0907-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 7 Sep 14, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Tracy Gray & Jeff Chen
THEME: All-Encompassing … we have a compass in the middle of the grid today, drawn by the black squares. At the four points of this compass are the letters N, S, E and W. Today’s is a rebus puzzle, with compasses inserted into symmetrical squares throughout the grid (which I’ve represented with a “+” symbol of sorts. This symbol is a signal to use the letter NS for down-answers crossing the rebus square (the north-south direction), and the letters WE for across-answers (the west-east direction).

17A. “No lie!” I SWEAR!
30A. Nasty storm, e.g. FOUL WEATHER
33A. Film director who said “I think an artist has always to be out of step with his time” ORSON WELLES
63A. Fan of pop’s One Direction, maybe TWEEN
64A. Veered off course YAWED
98A. Southern farm concern BOLL WEEVILS
100A. “No need to worry” DON’T SWEAT IT
115A. Marketing news magazine ADWEEK
3D. Kicks everyone out, say CLEANS HOUSE
8D. Big name in auto racing UNSER
13D. Cousin of a zucchini ACORN SQUASH
50D. Karate instructor SENSEI
57D. Stretching muscle TENSOR
66D. Dodo’s lack COMMON SENSE
73D. 1960s sci-fi series LOST IN SPACE
105D. Noted Dadaist ERNST

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 34m 09s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Loaded, in Lyon RICHE
The city of Lyon in France, is also known as “Lyons” in English.

6. Hosiery hue TAUPE
Taupe is a dark, gray-brown color. The word “taupe” comes from the Latin name of the European Mole, which has skin with the same color.

16. Last place CELLAR
“In the cellar” is a familiar phrase meaning “in last place”, especially in a game or sport.

20. Some politicians’ trips JUNKETS
Nowadays we use the term “junket” for a trip taken by a government official at public expense that has no public benefit. Back in the late 1500s, a junket was a basket for carrying fish. The term was then applied to a feast or banquet, perhaps adopting the notion of a picnic “basket”. From feast or banquet, the term came to mean a pleasure trip, and is now our political junket.

21. Cub Scout leader AKELA
Akela is the wolf in the “Jungle Book”. He gave his name to the cubmaster in the scouting movement, now known as “Akela”.

24. Shrinks’ org. APA
American Psychiatric Organization (APA)

29. JFK alternative in N.Y.C. LGA
The accepted three big airports serving New York City are John F. Kennedy (JFK), La Guardia (LGA) and Newark (EWR).

Fiorello La Guardia was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945, racking up three full terms in office. The famous airport that bears La Guardia’s name was built at his urging, stemming from an incident that took place while he was in office. He was taking a TWA flight to “New York” and was outraged when the plane landed at Newark Airport, in the state of New Jersey. The Mayor demanded that the flight take off again and land at a small airport in Brooklyn. A gaggle of press reporters joined him on the short hop and he gave them a story, urging New Yorkers to support the construction of a new commercial airport within the city’s limits. The new airport, in Queens, opened in 1939 as New York Municipal, often called “LaGuardia” as a nickname. The airport was officially relabeled as “LaGuardia” in 1947.

33. Film director who said “I think an artist has always to be out of step with his time” ORSON WELLES
Orson Welles is perhaps best-remembered in the world of film for his role in 1941’s “Citizen Kane”. In the world of radio, Welles is known for 1938’s famous broadcast of “The War of the Worlds”, a broadcast that convinced many listeners that the Earth was indeed being invaded by aliens.

36. “___ be praised” ALLAH
The term “Allah” comes from the Arabic “al-” and “ilah”, meaning “the” and “deity”. So “Allah” translates as “God”.

37. Paradoxical figure? ZENO
Zeno of Elea was a Greek philosopher who lived in Elea, a Greek colony in Southern Italy. Zeno is famous for his “paradoxes”, a set of problems that really make you think! In the problem known as Achilles and the Tortoise, Zeno tells us that Achilles races a tortoise, giving the tortoise a head start (of say 100 meters). By the time Achilles reaches the starting point of the tortoise, the tortoise will have moved on, albeit only a small distance. Achilles then sets his sights on the tortoise’s new position and runs to it. Again the tortoise has moved ahead a little. Achilles keeps on moving to the tortoise’s new position but can never actually catch his slower rival. Or can he …?

