0315-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 15 Mar 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Feyer
THEME: Making Connections … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase LINKED with the letter IN- at the front:

117A. Popular website whose name is a hint to this puzzle’s theme : LINKEDIN

23A. “You can never moor a boat here”? : INLET LIE (in + “let lie”)
24A. Provide sufficient coverage from risk? : INSURE ENOUGH (in + “sure enough”)
39A. Atheistic Cuban leader? : INFIDEL CASTRO (in + “Fidel Castro”)
46A. Desk chairs? : INBOX SEATS (in + “box seats”)
60A. Quechuan “hello”? : INCAN OPENER (in + “can opener”)
67A. Removing a Band-Aid too early? : INJURY TAMPERING (in + “jury tampering”)
74A. Covering first, second and third base? : INFIELD GOAL (in + “field goal”)
91A. Add to the Video Clip Hall of Fame? : INDUCT TAPE (in + “duct tape”)
97A. Diet? : INTAKE CONTROL (in + “take control”)
112A. Diapers? : INFANCY PANTS (in + “fancy pants”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 27m 04s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … SLUSHIE (Slushee), ACTINIC (actenic)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

9. So-called Baghdad by the Bay : FRISCO
Herb Caen was a San Francisco newspaper columnist, who wrote his “It’s News to Me” starting in 1938. Caen was the first person to coin the phrase “beatnik”. He also famously referred to San Francisco as “Baghdad by the Bay”, a reference to the exotic nature of the city.

21. Mr. Darcy’s creator : AUSTEN
Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy has to be one of the great romantic leads in English literature. He appears opposite Miss Elizabeth Bennet in Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice”. There have been many (terrible) “sequels” written for “Pride and Prejudice”, but I have read one “spin off” that I heartily recommend if you’d like to explore the story of Elizabeth and Darcy some more. There is a three-part novel called “Fitzwilliam Darcy: Gentleman” written by Pamela Aidan and published in 2003-2005. Ms. Aiden does a great job retelling the story of “Pride and Prejudice”, but from Darcy’s perspective. It really is a great read, even for die-hard Austen fans …

26. Fashion portmanteau : SKORT
Skorts are a hybrid between shorts and a skirt.

A portemanteau was a large suitcase, one that could be taken apart into two separate pieces. The word “portmanteau” is French for a “travelling bag”, from “porter” (to carry) and “manteau” (a coat, cloak). We also use “portmanteau” to mean a word that has been melded together from two parts (just like the suitcase). This usage was introduced to the world by Humpty Dumpty in Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”. He explained to Alice that the nonsense words in the “Jabberwocky” poem were actually portmanteau words. For example “slithy” comes from from “slimy” and “lithe”.

30. Feature of Hawaii’s Molokini Crater : REEF
Molokini is a spectacular crescent-shaped volcanic crater off the island of Maui in Hawaii. Most of the crater is actually submerged. I went SCUBA diving on Molokini some years ago, and what a spectacular couple of dives I had there. The first dive that day was the deepest I’ve ever done (136 feet), and that was down a sheer wall on the outside of the crater. The second dive was inside the crater, where I had spectacular views of sharks swimming along the sandy bottom, and also got to hear whales singing. A marvelous day!

32. Some miracle drug pushers : QUACKS
A “quack” is a person who pretends to have knowledge that he or she does not in fact possess. The term especially applies to someone fraudulently pretending to have medical skills. Our modern word is an abbreviation of “quacksalver”, an archaic term with Dutch roots that translates as “haker of salve”, Back in the Middle Ages, quacksalvers would shout out (quack) as they sold their pseudo-medical wares.

39. Atheistic Cuban leader? : INFIDEL CASTRO (in + “Fidel Castro”)
“Infidel” is an English word that was created by the Roman Catholic Church to describe someone who did not believe in the Catholic dogma. The word comes from Latin “infidelis” meaning “unfaithful”. During the time of the Crusades, the word “infidel” was used for any non-Christian, and particular the Saracens of North Africa.

