0301-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Mar 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Finn Vigeland
THEME: Noted Anniversary … today’s themed answers commemorate the film version of “The Sound of Music”, which opened this month fifty years ago. In honor of the show tune “Do-Re-Mi”, we have the notes of the scale in rebus squares running in ascending order diagonally across the grid, from the bottom-left to the top-right:

118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC

24A. Setting of 118-Across : SALZBURG, AUSTRIA
31A. Star of 118-Across : JULIE ANDREWS
49A. Opening lyric of 118-Across : THE HILLS ARE ALIVE …
68A. Duo behind 118-Across : RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN
91A. Honor for 118-Across : BEST PICTURE OSCAR
108A. Family upon whom 118-Across is based : THE VON TRAPPS

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 24m 11s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. “u r KIDDING!” : OMG
OMG is text-speak for Oh My Gosh! Oh My Goodness! or any other G words you might think of …

10. Neighbor of a delt : PEC
“Pecs” is the familiar term for the chest muscle, more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is a the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

The deltoid muscle is actually a group of muscles, the ones that cover the shoulder and create the roundness under the skin. The deltoids are triangular in shape resembling the Greek letter delta, hence the name.

13. 1958 space monkey : GORDO
Gordo was a squirrel monkey used by NASA in its space program. Gordo was launched into space in 1958 and travelled over 1500 miles in a 15-minute flight, 8 minutes of which were spent weightless. Gordo’s capsule re-entered the atmosphere at over 10,000 miles per hour, but the parachute failed to open. The capsule went into the South Atlantic and was never recovered.

17. Site of cataracts : NILE
The Cataracts of the Nile are a series of six shallows along the river between Aswan in the north and Khartoum in the south. The flow in the cataracts ranges from relatively smooth to whitewater rapids.

19. Chillax : VEG OUT
“Chillax” is a slang term meaning “chill and relax”. Who’da thunk it …?

21. “Conversely …,” online : OTOH
On the other hand (OTOH)

24. Setting of 118-Across : SALZBURG, AUSTRIA
(118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC)
Salzburg is a city in Austria with a great musical tradition. Salzburg was the birthplace of composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. It was also the setting for much of “The Sound of Music”.

27. Language from which “tattoo” comes : SAMOAN
The word “tattoo” (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word “tatau” into our “tattoo”.

29. Mens ___ (legal term) : REA
“Mens rea” is Latin for “guilty mind” and is a central concept in criminal law. The concept is expanded to “actus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea” meaning “the act does not make a person guilty unless the mind be also guilty”. In other words, a someone should not be deemed guilty of an act, unless he or she had a “guilty mind”, intended to do wrong.

31. Star of 118-Across : JULIE ANDREWS
(118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC)
The actress and singer Julie Andrews was made a Dame in 2000 by Queen Elizabeth II. The most famous roles played by Andrews were probably the leads in “Mary Poppins” (1964) and “The Sound of Music” (1965). More recently she has had a recurring role in “The Princess Diaries” (2001) and the film’s 2004 sequel. A favorite Julie Andrews film of mine is an comedy drama set in WWII called “The Americanization of Emily”, released in 1964.

35. “Roll Over Beethoven” group, briefly : ELO
The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) released a fabulous cover version of Chuck Berry’s hit “Roll Over Beethoven” in 1973. The ELO version was a hit on both sides of the Atlantic, and cleverly melds elements of the Chuck Berry song with elements of Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 5”.

36. Chemistry lab droppers : PIPETS
A pipette (also “pipet”) is tool used in a lab to transport an accurately measured volume of liquid. Back in my day, we would suck up the liquid into the pipette by applying our mouths to the top of the instrument. This could be quite dangerous, as one ended up with a mouthful of something unsavory if one lifted the top of pipette out of the liquid too soon. Nowadays, things are much safer.

37. Luggage checker, for short : TSA
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was created in 2001, soon after the 9/11 attacks. TSA personnel carry out the baggage and body searches at US airports.

43. Author LeShan : EDA
Eda LeShan wrote “When Your Child Drives You Crazy”, and was host of the PBS television show “How Do Your Children Grow?”