38. Fraternity member or muscle, briefly DELT
The deltoid muscle is actually a group of muscles, the ones that cover the shoulder and create the roundness under the skin. The deltoids are triangular in shape resembling the Greek letter delta, hence the name.

39. Mary who introduced the miniskirt QUANT
Mary Quant is an English fashion designer who is credited with the creation of the miniskirt and hot pants in the sixties.

42. “Law & Order” spinoff, informally SVU
“Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” is a spin off the TV crime drama “Law & Order”. “SVU” has been on the air since 1999, and is set in New York City. Interestingly, since 2007 there has been a very successful Russian adaptation of the show that is set in Moscow.

44. Ornery sorts CUSSES
A “cuss” is a person or animal, especially one that is annoying and ornery.

Back in the early 1800s, the word “ornery” was an informal contraction for the word “ordinary”, and meant commonplace, but with a sense of “poor quality, coarse, ugly” as opposed to “special”. Towards the end of the century, the usage “ornery” had evolved into describing someone who was mean or cantankerous.

48. Ayatollah predecessor SHAH
The last Shah of Iran was Mohammed-Reza Shah Pahlavi, as he was overthrown in the revolution led by the Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979. The post-revolution government sought the extradition of the Shah back to Iran while he was in the United States seeking medical care (he had cancer). His prolonged stay in the United States, recovering from surgery, caused some unrest back in Iran and resentment towards the United States. Some say that this resentment precipitated the storming of the US Embassy in Tehran and the resulting hostage crisis.

The Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini was one of the leaders of the 1979 Iranian Revolution which overthrew the Shah of Iran. After the revolution he came to power as the country’s Supreme Leader, holding the highest ranking political and religious position. When Khomeini died in 1989, there were two funerals. The first had to be aborted after a crowd of 2 million people got out of control and encroached on the funeral procession. The Ayatollah’s wooden casket broke open and his body nearly fell to the ground as devotees tried to grasp pieces of his death shroud.

49. Indiana Jones menace ASP
“Raiders of the Lost Ark” is, in my humble opinion, the best of the Indiana Jones franchise of movies. This first Indiana Jones film was released in 1981, produced by George Lucas and directed by Steven Spielberg. Harrison Ford was Spielberg’s first choice to play the lead, but Lucas resisted as he was concerned that he would be too closely associated with the actor (as Ford played Han Solo in “Star Wars”, and also appeared in Lucas’s “American Graffiti”). Tom Selleck was offered the role but couldn’t get out of his commitments to “Magnum, P.I.” Eventually Spielberg got his way, and that was a good thing I’d say …

54. Game with falling popularity? TETRIS
Tetris is a very addictive video game, developed in the Soviet Union in 1984. The name Tetris comes from a melding of the prefix “tetra-” (as all the game pieces have four segments) and “tennis” (a favorite sport played by the developer). Since 2005 there have been more than 100 million copies of the game installed on cell phones alone.

56. Native Oklahoman OTO
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

63. Fan of pop’s One Direction, maybe TWEEN
The term “tween” is now used to describe preadolescence, the years between 10 and 12 years of age.

65. Many Winslow Homer works SEASCAPES
Winslow Homer was an American landscape painter and illustrator active in the second half of the 19th century. His most famous work is probably the oil painting depicting a man and three boys sailing, which bears the title “Breezing Up (A Fair Wind)”, and which can be seen in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D. C.

70. Some holiday greenery MISTLETOE
Mistletoe is a parasitic plant that grows on trees or shrubs, absorbing water and other nutrients from the host. Mistletoe is commonly used as a Christmas decoration in Europe and North America. There is a custom that a man and woman meeting under the mistletoe must kiss. The tradition back in the 1800s was that a young man could extract a kiss from a young lady under the mistletoe, and then must pluck a cherry from the plant. Once all the cherries were plucked, there were no more kissing privileges.