Fidel Castro studied law at the University of Havana and there became a follower of left-wing ideals. He launched his first rebellion against Cuban president Fulgencio Batista in 1953, which landed him in jail for a year. He later led rebels in a guerrilla war against the Cuban government, which led to the Cuban Revolution and the overthrow of Batista in 1959. Castro took control of the country, and immediately formed a strong relationship with the Soviet Union. Concern over the alliance in the US led to the botched Bay of Pigs Invasion of 1961. There followed the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. Fidel Castro started to transfer power to his brother Raúl in 2008, and has led a life of increasing retirement ever since.

43. Like Columbus : GENOESE
Genoa is a seaport in the very north of Italy, in the region known as Liguria. One of Genoa’s most famous sons was Christopher Columbus.

45. Legendary weeper : NIOBE
In Greek mythology, when her children were killed, Niobe fled to Mt. Sipylus where she was turned into stone and wept for eternity. There is in fact a Niobe’s Rock on Mt. Sipylus that resembles a female face, and so is known as “The Weeping Rock”.

48. Most common key of Chopin’s piano pieces : A-FLAT
Frédéric Chopin was a Polish composer who spent most of his life in France. He was most famous for his piano works in the Romantic style. Chopin was a sickly man and died quite young, at 39. For many of his final years he had a celebrated and tempestuous relationship with the French author George Sand (the nom de plume of the Baroness Dudevant). Those years with Sand may have been turbulent, but they were very productive in terms of musical composition.

51. Tour grp. : PGA
The Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) was founded in 1916 and today has its headquarters (unsurprisingly) in Florida, where so many golfers live. Back in 1916, the PGA was based in New York City.

52. Side in the Peloponnesian War : SPARTA
Sparta was a city-state in ancient Greece, famous for her military might. Sparta and Athens fought the Peloponnesian War from 431 to 404 BC, with Sparta eventually emerging victorious.

56. Valentine and others: Abbr. : STS
Saint Valentine’s Day was chosen by Pope Gelasius I in 496 AD to honor various martyrs with the name Valentine. However, the saints’ day was dropped by the Roman Catholic church in 1969, by Pope Paul VI. Try telling that to Hallmark though …

57. Pvt. Pyle’s outfit : USMC
Jim Nabors was discovered by Andy Griffith and brought onto “The Andy Griffith Show” as Gomer Pyle, the gas station attendant. Famously, Nabors then got his own show called “Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.” Gomer had a cousin on the “The Andy Griffiths Show” called Goober Pyle. Goober was played by George Lindsay. Lindsay had auditioned for the Gomer part, but that went to Nabors.

60. Quechuan “hello”? : INCAN OPENER (in + “can opener”)
Quechua was the existing Native American language that was adopted by the Incan Empire and favored over other dialects.

64. ___-Caps : SNO
Sno-Caps are a brand of candy usually only available in movie theaters. Sno-caps have been around since the 1920s, would you believe?

65. Moved a shell : OARED
A scull is a boat used for competitive rowing. The main hull of the boat is often referred to as a shell. Crew members who row the boat can be referred to as “oars”.

67. Removing a Band-Aid too early? : INJURY TAMPERING (in + “jury tampering”)
“Band-Aid” is a brand name owned by Johnson & Johnson, although like many popular brands “band-aid” has become the generic term for an adhesive bandage, at least here in North America. The generic term we use in the British Isles for the same product is “plaster” …

70. 2:1, e.g., in the Bible : VERSE
In a Bible, “2:1” is a reference to chapter 2, verse 1.

78. “Hello, Hadrian!” : AVE!
“Ave” is a Latin word meaning “hail” as in “Ave Maria”, which translates as “Hail Mary”. “Ave” can also be used to mean “goodbye”.

79. Tear down, in Tottenham : RASE
To “raze” (“rase”, in UK English) is to level to the ground. How odd is it that “raise”, a homophone of “raze”, means to build up??!!
Tottenham is an area in north London in England. It is home to a famous football (soccer) club called Tottenham Hotspur, the team that I used to follow as a kid many moons ago …

Tottenham is an area in north London in England. It is home to a famous football (soccer) club called Tottenham Hotspur, the team that I used to follow as a kid many moons ago …

83. Certain tide : NEAP
Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon’s effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon’s gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

85. Green deli stock : CAPERS
The seasoning we know as “capers” are the edible flower buds of the caper bush, also known as Flinders rose. By the time we get them in a jar, the buds have been pickled and salted. I’m not a huge fan of capers …

87. With 115-Down, 1983 Lionel Richie hit : YOU
(115A. See 87-Across : ARE)
“You Are” was a 1983 hit for Lionel Richie. Richie co-wrote “You Are” with his wife at that time, Brenda Harvey Richie.

