0928-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Sep 14, Sunday

QuickLinks:
Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today’s New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Todd Gross
THEME: Four by Four … each of today’s themed answers comprises FOUR words, each containing FOUR letters:

23A. 1975 Tony-nominated play about an extended affair SAME TIME, NEXT YEAR
46A. The Crossroads of the West SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
92A. Warm way to welcome someone WITH ARMS WIDE OPEN
119A. Common slogan for a music radio station LESS TALK, MORE ROCK
16D. “Don’t be ashamed” HOLD YOUR HEAD HIGH
36D. Reagan’s challenge to Gorbachev TEAR DOWN THIS WALL

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 16s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Bygone potentate MAHARAJA
Maharaja is the Sanskrit word meaning “great king”, and was the name given to a ruler in India. A maharani, or maharanee, was the wife of a maharaja.

9. Ottoman inns IMARETS
Imarets were inns or hostels used by pilgrims throughout the Ottoman Empire. The network of imarets was set up to provide food to anyone in need, so also served as “soup kitchens”.

16. Web starter HTTP
“http” are the first letters in most Internet link addresses. “http” stands for HyperText Transfer Protocol.

20. Kind of steroid ANABOLIC
Steroids are found commonly in nature, with familiar examples being cholesterol and testosterone. The controversial class of drugs called anabolic steroids (known informally as “roids” or simply “steroids”) are artificially produced chemicals designed to mimic the effect of the male sex hormone, testosterone. They are termed “anabolic” as they build up cellular tissue (particularly muscle) in a process called anabolism.

23. 1975 Tony-nominated play about an extended affair SAME TIME, NEXT YEAR
“Same Time, Next Year” is a 1975 play written by Bernard Slade. It is romantic comedy about a man and woman who meet for a tryst once a year for over two decades. The play was adapted into a fabulous film of the same name that was released in 1978, starring Ellen Burstyn and Alan Alda. It’s one of my favorite movies of all time …

25. Spanish province LEON
León is a province in the autonomous community of Castile and León in the northwest of Spain. The province’s capital is the city of León, which was founded as Roman military encampment around 29 BC.

26. Rehnquist’s successor on the high bench SCALIA
Antonin Scalia was appointed to the Supreme Court by President Reagan in 1986, and is now the longest serving member of the court. Justice Scalia’s minority opinions are known for the scathing language that he uses to criticize the Court’s majority.

William Rehnquist served as an Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court from 1972 when he was appointed by President Nixon. When Chief Justice Warren Burger retired in 1986, President Reagan nominated Rehnquist to fill the vacant position. Rehnquist died in office in 2005 and was replaced as Chief Justice by John Roberts, who was in the process of being confirmed as an Associate Justice at the time.

30. “Guardians of the Galaxy” title characters, informally ETS
“Guardians of the Galaxy” is a 2014 film based on a team of superheroes from the Marvel Comics universe. The movie’s cast is very impressive, including Chris Pratt, Bradley Cooper, Glenn Close and Benicio del Toro. I don’t normally “do” superhero films, but I hear that this one is very entertaining.

31. Org. implementing the Protect America Act NSA
2007’s Protect America Act is designed to make it easier for the US government to surveille foreign intelligence targets. In particular, it removes the need for a warrant to be issued before such surveillance takes place.

35. Chief justice during the Civil War TANEY
Roger B. Taney was Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court from 1836 until 1864 (when he passed away). Taney’s most notable decision was in the case of Dred Scott v. Sandford, in which he delivered the majority opinion that African Americans could not be considered citizens of the US.

Famously, the slave Dred Scott was unsuccessful in suing for his freedom in St. Louis, Missouri in 1857.

37. Skateboard jump OLLIE
An “ollie” is a skateboarding trick invented in 1976 by Alan “Ollie” Gelfand. Apparently it’s a way of lifting the board off the ground, while standing on it, without touching the board with one’s hands. Yeah, I could do that …

39. Private parts LOINS
The phrase “gird your loins” dates back to Ancient Rome. The expression describes the action of lifting “one’s skirts” and tying them between the legs to allow more freedom of movement before going into battle. Nowadays, “gird your loins” is a metaphor for “prepare yourself for the worst”.

46. The Crossroads of the West SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
Salt Lake City (SLC) was founded by Brigham Young, in 1847. The city takes its name from the Great Salt Lake on which it sits, and indeed was known as “Great Salt Lake City” up until 1868.