74. The dark side YIN
The yin and the yang can be explained using many different metaphors. In one, as the sun shines on a mountain, the side in the shade is the yin and the side in the light is the yang. The yin is also regarded as the feminine side, and the yang the masculine. The yin can also be associated with the moon, while the yang is associated with the sun.

77. Island in Pacific W.W. II fighting BORNEO
Borneo is the third largest island on the planet (after Greenland and New Guinea), and is located north of Australia in Maritime Southeast Asia. Most of the island is part of Indonesia (taking up 73% of the island) with almost all of the remainder being part of Malaysia (26%). The final 1% is home to the sovereign state of Brunei.

78. “The cautious seldom ___”: Confucius ERR
“The Analects” or “Linyu” is a collection of the sayings of the Chinese philosopher Confucius. It wasn’t Confucius who wrote down his thoughts though, but rather his pupils, some 40 or so years after his death in 479 BC.

79. Stone of “The Help” EMMA
The actress Emma Stone really came to prominence with her performance in the 2010 high school movie called “Easy A”. My favorite film in which Stone appears is 2011’s “The Help”.

80. Atomic clock part MASER
A MASER is a device that was around long before LASERs came into the public consciousness. A MASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) is similar to a LASER, but microwaves are emitted rather than light waves. When the storyline for “Star Trek” was being developed, the writers introduced a weapon called a “phaser”, with the name “phaser” derived from PHoton mASER.

An atomic clock is the most accurate way of keeping track of time that is known. Most clocks work using some sort of an oscillation that takes place at a regular interval, like a pendulum. In the case of an atomic clock, the oscillation that is measured is between the nucleus of an atom and its surrounding electrons.

86. Figure on Argentina’s flag SUN
The flag of Argentina is composed of three horizontal bands, light blue on the top and bottom, and white across the middle. The simpler version of the flag just has these three bands. The full version of the flag includes a sun in the center of the white band.

93. Last Oldsmobile ALERO
The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made under the Oldsmobile brand. The Alero was produced from 1999 to 2004.

95. Org. that implemented the Food Stamp Act USDA
The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) actually dates back to 1862 when it was established by then-president Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln referred to the USDA as the “people’s department” as our economy had such a vast agrarian base back then.

97. Former Mrs. Trump IVANA
Ivana Winklmayr was born in Czechoslovakia. Winklmayr was an excellent skier, and was named as an alternate for the 1982 Czech Olympic Team. She was promoting the Montreal Olympics in New York in 1976 when she met Donald Trump. Ivana and Donald’s marriage was very public and well-covered by the media, but not nearly so well as their very litigious divorce in 1990.

98. Southern farm concern BOLL WEEVILS
A weevil is a small beetle, known for the damage that it can do to crops. The boll weevil damages cotton plants by laying eggs inside cotton bolls. The young weevils then eat their way out.

102. “Die Meistersinger” soprano EVA
Eva is the heroine in Richard Wagner’s (long!) opera titled “Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg” (The Mastersingers of Nuremberg).

103. Brio ELAN
Our word “élan” was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours i.e “style” or “flair”.

“Brio” is borrowed from Italian, in which language it means vigor and vivacity. “Con brio” is a musical direction often found on a score, instructing the musicians to play “with energy, vigor”.

104. ___ lamp LED
A Light Emitting Diode (LED) is a specialized form of semiconductor that when switched on releases photons (light). LEDs are getting more and more popular and have moved from use in electronic equipment to use as a replacement for the much less efficient tungsten light bulb. I replaced all of my tungsten Xmas lights last year and saved a lot on my electricity bill.

110. HBO comedy/drama GIRLS
“Girls” is an HBO comedy-drama series that was created by and stars Lena Dunham. The show follows a group of female friends living their lives in New York City.

115. Marketing news magazine ADWEEK
“Adweek” is a weekly trade magazine serving the advertising industry. It’s only the second biggest seller in the sector though, behind “Advertising Age”.

117. Dutch Golden Age painter STEEN
Jan Steen was a Dutch painter active in the Dutch Golden Age, the 17th century. Steen’s most famous work is probably “The Feast of Saint Nicholas”, which you can see at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.