44. Botanist Carl Linnaeus, for one : SWEDE
Carl Linnaeus was a botanist and physician from Sweden. Linnaeus who developed the system of biological classification that we still use today. He introduced us to kingdoms, classes, orders, families, genera and species in his 1735 publication “Systema Naturae”.

48. With 65-Down, 160-year-old fraternity founded at Miami University of Ohio : SIGMA …
(65D. See 48-Across : … CHI)
Sigma Chi is Greek-letter social fraternity that was founded back in 1855 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Sigma Chi was founded by a group of students who split with the existing Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity because of a dispute over who would be elected Poet in the the Erodelphian Literary Society. Sounds serious …

49. Opening lyric of 118-Across : THE HILLS ARE ALIVE …
(118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC)
Rodgers and Hammerstein wrote the broadway musical “The Sound of Music”, including the title song. Patti Page agreed to record a version of the song on the same day that the show opened on Broadway in 1959. Mary Martin sang the song in the stage musical, with Julie Andrews providing the honors for the 1965 film version. More recently, Lady Gaga performed the song along with a medley of other tunes from the musical at the 87th Academy Awards ceremony. I thought she did a fabulous job, and read that she practiced almost every day for six months with a voice coach just for that one performance. I’m not a Lady Gaga fan by any means, but take my hat off to her for the tribute she made night.

57. Complaints : FLAK
“Flak” was originally an acronym from the German term for an aircraft defense cannon (FLiegerAbwehrKanone). Flak then became used in English as a general term for antiaircraft fire, and ultimately a term for verbal criticism as in “to take flak”.

58. Georgetown athlete : HOYA
The athletic teams of Georgetown University are known as the Hoyas. The name is derived from “Hoya Saxa”, a traditional cheer yelled out at Georgetown games as far back as 1893. The term is a mixture of Greek and Latin, with the Greek word “hoya” meaning “such” or “what”, and “saxa” translating from Latin as “rocks” or “small stones”. The cheer is usually rendered in English as “what rocks!”.

62. Eclipses, to some : OMENS
A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes into the shadow cast by the earth from the light of the sun, in other words when the earth is positioned directly between the sun and the moon. The more spectacular solar eclipse takes place when moon passes in front of the sun, so that the earth falls into the shadow cast by the moon.

64. Raid target : ROACH
Raid insecticide has been killing bugs since 1956.

67. ___ Fridays : TGI
T.G.I. Friday’s is an American restaurant chain, founded in 1965 in New York City. Today there are over a thousand T.G.I. Friday’s restaurants in over 50 countries. I think they have always been particularly successful overseas. I used to visit one a lot with my family when we lived in the Philippines, and I believe the most successful Friday’s restaurant anywhere in the world is the one in Haymarket Leicester Square in London in the UK.

68. Duo behind 118-Across : RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN
(118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC)
Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II were extremely successful writers of Broadway musicals in the forties and fifties. Rodgers composed the music and Hammerstein wrote the lyrics for hits such as “Oklahoma!”, “Carousel”, “South Pacific”, The King and I” and “The Sound of Music”.

77. Fútbol announcer’s shout : GOL!
In Spanish, a football (fútbol) announcer might shout “goal!” (gol!).

80. “Così Fan Tutte,” e.g. : OPERA BUFFA
The Italian term “opera seria” is “serious” opera, as opposed to “opera buffa”, what we call “comic” opera.

Mozart’s comic opera “Così fan tutte” is also known in English as “The School for Lovers”. The literal translation of the opera’s title is “Thus do all (women)”, or “Women are like that”.

86. “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” actress : DENCH
Dame Judi Dench is an outstanding English actress, known for decades in her home country mainly as a stage and television actress. Dench’s film career took off in the nineties with a relatively trivial role as “M” in the James Bond series of films. Since then she has played leading roles in several excellent movies including “Shakespeare in Love”, “Mrs. Brown” and “Notes on a Scandal”.