55. Prop on “The Bachelor” ROSE
“The Bachelor” is a US reality television show that first aired in 2002 on ABC. I’ve avoided this one like the plague …

57. ___ Watts, English hymnist who wrote “Joy to the World” ISAAC
The English theologian Isaac Watts was also a celebrated composer of hymns, and is known as the “Father of English Hymnody”. The example of his work that is probably most familiar is the Christmas classic “Joy to the World”, for which he wrote the words. “Joy to the World” is the most-published Christmas Carol in North America.

64. Rockefeller Center statue ATLAS
The iconic bronze statue of Atlas that faces Fifth Avenue is the work of sculptor Lee Lawrie. It is not to be confused with the bronze gilded statue of a reclining Prometheus that looks over Rockefeller Plaza.

77. Writer painted by Velázquez AESOP
Aesop lived in Ancient Greece, probably around the sixth century BC. Supposedly he was born a slave, somehow became a free man, but then met with a sorry end. He was sent to the city of Delphi on a diplomatic mission but instead insulted the Delphians. He was tried on a trumped-up charge of stealing from a temple, sentenced to death and was thrown off a cliff.

Diego Velázquez was a Spanish painter during the Baroque period. He was a member of the court of King Philip IV in the first half of the 17th century, and as such was commissioned to paint many portraits and scenes of historical importance.

79. Pre-Bill Hillary RODHAM
HIllary Rodham was born in Chicago, Illinois to Hugh Rodham (a businessman in the textile industry) and Dorothy Howell (a homemaker). Hillary was raised in a conservative home, and she campaigned for Republican candidate Barry Goldwater in the 1964 US presidential election. The following year, she served as president of the Young Republicans at Wellesley College. Our former First Lady left the Republican Party expressing disappointment at what she witnessed at the 1968 Republican National Convention in Miami, citing “veiled” racist messages prevalent at that time.

80. Historic figure with a reputation at stake? JOAN OF ARC
Joan of Arc (also “Jeanne d’Arc”, her birth name in French) led the French Army successfully into battle a number of times during the Hundred Years War with England. When she was eventually captured, Joan was tried in Rouen, the seat of the occupying English government in France at that time. There she was burned at the stake having been found guilty of heresy. Joan of Arc was canonized some 600 years later, in 1920, and is now one of the patron saints of France.

84. Shelfmate of Bartlett’s, maybe ROGET
Peter Mark Roget was an English lexicographer. Roget was an avid maker of lists, apparently using the routine of list-making to combat depression, a condition he endured for most of his life. He published his famous thesaurus in 1852, with revisions and expansions being made years later by his son, and then in turn by his grandson.

“Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations” is a popular reference work containing tons of quotations. Bartlett’s was first issued in 1855, and as such is the longest-lived collection of quotations that we have available to us. The book started as a private list of quotes gathered by John Bartlett who ran the University Bookstore in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He kept the list as he was always being asked “who said?” by customers.

86. Onion relative CHIVE
Chives are the smallest species of edible onion, and a favorite of mine.

88. Lingo ARGOT
“Argot” is a French term, the name given in the 17th century to “the jargon of the Paris underworld”. Nowadays argot is the set of idioms used by any particular group, the “lingo” of that group.

91. Exxon Valdez, e.g. OILER
An “oiler” is an oil tanker, an ocean-going vessel used to transport crude oil.

The Exxon Valdez was an oil tanker that famously went aground in Prince William Sound in Alaska in 1989, spilling hundreds of thousands of crude oil. The ship was repaired after the incident and went back into service under a new name: Exxon Mediterranean.

97. Millennials, informally GEN-Y
“Generation Y” (Gen-Y) is alternative term for the Millennial Generation. Millennials were born after the “Gen-Xers”, from the early 1980s to the early 2000s.

98. Unflinching STOIC
Someone who is “stoic” is indifferent to pleasure or pain, is relatively impassive.

Zeno of Citium was a Greek philosopher famous for teaching at the Stoa Poikile, the “Painted Porch”, located on the north side of the Ancient Agora of Athens. Because of the location of his classes, his philosophy became known as stoicism (from “stoa”, the word for “porch”). And yes, we get our adjective “stoic” from the same root.