91. Add to the Video Clip Hall of Fame? : INDUCT TAPE (in + “duct tape”)
What we tend to call “duct” tape today was originally known as “duck” tape. In its first form, duck tape was made from a rubber-based adhesive applied to a duck cloth backing, hence the name. Cotton duck cloth is a canvas-like material, a plain woven cotton fabric. The name “duck” comes from the Dutch “doek” meaning “linen canvas”. Duck tape started to known as “duct tape” in the fifties, as it was commonly used to wrap air ducts in the construction industry.

95. Genre for Panic! at the Disco : EMO
Panic! at the Disco is a band from Los Vegas that got together in 2004. Originally a 4-man group, Panic! at the Disco now tours and records as a duo.

96. Drink that might cause brain freeze : SLUSHIE
A slushie is a flavored frozen drink. The brand names Slurpee and ICEE are examples of the genre.

101. Jack-in-the-box part : HYPHEN
There are three hyphens in the noun “Jack-in-the-box”.

A Jack-in-the-box is child’s toy. It’s a box with a crank handle at the side. Turning the crank causes a tune to play (usually “Pop Goes the Weasel”), and at the right moment the lid pops open and a spring loaded clown character jumps up out of the box.

102. “Lucy” star, in tabloids : SCARJO
Scarlett Johansson is a film actress from New York City. Johansson had an acclaimed lead performance in the 1996 movie “Manny & Lo”, when she was just 12 years old. The earliest films I remember her in, two favorites of mine, are “Girl in a Pearl Earring” and “Lost in Translation”, both from 2013. She has become quite the sex symbol, and is the only woman to have been named “Sexiest Woman Alive” twice by “Esquire” magazine. The media sometimes refer to her as “ScarJo”, a moniker that she apparently dislikes intensely.

103. Bygone Chevrolet : AVEO
The Chevrolet Aveo is a subcompact automobile that has been around since 2002. The Aveo is manufactured by GM Daewoo, the GM subsidiary in South Korea. Although the Aveo name is still used in some markets, here in North America the Aveo has been sold as the Chevrolet Sonic since 2012. By the way, GM Daewoo is the third largest manufacturer of automobiles in South Korea, after Hyundai and Kia.

104. Madonna’s “Into the Groove,” originally : B-SIDE
“Into the Groove” is a 1985 song written by Madonna, and performed by her for the film “Desperately Seeking Susan”, in which Madonna has a leading role.

108. Cameron who directed “Jerry Maguire” : CROWE
Cameron Crowe was a contributing editor for “Rolling Stone” magazine before he moved into the world of film, becoming an actor, producer, director and screenwriter. Crowe wrote “Fast Times at Ridgemont High”, and wrote and directed “Say Anything” and the huge hit “Jerry Maguire”. He also wrote and directed the semi-autobiographical movie “Almost Famous”, which was released in 2000.

“Jerry Maguire” is a 1996 film starring Tom Cruise, Cuba Gooding, Jr. and Renée Zellweger. The title character is played by Cruise, and is a sports agent. There are several lines oft quoted from “Jerry Maguire” including:

– “Show me the money!”
– “You complete me”
– “You had me at ‘hello’”

112. Diapers? : INFANCY PANTS (in + “fancy pants”)
“Diaper” is another word that I had to learn when I moved to America. What are called “diapers” over here, we call “nappies” back in Ireland. The term “diaper” is actually the original term that was used in England for the garment, where “diaper” referred to the cloth that was used. The term diaper was brought to the New World where it stuck. Back in Britain, diaper was displaced by the word “nappy”, a diminutive of “napkin”.

117. Popular website whose name is a hint to this puzzle’s theme : LINKEDIN
LinkedIn is a website used by professionals wishing to network with other professionals. From what I’ve heard, LinkedIn is mainly used by folks looking for a job, and other folks looking for suitable candidates to hire.