“The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” is an outstanding 2012 British film about a group of pensioners who move to a retirement hotel in India. The cast alone is impressive enough, and includes Judi Dench, Celia Imrie, Bill Nighy, Maggie Smith, Tom Wilkinson and Penelope Wilton, as well the talented Dev Patel (from “Slumdog Millionaire”) who portrays the hotel’s owner. I’ll be lining up next weekend to see the sequel, “The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”.

90. Port authority? : WINO
The city of Oporto in Portugal gave its name to port wine in the late 1600s, as it was the seaport through which most of the region’s fortified red wine was exported.

91. Honor for 118-Across : BEST PICTURE OSCAR
(118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC)
At the first Academy Awards ceremony, the award for Outstanding Picture and award for Unique and Artistic Production were regarded jointly as the top honors. The latter award was dropped at the second ceremony, the following year. The award for Outstanding picture changed its name several times, to Outstanding Production, Outstanding Motion Picture, Best Motion Picture, and finally Best Picture from 1962.

97. Narnia girl : SUSAN
In the C.S. Lewis novel “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”, four siblings visit the magical land of Narnia via a wardrobe in the spare room of house in which they are living while evacuated during WWII. The children are Lucy, Edmund, Susan and Peter Pevensie.

98. Curmudgeon’s review : UGH!
“Curmudgeon” is a favorite term used by my wife to describe me. A curmudgeon is a bad-tempered person full of resentment and stubborn notions. I am sure she means it very affectionately …

99. Fish dish : SASHIMI
“Sashimi” is thinly sliced raw fish, although it can also be raw meat. The word “sashimi” translates literally as “pierced body”, which may be a reference to the practice of sticking the tail and fin to sliced fish to identify it.

106. It ends in Nov. : DST
On the other side of the Atlantic, Daylight Saving Time (DST) is known as “summer time”. The idea behind summer/daylight-savings is to move clocks forward an hour in spring (i.e. “spring forward”) and backwards in the fall (i.e. “fall back”) so that afternoons have more daylight.

108. Family upon whom 118-Across is based : THE VON TRAPPS
(118A. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC)
Baron Georg Johannes von Trapp was an officer in the Austro-Hungarian Navy who achieved worldwide fame when his family became the inspiration for the musical “The Sound of Musical”.

111. Wynken, Blynken and Nod, e.g. : THREESOME
“Wynken, Blynken and Nod” is a children’s poem written by Eugene Field, first published in 1889. The original title of the work was “Dutch Lullaby”.

116. Recondite : ARCANE
Something that is “arcane” is something that is understood by only a few, something that might be described as mysterious.

Something described as “recondite” is obscure, beyond normal understanding. The term comes from the Latin verb “recondere” that means “store away, conceal”.

118. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC
“The Sound of Music” is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, made into a celebrated movie in 1965 starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer. The musical is based on “The Story of the Trapp Family Singers”, a memoir by Maria von Trapp. The von Trapp family ended up in Stowe, Vermont after the war, and one family descended from the Vermont von Trapps lives here in the same town in which I live in California.

124. “Wailing” instrument : SAX
The saxophone was invented by Belgian Adolphe Sax. Sax developed lip cancer at one point in his life, and one has to wonder if his affliction was related to his saxophone playing (I am sure not!). I had the privilege of visiting Sax’s grave in the Cemetery of Montmartre in Paris a few years ago.

125. Big export of Myanmar : RUBIES
The Republic of the Union of Myanmar is the official name of the Asian country that some nations still recognize as the Union of Burma.

127. “Let’s Make a Deal” features : DOORS
The game show “Let’s Make a Deal” first aired way back in 1963. For many years the show was hosted by Monty Hall. There’s a version airing right now that is hosted by Wayne Brady.

128. Figure in a Sunni/Shia dispute : ALI
The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family, and favoured the Prophet’s son-in-law Ali.

129. Where the Potemkin Steps are : ODESSA
The Potemkin Stairs is a symbol of Odessa, Ukraine, and is a staircase with 192 steps in total. Prior names for the structure were Boulevard Steps, the Giant Staircase, the Richelieu Steps and the Primorsky Stairs. The “Potemkin” name was applied in 1955 in honor of the 30th anniversary of the Battleship Potemkin.