118. Actress Brandt of “Breaking Bad” BETSY
Betsy Brandt is an actress best known for playing Marie Schrader on “Breaking Bad”. Brandt has two children, the second of which was born while the second season of “Breaking Bad” was being filmed.

Down
1. He walked away with Blaine in “Casablanca” RENAULT
Captain Renault is a character in 1942’s “Casablanca”, played by English actor Claude Rains. Humphrey Bogart plays Rick Blaine, and the beautiful Ingrid Bergman plays Ilsa Lund.

4. Yoga variety HATHA
Hatha yoga is a yoga system developed in 15th century India. Traditional Hatha yoga is a more “complete” practice than often encountered in the west, involving not just exercise but also meditation and relaxation.

5. Synthetic ERSATZ
Something described as “ersatz” is a copy, and usually not a good one. “Ersatz” comes from the German verb “ersetzen” meaning “to replace”.

6. ___ Maria TIA
Tia Maria is a coffee liqueur that was invented just after WWII in Jamaica, using Jamaica coffee beans. The name of course translates to “Aunt Maria”.

8. Big name in auto racing UNSER
The Unser family seems to have racing cars in its blood. Al Unser, Sr. won the Indy 500 on four occasions. Al’s brother Jerry was the first of the Unsers to compete at Indianapolis. Al’s other brother Bobby, won the Indy three times. Al’s son, Al Junior, won the Indy twice. Al Junior’s son is also a racing driver who competes at the Indy Speedway.

9. Trendy food regimen PALEO DIET
The paleolithic or caveman diet is a fad diet that became popular in the 2000s. The idea is to eat wild plants and animals that would have been available to humans during the Paleolithic era (roughly the Stone Age). This period precedes the introduction of agriculture and domestication of animals. As a result, someone on the diet avoids consuming grains, legumes, dairy and processed foods. The diet consists mainly of lean meat (about 45-65% of the total calorie intake), non-starchy vegetables, fruits, berries and nuts.

11. Expensive Super Bowl purchase TV SPOT
The Super Bowl is used for high-profile advertising because of the high viewership numbers. For example, Super Bowl XLV (2011) had an average audience of 111 million viewers, making it the most-watched American TV program in history.

13. Cousin of a zucchini ACORN SQUASH
The zucchini is one of those vegetables that strictly speaking is a fruit, in this case an immature fruit. The name “zucchini” that is used in North America comes from the Italian name “zucchina”, which translates as “small pumpkin”. In Britain and Ireland we call the same vegetable a “courgette”, the French name.

14. Boca Del ___, Fla. MAR
Boca Del Mar is a residential community in Boca Raton, Florida.

15. Certain bar orders, informally STELLAS
The Belgian beer Stella Artois is named for the brewer Sebastianus Artois. Artois was the master brewer at the Den Horen Brewery in Leuven, Belgium in the early 1700s. The Den Horen Brewery has been around at least since 1366 … yes, 1366!

16. Rounded roof CUPOLA
A cupola is a small dome-like structure on the top of a building. “Cupola” comes from the Latin “cupula” meaning “small cup”.

19. West Coast city where Nike had its start EUGENE
Eugene is the second-largest city in Oregon (after Portland). The city is named for its founder, Eugene Franklin Skinner. Skinner arrived in the area in 1846, after which the settlement he established was called Skinner’s Mudhole. The name was changed to Eugene City in 1852, which was shortened to Eugene in 1889.

20. Aladdin’s adversary JAFAR
Jafar is the bad guy in the animated film “Aladdin”. Jafar was important enough to get his name front and center in the sequel called “Aladdin 2”, which is usually referred to as “The Return of Jafar”.

26. “___ Mine,” 1984 Steve Perry hit SHE’S
Steve Perry was the lead singer of the band Journey for much of the eighties and nineties.

28. Winter Olympics site after St. Moritz OSLO
The 1952 Winter Olympic Games took place in Oslo, Norway. One of the firsts at the 1952 games was the first use of a purpose-built athletes’ village. The 1952 Games also marked the return of Japan and Germany to the Olympic family after being excluded from the 1948 games following WWII.