99. Be profligate, say SPEND
Someone described as “profligate” is recklessly extravagant. The term derives from the Latin “profligare” meaning “to ruin, cast down”. The idea is that a profligate person has been “ruined” by vice.

100. Radio host John TESH
John Tesh is a pianist and composer, as well as a radio and television presenter. For many years Tesh presented the show “Entertainment Tonight”. For “ET” he once covered the filming of an episode of “Star Trek: The Next Generation”. As part of the piece, he volunteered to act as a Klingon warrior and so if you see the “Star Trek: TNG” episode called “The Icarus Factor” in reruns, watch out for John Tesh engaging in ritual torture with Mr. Worf as his victim.

102. Throat problem STREP
Streptococcus bacteria multiply and divide along a single axis so that they form linked chains. That behavior gives the genus of bacteria its name, as “streptos” is Greek for “easily twisted, like a chain”. I had battles with streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat) on two separate occasions in the recent past, and neither was at all pleasant. Another species of streptococcus is responsible for that terrible “flesh-eating” infection that makes the news from time to time.

106. Team of oxen SPAN
A “span” is a pair of animals, such as oxen, that has been matched by size and strength as used as a team to pull a load.

108. Brother FRA
The title “Fra” (brother) is used by Italian monks.

114. Stats for Aaron and Gehrig RBIS
Runs batted in (RBIs)

The great Hank Aaron (Hammerin’ Hank) has many claims to fame. One notable fact is that he is the last major league baseball player to have also played in the Negro League.

Baseball legend Lou Gehrig was known as a powerhouse. He was a big hitter and just kept on playing. Gehrig broke the record for the most consecutive number of games played, and he stills holds the record for the most career grand slams. His durability earned him the nickname “The Iron Horse”. Sadly, he died in 1941 at 37-years-old suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an illness we now call “Lou Gehrig’s Disease”.

118. Goddess of marriage HERA
In Greek mythology, Hera was the wife of Zeus and was noted for her jealous and vengeful nature, particularly against those who vied for the affections of her husband. The equivalent character to Hera in Roman mythology was Juno. Hera was the daughter of Cronus and Rhea.

124. Vatican City vis-à-vis Rome ENCLAVE
Vatican City is a sovereign city-state that is walled off within the city of Rome. Vatican City is about 110 acres in area, and so is the smallest independent state in the world. With about 800 residents, it is also the smallest state in terms of population. Although the Holy See dates back to early Christianity, Vatican City only came into being in 1929. At that time, Prime Minister Benito Mussolini signed a treaty with the Holy See on behalf of the Kingdom of Italy that established the city-state.

125. “CSI: Miami” actress EVA LARUE
Eva LaRue is a an actress from Long Beach, California. LaRue’s most famous roles were Dr. Maria Santos on the soap “All My Children” and Detective Natalia Boa Vista on “CSI: Miami”. LaRue has a famous third cousin: the actress Jane Fonda.

Down
1. Pool stroke MASSE
In billiards, a massé shot is one in which the cue ball makes an extreme curve due to the player imparting heavy spin on the ball with his or her cue.

3. Gaza group HAMAS
Hamas is the Islamist political party that governs the Gaza Strip. “Hamas” translates into English as “enthusiasm”, and is also an acronym in Arabic for “Islamic Resistance Movement”. Hamas is classified as a terrorist organization by many nations in the world, including the US.

4. Biblical brother ABEL
In the story of Cain and Abel in the Book of Genesis, Cain murders his brother Abel. Subsequently, God asks Cain, “Where is Abel thy brother?” Cain replies, “I do not know. Am I my brother’s keeper?”

5. Corkscrew-shaped pasta ROTINI
Rotini is the corkscrew-shaped pasta that is often used in pasta salads. Even though “rotini” sounds like it comes from a word meaning “twist, rotate”, the word “rotini” doesn’t exist in Italian, other than as the name for the pasta.

6. George Orwell and George Eliot ALIASES
George Orwell was the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair, the famous British author of the classics “Nineteen Eighty-Four” and “Animal Farm”.

George Eliot was the pen name of English novelist Mary Anne Evans. As one might think, Evans chose a male pen name in order that her work might be best appreciated in the Victorian era. Eliot wrote seven novels including “Adam Bede” (1859), “The Mill on the Floss” (1860), “Silas Marner” (1861) and “Middlemarch” (1871-72).