Down
1. Two out of 11? : ONES
The two digits in the number 11 are both ones.

2. Nicki with the 2014 hit “Anaconda” : MINAJ
Nicki Minaj is a rapper from Queens, New York who was born in Trinidad.

3. Dress to the nines : GLAM UP
The term “to the nines” means “to perfection”. The first person to use the term in literature was Robbie Burns. Apparently the idea behind the use of “nines” is figurative (pun!), with the number nine considered “ideal” as it is arrived at by multiplying three by three.

4. Rite Aid rival : CVS
The name of the drugstore chain CVS once stood for Consumer Value Stores, although these days the company uses the acronym to denote Convenience, Value and Service.

What we know today as Rite Aid started out as one store in Scranton, Pennsylvania in 1962. Rite Aid is now the biggest chain of drugstores on the East Coast of the United States and has operations all over the country.

7. “The culminating point that beauty has attained in the sphere of music,” per Tchaikovsky : MOZART
The composer Mozart’s full name was Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The name “Wolfgang” translates literally as “wolf journey”. Amadeus translates as “love god”!

12. 1961 Disney villainess : CRUELLA
Cruella de Vil is the villain in the 1956 novel “The Hundred and One Dalmatians” written by Dodie Smith. Most famously perhaps, Cruella was played so ably by Glenn Close in the Disney movie adaption “101 Dalmatians”, released in 1996.

13. Crime boss John : GOTTI
John Gotti was the boss of the Gambino crime family from 1985. Gotti was known as the Teflon Don and took over leadership of the family from Paul Castellano when he was gunned down, allegedly on Gotti’s orders. Gotti remained head of the New York family until he was sentenced to life in prison in 1992. Gotti died of throat cancer after ten years behind bars.

14. Not esta or esa : OTRA
In Spanish, the other (otra) is neither this (esta) nor that (esa).

16. 2022 World Cup city : DOHA
Doha is the capital city of the state of Qatar located on the Persian Gulf. The name “Doha” translates from Arabic as “the big tree”.

The 2014 FIFA World Cup tournament was hosted by Brazil, the next two tournaments will be hosted by Russia (2018) and Qatar (2022).

18. Food poisoning cause : E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

23. Asian capital nicknamed the City of Azaleas : TAIPEI
“Taipei” translates from Chinese as “Northern Taiwan City” and indeed is situated at the northern tip of Taiwan. The city is nicknamed “City of Azaleas” as the flower blooms better in Taipei than in any other city on the island.

28. Something a trypanophobe fears : NEEDLE
Trypanophobia is a fear of the needle, a fear of injections and inoculations. The term derives from the Greek “trypano-” meaning “borer”.

33. Latin 101 verb : ESSE
“Esse” is the Latin for “to be”. “Sum” means “I am” and “erat” means “he, she was”.

40. Citrus fruit : UGLI
The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine, first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruits unsightly wrinkled rind.

41. Official in a turban : IMAM
An imam is a Muslim leader, often the person in charge of a mosque or perhaps a Muslim community.

47. Paperless party planner’s option : EVITE
An “evite” is an “electronic invitation”.

49. 2011 Marvel film : THOR
The 2011 movie “Thor” is yet another film based on a comic book hero. Even though I won’t be seeing it (I don’t do comics), I must admit it does have an impressive cast. Chris Hemsworth plays Thor, supported by Natalie Portman, Rene Russo and Anthony Hopkins. And to crown it all, Kenneth Branagh is the director.

50. ___ neanderthalensis : HOMO
The Homo genus includes the species Homo sapiens (modern humans), but we’re the only species left in that genus. The last known species related to humans was Homo neanderthalensis (Neanderthal Man) which died off about 24,000 years ago. However, another species was discovered in Indonesia in 2003 that has been dubbed Homo floresiensis (Flores Man … sometimes called “hobbit”), and it may possibly have lived as recently as 12,000 years ago. Watch this space …

53. Singer Bareilles with the 2007 hit “Love Song” : SARA
Sara Bareilles achieved success with her 2007 “Love Song” with the help of the iTunes online store. In one week in June of that year, iTunes offered the song as “free single of the week” and it quickly became the most downloaded song in the store, and from there climbed to the number spot in the charts.