119. Shakespeare’s “The Comedy of Errors,” e.g. : FARCE
William Shakespeare’s “The Comedy of Errors” is the shortest of all his plays, and one of his earliest. It’s all about two sets of identical twins who are separated at birth. Hilarity ensues …

122. ___ Mountains : SMOKY
The Great Smoky Mountains are a subrange of the Appalachians and are located in North Carolina and Tennessee. The “Smokies” lie almost entirely within the bounds of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which is the most-visited national park in the whole country. The name “Smoky” is a reference to the natural fog often seen hanging over the range. The fog is actually a vapor made up of volatile organic compounds released by the vegetation covering the peaks.

Down
2. Place for curlers : RINK
I think curling is a cool game (pun!). It’s somewhat like bowls, but played on a sheet of ice. The sport was supposedly invented in medieval Scotland, and is called curling because of the action of the granite stone is it moves across the ice. A player can make the stone take a curved path (“curl”) by causing it to slowly rotate as it slides.

3. Home for King Harald : OSLO
Oslo, the capital of Norway, is an ancient city that was founded around 1048. The medieval city was destroyed by fire in 1624 and was rebuilt by the Danish-Norwegian king Christian IV and renamed to Christiana. In 1877 there was an official change of the spelling of the city’s name to “Kristiana”, and then more recently in 1925 the name was restored to the original Oslo. Things have almost gone full circle and now the center of Oslo, the area that would have been contained by the original medieval walls, has apparently been renamed to Christiana.

King Harald V is the current king of Norway, and has been on the throne since 1991 when his father King Olav V passed away. The European Royal houses are famously quite “incestuous”, so King Harald V of Norway is in the line of succession for the throne of England (albeit around no. 60).

4. Shepherd formerly of “The View” : SHERRI
Sherri Shepherd is a comedian and television personality who is best known by many as one of the co-hosts of the ABC daytime talk show “The View”. I remember Shepherd as the police officer who was partnered with Robert Barone on the sitcom “Everybody Loves Raymond”.

5. Stinko : POTTED
“Stinko” and “potted” are terms that mean “inebriated, drunk”.

6. Big picture: Abbr. : ENL
Enlargement (enl.)

9. Parodist’s principle : FAIR USE
“Fair use” is a legal concept that provides for the limited use of copyrighted material without having to gain permission from the entity owning that copyright. For example, when say Jon Stewart uses clips from CNN or Fox News on “The Daily Show” in order to tell a few jokes, he doesn’t need to ask permission from CNN or Fox News.

11. There’s one every year for Person of the Year: Abbr. : ISS
Issue (iss.)

“Time” magazine started naming a “Man of the Year” in 1927, only changing the concept to “Person of the Year” in 1999. Prior to 1999, the magazine did recognize four females as “Woman of the Year”: Wallis Simpson (1936), Soong May-ling a.k.a. Madame Chiang Kai-shek (1937), Queen Elizabeth II (1952) and Corazon Aquino (1986). “Time” named Albert Einstein as Person of the Century in 1999, with Franklin D. Roosevelt and Mahatma Gandhi as runners-up.

12. Political analyst Rothenberg : STU
Stuart Rothenberg is best known as the author of “The Rothenberg Political Report”, a political newsletter that he publishes every two weeks (and now co-authors with Nathan Gonzales).

13. Roll by a cashier : CERTS
Certs were the first breath mints to be marketed nationally in the US, hitting the shelves in 1956. A Cert is called a mint, but it isn’t really as it contains no mint oil and instead has its famous ingredient named “Retsyn”. Retsyn is a mixture of copper gluconate (giving the green flecks), partially hydrogenated cottonseed oil (not healthy!) and flavoring (maybe mint?).

14. Long, unbroken take, in film lingo : ONER
A “oner” or “long take” is a continuous take that last much longer than usual, perhaps several minutes. Famously, the Alfred Hitchcock film “Rope” (1948) used only long takes. Hitchcock wanted to shoot the whole film in one take, but had to compromise as a whole roll of film only lasts about 10 minutes. However, he did manage to film “Rope” in just 11 long takes.

15. Certain ancient Greeks : IONIANS
The geographic region called Ionia is located in present day Turkey. Ionia was prominent in the days of Ancient Greece although it wasn’t a unified state, but rather a collection of tribes. The tribal confederacy was more based on religious and cultural similarities than a political or military alliance. Nowadays we often refer to this arrangement as the Ionian League.