The 1948 Winter Olympics were held in St. Moritz, Switzerland. They were the first Games to be held after WWII, with the last Games taking place 12 years earlier in Garmisch-Partenkirchen in Germany. Given the timing of the 1948 Games so soon after the war, the event was somewhat overshadowed by politics. Japan and Germany were excluded, and Russia decided not to compete. Some competitors found it hard to find the necessary equipment. A case in point was the Norwegian ski team that had to borrow skis from the Americans.

34. Gerrymandered, e.g. REDREW
Elbridge Gerry was the fifth Vice President of the US, serving under James Madison. Gerry only served 1½ years of his term however, as he died of heart failure while still in office. While Gerry was the governor of his home state of Massachusetts he signed a bill that allowed redrawing of electoral boundaries in such a way that it benefited his Democratic-Republican Party. The “Boston Gazette” wrote an article about the bill and termed the political tactic “Gerry-Mandering”. And “gerrymandering” is a term we still use today, and not just in this country but all over the world.

35. Verdant LUSH
Back in the late 1500s, “verdant” simply meant “green”, but we now tend to use the term to mean green and lush with vegetation. “Viridis” is the Latin for “green”.

41. Bright light NEON
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

44. In vogue CHIC
“Chic” is a French word meaning “stylish”.

46. X or Y supplier DAD
In most mammalian species, including man, females have two identical sex chromosomes (XX), and males two distinct sex chromosomes (XY). As a result it is the males who determine the sex of the offspring. However, in birds it’s the opposite, so females determine the sex of the chicks.

48. Mister, in Mumbai SRI
“Sri” is a title of respect for a male in India, sometimes used in place or our “Mister”.

Mumbai is the most populous city in India, and the second most populous city in the world (after Shanghai). The name of the city was changed from Bombay to Mumbai in 1995.

50. Karate instructor SENSEI
“Sensei” is a Japanese form of address used for figures of authority, from lawyers to martial arts instructors.

51. Joyous song PAEAN
A paean is a poem or song that expresses triumph or thanksgiving. “Paean” comes from the ancient Greek “paian” meaning “song of triumph”.

53. Small flycatcher PEWEE
A pewee is a small bird, so called because of the “pee wee” sound that it makes.

55. “___ Satanic Majesties Request” (Rolling Stones album) THEIR
“Their Satanic Majesties Request” is a 1967 album recorded by the Rolling Stones. The title is a play on wording found inside a UK passport: “Her Britannic Majesty requests and requires …” The cover of the album bears a remarkable similarity to the Beatles “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” that was released a few months earlier.

57. Stretching muscle TENSOR
A tensor muscle is one that tightens or stretches a part of the body.

60. E.R. figures RNS
Registered nurses (RNs) might be found in an operating room (OR) or emergency room (ER).

68. Bussing on a bus, briefly? PDA
PDA is an initialism standing for “public display of affection”.

“To buss” is “to kiss”. Not a term with which I am familiar …

69. Barber who wrote “Adagio for Strings” SAMUEL
Samuel Barber was one of the most respected composers of 20th-century classical music. Barber’s most famous work is probably “Adagio for Strings”, a piece that has been used a lot in television and movies, including a memorable scene in the movie “Platoon”.

71. Sketch show, briefly SNL
“Saturday Night Live” (SNL)

72. Caddy’s choices TEAS
A caddy is a container used for tea. “Caddy” comes from the Malay word “kati”, a unit of weight used as a standard by British tea companies in the East Indies.

73. 1960s sci-fi series LOST IN SPACE
“Lost in Space” is a television sci-fi show that originally ran for three season from 1965 to 1968. There was also a “Lost in Space” movie released in 1998. The show was based on a comic book series called “Space Family Robinson”, which in turn was based on the Johann David Wyss novel “The Swiss Family Robinson”. Some oft-repeated lines from the show were uttered by the Robot character, including:

– “Warning! Warning!”
– “That does not compute”
– “Danger, Will Robinson!”

79. N.B.A. Hall-of-Famer Monroe EARL
Earl Monroe is a retired professional basketball player who played for the Baltimore Bullets and the New York Knicks.