7. Parsons of “The Big Bang Theory” JIM
Jim Parsons is an actor from Houston, Texas who is best known for playing Sheldon Cooper on the television sitcom “The BIg Bang Theory”. As of 2014, Parsons and his costars Johnny Galecki and Kaley Cuoco are earning one million dollars per episode of the show.

8. Taiwanese computer giant ACER
I owned several Acer laptops, which are for my money the most reliable machine at the best price. Acer is a Taiwanese company that I used to visit a lot when I was in the electronics business. I was very impressed with the company’s dedication to quality, and haven’t been let down since.

9. Flowing glacial feature ICEFALL
An icefall is a feature in a glacier, named for the related waterfall in a river. Glacier ice moves relatively quickly in an ice fall, much more quickly than in the rest of the glacier. This is because icefalls occur where the glacier’s bed steeps or narrows, forcing a lot of ice through a smaller opening.

10. Mandible’s counterpart MAXILLA
The bones of the jaw are the maxilla (the upper jawbone) and the mandible (the lower jawbone).

12. The natural in “The Natural” ROY
Bernard Malamud wrote the novel “The Natural”, published in 1952. It tells the story of a baseball player called Roy Hobbs, who gets shot early in his career and makes a remarkable comeback many years later. Although Roy Hobbs is a fictional character, the story is apparently based on the real-life Phillies player Eddie Waitkus, who was indeed shot in his hotel room by an obsessed fan in 1949. The film adaptation released in 1984 is an excellent movie starring Robert Redford as “The Natural”.

15. Relative of a canary SERIN
Serins form a whole group of small finches, a group that includes canaries.

17. Vincent van Gogh’s brother THEO
Theo van Gogh was the younger brother of painter Vincent van Gogh, and a successful art dealer. Theo provided financial support for his brother throughout his life, allowing Vincent to pursue his passion for creating art. Vincent and Theo died about six months apart. The former committed suicide and the later died from the effects of syphilis.

18. G THOU
“G” and “thou” are slang terms used for a “thousand”.

32. “Ditto” AS AM I
“Ditto” was originally used in Italian (from Tuscan dialect) to avoid repetition of the names of months in a series of dates. So “ditto” is just another wonderful import from that lovely land …

34. Valley girl’s filler LIKE
The original “valley girls” were the young, middle-class females living in San Fernando Valley in Southern California.

36. Reagan’s challenge to Gorbachev TEAR DOWN THIS WALL
I once worked for a man who, when serving with the US Army, had the job of filming the construction of the Berlin Wall in the early sixties. Starting in 1952, the border between East And West Germany was strictly controlled, with the help of fences and walls running over 850 miles from the Baltic Sea to Czechoslovakia. There was a big “gap” in the restrictive barrier, in the divided city of Berlin. Restriction of movement in between East and West in the city was very lax for most of the fifties (you could take a subway train “under” the border, for example), and so Berlin became a gateway for emigration, almost exclusively from East to West. In August 1961, under orders from Nikita Khrushchev in Moscow, East Germany closed the border in Berlin, and construction started on the fortified wall.

38. Architect Saarinen EERO
Eero Saarinen was a Finnish American architect, renowned in this country for his unique designs for public buildings such as Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Dulles International Airport Terminal, and the TWA building at JFK.

40. Langston Hughes poem with the lines “They send me to eat in the kitchen / When company comes” I TOO
Langston Hughes was a poet active in the Harlem Renaissance, and someone who helped develop the literary form known as “jazz poetry”. His poem “I, Too, Sing America” was published in 1925.

I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
“Eat in the kitchen,”
Then.

Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed–

I, too, am America.

41. Earliest-born member of the Cartoon Hall of Fame NAST
Thomas Nast was an American caricaturist and cartoonist. Nast was the creator of the Republican Party elephant, the Democratic Party’s donkey, Uncle Sam and the image of the plump and jocular Santa Claus that we use today. Thomas Nast drew some famous cartoons in which he depicted the Tammany Society as a vicious tiger that was killing democracy. Nast’s use of the tiger symbology caught on and was used by other cartoonists to harp at the society.

42. “___ Mine, All Mine” (1920s tune) SHE’S
“She’s Mine All Mine” is a song from the twenties that was written by Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby. Kalmar and Ruby were a songwriting team who wrote for some of the Marx Brothers’ films, among others.