16. Small caves : GROTTOES
The word “grotto” comes to us from the Italian “grotta” meaning “vault” or “cavern”.

17. ___ Dhabi : ABU
Abu Dhabi is one of the seven Emirates that make up the federation known as the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The two largest members of the UAE (geographically) are Dubai and Abu Dhabi, the only two of the seven members that have veto power over UAE policy. Before 1971, the UAE was a British Protectorate, a collection of sheikdoms. The sheikdoms entered into a maritime truce with Britain in 1835, after which they became known as the Trucial States, derived from the word “truce”.

18. Bookie’s charge : VIG
A “vigorish” (also “vig”) is a charge paid to a bookie on an individual bet. It is a slang term that maybe comes into American English via Yiddish from the Russian “výigrysh” meaning “winnings, profit”.

19. Ordinal ending : -ETH
Ordinal numbers express a position in a series, i.e. first, second, third etc.

25. Something you might get two 20s for? : EYE EXAM
I can only understand the expression “20/20 vision” in non-technical terms. Apparently someone with 20/20 vision can see just as well as a standard/normal person at 20 feet from an eye chart. Someone with 20/40 vision can see just as well as a standard/normal person at 40 feet. Someone with 20/100 vision can see just as well as a standard/normal person at 100 feet, and so on. Those of you living in Metric Land use the term 6/6, with the standard distance being 6 meters instead of 20 feet.

28. Mideast’s Gulf of ___ : AQABA
The coastal city of Aqaba is the only seaport in the country of Jordan. The city lies at the very northern tip of the Gulf of Aqaba, which is off the Red Sea.

33. Bloods’ rivals : CRIPS
The Crips are a street gang with origins in Los Angeles going back to 1969. It is believed that the Crips have up to 35,000 members today across the country, and there is even a presence in the US military both here and abroad. The main rivals of the Crips are the Bloods.

34. Coastal region of Hawaii : KONA
The Kona district on the Big Island of Hawaii is on the western side of the island. The largest town in Kona is Kailua-Kona. Kailua-Kona is often incorrectly referred to as “Kona”. The term “kona” translates as “leeward side of the island” in Hawaiian.

36. What the Spanish Armada fought : SEA WAR
The most famous Armada was the Spanish fleet that sailed against England in order to overthrow Queen Elizabeth I in 1588. It failed in its mission, partly due to bad weather encountered en route. Ironically, the English mounted a similar naval attack against Spain the following year, and it failed as well.

37. Shakespeare’s world? : A STAGE
“As You Like It” is one of Shakespeare’s comedies, the tale of Rosalind fleeing from her Uncle’s court along with her cousin Celia and the court jester Touchstone. Rosalind lives in exile in the Forest of Arden, disguised as a male shepherd called Ganymede. The play is perhaps most memorable for an oft-quoted monologue that starts with:

All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players …

39. Japanese porcelain : IMARI
Imari is a port city located on the island of Kyushu in Japan. What Europeans know as Imari porcelain actually isn’t made in Imari, but rather in the nearby town of Arita. The name Imari was given to the porcelain because it was the port through which the ceramic ware was shipped. In Japan, the porcelains are called Arita-yaki.

41. ___ acid (vitamin B9) : FOLIC
Folic acid is also known as vitamin B9. Folic acid occurs as folate in the human body, a substance essential in the synthesis and repair of DNA.

47. Oil-rich land ruled by a sultan : BRUNEI
The official name of Brunei is the Nation of Brunei, the Abode of Peace. Brunei is situated in the island of Borneo, almost completely surrounded by Malaysia. Brunei’s government is dictated by the constitution adopted in 1959, and is ruled by a sultan with full executive authority. The main language spoken in the country is “Melayu Brunei” (Brunei Malay), with the official language being Malay. Apparently Malay and Brunei Malay are quite different from each other, with native speakers finding it difficult to understand each other.

49. Writer Nin : ANAIS
Anaïs Nin was a French author, famous for her journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly-regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

50. Pair of fins : TENNER
The US five-dollar bill is often called an “Abe”, as President Lincoln’s portrait is on the front. An Abe is also referred to as a “fin”, a term that has been used for a five-pound note in Britain since 1868.