82. “___ Nagila” HAVA
“Hava Nagila” is a Hebrew folk song, with the title translating into “Let Us Rejoice”. The melody is from a Ukrainian folk song. The words to “Hava Nagila” were composed in 1918 to celebrate the British victory in Palestine during WWI.

83. Light ___ SABER
Lightsabers are energy weapons used by the Jedi and the Sith in the “Star Wars” series of films.

86. P.R. firm’s job SPIN
Public Relations (PR)

88. Principal Seymour’s girlfriend on “The Simpsons” EDNA
In “the Simpsons” television show, Bart Simpson’s teacher is one Edna Krabappel, who is also Principal Seymour’s girlfriend.

90. Fullness SATIETY
“Sate” is a variant of the earlier word “satiate”. Both terms can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

92. Stick on the grill? SATAY
The dish known as “satay” originated in Java, Indonesia and is marinated pieces of meat served on a skewer in a sauce, often a spicy peanut sauce.

94. Where Excalibur was forged AVALON
Avalon is a legendary island featured in the Arthurian legends. The name Avalon probably comes from the word “afal”, the Welsh word for “apple”, reflecting the fact that the island was noted for its beautiful apples. Avalon is where King Arthur’s famous sword (Excalibur) was forged, and supposedly where Arthur was buried.

101. Philosopher Kierkegaard SOREN
Soren Kierkegaard was a Danish philosopher and theologian, and I never really understood anything that he wrote!

105. Noted Dadaist ERNST
Max Ernst was a painter and sculptor, a pioneer in the Dada movement and Surrealism. Ernst was born near Cologne in Germany in 1891 and he was called up to fight in WWI, as were most young German men at that time. In his autobiography he writes “Max Ernst died the 1st of August, 1914” a statement about his experiences in the war. In reality, Ernst died in 1976 having lived to the ripe old age of 85.

Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

109. ___ Technical Institute ITT
ITT Technical Institute is a private educational establishment with over 130 campuses all over the US.

111. Britain’s ___ News SKY
Sky News is a 14-hour news channel that was launched in Britain in 1989. Sky News is owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation, as is the US’s Fox News.

113. “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” enchanter TIM
“Monty Python and the Holy Grail” was released as a movie in 1975, and was a great success. Some thirty years later the film’s storyline was used as inspiration for the hit musical “Spamalot”. I saw “Spamalot” recently and wasn’t that impressed. But, mine was very much a minority opinion …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Loaded, in Lyon RICHE
6. Hosiery hue TAUPE
11. Eagles, Falcons and Cardinals TEAMS
16. Last place CELLAR
17. “No lie!” I SWEAR!
18. Move out VACATE
20. Some politicians’ trips JUNKETS
21. Cub Scout leader AKELA
22. Salt away STORE UP
24. Shrinks’ org. APA
25. What discoveries may yield AHAS
27. “Right you ___!” ARE
28. Abbr. not found on most smartphones OPER
29. JFK alternative in N.Y.C. LGA
30. Nasty storm, e.g. FOUL WEATHER
33. Film director who said “I think an artist has always to be out of step with his time” ORSON WELLES
36. “___ be praised” ALLAH
37. Paradoxical figure? ZENO
38. Fraternity member or muscle, briefly DELT
39. Mary who introduced the miniskirt QUANT
40. Outs, in a way RATS ON
42. “Law & Order” spinoff, informally SVU
43. “Yes” I DO
44. Ornery sorts CUSSES
45. Didn’t take it lying down, say SUED
47. ___ child (playful side) INNER
48. Ayatollah predecessor SHAH
49. Indiana Jones menace ASP
52. Lathered (up) SOAPED
54. Game with falling popularity? TETRIS
56. Native Oklahoman OTO
59. Hit from behind REAR-ENDED
61. “Eh, any one is fine” WHICHEVER
63. Fan of pop’s One Direction, maybe TWEEN
64. Veered off course YAWED
65. Many Winslow Homer works SEASCAPES
70. Some holiday greenery MISTLETOE
74. The dark side YIN
75. Kidnapping, e.g. ORDEAL
77. Island in Pacific W.W. II fighting BORNEO
78. “The cautious seldom ___”: Confucius ERR
79. Stone of “The Help” EMMA
80. Atomic clock part MASER
81. Flog LASH
83. Hightails it SCRAMS
86. Figure on Argentina’s flag SUN
87. Charge FEE
89. Period of inactivity STASIS
93. Last Oldsmobile ALERO
94. Took after APED
95. Org. that implemented the Food Stamp Act USDA
97. Former Mrs. Trump IVANA
98. Southern farm concern BOLL WEEVILS
100. “No need to worry” DON’T SWEAT IT
102. “Die Meistersinger” soprano EVA
103. Brio ELAN
104. ___ lamp LED
106. On ATOP
107. Wyo. neighbor IDA
108. Kind of scan RETINAL
110. HBO comedy/drama GIRLS
112. Way to storm off IRATELY
114. Begins, as work SETS TO
115. Marketing news magazine ADWEEK
116. Rattle off, say RECITE
117. Dutch Golden Age painter STEEN
118. Actress Brandt of “Breaking Bad” BETSY
119. Them, with “the” ENEMY