43. Goldman’s banking partner SACHS
Goldman Sachs made out like bandits during the subprime mortgage crisis of 2007-08, as the company actually short-sold subprime mortgage bonds, so as the price of the bonds nose-dived, Goldman Sachs made huge profits.

44. “___ of One’s Own” (Woolf essay) A ROOM
Virginia Woolf was an English author active in the period between the two World Wars. Woolf’s most famous novels were “Mrs. Dalloway”, “To the Lighthouse” and “Orlando”. She also wrote a long essay entitled “A Room of One’s Own” in which she states “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.”

47. ___ Leslie, three-time W.N.B.A. M.V.P. LISA
Lisa Leslie is a former professional basketball player who played in the WNBA with the Los Angeles Sparks. Leslie is rather tall, and was the first player to dunk the ball in a WNBA game.

52. Prefix with -scope STETHO-
The word “stethoscope” comes from the Greek word for “chest examination”. The stethoscope was invented back in 1816 in France by René Laennec, although back then it looked just like an ear trumpet, a wooden tube with flared ends.

58. Bit of seaweed ALGA
Algae are similar to terrestrial plants in that they use photosynthesis to create sugars from light and carbon dioxide, but they differ in that they have simpler anatomies, and for example lack roots.

59. Cav or Mav CAGER
In the early days of basketball, when a ball went out of bounds possession was awarded to the player who first retrieved the ball. This led to mad scuffles off the court, often involving spectators. As the game became more organized courts were routinely “caged”, largely because of this out of bounds rule, to limit interaction with the crowd. It’s because of these cages that basketball players are sometimes referred to today as “cagers”.

61. Brand with a red arrow through its logo SUNOCO
Back in the late 1800s, Sunoco was known as the Sun Oil Company.

63. Synagogue instrument SHOFAR
A shofar is a musical instrument used in Jewish rituals. It is a relatively simple instrument, made from an animal’s (usually a ram) horn.

68. Some smug comments SMARM
The term “smarm”, meaning insincere flattery, comes from a colloquial word “smalm” meaning to smear the hair with some sort of styling product.

72. It has almost 4,000 miles of coastline CHILE
The land of Chile has a very distinctive shape. It is a narrow strip that runs up the west coast of South America. The average width of the country is only a little over 100 miles, and yet its length is about 2,700 miles. Chile is touted as the longest country in the world, although I am not so sure what that means exactly. I mean, Russian extends about 4,800 miles from east-to west …

74. It might be at your fingertips EMERY
Emery is a very hard type of rock that is crushed for use as an abrasive. Emery paper is made by gluing small particles of emery to paper. Emery boards are just emery paper with a cardboard backing. And emery boards are primarily used for filing nails.

76. Work units ERGS
An erg is a unit of energy or mechanical work. “Erg” comes from the Greek word “ergon” meaning “work”. A dyne is a unit of force. The name “dyne” comes from the Greek “dynamis” meaning “power, force”. Ergs and dynes are related to each other in that one erg is the amount of energy needed to move a force of one dyne over a distance of one centimeter.

78. One picked out of a lineup, informally PERP
Perpetrator (perp.)

80. Classic movie shot on Martha’s Vineyard JAWS
“Jaws” is a thrilling 1975 movie directed by Steven Spielberg that is based on a novel of the same name by Peter Benchley. The film has a powerful cast, led by Roy Scheider, Richard Dreyfuss and Robert Shaw. “Jaws” was perhaps the first “summer blockbuster” with the highest box office take in history, a record that stood until “Star Wars” was released two years later.

Martha’s Vineyard is a relatively large island located south of Cape Cod in Massachusetts. “Martha’s Vineyard” was originally the name of a smaller island to the south, named by English explorer Bartholomew Gosnold in 1602. The name was eventually transferred to the main island, and is now the eighth-oldest English place-name still used in the US. It is likely that the Gosnold named the island for his daughter Martha.

81. Dead reckoning? OBIT
“Obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”, originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

93. Pituitary gland output, briefly ACTH
Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is produced by the anterior pituitary gland.

The pituitary gland is found at the base of the brain and is about the size of pea. The pituitary secretes nine hormones in all, and so affects many aspects of bodily function.