56. Many a Silicon Valley worker: Abbr. : ENGR
The Santa Clara Valley, just a few miles from me at the south of San Francisco Bay, is better known as “Silicon Valley”. The term “Silicon Valley” dates back to 1971 when it was apparently first used in a weekly trade newspaper called “Electronic News” in articles written by journalist Don Hoefler.

63. Maker of Dreamcast games : SEGA
Sega is a Japanese video game company headquartered in Tokyo. Sega actually started out 1940 in the US as Standard Games and was located in Honolulu, Hawaii. The owners moved the operation to Tokyo in 1951 and renamed the company to Service Games. The name “Sega” is a combination of the first two letters of the words “Se-rvice” and “Ga-mes”.

66. Cave opening? : HARD C
The opening letter in the word “cave” is a hard letter C.

69. Eldest Stark child on “Game of Thrones” : ROBB
HBO’s “Game of Thrones” is a fantasy television drama that was adapted from a series of novels by George R. R. Martin called “A Song of Ice and Fire”. “Game of Thrones” is actually made in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

75. Luzón, por ejemplo : ISLA
In Spanish, Luzon (Luzón) for example (por ejemplo), is an island (isla).

Luzon is the largest of the Philippine Islands, home to the capital city of Manila.

76. Manhattanite, e.g., for short : NYER
The island we know as Manhattan was inhabited by the Lenape Indians when the first Europeans explorers arrived in the area. According to the logbook of one of the officers on explorer Henry Hudson’s yacht, the island was called “Manna-hata” in the local language, from which the modern name derives.

81. 12 points : PICA
A pica is a unit of measure used in typography. One pica is equivalent to 1/6 of an inch. Each pica unit contains 12 “points”.

83. Senator William who pioneered a type of I.R.A. : ROTH
Roth Individual Retirement Accounts (Roth IRAs) were introduced in 1997 under a bill sponsored by Senator William Roth of Delaware, hence the name.

84. Seminoles’ sch. : FSU
Florida State University (FSU) is located in Tallahassee, the state capital of Florida. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Seminoles (sometimes “the ‘Noles”). The team name was chosen in 1947 by the students in a vote, and alludes to the Seminole people who originally lived in the state. Most of the Seminole now live in Oklahoma, after their forced relocation by the US government in the 1840s.

85. Part of the food pyramid : FATS
The first food guide pyramid was issued in 1974, in Sweden. The food pyramid that we’re most familiar with in this country is the one published by the USDA in 1992, which was replaced in 2011. Instead of a pyramid, we now have a guide called MyPlate. MyPlate urges us to eat about 30% grains, 30% vegetables, 20% fruits, 20% proteins on our plates, accompanied by a small serving of dairy.

87. Sicilian border? : CRUST
Here in the US, Sicilian pizza is a thick-crust variety.

88. Flight from danger : HEGIRA
“Hijra” (also “hegira”) is an Arabic word meaning migration or flight. In the Islamic tradition, “Hijra” is the name given to the journey of Muhammad with his followers from Mecca to Medina, a journey necessitated by a threat to assassinate the prophet.

93. About : IN RE
The term “in re” is Latin, derived from “in” (in) and “res” (thing, matter). “In re” literally means “in the matter”, and is used to mean “in regard to”, or “in the matter of”.

100. Crown since 1952 : MISS USA
The Miss USA beauty pageant was founded in 1952 in order to select the American candidate for the Miss Universe competition.

103. Annual awards in animation : ANNIES
The Annie Awards have been presented annually for accomplishments in animation since 1972.

104. Site of Spaceship Earth : EPCOT
EPCOT Center (now just called Epcot) is the theme park beside Walt Disney World in Florida. EPCOT is an acronym for Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow, and is a representation of the future as envisioned by Walt Disney. Walt Disney actually wanted to build a living community for 20,000 residents at EPCOT, but he passed away before that vision could be realized.