55. Atty. gen.’s employer : DOJ
Attorneys General (AGs) head up the Department of Justice (DOJ). When the office of the Attorney General was created in 1789 it was a part-time job, with no departmental support. The Department of Justice came into being in 1870.

58. Some ski resort rentals : CONDOS
The words “condominium” and “apartment” tend to describe the one type of residential property, a private living space with facilities shared with others residing in the same building or complex. The difference is that a condominium is usually owned, and an apartment is rented. At least that’s how it is in the US. The word “condominium” comes from the Latin “com” (together) and “dominum” (right of ownership).

62. City about 100 miles ENE of Cleveland, O. : ERIE, PA
Erie is a city in the very north of Pennsylvania, right on the southern shore of Lake Erie. The city takes its name from the Erie Native American tribe that resided in the area.

63. Paper featured in the documentary “Page One,” for short : NYT
“Page One: Inside the New York Times” is a 2011 documentary for which the film team had practically unrestricted access to the New York Times newsroom for a year. The film highlights the pressure on traditional print-based news publications with the advent of the Internet. I for one am worried …

64. No. often between 15 and 50 : SPF
In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun …

66. Belligerent, in Britspeak : AGGRO
“Aggro” is term that we use a lot in Ireland, probably more so than in the UK. It can mean an annoyance (sort for aggravation) but is more often used to mean “trouble”, as in someone caused trouble, created aggro.

68. Three on a 6 : MNO
The letter MNO are found on the 6-key on a telephone keypad.

75. More outré : ODDER
The word “outré” comes to us from French, as you might imagine, derived from the verb “outrer” meaning “to overdo, exaggerate”. “Outrer” is also the ultimate root of our word “outrage”.

76. Memorable mission : ALAMO
The famous Alamo in San Antonio, Texas was originally known as Mission San Antonio de Valero. The mission was founded in 1718 and was the first mission established in the city. The Battle of the Alamo took place in 1836, a thirteen-day siege by the Mexican Army led by President General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Only two people defending the Alamo Mission survived the onslaught. One month later, the Texian army got its revenge by attacking and defeating the Mexican Army in the Battle of San Jacinto. During the surprise attack on Santa Anna’s camp, many of the Texian soldiers were heard to cry “Remember the Alamo!”.

77. Disinfecting Wipes brand : LYSOL
The disinfectant called Lysol takes its name from the words “lysosome” and “solvent”. Lysosomes are structures found within cells that have the job of breaking up waste material and cellular debris.

80. Like light that causes chemical change : ACTINIC
Actinism is a property of solar radiation that leads to photochemical and photobiological changes. For example, the reaction of silver halide molecules in photographic film when they are exposed to light is an actinic effect.

81. “Gladiator” locale : ARENA
86. “Gladiator,” for one : EPIC
“Gladiator” is an epic movie starring Russell Crowe and Joaquin Phoenix, directed by Ridley Scott. The movie won five Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Actor for Crowe.

87. Smirnoff of comedy : YAKOV
The Ukrainian-born comedian Yakov Pokhis is better known by his stage name, Yakov Smirnoff. Smirnoff was popular on television in the eighties, playing comedic roles with a thick Russian accent. He is a smart cookie, and holds a master’s degree in positive psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.

88. “___ Como Va” (Santana hit) : OYE
“Oye Como Va” is a song written by Tito Puente in 1963. The best-known recording is the cover version from Santana released in 1970.

92. Country singer Kenny : CHESNEY
Kenny Chesney is a country music singer and songwriter from Knoxville, Tennessee. For just a few months in 2005, Chesney was married to the actress Renee Zellweger.

94. “Mazel ___!” : TOV
“Tov” is the Hebrew word for “good”, as in “mozel tov”, meaning “good luck”.

98. Bottom sirloin cut of beef : TRI-TIP
A “tri-tip” is a cut of meat that all goes by the names tip roast, round tip roast and sirloin tip roast. Tri-tip is a cut of beef from the rear of the animal. It is a triangular muscle, hence the name.

99. Made out : NECKED
The term “necking” applies to kissing and caressing. I like what Groucho Marx had to say on the subject: “Whoever named it necking was a poor judge of anatomy.”