104. Justice Kagan ELENA
Elena Kagan was the Solicitor General of the United States who replaced Justice John Paul Stevens on the US Supreme Court. That made Justice Kagan the fourth female US Supreme Court justice (there have been 108 men!). I hear she is a fan of Jane Austen, and used to reread “Pride and Prejudice” once a year. Not a bad thing to do, I’d say …

105. Oscar-winning actor whose name is Italian for “fishes” PESCI
Joe Pesci got his big break in movies with a supporting role in “Raging Bull” starring Robert De Niro, earning Pesci an Oscar nomination early in his career. There followed a string of gangster roles played alongside De Niro, namely “Once Upon a Time in America”, “Goodfellas” and “Casino”. But I like Pesci’s comedic acting best of all. He was marvelous in the “Home Alone” films, the “Lethal Weapon” series, and my personal favorite, “My Cousin Vinny”. Pesci gets a mention in the stage musical “Jersey Boys”, which isn’t too surprising as he is one of the show’s producers.

111. 2007 purchaser of Applebee’s IHOP
The International House of Pancakes (IHOP) was founded back in 1958. IHOP was originally intended to be called IHOE, the International House of Eggs, but that name didn’t do too well in marketing tests …

The Applebee’s chain of “Neighborhood Bar & Grill” restaurants was founded in 1980, with the first Applebee’s eatery opening in Decatur, Georgia.

112. Nephew of Caligula NERO
The Roman emperor Nero had quite the family life. When Nero was just 16-years-old he married his stepsister, Claudia Octavia. He also had his mother and step-brother executed.

Caligula was emperor of Rome after Tiberius, and before Claudius. “Caligula” was actually a nickname for Gaius Germanicus. Gaius’s father was a successful general in the Roman army and his soldiers called young Gaius “Caligula”, meaning “little soldier’s boot”.

113. Asia’s ___ Sea ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

115. Duck that nests in tree hollows SMEW
The smew is a beautiful-looking species of duck found right across northern Europe and Asia. The smew requires trees to complete its breeding cycle as it nests in tree holes, such as old woodpecker nests.

117. Gillette brand name TRAC
Gillette introduced the Trac II in 1971, the world’s first twin-blade razor.

120. Olympus OM-2, e.g. SLR
SLR stands for “single lens reflex”. Usually cameras with interchangeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

121. ___ chi TAI
More properly called tai chi chuan, tai chi is a martial art mostly practiced to improve overall health and increase longevity.

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Bygone potentate MAHARAJA
9. Ottoman inns IMARETS
16. Web starter HTTP
20. Kind of steroid ANABOLIC
21. Small thing to burn CALORIE
22. “Fancy meeting you here!” OH HI!
23. 1975 Tony-nominated play about an extended affair SAME TIME, NEXT YEAR
25. Spanish province LEON
26. Rehnquist’s successor on the high bench SCALIA
27. New home loan deal, in short REFI
28. Exclaimed CRIED OUT
30. “Guardians of the Galaxy” title characters, informally ETS
31. Org. implementing the Protect America Act NSA
33. Audacity GALL
35. Chief justice during the Civil War TANEY
36. Relationships TIES
37. Skateboard jump OLLIE
39. Private parts LOINS
43. Clear-minded SANE
46. The Crossroads of the West SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
51. Fields AREAS
53. Early-millennium year MII
54. Undermine ERODE
55. Prop on “The Bachelor” ROSE
56. What a bachelor might do COURT
57. ___ Watts, English hymnist who wrote “Joy to the World” ISAAC
60. Uncontested basketball attempts OPEN SHOTS
62. Swarms HORDES
64. Rockefeller Center statue ATLAS
66. Go after ENSUE
67. Irons, say SMOOTHS
69. Encourage EGG ON
71. Like a good-sized estate, maybe TEN-ACRE
75. “Wait, you can’t possibly think …?” WHO ME?
77. Writer painted by Velázquez AESOP
79. Pre-Bill Hillary RODHAM
80. Historic figure with a reputation at stake? JOAN OF ARC
84. Shelfmate of Bartlett’s, maybe ROGET
86. Onion relative CHIVE
87. Go cheek-to-cheek with ABUT
88. Lingo ARGOT
90. Good source of iron? ORE
91. Exxon Valdez, e.g. OILER
92. Warm way to welcome someone WITH ARMS WIDE OPEN
97. Millennials, informally GEN-Y
98. Unflinching STOIC
99. Be profligate, say SPEND
100. Radio host John TESH
102. Throat problem STREP
106. Team of oxen SPAN
107. “Say what?” HUH?
108. Brother FRA
111. Not now IN A WHILE
114. Stats for Aaron and Gehrig RBIS
116. Deeds TITLES
118. Goddess of marriage HERA
119. Common slogan for a music radio station LESS TALK, MORE ROCK
123. Kind of cavity ORAL
124. Vatican City vis-à-vis Rome ENCLAVE
125. “CSI: Miami” actress EVA LARUE
126. Take in some views? POLL
127. Some farms DAIRIES
128. Unpredictable one WILD CARD