Spaceship Earth is perhaps the structure that comes to mind when we think of Epcot in the Walt Disney World Resort. It is the large white, 18-story geodesic sphere.

105. Kevin of “House of Cards” : SPACEY
The hit TV show “House of Cards” is a political drama starring Kevin Spacey that highlights ruthless manipulation within the corridors of power in Washington, D.C. The show is an adaptation of a BBC miniseries of the same name, which in turn is based on a novel by Michael Dobbs. My wife and I have seen both versions of the show but disagree on which is the best. I favor the US version …

107. Unlike much Schoenberg music : TONAL
Arnold Schoenberg was a champion of the use of atonality in music. I admit to having a somewhat closed mind when it comes to atonality, so I have very little of his music in my collection.

108. Formula One driver ___ Fabi : TEO
Teo Fabi is a retired racing driving from Italy who competed on the Formula One circuit. Teo often raced against his older brother Corrado Fabi.

111. “Comin’ ___ the Rye” : THRO’
“Comin’ Thro’ the Rye” was the first novel of Ellen Buckingham Mathews, written under one of her pen names, Helen Mathers, and published in 1875. Mathews was a popular English novelist in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

114. Year that Cambridge’s St. John’s College was founded : MDXI
St. John’s College in Cambridge, England was founded way back in 1511. In over 500 years of its existence, the college has graduated an impressive list of alumni. A recent count includes nine winners of a Nobel Prize, six prime ministers, two princess and three saints!

120. Joe : MUD
It seems that no one really knows why we refer to coffee as “joe”, but we’ve been doing so since early in WWII.

121. Civil War inits. : CSA
The Confederate States of America (CSA) set up government in 1861 just before Abraham Lincoln took office. Jefferson Davis was selected as President of the CSA at its formation and retained the post for the life of the government.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. “u r KIDDING!” : OMG
4. Doesn’t tread lightly : CLOMPS
10. Neighbor of a delt : PEC
13. 1958 space monkey : GORDO
17. Site of cataracts : NILE
19. Chillax : VEG OUT
20. Goof : ERR
21. “Conversely …,” online : OTOH
22. Pass : ENACT
24. Setting of 118-Across : SALZBURG, AUSTRIA
27. Language from which “tattoo” comes : SAMOAN
29. Mens ___ (legal term) : REA
30. Required : ESSENTIAL
31. Star of 118-Across : JULIE ANDREWS
35. “Roll Over Beethoven” group, briefly : ELO
36. Chemistry lab droppers : PIPETS
37. Luggage checker, for short : TSA
38. Hearing something? : LAWSUIT
43. Author LeShan : EDA
44. Botanist Carl Linnaeus, for one : SWEDE
48. With 65-Down, 160-year-old fraternity founded at Miami University of Ohio : SIGMA …
49. Opening lyric of 118-Across : THE HILLS ARE ALIVE …
57. Complaints : FLAK
58. Georgetown athlete : HOYA
59. Send : ELATE
60. Important factor in a crossword tournament : SOLVING TIME
62. Eclipses, to some : OMENS
64. Raid target : ROACH
67. ___ Fridays : TGI
68. Duo behind 118-Across : RODGERS AND HAMMERSTEIN
77. Fútbol announcer’s shout : GOL!
78. See 130-Across : … SIREE!
79. Lightly hammered? : TIPSY
80. “Così Fan Tutte,” e.g. : OPERA BUFFA
86. “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” actress : DENCH
89. Do some roof work : TILE
90. Port authority? : WINO
91. Honor for 118-Across : BEST PICTURE OSCAR
95. Sports bar fixture : LCD TV
97. Narnia girl : SUSAN
98. Curmudgeon’s review : UGH!
99. Fish dish : SASHIMI
101. Prefix with city or centennial : TRI-
103. Digressions : ASIDES
106. It ends in Nov. : DST
108. Family upon whom 118-Across is based : THE VON TRAPPS
111. Wynken, Blynken and Nod, e.g. : THREESOME
115. Whup : TAN
116. Recondite : ARCANE
118. Movie that opened on 3/2/1965 : THE SOUND OF MUSIC
122. Superdietary, informally : NO-CAL
123. “Pics ___ didn’t happen” (slangy challenge) : OR IT
124. “Wailing” instrument : SAX
125. Big export of Myanmar : RUBIES
126. Nine-month pregnancy : TERM
127. “Let’s Make a Deal” features : DOORS
128. Figure in a Sunni/Shia dispute : ALI
129. Where the Potemkin Steps are : ODESSA
130. With 78-Across, “Righto!” : YES …