Down
1. He walked away with Blaine in “Casablanca” RENAULT
2. Type ILK
3. Kicks everyone out, say CLEANS HOUSE
4. Yoga variety HATHA
5. Synthetic ERSATZ
6. ___ Maria TIA
7. Get several views ASK AROUND
8. Big name in auto racing UNSER
9. Trendy food regimen PALEO DIET
10. Long span ERA
11. Expensive Super Bowl purchase TV SPOT
12. Polished off EATEN
13. Cousin of a zucchini ACORN SQUASH
14. Boca Del ___, Fla. MAR
15. Certain bar orders, informally STELLAS
16. Rounded roof CUPOLA
19. West Coast city where Nike had its start EUGENE
20. Aladdin’s adversary JAFAR
23. Times gone by PASTS
26. “___ Mine,” 1984 Steve Perry hit SHE’S
28. Winter Olympics site after St. Moritz OSLO
31. Bonny miss LASS
32. Like lottery winners, typically ENVIED
34. Gerrymandered, e.g. REDREW
35. Verdant LUSH
41. Bright light NEON
44. In vogue CHIC
46. X or Y supplier DAD
48. Mister, in Mumbai SRI
49. Creative, in a way ARTSY
50. Karate instructor SENSEI
51. Joyous song PAEAN
53. Small flycatcher PEWEE
55. “___ Satanic Majesties Request” (Rolling Stones album) THEIR
56. Eggy? OVATE
57. Stretching muscle TENSOR
58. Court cry ORDER!
60. E.R. figures RNS
62. Inspect EYE
66. Dodo’s lack COMMON SENSE
67. Weaponry ARMS
68. Bussing on a bus, briefly? PDA
69. Barber who wrote “Adagio for Strings” SAMUEL
70. To a greater extent MORE SO
71. Sketch show, briefly SNL
72. Caddy’s choices TEAS
73. 1960s sci-fi series LOST IN SPACE
76. Blowout win LANDSLIDE
77. Discombobulates BEFUDDLES
79. N.B.A. Hall-of-Famer Monroe EARL
82. “___ Nagila” HAVA
83. Light ___ SABER
84. Garlic segments CLOVES
85. Empathizes RELATES
86. P.R. firm’s job SPIN
88. Principal Seymour’s girlfriend on “The Simpsons” EDNA
90. Fullness SATIETY
91. Not going anywhere? IN IDLE
92. Stick on the grill? SATAY
94. Where Excalibur was forged AVALON
96. Threads ATTIRE
99. Delight ELATE
101. Philosopher Kierkegaard SOREN
105. Noted Dadaist ERNST
109. ___ Technical Institute ITT
110. Yammer GAB
111. Britain’s ___ News SKY
113. “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” enchanter TIM

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2 thoughts on “0907-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 7 Sep 14, Sunday”

  1. 63A: 'One Direction' is a British/Irish boy band. Their fan base seems to be preteen (tween) and teen aged girls. My 11 year old granddaughter likes them.

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