100. One who takes the bull by the horns : TORERO
“Votre toast, je peux vous le rendre” is more commonly called “The Toreador Song”, and is one of the most famous arias in Georges Bizet’s opera “Carmen”. “Toreador” is an old Spanish word for a bullfighter, but it’s a term not used any more in Spain nor in Latin America. In English we use the term “toreador”, but in Spanish a bullfighter is a “torero”.

102. Plant part : SEPAL
In a flower, the sepals are those green, leaf-like structures that are “interleaved” with the petals, providing support. Prior to acting as support for the petals, the sepals protect the flower in bud.

109. Sleipnir’s master, in myth : ODIN
Sleipnir is an eight-legged horse of Norse mythology, the steed that was ridden by Odin.

110. Drunk’s favorite radio station? : WINO
WINO-FM 89.9 is a repeater station located in Odessa, New York for Binghamton’s WSKG-FM station.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Opportunity : PROSPECT
9. So-called Baghdad by the Bay : FRISCO
15. “___ at the office” : I GAVE
20. Mayor’s title : HIS HONOR
21. Mr. Darcy’s creator : AUSTEN
22. Circle : ORBIT
23. “You can never moor a boat here”? : INLET LIE (in + “let lie”)
24. Provide sufficient coverage from risk? : INSURE ENOUGH (in + “sure enough”)
26. Fashion portmanteau : SKORT
27. Gets close to : NEARS
29. “Have some!” : TRY IT!
30. Feature of Hawaii’s Molokini Crater : REEF
32. Some miracle drug pushers : QUACKS
35. Bothers : EATS AT
39. Atheistic Cuban leader? : INFIDEL CASTRO (in + “Fidel Castro”)
43. Like Columbus : GENOESE
44. Low : MOO
45. Legendary weeper : NIOBE
46. Desk chairs? : INBOX SEATS (in + “box seats”)
48. Most common key of Chopin’s piano pieces : A-FLAT
51. Tour grp. : PGA
52. Side in the Peloponnesian War : SPARTA
53. Hit hard : SWAT
54. Unsalvageable : RUINED
56. Valentine and others: Abbr. : STS
57. Pvt. Pyle’s outfit : USMC
59. Get on : AGE
60. Quechuan “hello”? : INCAN OPENER (in + “can opener”)
64. ___-Caps : SNO
65. Moved a shell : OARED
67. Removing a Band-Aid too early? : INJURY TAMPERING (in + “jury tampering”)
70. 2:1, e.g., in the Bible : VERSE
73. On : LIT
74. Covering first, second and third base? : INFIELD GOAL (in + “field goal”)
78. “Hello, Hadrian!” : AVE!
79. Tear down, in Tottenham : RASE
81. A year in Brazil : ANO
82. Aristocratic : LORDLY
83. Certain tide : NEAP
85. Green deli stock : CAPERS
87. With 115-Down, 1983 Lionel Richie hit : YOU
90. Subjects of some modern school bans : SODAS
91. Add to the Video Clip Hall of Fame? : INDUCT TAPE (in + “duct tape”)
93. Is forbidden to, quaintly : MAYN’T
95. Genre for Panic! at the Disco : EMO
96. Drink that might cause brain freeze : SLUSHIE
97. Diet? : INTAKE CONTROL (in + “take control”)
101. Jack-in-the-box part : HYPHEN
102. “Lucy” star, in tabloids : SCARJO
103. Bygone Chevrolet : AVEO
104. Madonna’s “Into the Groove,” originally : B-SIDE
106. “Do ___!” : I EVER
108. Cameron who directed “Jerry Maguire” : CROWE
112. Diapers? : INFANCY PANTS (in + “fancy pants”)
117. Popular website whose name is a hint to this puzzle’s theme : LINKEDIN
119. Shakespeare’s “The Comedy of Errors,” e.g. : FARCE
120. How to make money “the old-fashioned way” : EARN IT
121. Disrespectful, in a way : SNEERING
122. ___ Mountains : SMOKY
123. Heavy-lidded : SLEEPY
124. Visitor to a fertility clinic : EGG DONOR