Down
1. Two out of 11? : ONES
2. Nicki with the 2014 hit “Anaconda” : MINAJ
3. Dress to the nines : GLAM UP
4. Rite Aid rival : CVS
5. Picks up : LEARNS
6. Checked out : OGLED
7. “The culminating point that beauty has attained in the sphere of music,” per Tchaikovsky : MOZART
8. ___ crawl : PUB
9. Guy’s name that’s an alphabet run : STU
10. Viola parts : PEGS
11. Remove any trace of : ERASE
12. 1961 Disney villainess : CRUELLA
13. Crime boss John : GOTTI
14. Not esta or esa : OTRA
15. Disturb : ROIL
16. 2022 World Cup city : DOHA
18. Food poisoning cause : E COLI
23. Asian capital nicknamed the City of Azaleas : TAIPEI
25. Hi-___ : RES
26. Does a real number on, say : SNOWS
28. Something a trypanophobe fears : NEEDLE
32. In the slightest : AT ALL
33. Latin 101 verb : ESSE
34. Trumpet sound : WA-WA
39. Go (through) : SIFT
40. Citrus fruit : UGLI
41. Official in a turban : IMAM
42. Bit of filming : TAKE
45. ___ de México (Mexico City daily) : EL SOL
46. A.L. East, e.g.: Abbr. : DIV
47. Paperless party planner’s option : EVITE
49. 2011 Marvel film : THOR
50. ___ neanderthalensis : HOMO
51. Checked out : EYED
52. “___ tight” : HANG
53. Singer Bareilles with the 2007 hit “Love Song” : SARA
54. Heaps : A TON
55. Interprets : READS
56. Many a Silicon Valley worker: Abbr. : ENGR
61. Heart : GIST
63. Maker of Dreamcast games : SEGA
65. See 48-Across : … CHI
66. Cave opening? : HARD C
69. Eldest Stark child on “Game of Thrones” : ROBB
70. Pivots : SLUES
71. Rendezvous : MEET
72. File ___ : MENU
73. Little songbirds : TITS
74. Bigger than big : EPIC
75. Luzón, por ejemplo : ISLA
76. Manhattanite, e.g., for short : NYER
80. Hooters : OWLS
81. 12 points : PICA
82. Cuts off : ENDS
83. Senator William who pioneered a type of I.R.A. : ROTH
84. Seminoles’ sch. : FSU
85. Part of the food pyramid : FATS
87. Sicilian border? : CRUST
88. Flight from danger : HEGIRA
92. Orbit, e.g. : PATH
93. About : IN RE
94. “Rats!” : OH DARN!
96. Smartphone capability : VIDEO
100. Crown since 1952 : MISS USA
102. Hookup in bed? : IV TUBE
103. Annual awards in animation : ANNIES
104. Site of Spaceship Earth : EPCOT
105. Kevin of “House of Cards” : SPACEY
107. Unlike much Schoenberg music : TONAL
108. Formula One driver ___ Fabi : TEO
109. Haven : OASIS
110. Pitfall : SNARE
111. “Comin’ ___ the Rye” : THRO’
112. Prince, e.g. : HEIR
113. Lies : RESTS
114. Year that Cambridge’s St. John’s College was founded : MDXI
117. Stately trees : ELMS
118. Kind of list : TO-DO
119. To’s partner : FRO
120. Joe : MUD
121. Civil War inits. : CSA

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3 thoughts on “0301-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 1 Mar 15, Sunday”

  1. I sensed a rebus coming after I had about half the thing done. But the SW corner still did me in. BTW, per IMDb, The Sound of Music debuted on Feb. 7th. Take what you will from that.

    Rebus…grrrrrrr.

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