Down
1. Pool stroke MASSE
2. Put on ___ AN ACT
3. Gaza group HAMAS
4. Biblical brother ABEL
5. Corkscrew-shaped pasta ROTINI
6. George Orwell and George Eliot ALIASES
7. Parsons of “The Big Bang Theory” JIM
8. Taiwanese computer giant ACER
9. Flowing glacial feature ICEFALL
10. Mandible’s counterpart MAXILLA
11. Not the main rte. ALT
12. The natural in “The Natural” ROY
13. Build ERECT
14. Sparkly topper TIARA
15. Relative of a canary SERIN
16. “Don’t be ashamed” HOLD YOUR HEAD HIGH
17. Vincent van Gogh’s brother THEO
18. G THOU
19. Pub order PINT
24. Haggle NEGOTIATE
29. Hard to grasp EELY
32. “Ditto” AS AM I
34. Valley girl’s filler LIKE
36. Reagan’s challenge to Gorbachev TEAR DOWN THIS WALL
38. Architect Saarinen EERO
40. Langston Hughes poem with the lines “They send me to eat in the kitchen / When company comes” I TOO
41. Earliest-born member of the Cartoon Hall of Fame NAST
42. “___ Mine, All Mine” (1920s tune) SHE’S
43. Goldman’s banking partner SACHS
44. “___ of One’s Own” (Woolf essay) A ROOM
45. Intro to science? NEURO-
47. ___ Leslie, three-time W.N.B.A. M.V.P. LISA
48. Get by COPE
49. Driver’s lic., e.g. IDENT
50. Like overtime periods vis-à-vis regulation play TENSER
52. Prefix with -scope STETHO-
58. Bit of seaweed ALGA
59. Cav or Mav CAGER
61. Brand with a red arrow through its logo SUNOCO
63. Synagogue instrument SHOFAR
65. Middlin’ SO-SO
68. Some smug comments SMARM
70. Bum NO-GOODNIK
72. It has almost 4,000 miles of coastline CHILE
73. Lustrous black RAVEN
74. It might be at your fingertips EMERY
76. Work units ERGS
78. One picked out of a lineup, informally PERP
80. Classic movie shot on Martha’s Vineyard JAWS
81. Dead reckoning? OBIT
82. Prefix with correct AUTO-
83. Sights at 127-Across COWS
85. Baby ___ TEETH
89. Bar jarful TIPS
93. Pituitary gland output, briefly ACTH
94. Corrupt DEPRAVE
95. Activates, in computer lingo ENABLES
96. No one can drive in this NEUTRAL
101. Protect SHIELD
103. All worked up RILED
104. Justice Kagan ELENA
105. Oscar-winning actor whose name is Italian for “fishes” PESCI
108. Trees and shrubs FLORA
109. Come back RECUR
110. Posed ASKED
111. 2007 purchaser of Applebee’s IHOP
112. Nephew of Caligula NERO
113. Asia’s ___ Sea ARAL
115. Duck that nests in tree hollows SMEW
117. Gillette brand name TRAC
120. Olympus OM-2, e.g. SLR
121. ___ chi TAI
122. Egg: Prefix OVI-

Return to top of page

The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections
Amazon.com Widgets

One thought on “0928-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 28 Sep 14, Sunday”

  1. Well, I thought I had brothers Gross and Shortz on "Rehnquist's successor." I knew that Rehnquist was on the Court long after Scalia had also been appointed (Rehnquist presided over the Clinton impeachment trial), and knew that Roberts had been appointed by GWBush to fill Rehnquist's slot on Rehnquist's death. So how could Scalia have succeeded Rehnquist? I'd forgotten that Reagan appointed Scalia to fill Rehnquist's slot when Burger retired and Rehnquist was elevated to Chief Justice. Tricky!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.