? : DEE
93. Descendant of a son of Noah : HAMITE
96. Igloo, e.g.? : ICE PIECE OF WORK (from “nice piece of work”)
101. Milton who led Uganda to independence : OBOTE
102. “The race ___!” : IS ON
103. Melees : FRACASES
104. State that borders three Can. provinces : MONT
105. Locale of a 1984 industrial disaster : BHOPAL
107. Shuffle, e.g. : IPOD
108. Lend, slangily : SPOT
111. One sending money from France or Germany? : EURO TRANSMITTER (from “neurotransmitter”)
114. Bayer brand : ALEVE
115. Winter vehicle : SNOWCAT
116. Sneak previews : TEASERS
117. Roman harvest goddess : CERES
118. Completely strip : DENUDE
119. Starting words of some 120-Across : O LORD …
120. See 119-Across : HYMNS

Down
1. Some haircuts : BOBS
2. C.O.O., e.g. : EXEC
3. Communion spot : ALTAR RAIL
4. Fate : KISMET
5. Sleeper, maybe : SPY
6. Takes part in a joint session? : SMOKES POT
7. Kaiser, e.g., for short : HMO
8. Jabbers : YAKS
9. Beethoven’s Third : EROICA
10. Whitewater enthusiast : RAFTER
11. Herr’s heirs? : SOHNE
12. Humans’ cousins : APES
13. Brooder : HEN
14. Irregular : ANOMALOUS
15. Adjust at Moody’s, say : RERATE
16. Not so conventional : ARTIER
18. Petruchio’s task vis-à-vis Katharina : TAMING
19. ___ sense : IN ONE
21. Herring relatives : SHADS
24. Mini mints : TIC TACS
26. Take ___ off : A LOAD
30. Beautified : DONE UP
31. Sandpiper’s domain : SHORE
33. Whom the witches deem “lesser than Macbeth, and greater” : BANQUO
34. “Hold on there, cowboy!” : EASY!
35. Domain : AREA
36. American ___ : ELM
37. Shut out : BAN
42. Epitome of attention to detail : DOTTED I
44. Passion : ZEAL
46. Opening on Broadway : ACT I
47. One might appear next to an article : NOUN
48. Tombstone figure : EARP
49. Something in a bookmarks tab : SITE
50. Image in the “Jurassic Park” logo, familiarly : T REX
52. “The Prodigal Son,” for one : PARABLE
53. Screw up : ERR
57. Feature of the Nixon tapes : GAP
58. Wee, in Dundee : SMA
60. First lady McKinley : IDA
62. Guitar accessory : CAPO
63. “What a surprise to run into you!” : OH HI!
64. Means : WAYS
66. Island that may have an apostrophe in its name : O’AHU
67. Light amount? : WATT
68. Martial arts level : DAN
69. Plane-related : AERO
71. “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” novelist : CAPOTE
74. Heads of staff? : G-CLEFS
76. Archetypal postwar suburb : LEVITTOWN
78. ___ Janney, four-time “West Wing” Emmy winner : ALLISON
79. Theme : MOTIF
80. Coming from out of nowhere, as an insult : UNMERITED
82. Nourishment for a plant embryo : ENDOSPERM
83. Hessian river : EDER
84. Hide-and-seek no-no : PEEK
86. Be behind : OWE
87. Angel’s opposite : IMP
88. Overarching : BROAD
91. Looks inside a house : DECORS
93. Subjects of some loans : HOMES
94. Teem : ABOUND
95. “The Prince and the Showgirl” co-star, 1957 : MONROE
97. Admits : COPS TO
98. Canine protector : ENAMEL
99. Bit of monkey business : CAPER
100. John who founded Methodism : WESLEY
102. “___ to break the news …” : I HATE
105. Little nail : BRAD
106. Chinese dynasty of a thousand years ago : LIAO
109. ___-ready : OVEN
110. Hardy heroine : TESS
112. The Horned Frogs of the Big 12 Conf. : TCU
113. Original Dungeons & Dragons game co. : TSR
114. Berlin cry : ACH!

Return to top of page

The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections
Amazon.com Widgets

2 thoughts on “0503-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 3 May 15, Sunday”

  1. Well, I got close, but a DNF for me within my time limit. NW had me stumnped, and I missed on 23A (___ of the world). Well, it was a fun challenge. Just not up to it today.

  2. I was disappointed not to finish, either. EASY really threw me on 34 down (couldn't get past, "WHOA" in my head) and a few literary things were just out of my ken.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.