Down
1. Sorority letters : PHIS
2. Place for curlers : RINK
3. Home for King Harald : OSLO
4. Shepherd formerly of “The View” : SHERRI
5. Stinko : POTTED
6. Big picture: Abbr. : ENL
7. 50-50 chance : COIN FLIP
8. It can be sappy : TREE
9. Parodist’s principle : FAIR USE
10. Charges : RUNS AT
11. There’s one every year for Person of the Year: Abbr. : ISS
12. Political analyst Rothenberg : STU
13. Roll by a cashier : CERTS
14. Long, unbroken take, in film lingo : ONER
15. Certain ancient Greeks : IONIANS
16. Small caves : GROTTOES
17. ___ Dhabi : ABU
18. Bookie’s charge : VIG
19. Ordinal ending : -ETH
25. Something you might get two 20s for? : EYE EXAM
28. Mideast’s Gulf of ___ : AQABA
31. Morn’s counterpart : E’EN
33. Bloods’ rivals : CRIPS
34. Coastal region of Hawaii : KONA
36. What the Spanish Armada fought : SEA WAR
37. Shakespeare’s world? : A STAGE
38. Proven : TESTED
39. Japanese porcelain : IMARI
40. A drag : NO FUN
41. ___ acid (vitamin B9) : FOLIC
42. Interlocking piece : COG
43. Became peeved : GOT SORE
47. Oil-rich land ruled by a sultan : BRUNEI
49. Writer Nin : ANAIS
50. Pair of fins : TENNER
52. Bits of music : STRAINS
55. Atty. gen.’s employer : DOJ
56. Word with get or smart : SET
58. Some ski resort rentals : CONDOS
61. Throb : PULSATE
62. City about 100 miles ENE of Cleveland, O. : ERIE, PA
63. Paper featured in the documentary “Page One,” for short : NYT
64. No. often between 15 and 50 : SPF
66. Belligerent, in Britspeak : AGGRO
68. Three on a 6 : MNO
69. Poorly : ILL
70. Go poof : VANISH
71. Without variation : EVENLY
72. Get educated (on) : READ UP
75. More outré : ODDER
76. Memorable mission : ALAMO
77. Disinfecting Wipes brand : LYSOL
80. Like light that causes chemical change : ACTINIC
81. “Gladiator” locale : ARENA
84. Resistance : PUSHBACK
86. “Gladiator,” for one : EPIC
87. Smirnoff of comedy : YAKOV
88. “___ Como Va” (Santana hit) : OYE
89. Cold : UNCARING
92. Country singer Kenny : CHESNEY
93. Grandeur : MAJESTY
94. “Mazel ___!” : TOV
98. Bottom sirloin cut of beef : TRI-TIP
99. Made out : NECKED
100. One who takes the bull by the horns : TORERO
102. Plant part : SEPAL
105. Turns a different shade, say : DYES
107. Alternatively : ELSE
109. Sleipnir’s master, in myth : ODIN
110. Drunk’s favorite radio station? : WINO
111. App creator, perhaps: Abbr. : ENGR
112. Uncertainties : IFS
113. ’60s war zone : NAM
114. Back the other way : FRO
115. See 87-Across : ARE
116. Uptown dir. in N.Y.C. : NNE
118. -: Abbr. : NEG

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4 thoughts on “0315-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 15 Mar 15, Sunday”

  1. Enjoyable grid. Shade over an hour for me. Also missed on SLUSHIE, IMARI (for some reason I had INARI), and AGGRO. In fact, I still don't get MOO's clue.

  2. I question your explanation of 20/20 vision. I believe it means a person can see 20 point type at 20 feet. BTW I asked eye dr. why my sight is getting worse (I am 70) when he gives me lenses that correct perfectly. He said eyes are just lenses; the brain is what is seeing. And my brain just keeps falling apart! –Carl

  3. Hi, Bill

    I enjoy your blog and always check it after I'm done the Sunday puzzle to see how I did, or to look for explanations for any of the answers that I struggled with. I thought it was about time that I posted to let you know how much I appreciate you taking the time to post up your detailed explanations. 🙂

    @Willie D: the "MOO" answer refers to the fact that "low" is another word for the sound that a cow makes, which is "moo". E.g., in the Christmas carol "Away in the Manger" there is a well known line that goes, "The cattle are lowing, the baby awakes…"

    Low is just another word for moo. 🙂

  4. A gem of a puzzle!

    Also, I really enjoyed the recently-aired 'Death Comes To Pemberly' on PBS. It's a mini-series adaption of a P.D. James novel about the imagined lives of Jane Austen's Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy. I highly recommend it.

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